WorldWideScience

Sample records for engines phase iii

  1. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter III: impurity control (engineering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Miki, Nobuharu; Shibutani, Yoji; Fujimura, Kaoru; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Kosuke; Fujii, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Itoh, Shin-ichi.

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to the second half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made on candidate materials for the divertor, limiter, and the first wall. Engineering trade-off studies are made for the high-recycling and low temperature conditions. The studies include material considerations, configuration, thermohydraulic and stress analysis, disruption, lifetime analysis, and tritium permeation. (author)

  2. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-04-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign, and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  3. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  4. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  5. The OPAL phase III microvertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, S.

    1997-01-01

    A description of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is given. Special emphasis is put on problems that have been encountered in the installation and operation of the different phases of the OPAL microvertex detector leading to the present Phase III detector and their cures. A short description of the new OPAL radiation monitoring and beam dump system is also given. (orig.)

  6. Doublet III construction and engineering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Progress during FY-78 on the construction and operation of the Doublet III is reported. Detailed discussions about the installation and testing of various components and subsystems, including the B-coil, E-coil, F-coils and support structure, vacuum vessel, vacuum pumping system, limiter, thermal insulation blanket, control system, B-coil power system, E-coil power system, F-coil power system, and motor-generator, are presented. A brief review of the engineering test operation is given

  7. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  9. Objectives and methodology of BIOBADASER phase iii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Piedra, Carlos; Hernández Miguel, M Victoria; Manero, Javier; Roselló, Rosa; Sánchez-Costa, Jesús Tomás; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Campos, Cristina; Cuende, Eduardo; Fernández-Lopez, Jesús Carlos; Bustabad, Sagrario; Martín Domenech, Raquel; Pérez-Pampín, Eva; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; Millan-Arcineas, Ana Milena; Díaz-González, Federico; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús

    2017-09-18

    Describe the objectives, methods and results of the first year of the new version of the Spanish registry of adverse events involving biological therapies and synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER III). Multicenter prospective registry of patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases being treated with biological drugs or synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatology departments in Spain. The main objective of BIOBADASER Phase III is the registry and analysis of adverse events; moreover, a secondary objective was added consisting of assessing the effectiveness by means of the registry of activity indexes. Patients in the registry are evaluated at least once every year and whenever they experience an adverse event or a change in treatment. The collection of data for phase iii began on 17 December 2015. During the first year, 35 centers participated. The number of patients included in this new phase in December 2016 was 2,664. The mean age was 53.7 years and the median duration of treatment was 8.1 years. In all, 40.4% of the patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequent adverse events were infections and infestations. BIOBADASER Phase III has been launched to adapt to a changing pharmacological environment, with the introduction of biosimilars and small molecules in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. This new stage is adapted to the changes in the reporting of adverse events and now includes information related to activity scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. ARIES-III divertor engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Cheng, E.T.; Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.; Herring, J.S.; Valenti, M.; Steiner, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m 2 , a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m 2 . The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed

  11. ARIES-III divertor engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States); Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Herring, J.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valenti, M.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Plasma Dynamics Lab.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}. The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed.

  12. ALTERNATIVE AVIATION FUELS FOR USE IN MILITARY APUS AND ENGINES VERSATILE AFFORDABLE ADVANCED TURBINE ENGINE (VAATE), PHASE II AND III. Delivery Order 0007: Alternative Aviation Fuels for Use in Military Auxiliary Power Units (APUs) and Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-03

    85-180L(A) WC-130 Hercules 85-98 KC/ RC /WC-135 KC-135 Stratotanker 85-180L RC -135U Combat Sent JFS100-135 WC-135 Constant Phoenix 85-98CK C-17... plane . The control room houses the required equipment for processing, recording, and displaying analog and digital test data. 6 DISTRIBUTION...engine conditions and is designed to duplicate the 131-9[B] engine combustion system aerodynamics from the deswirl exit to the turbine stator inlet plane

  13. Phase-exchange thermoacoustic engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Avshalom; Meir, Avishai; Ramon, Guy Z.; WET Lab Team

    2017-11-01

    Phase-exchange thermoacoustic engines are reliable machines holding great promise in converting heat from low grade heat sources to mechanical or electrical power. In these engines the working fluid is a gas mixture containing one condensable component, decreasing the temperature difference required for ignition and steady state operation. Our experimental setup consists of a vertical acoustic resonator containing a mixture of air-water vapor. Water evaporates near the heat source, condenses at the heat sink and is drawn back down by gravity and capillary forces where it re-evaporates, sustaining a steady state closed thermodynamic cycle. We investigated the stability limit, namely the critical point at which temperature difference in the engine enables onset of self-excited oscillations, and the steady state of the engine. A simple theoretical model was derived, describing mechanisms of irreversible entropy generation and production of acoustic power in such engines. This model captures the essence in the differences between regular and phase-exchange thermoacoustic engines, and shows good agreement with experimental results of stability limit. Steady state results reveal not only a dramatic decrease in temperature difference, but also an increase in engine performances. The authors acknowledge the support from the Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program (GTEP).

  14. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W R; Mazurek, M; Waber, H N [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J; Erlandson, A C; Hallbeck, L; Pedersen, K [Goeteborg University (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W; Fritz, P; Geyer, S; Geyer, W; Hanschman, G; Kopinke, F D; Poerschmann, J [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A V; Haworth, A; Ilett, D; Linklater, C M; Tweed, C J [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S R.N.; Kemp, S J; Milodowski, A E; Pearce, J M; Reeder, S; Rochelle, C A; Smith, B; Wetton, P D; Wragg, J [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I D [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E; Hughes, C R [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E K [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H N; Salameh, E [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B [Cement Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A F [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J A.T. [ed.; Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  15. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N.; Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K.; Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J.; Clark, I.D.; Karlsson, F.; Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E.; Lagerblad, B.; Longworth, G.; Savage, D.; Smellie, J.A.T.

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH) 2 type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the 'alkali disturbed zone' of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  16. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W R; Mazurek, M; Waber, H N [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J; Erlandson, A C; Hallbeck, L; Pedersen, K [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W; Fritz, P; Geyer, S; Geyer, W; Hanschman, G; Kopinke, F D; Poerschmann, J [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A V; Haworth, A; Ilett, D; Linklater, C M; Tweed, C J [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S R.N.; Kemp, S J; Milodowski, A E; Pearce, J M; Reeder, S; Rochelle, C A; Smith, B; Wetton, P D; Wragg, J [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I D [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E; Hughes, C R [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E K [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H N; Salameh, E [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B [Cement Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A F [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J A.T. [ed.; Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  17. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions

  18. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D- 3 He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated

  19. Phase transformations in engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C.; Dunand, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement

  20. Development of a central data warehouse for statewide ITS and transportation data in Florida phase III : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-15

    This report documents Phase III of the development and operation of a prototype for the Statewide Transportation : Engineering Warehouse for Archived Regional Data (STEWARD). It reflects the progress on the development and : operation of STEWARD sinc...

  1. Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) nuclear power project quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lingen; Du Jinxiang

    2001-01-01

    The completion and implementation of quality assurance system of Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) nuclear power project are presented. Some comments and understanding with consideration of the project characteristics are put forward

  2. Sample exchange/evaluation (SEE) report - Phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, W.I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) program. The SEE program is used to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site's high level waste tanks

  3. Electronic construction collaboration system : phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This phase of the electronic collaboration project involved two major efforts: 1) implementation of AEC Sync (formerly known as Attolist), a web-based project management system (WPMS), on the Broadway Viaduct Bridge Project and the Iowa Falls Arch Br...

  4. Social Analysis Systems (SAS2) - Phase III

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Scaling Up the International Impact of Action Research : Social Analysis ... up the international impact of action research : SAS phase 3; final technical report ... 000 Canadians abroad to work at the local level on various development issues.

  5. Two-phase titration of cerium(III) by permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, A.I.; Lazareva, V.I.; Gerko, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the two-phase titrimetric determination of cerium(III) with permanganate which does not require an expenditure of sugar and preliminary removal of chlorides and nitrates. The interaction of cerium(III) with permanganate at room temperature was studied as a function of the pH, the concentration of pyrophosphate, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), permanganate, and extraneous compounds, the rate of titration, and the time of stay of the solution in air before titration. The investigations were conducted according to the following methodology: water, solution of cerium(III) pyrophosphate, and TPP were introduced into an Erlenmeyer flask with a side branch near the bottom for clearer observation of the color of the chloroform phase. The authors established the given pH value, poured the water into a volume of 50 ml, and added chloroform. The result was titrated with permanganate solutions of various concentrations until a violet color appeared in the chloroform phase

  6. Joint probability of statistical success of multiple phase III trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Zhang, Jenny J

    2013-01-01

    In drug development, after completion of phase II proof-of-concept trials, the sponsor needs to make a go/no-go decision to start expensive phase III trials. The probability of statistical success (PoSS) of the phase III trials based on data from earlier studies is an important factor in that decision-making process. Instead of statistical power, the predictive power of a phase III trial, which takes into account the uncertainty in the estimation of treatment effect from earlier studies, has been proposed to evaluate the PoSS of a single trial. However, regulatory authorities generally require statistical significance in two (or more) trials for marketing licensure. We show that the predictive statistics of two future trials are statistically correlated through use of the common observed data from earlier studies. Thus, the joint predictive power should not be evaluated as a simplistic product of the predictive powers of the individual trials. We develop the relevant formulae for the appropriate evaluation of the joint predictive power and provide numerical examples. Our methodology is further extended to the more complex phase III development scenario comprising more than two (K > 2) trials, that is, the evaluation of the PoSS of at least k₀ (k₀≤ K) trials from a program of K total trials. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Double acting stirling engine phase control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchowitz, David M.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanical device for effecting a phase change between the expansion and compression volumes of a double-acting Stirling engine uses helical elements which produce opposite rotation of a pair of crankpins when a control rod is moved, so the phase between two pairs of pistons is changed by +.psi. and the phase between the other two pairs of pistons is changed by -.psi.. The phase can change beyond .psi.=90.degree. at which regenerative braking and then reversal of engine rotation occurs.

  8. Research ICT Africa (RIA!) - phase III | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research ICT Africa (RIA!) - phase III. Depuis la création du réseau RIA! en 2003, ses responsables ont mené avec succès des études portant tant sur l'offre que sur la demande afin de permettre de mieux comprendre l'accès aux TIC et leur utilisation en Afrique. Au cours des deux premières phases du projet (nos 101584 ...

  9. Public Policy and Protection from Exclusion - Phase III | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Public Policy and Protection from Exclusion - Phase III ... and decision-makers active in the promotion of equitable health policies, with a view to promoting the emergence of an observatory of health systems in the ... Policy in Focus publishes a special issue profiling evidence to empower women in the labour market.

  10. Palestinian Adolescents Coping with Trauma (PACT) - Phase III ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Palestinian Adolescents Coping with Trauma (PACT) - Phase III. Violent conflict has been repeatedly shown to result in severe, long-term social and mental health problems for exposed children and adolescents. While in the developed world, it is generally accepted that individuals seek professional one-on-one ...

  11. Encyclopedia of two-phase heat transfer and flow III macro and micro flow boiling and numerical modeling fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    Set III of this encyclopedia is a new addition to the previous Sets I and II. It contains 26 invited chapters from international specialists on the topics of numerical modeling of two-phase flows and evaporation, fundamentals of evaporation and condensation in microchannels and macrochannels, development and testing of micro two-phase cooling systems for electronics, and various special topics (surface wetting effects, microfin tubes, two-phase flow vibration across tube bundles). The chapters are written both by renowned university researchers and by well-known engineers from leading corporate research laboratories. Numerous "must read" chapters cover the fundamentals of research and engineering practice on boiling, condensation and two-phase flows, two-phase heat transfer equipment, electronics cooling systems, case studies and so forth. Set III constitutes a "must have" reference together with Sets I and II for thermal engineering researchers and practitioners.

  12. CHAOS. III. GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5457

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Berg, Danielle A. [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 1900 East Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T [N ii] with T [S iii] and T [O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T [S iii] with T [O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T [N ii], T [S ii], and T [O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T [N ii] with T [S iii] and T [O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T [S iii] with T [O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  13. Engineering Changes During the Service Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, Giovanna; Ahmed, Saeema

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses upon understanding the characteristics of engineering changes, in particular changes that emerge during the service phase of complex products, and on how these changes can be related to the product development process. For this purpose, a set of engineering change reports from...... an aerospace engine has been analyzed and the findings have been compared with change documentation from drilling machinery for the oil industry. These findings give insights into which phases of the design process should be modified in order to reduce the number of change requests from the service phase...... and to enable designers to efficiently answer the unavoidable change requests. This can be used to improve the product development process in order to take into account the factors leading to changes....

  14. Superconductivity in the unconventional high pressure phase bismuth-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semeniuk, Konstantin; Brown, Philip; Vasiljkovic, Aleksandar; Grosche, Malte [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    One of the most surprising developments in high pressure research was the realisation that many elements assume very unexpected high pressure structures, described in terms of extremely large or even infinite unit cells. Elemental bismuth, which has been known to undergo a series of pressure induced structural transitions between 25 kbar and 80 kbar, is an interesting example: the intermediate pressure Bi-III phase has a complex 'host-guest' structure consisting of two incommensurate sublattices. Since the unit cell is infinitely large, the description of electronic and lattice excitations is problematic. Apart from its metallic character and the observation of superconductivity at low temperature, little is known about the electronic structure in this phase. We investigate the electrical resistivity within the metallic Bi-III phase under high hydrostatic pressure and in applied magnetic field using a piston cylinder cell. Superconductivity is observed below 7.1 K, and we extract the temperature dependence of the upper critical field, which exceeds 2 T at low temperature. The normal state resistivity exhibits an approximately linear temperature dependence. This could be attributed to strong scattering from low-lying excitations, as caused by an unusually soft phonon spectrum. The results suggest that strong coupling superconductivity arises within the host-guest structure of Bi-III out of an unusual electronic state.

  15. Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP), phase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Space Transportation Engine Program (STEP) Phase 2 effort includes preliminary design and activities plan preparation that will allow smooth and time transition into a Prototype Phase and then into Phases 3, 4, and 5. A Concurrent Engineering approach using Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques, is being applied to define an oxygen-hydrogen engine. The baseline from Phase 1/1' studies was used as a point of departure for trade studies and analyses. Existing STME system models are being enhanced as more detailed module/component characteristics are determined. Preliminary designs for the open expander, closed expander, and gas generator cycles were prepared, and recommendations for cycle selection made at the Design Concept Review (DCR). As a result of July '90 DCR, and information subsequently supplied to the Technical Review Team, a gas generator cycle was selected. Results of the various Advanced Development Programs (ADP's) for the Advanced Launch Systems (ALS) were contributive to this effort. An active vehicle integration effort is supplying the NASA, Air Force, and vehicle contractors with engine parameters and data, and flowing down appropriate vehicle requirements. Engine design and analysis trade studies are being documented in a data base that was developed and is being used to organize information. To date, seventy four trade studies were input to the data base.

  16. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ''Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.''

  17. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-12-13

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.``

  18. Development of Cryogenic Engine for GSLV MkIII: Technological Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, RS; Jayan, N.; Bijukumar, KS; Jayaprakash, J.; Narayanan, V.; Ayyappan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic engine capable of delivering 200 kN thrust is being developed for the first time in the country by ISRO for powering the upper stage of GSLV Mk-III, the next generation launch vehicle of ISRO capable of launching four tonne class satellites to Geo-synchronous Transfer Orbit(GTO). Development of this engine started a decade ago when various sub-systems development and testing were taken up. Starting with injector element development, the design, realization and testing of the major sub-systems viz the gas generator, turbopumps, start-up system and thrust chamber have been successfully done in a phased manner before conducting a series of developmental tests in the integrated engine mode. Apart from the major sub-systems, many critical components like the igniter, control components etc were independently developed and qualified. During the development program many challenges were faced in almost all areas of propulsion engineering. Systems engineering of the engine was another key challenge in the realization. This paper gives an outlook on various technological challenges faced in the key areas related to the engine development, insight to the solutions and measures taken to overcome the challenges.

  19. Aqueous phase complexation of Cm(III) and Cf(III) with ionizable macrocyclic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchanda, V.K.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Complexation behaviour of Cm(III) and Cf(III) with 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (K21DA), 1,10-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (K22DA) and ethylene diamine N,N'- diacetic acid (EDDA) has been investigated using dinonyl naphthalene sulphonic acid (DNNS), in tetramethyl ammonium form as liquid cation exchanger. The aqueous phase complex formation constants are computed from the distribution data. Though larger complex formation constants are observed with K21DA as well as K22DA compared to those with the acyclic analog EDDA, no size correlation is observed. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  20. Solar neutrino oscillation parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Liu Qiuyu

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ 12 . Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND , we obtain the parameters Δm 12 2 =7.684 -0.208 +0.212 x 10 -5 eV 2 , tan 2 θ 12 =0.440 -0.057 +0.059 . We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ 13 . (authors)

  1. Engineer, design construct, test, and evaluate a pressurized fluidized-bed pilot plant using high-sulfur coal for production of electric power: Phase I. Preliminary engineering; Phase II. Final design; Phase III. Construction. Annual report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The extended test program on the SGT/PFB Technology Unit, previously placed in operation, was completed. Total operating time is 3378 which includes 2681 h burning coal and 1205 h total turbine engine operation. Significant performance and operational milestones, completed during the past year, included: over 2000 h on candidate heat exchanger tube materials at design temperature during which durability of iron-base alloy for PFB heat exchanger tubes was demonstrated; generated electric power with gas turbine operating on PFB coal combustion gas for 1000 h with no appreciable erosion or corrosion of turbine rotor blades and stator vanes; evaluated and improved hot gas cleanup system during which mean particle size of 1.3 Microns and a loading of 0.054 grains/Scf was achieved; and durability of hot/ash solids lock hopper valves for over 1000 h without leakage and stellite coated butterfly gas valve operating successfully for over 900 h in a highly erosive environment was demonstrated. Details of materials evolutions and corrosion rates, component performances and gaseous emission levels are presented.

  2. Enginnering development of coal-fired high performance power systems phase II and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R ampersand D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update

  3. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  4. Thermal dewatering of lignite: Phase III - final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, P J; Szladow, A J; Kybett, B D

    1981-01-01

    Phase III of this project extended the investigation of thermal dewatering on several lignite and peat samples at the temperature range up to 400 degrees C and investigated variables such as retention time, increased rates of heating and cooling, extent of trace element removal, effect of particle size and effect of dewatering under heavy and light oils. Lignites from three areas of Canada (Estevan and Coronach, Saskatchewan, and Onakawana, Ontario) and one peat sample (Garrick, Saskatchewan) were thermally dewatered. The equilibrium moisture values obtained for the dewatered products were as low as, or lower than those obtained in Phases I and II of this project (350 degrees C). However, the measured moisture contents of the thermally dewatered Saskatchewan lignites were somewhat higher than those measured in Phases I and II. The equilibrium moisture values and the moisture contents decreased with increasing temperature. An optimum balance between extent of dewatering and resulting steam pressures is obtained for a dewatering temperature between 300 and 350 degrees C. At these temperatures, residence times in the order of 15 minutes are required. (35 refs.)

  5. SIMMER-III code-verification. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.

    1996-05-01

    SIMMER-III is a computer code to investigate core disruptive accidents in liquid metal fast reactors but should also be used to investigate safety related problems in other types of advanced reactors. The code is developed by PNC with cooperation of the European partners FZK, CEA and AEA-T. SIMMER-III is a two-dimensional, three-velocity-field, multiphase, multicomponent, Eulerian, fluid-dynamics code coupled with a space-, time-, and energy-dependent neutron dynamics model. In order to model complex flow situations in a postulated disrupting core, mass and energy conservation equations are solved for 27 density components and 16 energy components, respectively. Three velocity fields (two liquid and one vapor) are modeled to simulate the relative motion of different fluid components. An additional static field takes into account the structures available in a reactor (pins, hexans, vessel structures, internal structures etc.). The neutronics is based on the discrete ordinate method (S N method) coupled into a quasistatic dynamic model. The code assessment and verification of the fluid dynamic/thermohydraulic parts of the code is performed in several steps in a joint effort of all partners. The results of the FZK contributions to the first assessment and verification phase is reported. (orig.) [de

  6. Radiotherapy in carcinoma of the uterine cervix phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Villa, O; Reinerio, A; Felipe Castillo, A; Alonso Pantiga, R; Roig, M

    1985-01-01

    Between April 1968 and December 1980, 61 patients with phase III cancer of the cervix were treated. Fifty-six of them were squamous-cell carcinomas and five adenocarcinomas. The treatment consisted of a combination of external irradiation at doses varying between 4,000 and 7,000 rads and intracavitary radiotherapy with doses of 4.000 to 6.000 MHz, according to the schemes of the D.M. Anderson of Houston. The results obtained as far as survival is concerned and calculated by the actuarial method were 40% after five and ten years. The local control rate reached was 74%. The severe complications caused by the treatment reached 8.1%.

  7. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  9. 78 FR 73555 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan and Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS). The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS considers programmatic... programmatic restoration alternatives. The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS evaluates these restoration alternatives... the Framework Agreement. The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS also evaluates the environmental consequences of...

  10. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase III final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pitty, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    The CNAP Phase III project was carried out following identification of the requirement to support ongoing laboratory and modelling efforts on the potential reaction of the bentonite buffer with cementitious leachates in the repository EBS. Although it is known that the higher pH (12.5 to 13) leachates from OPC cement will degrade bentonite, it is unclear if this will also be the case for the lower pH (10 to 11) leachates typical of low alkali cements. Ongoing laboratory and URL programmes which are currently investigating this face the obstacle of slow kinetics and the production of short-lived metastable phases, meaning obtaining unambiguous results may take decades. This is exacerbated by the limitations of the thermodynamic databases for minerals of interest to models of bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction. It was therefore decided to implement a focussed NA study on bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction to provide indications of likely long-term reaction products and reaction pathways to provide feedback on the existing short-term investigations noted above and to ascertain if any critical path R and D needs to be instigated now. The results of the analyses presented here suggest that there has been very limited alkaline groundwater reaction with the bentonite. This is generally supported by both the geomorphological evidence and the natural decay series data which imply groundwater groundwater/rock interaction in the last 10 5 a. When integrated with the novel data currently being produced in the BIGRAD project, the CNAP data tend to indicate that any long-term bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates is minimal. (orig.)

  11. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase III final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W R [Bedrock Geosciences, Auenstein (Switzerland); Milodowski, A E [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Pitty, A F [Pitty (EIA) Consulting, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    The CNAP Phase III project was carried out following identification of the requirement to support ongoing laboratory and modelling efforts on the potential reaction of the bentonite buffer with cementitious leachates in the repository EBS. Although it is known that the higher pH (12.5 to 13) leachates from OPC cement will degrade bentonite, it is unclear if this will also be the case for the lower pH (10 to 11) leachates typical of low alkali cements. Ongoing laboratory and URL programmes which are currently investigating this face the obstacle of slow kinetics and the production of short-lived metastable phases, meaning obtaining unambiguous results may take decades. This is exacerbated by the limitations of the thermodynamic databases for minerals of interest to models of bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction. It was therefore decided to implement a focussed NA study on bentonite/low alkali cement leachate reaction to provide indications of likely long-term reaction products and reaction pathways to provide feedback on the existing short-term investigations noted above and to ascertain if any critical path R and D needs to be instigated now. The results of the analyses presented here suggest that there has been very limited alkaline groundwater reaction with the bentonite. This is generally supported by both the geomorphological evidence and the natural decay series data which imply groundwater groundwater/rock interaction in the last 10{sup 5} a. When integrated with the novel data currently being produced in the BIGRAD project, the CNAP data tend to indicate that any long-term bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates is minimal. (orig.)

  12. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  13. Brush Day & Night Phase III to Phase IV: ensuring that good oral health habits are sustainable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Paulo; Fine, Charlotte; Malone, Sinead; Horn, Virginie

    2018-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, the FDI-Unilever Brush Day & Night partnership has significantly influenced the life of children worldwide through the implementation of school programmes for oral health education and prevention. This article reports the key facts and outcomes of Phase III of the partnership, and announces the launch of Phase IV. During Phase III, the expert advisors of the Brush Day & Night partnership conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the impact of the '21 Day' programme in almost 8,000 children in 10 countries. Analysis revealed the effectiveness of the 21 Day programme in sustainably educating children to brush their teeth twice a day, with the greatest impact observed in children aged 7-9 years. With the launch of Phase IV, the Brush Day & Night partnership will continue to deliver its oral health school programme for 7-9 year-old children with a strengthened methodology, including randomized sampling and control groups. The scope of the evaluation will be broadened to include oral health-related quality of life indicators, and monitoring of the oral health knowledge of children's parents/carers. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  15. CIM5 Phase III base process development results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated Demonstration Runs for the Am/Cm vitrification process were initiated in the Coupled 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) on 11/30/98 and completed on 12/9/98. Four successful runs at 60 wt% lanthanide loading were completed which met or exceeded all established criteria. The operating parameters used in these runs established the base conditions for the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) process and were summarized in the 5-inch CIM design basis, SRT-AMC-99-OO01. (1) In subsequent tests, a total of fourteen CIM5 runs were performed using various power inputs, ramp rates and target temperatures to define the preferred processing conditions (2) Process stability and process flexibility were the key criteria used in assessing the results for each run. A preferred set of operating parameters was defined for the CIM5 batch process and these conditions were used to generate a pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle that was used for the last six CIM.5 runs (3) These operational tests were successfully completed in the January-February time frame and were summarized in SRT-AMC-99-00584. The recommended set of operating conditions defined in Runs No.1 through No.14 was used as the starting point for further pilot system runs to determine the robustness of the process, evaluate a bubbler, and investigate off-normal conditions. CIM5 Phase III Runs No.15 through No.60 were conducted utilizing the pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle to investigate system performance. This report summarizes the results of these tests and provides a recommendation for the base process as well as a processing modification for minimizing volume expansions if americium and/or curium are subject to a thermal reduction reaction like cerium. This document summarizes the results of the base process development tests conducted in the Am/Cm Pilot Facility located in Building 672-T

  16. Phase 0 and phase III transport in various organs: combined concept of phases in xenobiotic transport and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Barbara; Petzinger, Ernst

    2014-08-01

    The historical phasing concept of drug metabolism and elimination was introduced to comprise the two phases of metabolism: phase I metabolism for oxidations, reductions and hydrolyses, and phase II metabolism for synthesis. With this concept, biological membrane barriers obstructing the accessibility of metabolism sites in the cells for drugs were not considered. The concept of two phases was extended to a concept of four phases when drug transporters were detected that guided drugs and drug metabolites in and out of the cells. In particular, water soluble or charged drugs are virtually not able to overcome the phospholipid membrane barrier. Drug transporters belong to two main clusters of transporter families: the solute carrier (SLC) families and the ATP binding cassette (ABC) carriers. The ABC transporters comprise seven families with about 20 carriers involved in drug transport. All of them operate as pumps at the expense of ATP splitting. Embedded in the former phase concept, the term "phase III" was introduced by Ishikawa in 1992 for drug export by ABC efflux pumps. SLC comprise 52 families, from which many carriers are drug uptake transporters. Later on, this uptake process was referred to as the "phase 0 transport" of drugs. Transporters for xenobiotics in man and animal are most expressed in liver, but they are also present in extra-hepatic tissues such as in the kidney, the adrenal gland and lung. This review deals with the function of drug carriers in various organs and their impact on drug metabolism and elimination.

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. Development of Engine Loads Methodology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR seeks to improve the definition of design loads for rocket engine components such that higher performing, lighter weight engines can be developed more...

  19. Interactive Model-Centric Systems Engineering (IMCSE) Phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Interactive Model-Centric Systems Engineering (IMCSE) Phase 5 Technical Report SERC-2018-TR-104 Feb 28, 2018 Principal Investigator...Date February 28, 2018 Copyright © 2018 Stevens Institute of Technology, Systems Engineering ...Research Center The Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC) is a federally funded University Affiliated Research Center managed by Stevens

  20. Security Quality Requirements Engineering (SQUARE): Case Study Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    meetings catered by outside food services. Increase reliability. The company has had a long history of bad luck with local caterers. With our own robot...If an open source database is used, it must be PostgreSQL . • If a commercial database is used, it must be Oracle. There appears to be no... PostgreSQL is a CMU/SEI-2006-SR-003 143 reasonable alternative. In any case, the system must not depend on features of either database that are not in the

  1. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  2. Engineering Strain for Improved III-Nitride Optoelectronic Device Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broeck, Dennis Marnix

    Due to growing environmental and economic concerns, renewable energy generation and high-efficiency lighting are becoming even more important in the scientific community. III-Nitride devices have been essential in production of high-brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and are now entering the photovoltaic (PV) realm as the technology advances. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well LEDs emitting in the blue/green region have emerged as promising candidates for next-generation lighting technologies. Due to the large lattice mismatch between InN and GaN, large electric fields exist within the quantum well layers and result in low rates of radiative recombination, especially for the green spectral region. This is commonly referred to as the "green gap" and results in poor external quantum efficiencies for light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. In order to mitigate the compressive stress of InGaN QWs, a novel growth technique is developed in order to grown thick, strain-relaxed In yGa1-yN templates for 0.08 structure, "semibulk" InGaN templates were achieved with vastly superior crystal and optical properties than bulk InGaN films. These semibulk InGaN templates were then utilized as new templates for multiple quantum well active layers, effectively reducing the compressive strain in the InGaN wells due to the larger lattice constant of the InGaN template with respect to a GaN template. A zero-stress balance method was used in order to realize a strain-balanced multiple quantum well structure, which again showed improved optical characteristics when compared to fully-strain active regions. The semibulk InGaN template was then implemented into "strain-compensated" LED structures, where light emission was achieved with very little leakage current. Discussion of these strain-compensated devices compared to conventional LEDs is detailed.

  3. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  4. System Engineering Process Realization Toolkit, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA faces many systems engineering challenges as it seeks to conduct exploration and science missions concurrently. One such challenge is implementing a repeatable...

  5. Divergent Field Annular Ion Engine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work investigates an approach that would allow an annular ion engine geometry to achieve ion beam currents approaching the Child-Langmuir limit. In this...

  6. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  7. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging the Phase I achievements of the Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) including its software toolsets and system building...

  8. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 Architecture Document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, John F.

    2015-12-01

    This document contains a description of the system architecture for the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project. This is a draft version that primarily provides background information for understanding delivered Use Case Realizations.

  9. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Carl T [Denver, IA

    2011-11-29

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  10. Urban Ecosystem Health in Kathmandu (Nepal) - Phase III | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The two earlier phases of this project (003320 and 101277) led to the creation or strengthening of 18 local stakeholder groups and resulted in a new Animal Slaughtering and Meat Inspection Act, modification of the Nepal Food Act, modification of the Garbage Disposal Act, revisions to the Kathmandu Valley Housing Plan ...

  11. Research ICT Africa - Phase III | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    During this phase, RIA will construct an African index of ICT policy and regulations; establish a network structure suitable for growth and the integration of North Africa; refine its policy influence and dissemination strategy; integrate its supply- and demand-side data and triangulate it with the telecommunication regulatory ...

  12. Research ICT Africa - Phase III | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Launched in 2003, Research ICT Africa (RIA) has successfully conducted demand- and supply-side studies with a view to better understanding information and communication technology (ICT) access and usage in Africa. The network expanded over the first two phases of support (101584 and 103114) to include members ...

  13. LWR design decision methodology. Phase III. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertucio, R.; Held, J.; Lainoff, S.; Leahy, T.; Prather, W.; Rees, D.; Young, J.

    1982-01-01

    Traditionally, management decisions regarding design options have been made using quantitative cost information and qualitative safety information. A Design Decision Methodology, which utilizes probabilistic risk assessment techniques, including event trees and fault trees, along with systems engineering and standard cost estimation methods, has been developed so that a quantitative safety measure may be obtained as well. The report documents the development of this Design Decision Methodology, a demonstration of the methodology on a current licensing issue with the cooperation of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS), and a discussion of how the results of the demonstration may be used addressing the various issues associated with a licensing position on the issue

  14. An Axiomatic Design Approach of Nanofluid-Engineered Nuclear Safety Features for Generation III+ React

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, In Cheol; Heo, Gyun Young; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Heo, Sun

    2009-01-01

    A variety of Generation III/III+ reactor designs featuring enhanced safety and improved economics are being proposed by nuclear power industries around the world to solve the future energy supply shortfall. Nanofluid coolants showing an improved thermal performance are being considered as a new key technology to secure nuclear safety and economics. However, it should be noted that there is a lack of comprehensible design works to apply nanofluids to Generation III+ reactor designs. In this work, the review of accident scenarios that consider expected nanofluid mechanisms is carried out to seek detailed application spots. The Axiomatic Design (AD) theory is then applied to systemize the design of nanofluid-engineered nuclear safety systems such as Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and External Reactor Vessel Cooling System (ERVCS). The various couplings between Gen-III/III+ nuclear safety features and nanofluids are investigated and they try to be reduced from the perspective of the AD in terms of prevention/mitigation of severe accidents. This study contributes to the establishment of a standard communication protocol in the design of nanofluid-engineered nuclear safety systems

  15. Unraveling the Mystery of the Blue Fog: Structure, Properties, and Applications of Amorphous Blue Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sahil Sandesh; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-12-01

    The amorphous blue phase III of cholesteric liquid crystals, also known as the "blue fog," are among the rising stars in materials science that can potentially be used to develop next-generation displays with the ability to compete toe-to-toe with disruptive technologies like organic light-emitting diodes. The structure and properties of the practically unobservable blue phase III have eluded scientists for more than a century since it was discovered. This progress report reviews the developments in this field from both fundamental and applied research perspectives. The first part of this progress report gives an overview of the 130-years-long scientific tour-de-force that very recently resulted in the revelation of the mysterious structure of blue phase III. The second part reviews progress made in the past decade in developing electrooptical, optical, and photonic devices based on blue phase III. The strong and weak aspects of the development of these devices are underlined and criticized, respectively. The third- and-final part proposes ideas for further improvement in blue phase III technology to make it feasible for commercialization and widespread use. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Individualized Inservice Teacher Education (Project In-Step). Evaluation Report. Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    This is a report on the third phase of Project IN-STEP, which was intended to develop a viable model for individualized, multi-media in-service teacher education programs. (Phase I and II are reported in ED 033 905, and ED 042 709). The rationale for Phase III was to see if the model could be successfully transferred to an area other than teaching…

  17. Tier I ecological evaluation for phase III channel improvements to the John. F. Baldwin ship channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, R.W.; Shreffler, D.K.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    To assist the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in determing whether the material from proposed dredging of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel (JFBSC) is suitable for unrestricted, unconfined open-ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) prepared this report. Based on these findings, sediments that would be removed during Phase III improvements to the JFBSC fail to meet the three suitability criteria for open-ocean disposal. Firstly, fine-grained sediments comprise a significant fraction of the bottom material in some areas of the channel, and this material is not exposed to high current or wave energy. Dredged material from the JFBSC is not being proposed for beach nourishment; therefore the second criterion is not met. JFBSC sediments do not meet the third criterion because, although they may be substantially similar to substrates at several of the proposed disposal sites, they are from an area that historically has experienced loading of contaminants, which toxicology studies have shown have the potential to result in acute toxicity or significant bioaccumulation.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Donna [Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, Nixon, NV (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  19. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary

  20. Phase III (full scale) agitated mixing test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A (WRAP 2A) is the proposed second module of the WRAP facility. This facility will provide the required treatment for contact Handled (CH) Low Level (LL) Mixed Waste (MW) to allow its permanent disposal. Solidification of a portion of this waste using a cement based grout has been selected in order to reduce the toxicity and mobility of the waste in the disposal site. Mixing of the waste with the cement paste and material handling constraints/requirements associated with the mixed material is, therefore, a key process in the overall treatment strategy. This test plan addresses Phase 3, Full Scale Testing. The objectives of these tests are to determine if there are scale-up issues associated with the mixing results obtained in Phase 1 and 2 mixing tests, verify the workability of mixtures resulting from previous formulation development efforts (Waste Immobilization Development [WID]), and provide a baseline for WRAP 2A mixing equipment design. To this end, the following objectives are of particular interest: determine geometric influence of mixing blade at full scale (i.e., size, type, and location: height/offset); determine if similar results in terms of mixing effectiveness and product quality are achievable at this scale; determine if vibration is as effective at this larger scale in fluidizing the mixture and aiding in cleaning the vessel; determine if baffles or sweeping blades are needed to aid in mixing at the larger size and for cleaning the vessel; and determine quality of the poured monolithic product and investigate exotherm and filling influences at this larger size

  1. Use of Geothermal Energy for Aquaculture Purposes - Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W C; Smith, K C

    1981-09-01

    This project, financed by the Pacific Northwest Regional Commission (PNRC), was designed to provide information to evaluate the best methods to use for intensive aquaculture of freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, using geothermal energy. The freshwater prawn is a tropical organism and is native to southeast Asia. Earlier projects at Oregon Institute of Technology have shown the feasibility of culturing this aquatic animal in geothermal water. This phase of the project was designed to investigate intensive culture of this animal as well as the advantages of growing rainbow trout, ornamental tropical fin fish, and mosquito fish, Gambusia affnis, for vector control using geothermal energy. The research data collected on the prawns was obtained from the stocking and sampling of two 0.2- ha (half-acre) ponds constructed as a part of the project. The ponds are equipped with recording monitors for temperature and flow. The geothermal energy used is the geothermal effluent from the Oregon Institute of Technology heating system. This water is of potable quality and ranges in temperature from 50 to 70oC. The geothermal water used in the ponds is controlled at 27oC, ± 2oC, by using thermostats and solenoid valves. A small building next to the ponds contains facilities for hatching larvae prawns and tanks for growing post-larvae prawns. The hatchery facility makes the project self-sustaining. The hatchery was obtained as part of an earlier PNRC project.

  2. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase II : wetting and drying tests, Phase III : freezing and thawing tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-12-01

    This report describes a laboratory research program on the durability of lightweight concrete. Two phases of a three phase study are covered by this report, while the remaining phase is still under study. The two phases being reported are Phase II - ...

  3. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  4. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  5. Reversed phase partition chromatographic separation of Gd(III) on poly(Crown Ether) column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanwar, K.R.; Sabale, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    A simple method has been developed for the separation of Gd(III) in hippuric acid medium by using poly(dibenzo-18-crown-6) as stationary phase. The effect of hippuric acid concentration, different eluting agent, foreign ions etc was studied and the optimum conditions were established. Breakthrough capacity of poly(dibenzo-18-crown-6) for Gd(III) was found to be 0.572 ±0.01 mmolg -1 of crown polymer. The separation of Gd(III) from other elements in multicomponent mixtures has been achieved. The method was extended for determination of Gd(III) in real sample. The method is simple, rapid and selective with good reproducibility (approximately ± 2%). Crown ethers are widely used as complexing agent that can selectively capture metal cation in their cavity. This special feature shown by poly (dibenzo-18-crown-6) has been used in our laboratory for selective cation exchanger by column chromatography. No attempts were made for the separation of Gd(III) using hippuric acid media and column chromatography. The present communication describes a simple and sensitive method for the determination of Gd(III) using poly(dibenzo-18-crown-6) as stationary phase in hippuric acid medium. The proposed method affords an attractive feature as compared to the solvent extraction technique i.e. it is free from any organic diluents as an environmental concern

  6. Continuous-Scan Phased Array Measurement Methods for Turbofan Engine Acoustic Testing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes an SBIR project to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of a method for measuring phased array acoustic data for...

  7. Pollution reduction technology program small jet aircraft engines, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Kuhn, T. E.; Mongia, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A series of Model TFE731-2 engine tests were conducted with the Concept 2 variable geometry airblast fuel injector combustion system installed. The engine was tested to: (1) establish the emission levels over the selected points which comprise the Environmental Protection Agency Landing-Takeoff Cycle; (2) determine engine performance with the combustion system; and (3) evaulate the engine acceleration/deceleration characteristics. The hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and smoke goals were met. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) were above the goal for the same configuration that met the other pollutant goals. The engine and combustor performance, as well as acceleration/deceleration characteristics, were acceptable. The Concept 3 staged combustor system was refined from earlier phase development and subjected to further rig refinement testing. The concept met all of the emissions goals.

  8. Effects of PECS Phase III Application Training on Independent Mands in Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jessica June

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PECS phase III application training on independent mands in young children with autism. Participants were five children with autism ranging from ages 2 to 4 years old. A multiple baseline across participants was used to evaluate acquisition of independent correct mands across baseline and…

  9. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Job Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Job Profiles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  10. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Individual and Team Performance Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Individual and Team Performance Guidelines. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  11. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III Testing. This procedure will test the sealing integrity of the Flexible Receiver System to ensure that release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from tank SY-101

  12. Explorations of new phases in the Ga(III)/In(III)-Mo(VI)-Se(IV)/Te(IV)-O systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fang; Hu, Chun-Li; Hu, Ting; Zhou, Yong; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2009-07-07

    Systematic explorations of new phases in the Ga(III)/In(III)-Mo(VI)-Se(IV)/Te(IV)-O systems by hydrothermal syntheses or solid-state reactions at high-temperature led to four new quaternary compounds, namely, Ga(2)MoQ(2)O(10) (Q = Se, Te), In(2)Mo(2)Se(2)O(13)(H(2)O) and In(2)MoTe(2)O(10). Ga(2)MoQ(2)O(10) (Q = Se, Te) are isostructural and their structures feature a 3D network of gallium selenite/tellurite with 12-member ring tunnels along b-axis, the distorted MoO(6) octahedra are attached on the wall of the above tunnels. The structure of In(2)Mo(2)Se(2)O(13)(H(2)O) features a new pillared-layered architecture composed of 2D indium(III) selenite layers that are interconnected by Mo(2)O(10) dimers, forming 8-membered ring tunnels along the b-axis. The structure of In(2)MoTe(2)O(10) features a 2D indium oxide layer formed by corner- and edge-sharing InO(6) and InO(7) polyhedra with MoO(4) tetrahedra and TeO(n) (n = 4, 5) polyhedra hanging on both sides of the layer, there are weak interlayer Te-O bonds of 2.512 A. Results of optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements indicate that all four compounds are insulators, which are in agreement with results of band structure calculations based on DFT methods.

  13. Enantiomeric separation of iridium (III) complexes using HPLC chiral stationary phases based on amylose derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Seo, Na Hyeon; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes formed with three identical cyclometalating (C-N) ligands (homoleptic) or formed with two cyclometalating (C-N) ligands and one ancillary (LX) ligand (heteroleptic) have been known as highly phosphorescent materials and, thus, they have been utilized as efficient phosphorescent dopants in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) 1–3 or as effective phosphorescent chemosensors. 4–7 Cylometalated iridium (III) complexes are chiral compounds consisting of lambda (Λ, left-handed) and delta (Δ, right-handed) isomers. Racemic cyclometa- lated iridium (III) complexes emit light with no net polarization, but optically active cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes emit circularly polarized light. 8,9 Circularly polarized light can be used in various fields including highly efficient three dimensional electronic devices, photo nic devices for optical data storage, biological assays, and others. 8,9 In order to obtain optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes and to determine the enantiomeric composition of optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes, liquid chromatogr aphic enantiomer separation method on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been used. For example, Okamoto and coworkers first reported the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) direct enantiomeric separation of two homoleptic cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on immobilized amylose tris(3,5- dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak IA), coated cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralc el OD), and coated cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (Chiralce l OJ). 10 Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) was also used by Bernhard and coworkers for the enantiomeric separation of cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on coated amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak AD-H). 8 However, the general use of the HPLC method for the direct enantiomeric separation of homoleptic

  14. Enantiomeric separation of iridium (III) complexes using HPLC chiral stationary phases based on amylose derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Seo, Na Hyeon; Hyun, Myung Ho [Dept. of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes formed with three identical cyclometalating (C-N) ligands (homoleptic) or formed with two cyclometalating (C-N) ligands and one ancillary (LX) ligand (heteroleptic) have been known as highly phosphorescent materials and, thus, they have been utilized as efficient phosphorescent dopants in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) 1–3 or as effective phosphorescent chemosensors. 4–7 Cylometalated iridium (III) complexes are chiral compounds consisting of lambda (Λ, left-handed) and delta (Δ, right-handed) isomers. Racemic cyclometa- lated iridium (III) complexes emit light with no net polarization, but optically active cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes emit circularly polarized light. 8,9 Circularly polarized light can be used in various fields including highly efficient three dimensional electronic devices, photo nic devices for optical data storage, biological assays, and others. 8,9 In order to obtain optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes and to determine the enantiomeric composition of optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes, liquid chromatogr aphic enantiomer separation method on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been used. For example, Okamoto and coworkers first reported the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) direct enantiomeric separation of two homoleptic cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on immobilized amylose tris(3,5- dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak IA), coated cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralc el OD), and coated cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (Chiralce l OJ). 10 Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) was also used by Bernhard and coworkers for the enantiomeric separation of cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on coated amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak AD-H). 8 However, the general use of the HPLC method for the direct enantiomeric separation of homoleptic.

  15. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with

  16. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, A.; Kefford, R.; Marshall, Martin; Punt, C.J.A.; Haanen, J.B.; Marmol, M.; Garbe, C.; Gogas, H.; Schachter, J.; Linette, G.; Lorigan, P.; Kendra, K.L.; Maio, M.; Trefzer, U.; Smylie, M.; McArthur, G.A.; Dreno, B.; Nathan, P.D.; Mackiewicz, J.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Gomez-Navarro, J.; Huang, B.; Pavlov, D.; Hauschild, A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients

  17. Databases in welding engineering - definition and starting phase of the integrated welding engineering information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmess, H.; Queren, W.; Stracke, M.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the Information AAssociation for Welding Engineering, newly established by the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik, are presented. Examined are: special literature for welding techniques - value and prospects; databases accessible to the public for information on welding techniques; concept for the Information Association for Welding Engineering; the four phases to establish databasis for facts and expert systems of the Information Association for Welding Engineering; the pilot project 'MVT-Data base' (hot crack data base for data of modified varestraint-transvarestraint tests). (orig./MM) [de

  18. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  19. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: experimental and theoretical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaf, Abdul. W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.; Boustani, Ihsan

    1999-03-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of Phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by an on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCl as precursor passed over heated AgCN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands centered at 2165 and 1385 cm -1. These bands are assigned to, ν1 (CN stretch) and ν2 (OP stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN.

  20. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: Experimental and theoretical and theoretical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A.W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.

    1999-01-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCI as precursor passed over heated Ag CN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands at 2165 and 1385 cm -1 . These bands are assigned to ν 1 (C≡N stretch) and ν 2 (O=P stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Moeller - Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN. (authors)

  1. Exploring the Photoreduction of Au(III) Complexes in the Gas-Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Kaufman, Sydney H.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    We have used photodissociation spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and photoreduction of Au(III) in gas-phase complexes containing Cl- and OH-. The gas-phase electronic spectrum of [AuCl_4]- closely resembles the aqueous solution spectrum, showing a lack of strong solvatochromic shifts. Substitution of Cl- ligands with OH- results in a strong blue shift, in agreement with ligand-field theory. Upon excitation, [AuCl_4]- can dissociate by loss of either one or two neutral Cl atoms, resulting in the reduction of gold from Au(III) to Au(II) and Au(I) respectively. The hydroxide substituted complex, [AuCl_2(OH)_2]-, demonstrates similar behavior but the only observable fragment channel is the loss of two neutral OH ligands, leading only to Au(I).

  2. Safety systems and safety analysis of the Qinshan phase III CANDU nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianping; Shen Sen; Barkman, N.

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the Canadian nuclear reactor safety philosophy and the Qinshan Phase III CANDU NPP safety systems and safety analysis, which are designed and performed according to this philosophy. The concept of 'defence-in-depth' is a key element of the Canadian nuclear reactor safety philosophy. The design concepts of redundancy, diversity, separation, equipment qualification, quality assurance, and use of appropriate design codes and standards are adopted in the design. Four special safety systems as well as a set of reliable safety support systems are incorporated in the design of Qinshan phase III CANDU for accident mitigation. The assessment results for safety systems performance show that the fundamental safety criteria for public dose, and integrity of fuel, channels and the reactor building, are satisfied

  3. The application and design of distributed control system in reactor shutdown system of Qinshan phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guoquan; Liu Wangtian; Yu Yijun; Xiong Weihua

    2006-03-01

    The design, commissioning and running of the reactor trip parameter monitoring system used in Qinshan Phase III are introduced. The applying technology of Distributed Control System realized trip parameter monitoring and realized the function of trip parameters quick data acquisitioning, transferring, saving, alarm, query. The applying of trip parameters monitoring system improved the abilities of plant status monitoring and event analyzing, and increased the security and economy of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  4. HPT Clearance Control: Intelligent Engine Systems-Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The following work has been completed to satisfy the Phase I Deliverables for the "HPT Clearance Control" project under NASA GRC's "Intelligent Engine Systems" program: (1) Need for the development of an advanced HPT ACC system has been very clearly laid out, (2) Several existing and potential clearance control systems have been reviewed, (3) A scorecard has been developed to document the system, performance (fuel burn, range, payload, etc.), thermal, and mechanical characteristics of the existing clearance control systems, (4) Engine size and flight cycle selection for the advanced HPT ACC system has been reviewed with "large engine"/"long range mission" combination showing the most benefit, (5) A scoring criteria has been developed to tie together performance parameters for an objective, data driven comparison of competing systems, and (6) The existing HPT ACC systems have been scored based on this scoring system.

  5. 200-ZP-1 phase II and III IRM groundwater pump and treat site safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St. John, C.H.

    1996-07-01

    This safety plan covers operations, maintenance, and support activities related to the 200-ZP-1 Phase II and III Ground Water Pump- and-Treat Facility. The purpose of the facility is to extract carbon tetrachloride contaminated groundwater underlying the ZP-1 Operable Unit; separate the contaminant from the groundwater; and reintroduce the treated water to the aquifer. An air stripping methodology is employed to convert volatile organics to a vapor phase for absorption onto granular activated carbon. The automated process incorporates a variety of process and safety features that shut down the process system in the event that process or safety parameters are exceeded or compromised

  6. Ultracompact electro-optic phase modulator based on III-V-on-silicon microdisk resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, J; Kumar, R; Sales, S; Ramos, F; Morthier, G; Mechet, P; Spuesens, T; Van Thourhout, D; Olivier, N; Fédéli, J-M; Capmany, J

    2012-06-15

    A novel ultracompact electro-optic phase modulator based on a single 9 μm-diameter III-V microdisk resonator heterogeneously integrated on and coupled to a nanophotonic waveguide is presented. Modulation is enabled by effective index modification through carrier injection. Proof-of-concept implementation involving binary phase shift keying modulation format is assembled. A power imbalance of ∼0.6  dB between both symbols and a modulation rate up to 1.8 Gbps are demonstrated without using any special driving technique.

  7. The majority of patients with metastatic melanoma are not represented in pivotal phase III immunotherapy trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Kimper-Karl, Marie Louise; Høyer, Katrine Lundby

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent randomised phase III trials have led to the approval of several immune checkpoint inhibitors for unresectable or metastatic melanoma (MM). These trials all employed strict patient selection criteria, and it is currently unknown how large proportion of 'real-world' patients diag...... a huge knowledge gap regarding the usefulness of new immunotherapies in the 'real-world' patient population, and urge additional testing of known regimens in selected poor prognosis cohorts.......BACKGROUND: Recent randomised phase III trials have led to the approval of several immune checkpoint inhibitors for unresectable or metastatic melanoma (MM). These trials all employed strict patient selection criteria, and it is currently unknown how large proportion of 'real-world' patients...... in 2014, were included in the analysis. Seven pre-defined eligibility criteria, all used to select patients for enrolment in five recent randomised phase III immunotherapy trials, were analysed. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent of the total population with MM did not meet one or more eligibility criteria ('not...

  8. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-09-01

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  9. Phase II and III the next generation of CLS beamline control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias, E.; Beauregard, D.; Berg, R.; Black, G.; Boots, M.J.; Dolton, W.; Hunter, D.; Igarashi, R.; Liu, D.; Maxwell, D.; Miller, C.D.; Wilson, T.; Wright, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is nearing the completion of its suite of Phase II Beamlines and in detailed design of its Phase III Beamlines. The paper presents an overview of the overall approach adopted by CLS in the development of beamline control and data acquisition systems. Building on the experience of our first phase of beamlines the CLS has continued to make extensive use of EPICS with EDM and QT based user interfaces. Increasing interpretive languages such as Python are finding a place in the beamline control systems. Web based environment such as ScienceStudio have also found a prominent place in the control system architecture as we move to tighter integration between data acquisition, visualization and data analysis. (authors)

  10. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Imprinted magnetic graphene oxide for the mini-solid phase extraction of Eu (III) from coal mine area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2017-05-01

    The present work represents the preparation of imprinted magnetic reduced graphene oxide and applied it for the selective removal of Eu (III) from local coal mines area. A simple solid phase extraction method was used for this purpose. The material shows a very high adsorption as well as removal efficiency towards Eu (III), which suggest that the material have potential to be used in future for their real time applications in removal of Eu (III) from complex matrices.

  12. A new ion imprinted polymer based on Ru(III)-thiobarbituric acid complex for solid phase extraction of ruthenium(III) prior to its determination by ETAAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    A new ruthenium ion imprinted polymer was prepared from the Ru(III) 2-thiobarbituric acid complex (the template), methacrylic acid or acrylamide (the functional monomers), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the cross-linking agent) using 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile as the radical initiator. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized and used as a selective sorbent for the solid phase extraction of Ru(III) ions. The effects of type of functional monomer, sample volume, solution pH and flow rate on the extraction efficiency were studied in the dynamic mode. Ru(III) ion was quantitatively retained on the sorbents in the pH range from 3.5 to 10, and can be eluted with 4 mol L−1 aqueous ammonia. The affinity of Ru(III) for the ion imprinted polymer based on the acrylamide monomer is weaker than that for the polymer based on the methacrylic acid monomer, which therefore was used in interference studies and in analytical applications. Following extraction of Ru(III) ions with the imprint and their subsequent elution from the polymer with aqueous ammonia, Ru(III) was detected by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a detection limit of 0.21 ng mL −1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ru(III) in water, waste, road dust and platinum ore (CRM SARM 76) with a reproducibility (expressed as RSD) below 6.4 %. (author)

  13. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedure in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitee eTing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many multiple testing procedures (MTP have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues.

  14. On the determination of Zr(IV), Ce((III), Th(IV) and U(VI) in organic phase using arsenazo-I and arsenazo-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sweify, F.H.; Kamel, M.M.; Shabana, R.

    1997-01-01

    Some organic extractants of different types, namely tridodecylamine (TDA), tricapryl methyl ammonium chloride (TCMA), di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and 1-[thenoyl-(2)]-3,3,3-trifluoroacetone (HTTA) in xylene have been used to study the extraction behaviour of coloured complexes of Zr(IV), Ce(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) from slightly acidic aqueous solutions of arsenazo-III. Spectrophotometric study for the determination of the aforementioned elements, as well as the colouring agents arsenazo-I and arsenazo-III in the organic phase has been carried out. Some factors affecting the spectrophotometric determination of these elements were studied. These factors were hydrogen ion concentration, concentration of the colouring agents in the aqueous phase and diluent type. Absorption spectra and standard curves are given. The molar extinction coefficients have been calculated. 10 figs

  15. Superior outcome of women with stage I/II cutaneous melanoma: Pooled analysis of four European organisation for research and treatment of cancer phase III trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Joosse (Arjen); S. Collette (Sandra); S. Suciu (Stefan); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); F.J. Lejeune (Ferdy); U.R. Kleeberg (Ulrich); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); E.G.E. de Vries (Elisabeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Several studies observed a female advantage in the prognosis of cutaneous melanoma, for which behavioral factors or an underlying biologic mechanism might be responsible. Using complete and reliable follow-up data from four phase III trials of the European Organisation for

  16. Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop - Phase 1 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kultgen, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hvasta, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lisowski, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Toter, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Borowski, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents the current status of the Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop (METL) as of the end of FY2016. Currently, METL is in Phase I of its design and construction. Once operational, the METL facility will test small to intermediate-scale components and systems in order to develop advanced liquid metal technologies. Testing different components in METL is essential for the future of advanced fast reactors as it will provide invaluable performance data and reduce the risk of failures during plant operation.

  17. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  18. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III

  19. Single-crystal neutron diffraction study of ammonium nitrate phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.S.; Prask, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The crystal structure of ammonium nitrate phase III has been studied at room temperature by neutron diffraction using a single crystal containing 5% KNO 3 in solid-solution form. The space group is Pnma, with a = 7.6772 (4), b = 5.8208 (4), c = 7.1396 (5) A, Z = 4. The final residual after full-matrix least-squares refinement was R = 0.042 for 348 observed reflections. The ammonium ions are thermally disordered into two orientations, displaced by an angle of approximately 42 0 about an axis parallel to the c axis. (Auth.)

  20. SAFOD Phase III Core Sampling and Data Management at the Gulf Coast Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lockner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFODproject is yielding new insight into the San Andreas Fault (Zoback et al., 2010; Zoback et al., this issue. SAFOD drilling started in 2002 with a pilot hole, and proceeded with three phrases of drilling and coring during the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2007 (Fig. 1. One key component of theproject is curation, sampling, and documentation of SAFOD core usage at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP Gulf Coast Repository (GCR at Texas A&M University. We present here the milestones accomplished over the past two years of sampling Phase III core at the GCR.

  1. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field.

  2. Stability considerations of permanent magnet quadrupoles for CESR phase-III upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lou

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cornell electron storage ring (CESR phase-III upgrade plan includes very strong permanent magnet quadrupoles in front of the cryostat for the superconducting quadrupoles and physically as close as possible to the interaction point. Together with the superconducting quadrupoles, they provide tighter vertical focusing at the interaction point. The quadrupoles are built with neodymium iron boron (NdFeB material and operate inside the 15 kG solenoid field. Requirements on the field quality and stability of these quadrupoles are discussed and test results are presented.

  3. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christini, R.A.; Dawless, R.K.; Ray, S.P.; Weirauch, D.A. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  4. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl 2 O 4 are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test

  5. The third phase of the OECD/NEA TDB project: TDB III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mompean, F.J.; Illemassene, M.; Perrone, J.

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 with a foreseen duration of four years. The main objective of this new phase is to extend the existing critically reviewed database for elements of relevance in radioactive waste management, paying attention to the needs of the various national programmes. Following the decision by the Project Management Board (integrated by representatives of 16 organisations with responsibilities in radioactive waste management in 12 OECD member countries) the elements contemplated in this new phase are Th, Sn and Fe, with a higher priority being allocated to inorganic species and compounds. In addition to the corresponding review teams for these elements, an additional expert team has been constituted to prepare guidelines for the evaluation of thermodynamic data for solid solutions. As was the case in TDB Phase II, the basic project review methodology remains unaltered in TDB III. The Figure illustrates the relationship between the various TDB bodies, with an International Organisation, the OECD NEA, acting as Project Coordinator and linking the independent scientific teams and the project governing bodies. This organizational paradigm has proven successful with the recent completion of the five Phase II Reviews (Update, Ni, Se, Zr and Organic Ligands). The review and expert team activities were started in 2004 (except for Fe, being started in 2005) following an initiation stage. This preliminary stage was designed in order to tailor the team compositions to the existing literature for each element. The first reviews stemming from TDB III are scheduled to appear in published form in 2007. The successful completion of these objectives will add three further reports to the current series of nine volumes (dealing with the chemical thermodynamics of U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni, Se, Zr and compounds and complexes of these elements with oxalate, citrate, EDTA and isa). (authors)

  6. TWRS privatization phase 1 monitoring wells engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.A.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1998-04-01

    This engineering study provides an evaluation of existing wells and boreholes (wells) within the proposed location for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 demonstration site. Phase 1 is part of the TWRS program that was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of high-level waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. This evaluation is to determine which wells will remain active within the demonstration site based on regulatory, programmatic, or other beneficial use requirements. An initial evaluation of wells within the demonstration site was conducted in 1996. However, changes in construction plans and expansion of the demonstration site necessitated a reevaluation and reclassification of the wells that are within the expanded site. Impacted wells include many of those previously evaluated as well as additional wells identified in or near the expansion areas. Thirty-three wells exist within and immediately adjacent to the identified boundary of the proposed demonstration site. The wells identified for decommissioning will be abandoned according to the well decommissioning plan. Future well requirements within the site include replacement wells for those wells impacted by construction activities, replacements for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) wells going dry, and a new characterization well installed to support a TWRS Phase 2 site assessment

  7. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Report of phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of the field/laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling defined for the phase III of the project. Results from test cases 2-6 are given in separate chapters of the report (which have been indexed separately), and the last chapter discusses the lessons learned from the three phases of the DECOVALEX project

  8. Impact of Dengue Vaccination on Serological Diagnosis: Insights From Phase III Dengue Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plennevaux, Eric; Moureau, Annick; Arredondo-García, José L; Villar, Luis; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Tran, Ngoc H; Bonaparte, Matthew; Chansinghakul, Danaya; Coronel, Diana L; L'Azou, Maïna; Ochiai, R Leon; Toh, Myew-Ling; Noriega, Fernando; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2018-04-03

    We previously reported that vaccination with the tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV; Dengvaxia) may bias the diagnosis of dengue based on immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) assessments. We undertook a post hoc pooled analysis of febrile episodes that occurred during the active surveillance phase (the 25 months after the first study injection) of 2 pivotal phase III, placebo-controlled CYD-TDV efficacy studies that involved ≥31000 children aged 2-16 years across 10 countries in Asia and Latin America. Virologically confirmed dengue (VCD) episode was defined with a positive test for dengue nonstructural protein 1 antigen or dengue polymerase chain reaction. Probable dengue episode was serologically defined as (1) IgM-positive acute- or convalescent-phase sample, or (2) IgG-positive acute-phase sample and ≥4-fold IgG increase between acute- and convalescent-phase samples. There were 1284 VCD episodes (575 and 709 in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups, respectively) and 17673 other febrile episodes (11668 and 6005, respectively). Compared with VCD, the sensitivity and specificity of probable dengue definition were 93.1% and 77.2%, respectively. Overall positive and negative predictive values were 22.9% and 99.5%, respectively, reflecting the much lower probability of correctly confirming probable dengue in a population including a vaccinated cohort. Vaccination-induced bias toward false-positive diagnosis was more pronounced among individuals seronegative at baseline. Caution will be required when interpreting IgM and IgG data obtained during routine surveillance in those vaccinated with CYD-TDV. There is an urgent need for new practical, dengue-specific diagnostic algorithms now that CYD-TDV is approved in a number of dengue-endemic countries. NCT01373281 and NCT01374516.

  9. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  10. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2010-01-01

    The AMU created new logistic regression equations in an effort to increase the skill of the Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II (Lambert 2007). One equation was created for each of five sub-seasons based on the daily lightning climatology instead of by month as was done in Phase II. The assumption was that these equations would capture the physical attributes that contribute to thunderstorm formation more so than monthly equations. However, the SS values in Section 5.3.2 showed that the Phase III equations had worse skill than the Phase II equations and, therefore, will not be transitioned into operations. The current Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II will continue to be used operationally in MIDDS. Three warm seasons were added to the Phase II dataset to increase the POR from 17 to 20 years (1989-2008), and data for October were included since the daily climatology showed lightning occurrence extending into that month. None of the three methods tested to determine the start of the subseason in each individual year were able to discern the start dates with consistent accuracy. Therefore, the start dates were determined by the daily climatology shown in Figure 10 and were the same in every year. The procedures used to create the predictors and develop the equations were identical to those in Phase II. The equations were made up of one to three predictors. TI and the flow regime probabilities were the top predictors followed by 1-day persistence, then VT and Ll. Each equation outperformed four other forecast methods by 7-57% using the verification dataset, but the new equations were outperformed by the Phase II equations in every sub-season. The reason for the degradation may be due to the fact that the same sub-season start dates were used in every year. It is likely there was overlap of sub-season days at the beginning and end of each defined sub-season in each individual year, which could very well affect equation

  11. The Phase I/II BNCT Trials at the Brookhaven medical research reactor: Critical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.Z.

    2001-01-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1994. Many critical issues were considered during the design of the first of many sequential dose escalation protocols. These critical issues included patient selection criteria, boron delivery agent, dose limits to the normal brain, dose escalation schemes for both neutron exposure and boron dose, and fractionation. As the clinical protocols progressed and evaluation of the tolerance of the central nervous system (CNS) to BPA-mediated BNCT at the BMRR continued new specifications were adopted. Clinical data reflecting the progression of the protocols will be presented to illustrate the steps taken and the reasons behind their adoption. (author)

  12. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond.

  13. Runaway electron damage to the Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.; Lutz, T.; Walsh, D.; Martin, G.; Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.; Guilhem, D.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of the Phase III outboard pump limiter (OPL) in Tore Supra in 1994 was terminated prematurely when runaway electrons during the current decay following a disruption pierced leading edge tube on the electron side and caused a water leak. The location, about 20 mm outside the last closed flux surface during normal operation, and the infrared (IR) images of the limiter indicate that the runaways moved in large outward steps, i.e. tens of millimeters, in one toroidal revolution. For plasma (runaway) currents in the range of 155 to 250 kA, the drift orbits open to the outside. Basic trajectory computations suggest that such motion is possible under the conditions present for this experiment. Activation measurements made on sections of the tube to indicate the area of local damage are presented here. An understanding of this event may provide important guidance regarding the potential damage from runaways in future tokamaks

  14. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented.

  15. A randomized placebo-controlled phase III trial of oral laquinimod for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollmer, T L; Sorensen, P S; Selmaj, K

    2014-01-01

    The phase III placebo-controlled BRAVO study assessed laquinimod effects in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), and descriptively compared laquinimod with interferon beta (IFNβ)-1a (Avonex(®) reference arm). RRMS patients age 18-55 years with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores...... months. The primary endpoint was annualized relapse rate (ARR); secondary endpoints included percent brain volume change (PBVC) and 3-month confirmed disability worsening. In all, 1,331 patients were randomized: laquinimod (n = 434), placebo (n = 450), and IFNβ-1a (n = 447). ARR was not significantly...... reduced with laquinimod [-18 %, risk ratio (RR) = 0.82, 95 % CI 0.66-1.02; p = 0.075] vs. placebo. Laquinimod significantly reduced PBVC (28 %, p change in confirmed disability worsening with laquinimod measured...

  16. Integrated safety analysis of rolapitant with coadministered drugs from phase II/III trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbour, S; Smit, T.; Wang, X

    2017-01-01

    adverse events by use versus non-use of drug substrates of CYP2D6 or BCRP. Patients and methods: Patients were randomized to receive either 180 mg oral rolapitant or placebo approximately 1-2 hours before chemotherapy in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 RA and dexamethasone. Data...... cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, but it does inhibit CYP2D6 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To analyze potential drug-drug interactions between rolapitant and concomitant medications, this integrated safety analysis of four double-blind, randomized phase II or III studies of rolapitant examined...... for treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and treatment-emergent serious adverse events (TESAEs) during cycle 1 were pooled across the four studies and summarized in the overall population and by concomitant use/non-use of CYP2D6 or BCRP substrate drugs. Results: In the integrated safety population, 828...

  17. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented

  18. Direct disposal of spent fuel. Simulation of shaft transport. Phase III. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, W.; Heda, M.; Khamis, M.; Neydek, J.; Niehues, N.; Rissel, J.; Schrimpf, C.; Weber, W.; Fuchs, D.; Gerlach, A.; Langebrake, F.; Sindern, W.; Gasch, A.; Leicht, R.; Schwab, B.; Hecke, R. van; Kipka, P.; Simmich, K.; Weber, H.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of these demonstration tests was to verify the technical feasibility of a shaft hoisting equipment with a payload of 85 t as well as the safe transport of POLLUX-casks. In phase III of the project the components and the test stand were built, their proper functioning and reliability were tested to demonstrate that they are state-of-the-art. The following additional investigations were carried out: - Tests to fix operational disturbances and simulation tests for the new components to demonstrate their licensibility -Selection and lifetime tests of ropes and investigation of the present state-of-the-art of rope slighting under the conditions of the conceptual design of the shaft hoisting facility - Execution of a probabilistic safety analysis e.g. the determination of the release of radioactive material (result: probability [de

  19. The Qinshan phase III project-a successful model of sino-canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, S.H.H.; Alikhan, S.; Gu Jun

    2005-01-01

    The Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) Project, the largest-scale cooperative project between China and Canada, was completed in 2003 well in advance of the schedule and 10% under budget. The Third Qinshan (Phase III) Nuclear Power Plant (TQNPP) was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 20, 2003, 43 days and 115 days ahead of schedule respectively. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 months from First Concrete to Criticality - a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods, electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management and control. New design and construction techniques were introduced by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools has benefited TQNPC in its subsequent plant operation, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China as well as enhancing their opportunities internationally. Excellent co-operation and teamwork within the integrated TQNPC/AECL Commissioning Team with well documented QA program, process and procedures also contributed to the remarkable success of the Project. AECL's initial assessment, based on lessons learned, showed that the project schedule could readily be reduced to 66 months and the capital costs reduced by 25% for a replication project. AECL is building on this experience and successful results of TQNPP in its Advanced CANDU Reactor TM (ACR TM ) ** design. (authors)

  20. Phase III trial of high and low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Fuchihata, Hajime; Furukawa, Souhei

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Oral tongue carcinomas are highly curable with radiotherapy. In the past, patients with tongue carcinoma have usually been treated with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. This Phase III study was designed to compare the treatment results obtained with LDR with those obtained with high dose rate (HDR) interstitial radiotherapy for tongue carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The criteria for patient selection for the Phase III study were: (a) presence of a T1T2N0 tumor that could be treated with single-plane implantation, (b) localization of tumor at the lateral tongue border, (c) tumor thickness of 10 mm or less, (d) performance status between O and 3, and (e) absence of any severe concurrent disease. From April 1992 through December 1993, 15 patients in the LDR group (70 Gy/4 to 9 days) and 14 patients in the HDR group (60 Gy/10 fractions/6 days) were accrued. The time interval between two fractions of the HDR brachytherapy was more than 6 h. Results: Local recurrence occurred in two patients treated with LDR brachytherapy but in none of the patients treated with HDR. One- and 2-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were both 86%, compared with 100% in the HDR group (p = 0.157). There were four patients with nodal metastasis in the LDR group and three in the HDR group. Local recurrence occurred in two of the four patients with nodal metastases in the LDR group. One- and 2-year nodal control rates for patients in the LDR group are were 85%, compared with 79% in the HDR group. Conclusion: HDR fractionated interstitial brachytherapy can be an alternative to traditional LDR brachytherapy for early tongue cancer and eliminate the radiation exposure for medical staffs

  1. Evaluating Intermittent Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Phase III Clinical Trials: The Devil Is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Maha; Tangen, Catherine; Higano, Celestia; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-20

    Intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) has been widely tested in prostate cancer. However, phase III trials testing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) versus IAD have reached inconclusive and seemingly contradictory results. Different design and conduct issues must be critically evaluated to better interpret the results. Seven published phase III trials were examined for prespecified design and outcomes. Treatment specifications; primary end point; superiority versus noninferiority design assumptions, including magnitude of assumed versus observed noninferiority margin (NIM); duration of follow-up; and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes were considered in terms of the results and conclusions reported. Five trials had a superiority and three had a noninferiority primary hypothesis. Only three trials had a uniform population and overall survival (OS) end point. All trials observed better outcomes in terms of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) than assumed at time of study design, translating into prespecified NIMs or hazard ratios that reflected larger absolute differences in OS or PFS between arms. Lower-than-expected event rates also reduced statistical power for the trials. Other factors, including length of follow-up, cause of death, QOL, and primary end point, and their impact on trial interpretation are discussed. No trial to date has demonstrated survival superiority of IAD compared with CAD. Trials concluding IAD is noninferior to CAD were based on wide NIMs that included clinically important survival differences, not likely to be considered comparable by physicians or patients. Interim analyses relying on short follow-up and including a majority of non-prostate cancer deaths will favor a noninferiority conclusion and should be interpreted cautiously. Adequate follow-up is required to ensure capture of prostate cancer deaths in both superiority and noninferiority trials. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Unexpected Relationships and Inbreeding in HapMap Phase III Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Eric L.; Baugher, Joseph D.; Shirley, Matthew D.; Frelin, Laurence P.; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation of the genetic relationships between samples is essential for population genomic studies, which could be biased by errors or omissions. To this end, we used identity-by-state (IBS) and identity-by-descent (IBD) methods to assess genetic relatedness of individuals within HapMap phase III data. We analyzed data from 1,397 individuals across 11 ethnic populations. Our results support previous studies (Pemberton et al., 2010; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou et al., 2011) assessing unknown relatedness present within this population. Additionally, we present evidence for 1,657 novel pairwise relationships across 9 populations. Surprisingly, significant Cotterman's coefficients of relatedness K1 (IBD1) values were detected between pairs of known parents. Furthermore, significant K2 (IBD2) values were detected in 32 previously annotated parent-child relationships. Consistent with a hypothesis of inbreeding, regions of homozygosity (ROH) were identified in the offspring of related parents, of which a subset overlapped those reported in previous studies (Gibson et al. 2010; Johnson et al. 2011). In total, we inferred 28 inbred individuals with ROH that overlapped areas of relatedness between the parents and/or IBD2 sharing at a different genomic locus between a child and a parent. Finally, 8 previously annotated parent-child relationships had unexpected K0 (IBD0) values (resulting from a chromosomal abnormality or genotype error), and 10 previously annotated second-degree relationships along with 38 other novel pairwise relationships had unexpected IBD2 (indicating two separate paths of recent ancestry). These newly described types of relatedness may impact the outcome of previous studies and should inform the design of future studies relying on the HapMap Phase III resource. PMID:23185369

  3. Grain Boundary Engineering for Assessing Durability and Aging Issues with Nickel-Based Superalloys, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Grain Boundary Engineering (GBE) approach, successfully demonstrated in Phase I, that microstructural optimization provides a very significant improvement in...

  4. Acute morbidity reduction using 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma; a randomised phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, P.; Putten, W. van; Stroom, J.; Korevaar, G.; Heijmen, B.; Wijnmaalen, A.; Jansen, P.; Hanssens, P.; Griep, C.; Krol, A.; Samson, M.; Levendag, P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A randomised phase III toxicity study (conventional vs conformal radiotherapy) was performed for prostatic carcinoma to study the effects on the (acute) morbidity of intestinal/rectosigmoid and bladder. The observed toxicity was compared with Dose Volume Histograms to reveal possible volume (reduction) effects. Methods: In the phase III study 266 T1-4 N0M0 prostate cancer patients were entered. Patients were randomised for conventional and conformal radiotherapy (total dose 66 Gy, minimum PTV dose 95% ICRU and a CTV-PTV margin of 10 mm in both study arms). The GTV was limited to the prostate only in T1 tumors. In all other patients the GTV was defined to be prostate and seminal vesicles for the complete treatment course. The CTV-PTV margin (10mm) was created by a automated program to ensure the minimum prescribed margin. The rectosigmoid was defined to be the rectum including the sigmoid within the Treatment Volume (ICRU). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the EORTC/RTOG morbidity score and weekly quality of life questionnaires. The radiation technique comparison was done by Dose volume Histogram analysis using the Area Under The Curve (AUC) for different dose levels. In this preliminary DVH analysis we present the data for the first 100 patients. Results: Patient and tumor characteristics were evenly distributed between both study groups. The maximum toxicity is reached at 75% of the tumordose (TD) (rectal grade I 59% grade II 26%, bladder grade I 48%, grade II 16% and grade III 1% [catheter for urinary retention]). Comparing both study arms there seems to be a reduction in intestinal morbidity (grade II and higher resp. 32% vs 19% p=0.02). Further analysis revealed a marked reduction in medication for anal symptoms; this accounts for a large part of the significant difference in intestinal toxicity (grade II conventional vs conformal rectosigmoid 18% vs 14% and anal 16% vs 8%). For bladder morbidity no difference for mobidity higher than grade I is

  5. Bottlenecks in the development of topical analgesics: molecule, formulation, dose-finding, and phase III design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink,1 David J Kopsky,2 Stephen M Stahl3 1Institute Neuropathic Pain, Bosch en Duin, the Netherlands; 2Institute Neuropathic Pain, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Topical analgesics can be defined as topical formulations containing analgesics or co-analgesics. Since 2000, interest in such formulations has been on the rise. There are, however, four critical issues in the research and development phases of topical analgesics: 1 The selection of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. Analgesics and co-analgesics differ greatly in their mechanism of action, and it is required to find the most optimal fit between such mechanisms of action and the pathogenesis of the targeted (neuropathic pain. 2 Issues concerning the optimized formulation. For relevant clinical efficacy, specific characteristics for the selected vehicle (eg, cream base or gel base are required, depending on the physicochemical characteristics of the active pharmaceutical ingredient(s to be delivered. 3 Well-designed phase II dose-finding studies are required, and, unfortunately, such trials are missing. In fact, we will demonstrate that underdosing is one of the major hurdles to detect meaningful and statistically relevant clinical effects of topical analgesics. 4 Selection of clinical end points and innovatively designed phase III trials. End point selection can make or break a trial. For instance, to include numbness together with tingling as a composite end point for neuropathic pain seems stretching the therapeutic impact of an analgesic too far. Given the fast onset of action of topical analgesics (usually within 30 minutes, enrichment designs might enhance the chances for success, as the placebo response might decrease. Topical analgesics may become promising inroads for the treatment of neuropathic pain, once sufficient attention is given to these four key aspects. Keywords: topical, analgesics

  6. Engineered Quasi-Phase Matching for Nonlinear Quantum Optics in Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A.

    Entanglement is the hallmark of quantum mechanics. Quantum entanglement--putting two or more identical particles into a non-factorable state--has been leveraged for applications ranging from quantum computation and encryption to high-precision metrology. Entanglement is a practical engineering resource and a tool for sidestepping certain limitations of classical measurement and communication. Engineered nonlinear optical waveguides are an enabling technology for generating entangled photon pairs and manipulating the state of single photons. This dissertation reports on: i) frequency conversion of single photons from the mid-infrared to 843nm as a tool for incorporating quantum memories in quantum networks, ii) the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype broadband source of polarization and frequency entangled photons; and iii) a roadmap for further investigations of this source, including applications in quantum interferometry and high-precision optical metrology. The devices presented herein are quasi-phase-matched lithium niobate waveguides. Lithium niobate is a second-order nonlinear optical material and can mediate optical energy conversion to different wavelengths. This nonlinear effect is the basis of both quantum frequency conversion and entangled photon generation, and is enhanced by i) confining light in waveguides to increase conversion efficiency, and ii) quasi-phase matching, a technique for engineering the second-order nonlinear response by locally altering the direction of a material's polarization vector. Waveguides are formed by diffusing titanium into a lithium niobate wafer. Quasi-phase matching is achieved by electric field poling, with multiple stages of process development and optimization to fabricate the delicate structures necessary for broadband entangled photon generation. The results presented herein update and optimize past fabrication techniques, demonstrate novel optical devices, and propose future avenues for device development

  7. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate and hydroxyurea for recurrent grade III malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Annick; Quinn, Jennifer A; Vredenburgh, James J; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Friedman, Allan H; Herndon, James E; McLendon, Roger E; Provenzale, James M; Rich, Jeremy N; Sampson, John H; Gururangan, Sridharan; Dowell, Jeannette M; Salvado, August; Friedman, Henry S; Reardon, David A

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports demonstrate the activity of imatinib mesylate, an ATP-mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We performed the current phase 2 study to evaluate this regimen among patients with recurrent WHO grade III malignant glioma (MG). Patients with grade III MG at any recurrence, received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Clinical assessments were performed monthly and radiographic assessments were obtained at least every 2 months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. All patients had progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. The median number of episodes of prior progression was 2 (range, 1-7) and the median number of prior treatment regimens was 3 (range, 1-8). With a median follow-up of 82.9 weeks, 24% of patients were progression-free at 6 months. The radiographic response rate was 10%, while 33% achieved stable disease. Among patients who achieved at least stable disease at first evaluation, the 6-month and 12-month PFS rates were 53% and 29%, respectively. The most common grade 3 or greater toxicities were hematologic and complicated less than 4% of administered courses. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea, is well tolerated and associated with anti-tumor activity in some patients with recurrent grade 3 MG.

  8. Joint Operations 2030 - Phase III Report: The JO 2030 Capability Set (Operations interarmees 2030 - Rapport Phase III: L’ensemble capacitaire JO 2030)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Registry for EU and ul. Ostrobramska 109 NATO FRANCE 04-041 Warszawa Vojkova 55 O.N.E.R.A. (ISP) 1000 Ljubljana 29, Avenue de la Division...Ostrobramska 109 Dstl Knowledge and Information Streitkräfteamt / Abteilung III 04-041 Warszawa Services Fachinformationszentrum der Bundeswehr (FIZBw

  9. Transportation engineering advancement and mentoring program : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The numbers of female and minority students enrolled in engineering schools are increasing slowly; however, there are still : relatively small percentages drawn to the field of transportation civil engineering. As a consequence, there is a need to ed...

  10. Gearing up for transportation engineering, a summer institute : phase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The numbers of female and minority students enrolled in engineering schools are increasing slowly, however there is still a relatively small percentage drawn to the field of transportation civil engineering. As a consequence, there is a need to educa...

  11. Gearing up for transportation engineering, a summer institute : phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-31

    The numbers of female and minority students enrolled in engineering schools are increasing slowly; however, a relatively small percentage of these students are drawn to the field of transportation engineering. For this reason, there is a need to educ...

  12. Gearing up for transportation engineering summer program (GUTEP) : phase VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The numbers of female and minority students enrolled in engineering schools are increasing slowly, however there is still a relatively small percentage drawn to the field of transportation civil engineering. As a consequence, there is a need to educa...

  13. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  14. 40 CFR 35.6570 - Use of the same engineer during subsequent phases of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of the same engineer during... Agreement § 35.6570 Use of the same engineer during subsequent phases of response. (a) If the public notice... CERCLA remedial response Cooperative Agreement may use the engineer procured to conduct any or all of the...

  15. A survey of Type III restriction-modification systems reveals numerous, novel epigenetic regulators controlling phase-variable regulons; phasevarions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, John M; Yang, Yuedong; Jennings, Michael P

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Many bacteria utilize simple DNA sequence repeats as a mechanism to randomly switch genes on and off. This process is called phase variation. Several phase-variable N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferases from Type III restriction-modification systems have been reported in bacterial pathogens. Random switching of DNA methyltransferases changes the global DNA methylation pattern, leading to changes in gene expression. These epigenetic regulatory systems are called phasevarions — phase-variable regulons. The extent of these phase-variable genes in the bacterial kingdom is unknown. Here, we interrogated a database of restriction-modification systems, REBASE, by searching for all simple DNA sequence repeats in mod genes that encode Type III N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferases. We report that 17.4% of Type III mod genes (662/3805) contain simple sequence repeats. Of these, only one-fifth have been previously identified. The newly discovered examples are widely distributed and include many examples in opportunistic pathogens as well as in environmental species. In many cases, multiple phasevarions exist in one genome, with examples of up to 4 independent phasevarions in some species. We found several new types of phase-variable mod genes, including the first example of a phase-variable methyltransferase in pathogenic Escherichia coli. Phasevarions are a common epigenetic regulation contingency strategy used by both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. PMID:29554328

  16. Lapatinib versus hormone therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a randomized phase III clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravaud, Alain; Hawkins, Robert; Gardner, Jason P

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Lapatinib is an orally reversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) tyrosine kinases with demonstrated activity in patients with HER-2-positive breast cancer. In the current phase III open-label trial, lapatinib was comp...

  17. The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and Their Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah; Felce, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the impact of mastery of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) to Phase III, on the communications of children with autism. Children aged between 3 and 7 years, formed a PECS intervention group and a non-intervention control group. The intervention group received 15 h of PECS teaching over 5 weeks. Three 2-h…

  18. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals: Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  19. Assessing braze quality in the actively cooled Tore Supra phase III outboard pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hygren, R.; Lutz, T.; Miller, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the assessment of quality of brazing of pyrolytic graphite (PG) armor brazed to copper tubes in Tore Supra's Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). The limiter head is a bank of 14 water-cooled copper tubes with several hundred brazed PG tiles. Braze quality was first assessed through pre-service qualification testing of individual copper/tiles assemblies. The quality of brazes was evaluated using (non-destructive) transient heating (open-quotes hot waterclose quotes) tests performed in the high temperature, high pressure flow loop at Sandia's Plasma Materials Test Facility. The surface temperatures of tiles were monitored with an infra-red (IR) camera as water at 120 degrees C water at about 2.07 MPa (300 psi) passed through a tube assembly initially at 30 degrees C. For tiles with braze voids or cracks, the surface temperatures lagged behind those of adjacent well bonded tiles. Temperature lags were correlated with flaw sizes observed during repairs using a detailed 2-D heat transfer analyses. open-quotes Badclose quotes tiles, i.e., temperature lags of 10-20 degrees C depending upon tile's size, were easy to detect and, when removed, revealed braze voids of roughly 50% of the joint area. 11 of the 14 tubes were rebrazed after bad tiles were detected and removed. Three tubes were re-brazed twice

  20. SPIRIT: A seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Daniel; Yuan, Ying

    2018-06-07

    Immunotherapy-treatments that enlist the immune system to battle tumors-has received widespread attention in cancer research. Due to its unique features and mechanisms for treating cancer, immunotherapy requires novel clinical trial designs. We propose a Bayesian seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials (SPIRIT) to find the optimal biological dose (OBD) defined in terms of the restricted mean survival time. We jointly model progression-free survival and the immune response. Progression-free survival is used as the primary endpoint to determine the OBD, and the immune response is used as an ancillary endpoint to quickly screen out futile doses. Toxicity is monitored throughout the trial. The design consists of two seamlessly connected stages. The first stage identifies a set of safe doses. The second stage adaptively randomizes patients to the safe doses identified and uses their progression-free survival and immune response to find the OBD. The simulation study shows that the SPIRIT has desirable operating characteristics and outperforms the conventional design. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Solid phase extraction of Am (III) by resins impregnated with multiply diglycolamide-functionalized ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, R.B.; Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Verboom, W.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent extraction studies with multiply diglycolamide-functionalized extractants such as tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) or diglycolamide-functionalized calix(4)arene (C4DGA) ligands have shown excellent results as compared to those of normal DGA ligands such as TODGA. A very high selectivity for Am(III) has been reported with these ligands with respect to U(VI) and Pu(IV). High selectivities and large extraction efficiencies of these ligands towards trivalent f elements were ascribed to a co-operative complexation mechanism. Furthermore, the extraction efficiency of these ligands increased several folds in ionic liquid medium as compared to paraffinic solvents. It was of interest, therefore, to prepare extraction chromatographic resins by impregnation of solvent systems containing these ligands in an ionic liquid. In the present work, solid phase extraction studies were carried out using these two multiply diglycolamide-functionalized extractants, viz. T-DGA (resin I) and C4DGA (resin-II) containing the ionic liquid C 4 mim. NTf 2 impregnated on Chromosorb-W

  2. Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

    1977-03-01

    A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components

  3. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, Pfunding than any of the other modalities (Pfunded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (Pfunded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  4. Assessing braze quality in the actively cooled Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.L.; Miller, J.D.; McGrath, R.; Dale, G.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of brazing of pyrolytic graphite armor brazed to copper tubes in Tore Supra's Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter was assessed through pre-service qualification testing of individual copper/tile assemblies. The evaluation used non-destructive, hot water transient heating tests performed in the high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop at Sandia's Plasma Materials Test Facility. Surface temperatures of tiles were monitored with an infrared camera as water at 120 degrees C at about 2.07 MPa (300 psi) passed through a tube assembly initially at 30 degrees C. For tiles with braze voids or cracks, the surface temperatures tagged behind those of adjacent well-bonded tiles. Temperature tags were correlated with flaw sizes observed during repairs based upon a detailed 2-D heat transfer analyses. open-quotes Badclose quotes tiles, i.e., temperature tags of 10-20 degrees C depending upon tile's size, were easy to detect and, when removed, revealed braze voids of roughly 50% of the joint area. Eleven of the 14 tubes were rebrazed after bad tiles were detected and removed. Three tubes were rebrazed twice

  5. Growth, structure and phase transitions of epitaxial nanowires of III-V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glas, F; Patriarche, G; Harmand, J C

    2010-01-01

    We review and illustrate the impact of TEM on the study of nanowires of non-nitride III-V semiconductors, with particular emphasis on the understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics of their formation assisted by nano-sized catalyst particles. Besides providing basic information about the morphology of the nanowires and their growth rate as a function of diameter, TEM offers insights into the peculiar crystalline structure that they adopt. We discuss the formation of the unusual wurtzite hexagonal crystalline phase and that of planar stacking defects in these nanowires and show that they are kinetically controlled. We also demonstrate the transformation of wurtzite into cubic sphalerite upon epitaxial burying of the nanowires. Nanowires are particularly interesting in that they allow the fabrication of precisely positioned quantum dots with well-defined geometries. In this respect, we discuss the formation of strained quantum-size inclusions in nanowires, their critical dimensions and the kinetic and thermodynamic factors governing the changes of the crystalline structure that sometimes occur around a hetero-interface.

  6. Analysis of gas-liquid metal two-phase flows using a reactor safety analysis code SIMMER-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Kondo, Satoru; Saito, Yasushi; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2003-01-01

    SIMMER-III, a safety analysis code for liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), includes a momentum exchange model based on conventional correlations for ordinary gas-liquid flows, such as an air-water system. From the viewpoint of safety evaluation of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) in LMFRs, we need to confirm that the code can predict the two-phase flow behaviors with high liquid-to-gas density ratios formed during a CDA. In the present study, the momentum exchange model of SIMMER-III was assessed and improved using experimental data of two-phase flows containing liquid metal, on which fundamental information, such as bubble shapes, void fractions and velocity fields, has been lacking. It was found that the original SIMMER-III can suitably represent high liquid-to-gas density ratio flows including ellipsoidal bubbles as seen in lower gas fluxes. In addition, the employment of Kataoka-Ishii's correlation has improved the accuracy of SIMMER-III for gas-liquid metal flows with cap-shape bubbles as identified in higher gas fluxes. Moreover, a new procedure, in which an appropriate drag coefficient can be automatically selected according to bubble shape, was developed. Through this work, the reliability and the precision of SIMMER-III have been much raised with regard to bubbly flows for various liquid-to-gas density ratios

  7. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Phase III - Analysis of Alternatives and Development of an LTMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palermo, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This report documents Phase III of a three-phase study to develop a Long-Term Management Study for disposal of dredged material unsuitable for ocean disposal from Pearl Harbor Naval Complex for the next 30 years...

  8. Model-Based Fault Management Engineering Tool Suite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's successful development of next generation space vehicles, habitats, and robotic systems will rely on effective Fault Management Engineering. Our proposed...

  9. Aspirated Compressors for High Altitude Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences proposes to incorporate aspirated compressor technology into a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) concept engine. Aspiration has been proven...

  10. Optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: phase III prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2002-01-01

    To determine the optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer by comparing survival, patterns of failure, toxicities in early and late radiotherapy groups using a phase III randomized prospective clinical trial. From January 1996 to March 1999, 307 patients with curatively resected AJCC stage II and III rectal cancer were assigned randomly to an 'early (151 patients, arm I)' or a 'late (156 patients, arm II)' and were administered combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m 2 /day, leucovorin 20 mg/m 2 , IV bolus daily, for 3 days with RT, 5 days without RT, 8 cycles with 4 weeks interval) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Patients of arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 of the first cycle of chemotherapy and those of arm II from day 57 with a third cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up period of living patients was 40 months. Of the 307 patients enrolled, fifty patients did not receive scheduled radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The overall survival rate and disease free survival rate at 5 years were 78.3% and 68.7% in arm I, and 78.4% and 67.5% in arm II. The local recurrence rate was 6.6% and 6.4% (ρ = 0.46) in arms I and II, respectively, no significant difference was observed between the distant metastasis rates of the two arms (23.8% and 29.5%, ρ = 0.16). During radiation therapy, grade 3 diarrhea or more, by the NCI common toxicity criteria, was observed in 63.0% and 58.2% of the respective arms (ρ = N.S.), but most were controlled with supportive care. Hematologic toxicity (leukopenia) greater than RTOG grade 2 was found in only 1.3% and 2.6% of patients in each respective arm. There was no significant difference in survival, patterns of failure or toxicities between the early and late radiation therapy arms. Postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation was found to be a relatively safe treatment but higher compliance is needed

  11. NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2006-01-23

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the October through December 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main field activity was reservoir testing in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' in the AEP No.1 well. In addition reservoir simulations were completed to assess feasibility of CO{sub 2} injection for the Mountaineer site. These reservoir testing and computer simulation results suggest that injection potential may be substantially more than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work also continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

  12. Space nuclear power plant technology development philosophy for a ground engineering phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Trapp, T.J.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM)

    1985-01-01

    The development of a space qualified nuclear power plant is proceeding from the technical assessment and advancement phase to the ground engineering phase. In this new phase, the selected concept will be matured by the completion of activities needed before protoflight units can be assembled and qualified for first flight applications. This paper addresses a possible philosophy to arrive at the activities to be performed during the ground engineering phase. The philosophy is derived from what we believe a potential user of nuclear power would like to see completed before commitment to a flight development phase. 5 references

  13. Space nuclear power plant technology development philosophy for a ground engineering phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Trapp, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a space qualified nuclear power plant is proceeding from the Technical Assessment and Advancement Phase to the Ground Engineering Phase. In this new phase, the selected concept will be matured by the completion of activities needed before protoflight units can be assembled and qualified for first flight applications. This paper addresses a possible philosophy to arrive at the activities to be performed during the Ground Engineering Phase. The philosophy is derived from what we believe a potential user of nuclear power would like to see completed before commitment to a flight development phase

  14. Utilization of modified corn silk as a biosorbent for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongmei; Pang, Jing; Wu, Mei; Wu, Qiaoli; Huo, Cuixiu

    2014-01-01

    The ues of corn silk modified with diluted nitric acid (HNO3-MCS) as a novel biosorbent has been established for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation in water samples. The functional groups of the HNO3-MCS surface are favorable for the adsorption of Cr(III). Effective extraction conditions were optimized in both batch and column methods. At pH 3.0 - 6.0, a discrimination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) is achieved on the HNO3-MCS surface. Cr(III) ions are retained onto the HNO3-MCS surface, however, the adsorption of Cr(VI) is negligible under the same conditions. The adsorption isotherm of HNO3-MCS for Cr(III) has been demonstrated in accordance with a linear form of the Langmuir equation, and the maximum adsorption capacity is 35.21 mg g(-1). The well fitted linear regression of the pseudo-second order model showed the indication of a chemisorption mechanism for the entire concentration range. Thermodynamic studies have shown that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorbed Cr(III) was quantitatively eluted by a nitric acid solution with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). With a sample volume of 30 mL, a detection limit (3σ) of 0.85 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.0% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level were achieved. The concentration of Cr(III) could be accurately quantified within a linear range of 3 - 200 μg L(-1). After Cr(VI) has been reduced to Cr(III) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, the total amount of chromium was obtained, and the content of Cr(VI) was given by subtraction. The procedure was validated by analyzing chromium in a certified reference material (GBW (E) 080039). It was also successfully applied for the speciation of chromium in wastewater samples.

  15. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  16. Demonstration of a free piston Stirling engine driven linear alternator, phase I report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldwater, B.; Piller, S.; Rauch, J.; Cella, A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the work performed under Phase I of the free piston Stirling engine demonstrator program are described. The objective of the program is to develop a 2 kW free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator energy conversion system, for an isotopic heat source, with a greater than 30% overall efficiency. Phase I was a 15-month effort to demonstrate the feasibility of the system through analysis and experimental testing of the individual components. An introduction to Stirling engines and the details of the tasks completed are presented in five major sections: (1) introduction to Stirling engine; (2) preliminary design of an advanced free piston Stirling demonstrator engine; (3) design and test of a 1 kWE output linear alternator; (4) test of a model free piston Stirling engine; and (5) development of a free piston Stirling engine computer simulation code

  17. Demonstration of a free piston Stirling engine driven linear alternator, phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, B.; Piller, S.; Rauch, J.; Cella, A.

    1977-03-30

    The results of the work performed under Phase I of the free piston Stirling engine demonstrator program are described. The objective of the program is to develop a 2 kW free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator energy conversion system, for an isotopic heat source, with a greater than 30% overall efficiency. Phase I was a 15-month effort to demonstrate the feasibility of the system through analysis and experimental testing of the individual components. An introduction to Stirling engines and the details of the tasks completed are presented in five major sections: (1) introduction to Stirling engine; (2) preliminary design of an advanced free piston Stirling demonstrator engine; (3) design and test of a 1 kWE output linear alternator; (4) test of a model free piston Stirling engine; and (5) development of a free piston Stirling engine computer simulation code.

  18. Radiation therapy for ocular choroidal neovascularization (phase I/II study): preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Keisuke; Murata, Rumi; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Ngata, Yasushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of severe loss of visual acuity in some ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and angioid streaks. Laser photocoagulation has been used to treat patients with subfoveal neovascular lesions with well-demarcated boundaries. However, the treatment method is usually associated with a large decrease in visual acuity. Therefore, indications for this treatment are very limited. Recently, some investigators reported the effect of low dose irradiation on the sub retinal neovascular membranes in CNV. We conducted a Phase I/II study to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external photon beam radiotherapy in patients with CNV. Methods and Materials: Between April, 1994 and July, 1995, 36 patients with choroidal neovascularization (34 with ARMD and 2 with angioid streaks) were treated with radiation therapy. Treatment planning was performed using a CT simulator that enables real-time treatment planning from multiple CT slices. The clinical target volume that included the macula and optic disc received a dose of 10 Gy/5 fractions/1 week (first 18 eyes) or 20 Gy/10 fractions/2 weeks (last 18 eyes). All eyes were irradiated with a single lateral 6 MV photon beam, angled 10 degrees posteriorly to exclude the ipsilateral lens and the contralateral eye from the radiation field. The ipsilateral lens was irradiated with less than 10% of the total reference dose. The field size averaged 3.0 x 2.5 cm. Records of the 17 eyes with CNV referred to our hospital in 1993, which satisfied the eligibility criteria for this study, were retrospectively analyzed for comparison. Results: There was no significant acute morbidity. All patients were followed regularly by both ophthalmologists and radiation oncologists. Cataract formation after 1 year of the treatment was observed in one patient who had received a dose of 20 Gy. One patient who had received 20 Gy complained of transient dry-eye sensation

  19. Study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailova, M.M.; Egorova, L.A.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel. The condition of cobalt in various rate of oxidation in acrylamide aqueous solutions was studied. The concentration conditions of stability of system Co(II)-Co(III) were defined. The composition of coordination compounds of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel was determined.

  20. How Accurately Do Consecutive Cohort Audits Predict Phase III Multisite Clinical Trial Recruitment in Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Nikki; Fazekas, Belinda; Cutri, Natalie; Currow, David C

    2016-04-01

    Audits have been proposed for estimating possible recruitment rates to randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but few studies have compared audit data with subsequent recruitment rates. To compare the accuracy of estimates of potential recruitment from a retrospective consecutive cohort audit of actual participating sites and recruitment to four Phase III multisite clinical RCTs. The proportion of potentially eligible study participants estimated from an inpatient chart review of people with life-limiting illnesses referred to six Australian specialist palliative care services was compared with recruitment data extracted from study prescreening information from three sites that participated fully in four Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative RCTs. The predominant reasons for ineligibility in the audit and RCTs were analyzed. The audit overestimated the proportion of people referred to the palliative care services who could participate in the RCTs (pain 17.7% vs. 1.2%, delirium 5.8% vs. 0.6%, anorexia 5.1% vs. 0.8%, and bowel obstruction 2.8% vs. 0.5%). Approximately 2% of the referral base was potentially eligible for these effectiveness studies. Ineligibility for general criteria (language, cognition, and geographic proximity) varied between studies, whereas the reasons for exclusion were similar between the audit and pain and anorexia studies but not for delirium or bowel obstruction. The retrospective consecutive case note audit in participating sites did not predict realistic recruitment rates, mostly underestimating the impact of study-specific inclusion criteria. These findings have implications for the applicability of the results of RCTs. Prospective pilot studies are more likely to predict actual recruitment. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diet and Respiratory Health in Children from 11 Latin American Countries: Evidence from ISAAC Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Alfonso Mario; Thawer, Sumaiyya; Boyle, Robert J; Villalba, Sara; Jaller, Rodolfo; Tapias, Elmy; Segura, Ana María; Villegas, Rodrigo; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa

    2017-12-01

    The burden of childhood asthma and its risk factors is an important but neglected public health challenge in Latin America. We investigated the association between allergic symptoms and dietary intake in children from this region. As part of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase III, questionnaire collected dietary intake was investigated in relation to risk of parental/child reported current wheeze (primary outcome) and rhino-conjunctivitis and eczema. Per-country adjusted logistic regressions were performed, and combined effect sizes were calculated with meta-analyses. 143,967 children from 11 countries had complete data. In children aged 6-7 years, current wheeze was negatively associated with higher fruit intake (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65; 95% CI 0.74, 0.97). Current rhino-conjunctivitis and eczema were statistically negatively associated with fruit intake (aOR 0.72; 95% CI 0.64, 0.82; and OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.56, 0.74, respectively). Vegetable intake was negatively associated with risk of symptoms in younger children, but these associations were attenuated in the 13-14 years old group. Fastfood/burger intake was positively associated with all three outcomes in the older children. A higher intake of fruits and vegetables was associated with a lower prevalence of allergic symptoms in Latin American children. Conversely, intake of fastfood was positively associated with a higher prevalence of wheeze in adolescents. Improved dietary habits in children might help reduce the epidemic of allergic symptoms in Latin America. Food interventions in asthmatic children are needed to evaluate the possible public health impact of a better diet on respiratory health.

  2. Combining dosimetry and toxicity: analysis of two UK phase III clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    There are many advantages to performing a clinical trial when implementing a novel radiotherapy technique. The clinical trials framework enables the safety and efficacy of the 'experimental arm' to be tested and ensures practical support, rigorous quality control and data monitoring for participating centres. In addition to the clinical and follow-up data collected from patients within the trial, it is also possible to collect 3-D dosimetric information from the corresponding radiotherapy treatment plans. Analysing the combination of dosimetric, clinical and follow-up data enhances the understanding of the relationship between the dose delivered to both the target and normal tissue structures and reported outcomes and toxicity. Aspects of the collection, collation and analysis of data from two UK multicentre Phase III radiotherapy trials are presented here. MRC-RT01 dose-escalation prostate radiotherapy trial ISRCTN47772397 was one of the first UK multi-centre radiotherapy trials to collect 3-D dosimetric data. A number of different analysis methodologies were implemented to investigate the relationship between the dose distribution to the rectum and specific rectal toxicities. More recently data was collected from the PARSPORT trial (Parotid Sparing IMRT vs conventional head and neck radiotherapy) ISRCTN48243537. In addition to the planned analysis, dosimetric analysis was employed to investigate an unexpected finding that acute fatigue was more prevalent in the IMRT arm of the trial. It can be challenging to collect 3-D dosimetric information from multicentre radiotherapy trials. However, analysing the relationship between dosimetric and toxicity data provides invaluable information which can influence the next generation of radiotherapy techniques.

  3. A phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-C.; Guo, W.-Y.; Leung, M.-J.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Chen, S.-Y; Wang, L.-W.; Lai, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-M.; Lian, S.-L.; Chang, C.-H.; Liu, T.-W.; Chin, Y.-H.; Yen, S.-H.; Perng, C.-H.; Chen, Kuang Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients, we conducted a randomized Phase III trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy to RT alone in patients with advanced NPC. Methods and Materials: Between November 1994 and March 1999, 157 patients with Stage IV, M 0 (UICC/AJCC, 1992) advanced NPC disease were randomized to receive standard radiotherapy, as follows: 35-40 fractions, 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week, to a total dose 70-72 Gy with or without 9 weekly cycles of 24-h infusional chemotherapy (20 mg/m 2 cisplatin, 2,200 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, and 120 mg/m 2 leucovorin) after RT. Of 157 patients enrolled, 154 (77 radiotherapy, 77 combined therapy) were evaluable for survival and toxicity analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 49.5 months, the 5-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were 60.5% vs. 54.5% (p = 0.5) and 49.5% vs. 54.4% (p = 0.38) for the radiotherapy-alone group and the combined radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy group, respectively. The Cox regression showed that the hazard rates ratio of combined treatment to RT alone was 0.673 (p value = 0.232); the 95% confidence interval was 0.352 and 1.288, respectively. Patients who received combined treatment had a lower systemic relapse rate than radiotherapy-alone patients, according to relapse pattern analysis. The incidence of leukopenia (≥ Grade 3) occurred in 17 out of 819 (2.1%) cycles of weekly chemotherapy. No patient developed moderate to severe mucositis (≥ Grade 3). Conclusions: We conclude that adjuvant chemotherapy after RT for patients with advanced NPC has no benefit for overall survival or relapse-free survival

  4. Phase III study of ibuprofen versus placebo for radiation-induced genitourinary side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C. Norman; Kelly, Laura; Riese Daly, Nancy; Beard, Clair; Kaplan, Irving; Lamb, Carolyn; Propert, Kathleen; Manola, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: On the basis of our anecdotal clinical observations that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents relieved dysuria during radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer, we conducted a Phase III randomized trial of ibuprofen vs. placebo for patients who had an increase in acute urinary symptoms. Our in vitro and in vivo laboratory data with a higher concentration of ibuprofen than achievable in this study demonstrated radiosensitization. This study examined whether the inflammatory response within the prostate during radiotherapy would respond to the standard dose of ibuprofen as assessed by a symptom score. Methods and Materials: Patients were registered to the study and were followed weekly with a formal symptom assessment. A double-blind randomization to ibuprofen, 400 mg q.i.d., vs. placebo for 7 days was done at a time when the severity score increased. The symptom response was evaluated at the end of the week. Results: Between 1995 and 1998, 100 patients were entered, 28 did not have a sufficient change in symptom score to be randomized, and 19 were either unable to take ibuprofen or withdrew before randomization. Of the 53 patients randomized, 27 received placebo and 26 ibuprofen. No statistically significant differences were found between the placebo and ibuprofen groups between baseline and randomization or between randomization and the 1-week posttreatment assessment. Neither group had a change in symptom severity between randomization and the 1-week posttreatment evaluation. Conclusion: The standard anti-inflammatory dose of ibuprofen did not relieve the acute urinary or rectal symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are potential radiation sensitizers with the mechanism of action as yet unknown. Clinical trials of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors as radiation sensitizers should explore a range of doses and evaluate potential mechanisms of action, including cyclooxygenase inhibition and other non

  5. Steady-state heat and particle removal with the actively cooled Phase III outboard pump limiter in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.; Koski, J.; Lutz, T.; McGrath; Miller, J.; Watkins, J.; Guilhem, D.; Chappuis, P.; Cordier, J.; Loarer, T.

    1995-01-01

    Tore Supra's Phase III outboard pump limiter (OPL) is a modular actively-cooled mid-plane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation. During its initial operation in 1993, the OPL successfully removed about 1 MW of power during ohmicly heated shots of up to 10 s duration and reached (steady state) thermal equilibrium. The particle pumping of the Phase III OPL was found to be about 50% greater than the Phase II OPL which had a radial distance between the last closed flux surface and the entrance of the pumping throat of 3.5 cm compared with only 2.5 cm for the Phase III OPL. This paper gives examples of power distribution over the limiter from IR measurements of surface temperature and from extensively calorimetry (34 thermocouples and 10 flow meters) and compares the distributions with values predicted by a 3D model (HF3D) with a detailed magnetic configuration (e.g., includes field ripple). ((orig.))

  6. Motivation and participation in a phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme: an application of the health action process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnke, Birte; Nowossadeck, Enno; Müller-Fahrnow, Werner

    2010-10-01

    This longitudinal study extends the previous research on low participation rates and high dropout rates in phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise programmes. It examines the correlates of motivation and participation 6 months after inpatient phase II CR (T1) and the predictors of dropout 6 months later (T2) using the health action process approach (HAPA). Risk perception, outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, intention (at T1), and participation (at T1 and T2) in relation to phase III CR programmes was assessed in 456 patients. Based on intention and participation at T1, patients were classified as nonintenders (56%), intenders (13%), or actors (31%). Group differences were confirmed in outcome expectancies and self-efficacy. By T2, 21% of T1 actors had dropped out. Dropouts and maintainers differed in intention and self-efficacy (at T1). Results are in line with the HAPA and suggest a perspective for tailoring motivational counselling to improve participation in phase III CR programmes.

  7. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. The Phase II - Title I services include the preparation of topographic measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 0.5 million tons of tailings at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The nine alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through IX). Cost estimates for the nine options range from $480,000 to $5,890,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Durango site, Durango, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Durango, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.555 million tons of tailings at the Durango site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from vegetative stabilization (Option I), to contouring and stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II and III), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V to VIII). All options include remedial action costs for offsite locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimated for the eight options range from $4,340,000 to $13,590,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is sufficiently economically attractive to justify reprocessing in conjunction with each of the options

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Maybell site, Maybell, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiometric measurements to determine radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.6 million tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The three alternative actions presented range from fencing and maintenance (Option I), to placing the tailings in an open-pit mine and adding 2 ft of stabilization cover material (Option III). Cost estimates for the three options range from $250,000 to $4,520,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  10. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  11. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Rocket Engine Igniter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spark ignition of a bi-propellant rocket engine is a classic, proven, and generally reliable process. However, timing can be critical, and the control logic,...

  12. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 3 Development Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, John F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pollock, David L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a project development plan that proposes how the parties interested in the IDC Re-Engineering system will coordinate its development, testing and transition to operations.

  13. Automated Flight Safety Inference Engine (AFSIE) System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an innovative Autonomous Flight Safety Inference Engine (AFSIE) system to autonomously and reliably terminate the flight of an errant launch...

  14. Lightweight Exit Cone for Liquid Rocket Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) J-2X engine will power the upper stage of the Ares I and the earth departure stage (EDS) of the Ares V, which will enable...

  15. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The on-ground and Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) provides a system architecture and software tools for performing diagnostics...

  16. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a safe, highly-reliable, low-cost and uniquely versatile propulsion...

  17. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 3 Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, James M.; Burns, John F.; Pollock, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a project development plan that proposes how the parties interested in the IDC Re-Engineering system will coordinate its development, testing and transition to operations.

  18. Integrated Computational Material Engineering Technologies for Additive Manufacturing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuesTek Innovations, a pioneer in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) and a Tibbetts Award recipient, is teaming with University of Pittsburgh,...

  19. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a highly-reliable, low-cost and...

  20. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  1. Waste retrieval sluicing system vapor sampling and analysis plan for evaluation of organic emissions, process test phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained to address vapor issues related to the sluicing of tank 241-C-106. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection Phase III (Jones 1999) and Process Test Plan Phase III, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection (Powers 1999). Analytical requirements include those specified in Request for Ecology Concurrence on Draft Strategy/Path Forward to Address Concerns Regarding Organic Emissions from C-106 Sluicing Activities (Peterson 1998). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System was installed to retrieve and transfer high-heat sludge from tank 241-C-106 to tank 241-AY-102, which is designed for high-heat waste storage. During initial sluicing of tank 241-C-106 in November 1998, operations were halted due to detection of unexpected high volatile organic compounds in emissions that exceeded regulatory permit limits. Several workers also reported smelling sharp odors and throat irritation. Vapor grab samples from the 296-C-006 ventilation system were taken as soon as possible after detection; the analyses indicated that volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds were present. In December 1998, a process test (phase I) was conducted in which the pumps in tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 were operated and vapor samples obtained to determine constituents that may be present during active sluicing of tank 241-C-106. The process test was suspended when a jumper leak was detected. On March 7, 1999, phase I1 of the process test was performed; the sluicing system was operated for approximately 7 hours and was ended using the controlled shutdown method when the allowable amount of solids were transferred to 241-AY-102. The phase II test was successful, however, further testing is required to obtain vapor samples at higher emission levels

  2. High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team Final Report, Volumes I, II, and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the process used and results obtained by the High Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team to select a primary and backup alternative salt disposition method for the Savannah River Site

  3. Novel concepts for the compression of large volumes of carbon dioxide-phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Allison, Timothy C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Evans, Neal D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Moreland, Brian [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hernandez, Augusto J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Day, Meera [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Ridens, Brandon L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-30

    and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2 . Both test programs successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  4. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  5. Experimental Demonstration of Phase Sensitive Parametric Processes in a Nano-Engineered Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Ning; Fadil, Ahmed; Pu, Minhao

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally phase-sensitive processes in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for the first time. Furthermore, we highlight paths towards the optimization of the phase-sensitive extinction ratio under the impact of two-photon and free-carrier absorption.......We demonstrate experimentally phase-sensitive processes in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for the first time. Furthermore, we highlight paths towards the optimization of the phase-sensitive extinction ratio under the impact of two-photon and free-carrier absorption....

  6. Analysis of Reasons for fluctuation in seal oil system on generator and countermeasures in Qinshan phase III project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Reasons for hydraulic differential fluctuations seal hydrogen oil on generator in Qinshan phase III project were analyzed, provide a basis for modifying Run method is to determine the causes and effects of seal oil flow changes and in the relationship between flow changes and hydraulic differential hydrogen oil changes according to reason Results were analyzed to adjust the running test, to verify the feasibility of running adjustment programs

  7. Stakeholder perspectives on the use of positron emission tomography in phase III oncology trials in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Anaya, Hector; Skogen, Karoline; Miles, Kenneth Alan

    2012-06-01

    To identify factors that influence the use of PET in phase III oncology trials in the UK by evaluating stakeholder perspectives. A wide range of UK PET research stakeholders with a potential interest in the use of PET in phase III trials were identified and invited to participate. These UK PET research stakeholders were consulted using a semistructured questionnaire on their personal experience with and involvement in PET research, the role of PET in phase III oncology clinical trials and on the promotion of UK PET research and unmet clinical needs in oncology. Responses were analysed quantitatively and by qualitative content analysis of free-text responses. A total of 118 responses were received from a wide range of stakeholders representing several professional groups and working environments. Of these respondents, 49 (42%) were using PET in their research. There was the general perception that using PET in clinical research is beneficial in oncology. The two major barriers identified were poor availability of PET and perceived difficulties in funding of excess treatment costs (75% of respondents). Other factors included limited coverage of PET in training, uncertainty about developing imaging protocols or the status of tracers other than 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, and low awareness of the role of PET in patient selection for therapeutic trials. Patient concerns about radiation were not perceived as a research barrier. Interventions that improve the availability and funding pathways for PET research scans and that increase researcher awareness could help promote the use of PET for phase III oncology trials in the UK.

  8. High Efficiency Quantum Dot III-V Multijunction Solar Cell for Space Power, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to utilize quantum dots to develop a super high-efficiency multijunction III-V solar cell for space. In metamorphic triple junction space solar...

  9. Toxicity Evaluation of Engineered Nanomaterials (Phase 1 Studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    e ICP-MS. The DRC gas was methane at 0.55 mL/min. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography ( HPLC ): Solutions were prepared and incubated at... flavonoids rutin and quercetin, were reported to behave via similar mechanisms.35 Recently, additional phenolic compounds have...molecule at roughly 20.64-20.67 min (Figure S7, Appendix III, B). In addition, the peak for the Dynasore molecule through HPLC was split after the

  10. Twenty-seven years of phase III trials for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer: disappointing results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Oze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine-based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care.

  11. Broadband microwave photonic fully tunable filter using a single heterogeneously integrated III-V/SOI-microdisk-based phase shifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Juan; Morthier, Geert; Ramos, Francisco; Sales, Salvador; Van Thourhout, Dries; Spuesens, Thijs; Olivier, Nicolas; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Capmany, José

    2012-05-07

    A broadband microwave photonic phase shifter based on a single III-V microdisk resonator heterogeneously integrated on and coupled to a nanophotonic silicon-on-insulator waveguide is reported. The phase shift tunability is accomplished by modifying the effective index through carrier injection. A comprehensive semi-analytical model aiming at predicting its behavior is formulated and confirmed by measurements. Quasi-linear and continuously tunable 2π phase shifts at radiofrequencies greater than 18 GHz are experimentally demonstrated. The phase shifter performance is also evaluated when used as a key element in tunable filtering schemes. Distortion-free and wideband filtering responses with a tuning range of ~100% over the free spectral range are obtained.

  12. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  13. Phase III Study of Cabozantinib in Previously Treated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: COMET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; De Bono, Johann; Sternberg, Cora; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Oudard, Stéphane; De Giorgi, Ugo; Krainer, Michael; Bergman, Andries; Hoelzer, Wolfgang; De Wit, Ronald; Bögemann, Martin; Saad, Fred; Cruciani, Giorgio; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine; Feyerabend, Susan; Miller, Kurt; Houédé, Nadine; Hussain, Syed; Lam, Elaine; Polikoff, Jonathan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mainwaring, Paul; Ramies, David; Hessel, Colin; Weitzman, Aaron; Fizazi, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of kinases, including MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and has shown activity in men with previously treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This blinded phase III trial compared cabozantinib with prednisone in patients with mCRPC. Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio to cabozantinib 60 mg once per day or prednisone 5 mg twice per day. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Bone scan response (BSR) at week 12 as assessed by independent review committee was the secondary end point; radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and effects on circulating tumor cells (CTCs), bone biomarkers, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs) were exploratory assessments. A total of 1,028 patients were randomly assigned to cabozantinib (n = 682) or prednisone (n = 346). Median OS was 11.0 months with cabozantinib and 9.8 months with prednisone (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.06; stratified log-rank P = .213). BSR at week 12 favored cabozantinib (42% v 3%; stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel P < .001). rPFS was improved in the cabozantinib group (median, 5.6 v 2.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.57; stratified log-rank P < .001). Cabozantinib was associated with improvements in CTC conversion, bone biomarkers, and post-random assignment incidence of SSEs but not PSA outcomes. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events and discontinuations because of adverse events were higher with cabozantinib than with prednisone (71% v 56% and 33% v 12%, respectively). Cabozantinib did not significantly improve OS compared with prednisone in heavily treated patients with mCRPC and progressive disease after docetaxel and abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. Cabozantinib had some activity in improving BSR, rPFS, SSEs, CTC conversions, and bone biomarkers but not PSA outcomes. © 2016 by

  14. Sunitinib versus sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular cancer: results of a randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lin, Deng-Yn; Park, Joong-Won; Kudo, Masatoshi; Qin, Shukui; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Song, Xiangqun; Xu, Jianming; Poggi, Guido; Omata, Masao; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Lanzalone, Silvana; Yang, Liqiang; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Raymond, Eric

    2013-11-10

    Open-label, phase III trial evaluating whether sunitinib was superior or equivalent to sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer. Patients were stratified and randomly assigned to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg once per day or sorafenib 400 mg twice per day. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Early trial termination occurred for futility and safety reasons. A total of 1,074 patients were randomly assigned to the study (sunitinib arm, n = 530; sorafenib arm, n = 544). For sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, median OS was 7.9 versus 10.2 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; one-sided P = .9990; two-sided P = .0014); median progression-free survival (PFS; 3.6 v 3.0 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8785; two-sided P = .2286) and time to progression (TTP; 4.1 v 3.8 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8312; two-sided P = .3082) were comparable. Median OS was similar among Asian (7.7 v 8.8 months; HR, 1.21; one-sided P = .9829) and hepatitis B-infected patients (7.6 v 8.0 months; HR, 1.10; one-sided P = .8286), but was shorter with sunitinib in hepatitis C-infected patients (9.2 v 17.6 months; HR, 1.52; one-sided P = .9835). Sunitinib was associated with more frequent and severe adverse events (AEs) than sorafenib. Common grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (29.7%) and neutropenia (25.7%) for sunitinib; hand-foot syndrome (21.2%) for sorafenib. Discontinuations owing to AEs were similar (sunitinib, 13.3%; sorafenib, 12.7%). OS with sunitinib was not superior or equivalent but was significantly inferior to sorafenib. OS was comparable in Asian and hepatitis B-infected patients. OS was superior in hepatitis C-infected patients who received sorafenib. Sunitinib-treated patients reported more frequent and severe toxicity.

  15. Investigation of global particulate nitrate from the AeroCom phase III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of global particulate nitrate and ammonium aerosol based on simulations from nine models participating in the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom phase III study is presented. A budget analysis was conducted to understand the typical magnitude, distribution, and diversity of the aerosols and their precursors among the models. To gain confidence regarding model performance, the model results were evaluated with various observations globally, including ground station measurements over North America, Europe, and east Asia for tracer concentrations and dry and wet depositions, as well as with aircraft measurements in the Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitudes for tracer vertical distributions. Given the unique chemical and physical features of the nitrate occurrence, we further investigated the similarity and differentiation among the models by examining (1 the pH-dependent NH3 wet deposition; (2 the nitrate formation via heterogeneous chemistry on the surface of dust and sea salt particles or thermodynamic equilibrium calculation including dust and sea salt ions; and (3 the nitrate coarse-mode fraction (i.e., coarse/total. It is found that HNO3, which is simulated explicitly based on full O3-HOx-NOx-aerosol chemistry by all models, differs by up to a factor of 9 among the models in its global tropospheric burden. This partially contributes to a large difference in NO3−, whose atmospheric burden differs by up to a factor of 13. The atmospheric burdens of NH3 and NH4+ differ by 17 and 4, respectively. Analyses at the process level show that the large diversity in atmospheric burdens of NO3−, NH3, and NH4+ is also related to deposition processes. Wet deposition seems to be the dominant process in determining the diversity in NH3 and NH4+ lifetimes. It is critical to correctly account for contributions of heterogeneous chemical production of nitrate on dust and sea salt, because this process

  16. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen B.K.; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John G.H.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S.K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  17. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  18. Engineering topological phases with a three-dimensional nodal-loop semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linhu; Yap, Han Hoe; Araújo, Miguel A. N.; Gong, Jiangbin

    2017-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) nodal-loop semimetal phase is exploited to engineer a number of intriguing phases featuring different peculiar topological surface states. In particular, by introducing various two-dimensional gap terms to a 3D tight-binding model of a nodal-loop semimetal, we obtain a rich variety of topological phases of great interest to ongoing theoretical and experimental studies, including a chiral insulator, degenerate-surface-loop insulator, and second-order topological insulator, as well as a Weyl semimetal with tunable Fermi arc profiles. The unique concept underlying our approach is to engineer topological surface states that inherit their dispersion relations from a gap term. The results provide one rather unified principle for the creation of novel topological phases and can guide the search for new topological materials. Two-terminal transport studies are also carried out to distinguish the engineered topological phases.

  19. Radiation therapy for ocular choroidal neovascularization (phase I/II study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Keisuke; Murata, Rumi; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of severe loss of visual acuity in some ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and angio-streaks. Laser photocoagulation has been used to treat patients with subfoveal neovascular lesions with well demarcated boundaries. However, the treatment method is usually associated with a large decrease in visual acuity. Therefore, indications for this treatment are very limited. Recently, some investigators reported the effect of low dose irradiation on the subretinal neovascular membranes in CNV. We conducted a phase I/II study to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external photon beam radiotherapy in patients with CNV. Materials and Methods: Between April 1994 and July 1995, 36 patients with choroidal neovascularization (34 with ARMD; 2 with angiostreaks) were treated with radiation therapy. Eligibility criteria for this study were as follows: the eyes had subretinal neovascular membranes in the avascular area of the fovea; the neovascular membranes had grown in size in the last 6 months; the best pretreatment corrected visual acuity was worse than (20(25)); there were no large subretinal hemorrhages causing decrease in visual acuity; patients were 50 years or older and had not received laser photocoagulation nor other treatment for this condition. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The patients underwent fluorescein angiographic evaluation and documentation of their neovascular disease prior to irradiation. Fluorescein angiography, measurement of the best corrected visual acuity, ophthalmoscopic and biomicroscopic examinations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Treatment planning was performed using a CT simulator which enables real-time treatment planning from multiple CT slices. The clinical target volume included the macula and optic disc, which received a dose of 10 Gy/5 fractions/1 week (first 18 eyes) or 20 Gy/10 fractions

  20. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Rocket Engine Igniter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under a Phase 1 effort, IES successfully developed and demonstrated a spark ignition concept where propellant flow drives a very simple fluid mechanical oscillator...

  1. Distributed Engine Control Empirical/Analytical Verification Tools, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I project, Impact Technologies, in collaboration with Prof. R.K. Yedavalli, propose a novel verification environment for eventual rapid certification...

  2. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT III, MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM. TOPICS ARE (1) PURPOSE OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (2) TRACING THE FUEL FLOW, (3) MINOR COMPONENTS OF THE FUEL SYSTEM, (4) MAINTENANCE TIPS, (5) CONSTRUCTION AND FUNCTION OF THE FUEL INJECTORS, AND (6)…

  3. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-09-12

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography.

  4. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  5. Neighborhood crime and transit station access mode choice - phase III of neighborhood crime and travel behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report provides the findings from the third phase of a three-part study about the influences of neighborhood crimes on travel : mode choice. While previous phases found evidence that high levels of neighborhood crime discourage people from choos...

  6. Optimal dose selection accounting for patient subpopulations in a randomized Phase II trial to maximize the success probability of a subsequent Phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumihiro; Morita, Satoshi

    2018-02-08

    Phase II clinical trials are conducted to determine the optimal dose of the study drug for use in Phase III clinical trials while also balancing efficacy and safety. In conducting these trials, it may be important to consider subpopulations of patients grouped by background factors such as drug metabolism and kidney and liver function. Determining the optimal dose, as well as maximizing the effectiveness of the study drug by analyzing patient subpopulations, requires a complex decision-making process. In extreme cases, drug development has to be terminated due to inadequate efficacy or severe toxicity. Such a decision may be based on a particular subpopulation. We propose a Bayesian utility approach (BUART) to randomized Phase II clinical trials which uses a first-order bivariate normal dynamic linear model for efficacy and safety in order to determine the optimal dose and study population in a subsequent Phase III clinical trial. We carried out a simulation study under a wide range of clinical scenarios to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in comparison with a conventional method separately analyzing efficacy and safety in each patient population. The proposed method showed more favorable operating characteristics in determining the optimal population and dose.

  7. Pollution Reduction Technology Program, Turboprop Engines, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. D.; Herman, A. S.; Tomlinson, J. G.; Vaught, J. M.; Verdouw, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    Exhaust pollutant emissions were measured from a 501-D22A turboprop engine combustor and three low emission combustor types -- reverse flow, prechamber, and staged fuel, operating over a fuel-air ratio range of .0096 to .020. The EPAP LTO cycle data were obtained for a total of nineteen configurations. Hydrocarbon emissions were reduced from 15.0 to .3 lb/1000 Hp-Hr/cycle, CO from 31.5 to 4.6 lb/1000 Hp-Hr/cycle with an increase in NOx of 17 percent, which is still 25% below the program goal. The smoke number was reduced from 59 to 17. Emissions given here are for the reverse flow Mod. IV combustor which is the best candidate for further development into eventual use with the 501-D22A turboprop engine. Even lower emissions were obtained with the advanced technology combustors.

  8. Phase I Technical Report for the Engineering of Monosodium Titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NASH, CHARLES

    2004-01-01

    Monosodium titanate (MST) is an inorganic adsorbent that effectively removes strontium, plutonium, uranium, and other trace elements from alkaline salt supernate. Current plans use the MST in batch contact processes to treat Savannah River Site (SRS) waste solutions that require 90Sr and actinide removal to meet low level disposal criteria. More effective use of MST may be realized if the MST could be engineered into a form suitable for a continuous treatment process such as an adsorption column. The main benefits of column operation are (1) enhanced loading due to equilibration with feed adsorbate levels versus product levels, and (2) a small footprint relative to that of a batch contact tank. The current baseline MST material features particles of nominally 0.5-35 micron in size, which are much too fine for use in an adsorption column. An extensive review of the literature and consultation with technical experts identified candidate methods to produce engineered forms of MST. From this list a review team selected five candidate methods for further study. Laboratory syntheses at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and offsite produced representative samples for characterization and performance testing. Testing identified two suitable methods. The two methods include internal gelation, which is patented technology of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and internal hydrolysis, a method in which the MST is produced within a porous substrate. A commercial sodium titanate, SrTreat(R), produced by Fortum Engineering (Finland), demonstrated good performance as well although plutonium removal kinetics appeared much slower than observed for the other engineered MST materials

  9. Vehicle Systems Engineering and Integration Activities - Phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    payload, 10,300 lb gross vehicle weight. The Expanded Capacity Vehicle (ECV, 1993-present) has a 6.5 liter turbo diesel Bolt on armor required...installed by the maintenance unit. A proposed ECV2 (not currently in production) has an improved 6.5 liter turbo diesel engine, a new transmission...frame (3 piece welded), integral “A” armor with attachment points for “B” armor kit, increased cab space (14 cubic feet), enhanced 6500 turbo diesel

  10. Nuclear engineering career - Phase 2 Argentina. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the project was to consolidate and extend the conditions necessary for the development of nuclear technology, and to observe the problems posed by the application of the nuclear energy through the increase and improvement of the scientific and technical infrastructure. The immediate objective of the project was to complete the advancement of research and development activities in nuclear engineering at the Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro

  11. Mechanical Engineering and Design of the LHC Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Gentini, L; Mariani, N; Perret, R; Timmins, M A

    2010-01-01

    Phase II collimators will complement the existing system to improve the expected high RF impedance and limited efficiency of Phase I jaws. An international collaborative effort has been launched to identify novel advanced materials responding to the very challenging requirements of the new collimators. Complex numerical calculations simulating extreme conditions and experimental tests are in progress. In parallel, an innovative modular design concept of the jaw assembly is being developed to allow fitting in alternative materials, minimizing the thermally induced deformations, withstanding accidents and accepting high radiation doses. Phase II jaw assembly is made up of a molybdenum back-stiffener ensuring high geometrical stability and a modular jaw split in threes sectors. Each sector is equipped with a high-efficiency independent cooling circuit. Beam position monitors (BPM) are embedded in the jaws to fasten setup time and improve beam monitoring. An adjustment system will permit to fine-tune the jaw flat...

  12. Implementing Effective Mission Systems Engineering Practices During Early Project Formulation Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moton, Tryshanda

    2016-01-01

    Developing and implementing a plan for a NASA space mission can be a complicated process. The needs, goals, and objectives of any proposed mission or technology must be assessed early in the Project Life Cycle. The key to successful development of a space mission or flight project is the inclusion of systems engineering in early project formulation, namely during Pre-phase A, Phase A, and Phase B of the NASA Project Life Cycle. When a space mission or new technology is in pre-development, or "pre-Formulation", feasibility must be determined based on cost, schedule, and risk. Inclusion of system engineering during project formulation is key because in addition to assessing feasibility, design concepts are developed and alternatives to design concepts are evaluated. Lack of systems engineering involvement early in the project formulation can result in increased risks later in the implementation and operations phases of the project. One proven method for effective systems engineering practice during the pre-Formulation Phase is the use of a mission conceptual design or technology development laboratory, such as the Mission Design Lab (MDL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper will review the engineering process practiced routinely in the MDL for successful mission or project development during the pre-Formulation Phase.

  13. Combustion phasing for maximum efficiency for conventional and high efficiency engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, Jerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion phasing for max efficiency is a function of engine parameters. • Combustion phasing is most affected by heat transfer, compression ratio, burn duration. • Combustion phasing is less affected by speed, load, equivalence ratio and EGR. • Combustion phasing for a high efficiency engine was more advanced. • Exergy destruction during combustion as functions of combustion phasing is reported. - Abstract: The importance of the phasing of the combustion event for internal-combustion engines is well appreciated, but quantitative details are sparse. The objective of the current work was to examine the optimum combustion phasing (based on maximum bmep) as functions of engine design and operating variables. A thermodynamic, engine cycle simulation was used to complete this assessment. As metrics for the combustion phasing, both the crank angle for 50% fuel mass burned (CA 50 ) and the crank angle for peak pressure (CA pp ) are reported as functions of the engine variables. In contrast to common statements in the literature, the optimum CA 50 and CA pp vary depending on the design and operating variables. Optimum, as used in this paper, refers to the combustion timing that provides the maximum bmep and brake thermal efficiency (MBT timing). For this work, the variables with the greatest influence on the optimum CA 50 and CA pp were the heat transfer level, the burn duration and the compression ratio. Other variables such as equivalence ratio, EGR level, engine speed and engine load had a much smaller impact on the optimum CA 50 and CA pp . For the conventional engine, for the conditions examined, the optimum CA 50 varied between about 5 and 11°aTDC, and the optimum CA pp varied between about 9 and 16°aTDC. For a high efficiency engine (high dilution, high compression ratio), the optimum CA 50 was 2.5°aTDC, and the optimum CA pp was 7.8°aTDC. These more advanced values for the optimum CA 50 and CA pp for the high efficiency engine were

  14. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  15. Scientific and engineering aspects of the Active Phase Separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klipping, G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the Active Phase Separator (APS), which was initiated by the rather extreme demands for the GIRL (German Infrared Laboratory) mission, is reviewed. As a final result the APS model V is presented, which is suitable for space qualification and can be considered not only as a universal phase separator but also as a multifunctional component for space cooling systems, allowing a simplification of the valve plan. Besides discussing the scientific results obtained with annular flow channels and presentation of performance tests with the APS, the status of the actual IR telescopes IRAS, (Infra Red Astronomy Sattelite), GIRL, and ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) is summarized

  16. Phase II study of ipilimumab in adolescents with unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geoerger, Birgit; Bergeron, Christophe; Gore, Lia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma in adults; however, little information on the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in younger patients is available. METHODS: Patients aged 12 to <18 years with previously treated or untreated, unresectable stage III or IV mal...

  17. Phase I/II Pilot Study of Mixed Chimerism to Treat Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Hurler Syndrome (MPS I); Hurler-Scheie Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome (MPS II); Sanfilippo Syndrome (MPS III); Krabbe Disease (Globoid Leukodystrophy); Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and AMN); Sandhoff Disease; Tay Sachs Disease; Pelizaeus Merzbacher (PMD); Niemann-Pick Disease; Alpha-mannosidosis

  18. Phased Array Ultrasonic Evaluation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Nozzle Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Steve; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; Hopson, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the phased array ultrasonic evaluation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) nozzle weld. Details are given on the nondestructive testing evaluation approach, conventional shear wave and phased array techniques, and an x-ray versus phased array risk analysis. The field set-up was duplicated to the greatest extent possible in the laboratory and the phased array ultrasonic technique was developed and validated prior to weld evaluation. Results are shown for the phased array ultrasonic evaluation and conventional ultrasonic evaluation results.

  19. Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine Study. Phase A, extension 1: Advanced expander cycle engine optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The performance optimization of expander cycle engines at vacuum thrust levels of 10K, 15K, and 20K lb is discussed. The optimization is conducted for a maximum engine length with an extendible nozzle in the retracted position of 60 inches and an engine mixture ratio of 6.0:1. The thrust chamber geometry and cycle analyses are documented. In addition, the sensitivity of a recommended baseline expander cycle to component performance variations is determined and chilldown/start propellant consumptions are estimated.

  20. Enhanced Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in ice phase: Important role of dissolved organic matter from biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xiaoling [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.edu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210046 (China); Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gress, Julia; Harris, Willie [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong [Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031-3314 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) effectively reduced Cr(VI) and oxidized As(III). • Cr(VI) and As(III) could serve as a redox couple. • Cr(VI) and As(III) redox conversion was more effective in the ice phase than aqueous phase. • FTIR and ESR showed that biochar DOM served as both electron donor and acceptor. - Abstract: This study evaluated the impact of DOM from two biochars (sugar beet tailing and Brazilian pepper) on Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in both ice and aqueous phases with a soil DOM as control. Increasing DOM concentration from 3 to 300 mg C L{sup −1} enhanced Cr(VI) reduction from 20% to 100% and As(III) oxidation from 6.2% to 25%; however, Cr(VI) reduction decreased from 80–86% to negligible while As(III) oxidation increased from negligible to 18–19% with increasing pH from 2 to 10. Electron spin resonance study suggested semiquinone radicals in DOM were involved in As(III) oxidation while Fourier transform infrared analysis suggested that carboxylic groups in DOM participated in both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation. During Cr(VI) reduction, part of DOM (∼10%) was oxidized to CO{sub 2}. The enhanced conversion of Cr(VI) and As(III) in the ice phase was due to the freeze concentration effect with elevated concentrations of electron donors and electron acceptors in the grain boundary. Though DOM enhanced both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III)oxidation, Cr(VI) reduction coupled with As(III) oxidation occurred in absence of DOM. The role of DOM, Cr(VI) and/or As(III) in Cr and As transformation may provide new insights into their speciation and toxicity in cold regions.

  1. The engineering design evolution of IFMIF: From CDR to EDA phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Mario, E-mail: mario.perez@ifmif.org

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Brief description of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), its background and scope its Engineering Design and Validation Activities (EVEDA) phase. • Description and justification of the main design evolutions from previous phases; and in particular from the baseline described in the “Comprehensive Design Report” (CDR). - Abstract: The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), presently in its Engineering Design and Engineering Validation Activities (EVEDA) phase, started in 2007 under the framework of the Broader Approach (BA) Agreement between Japanese Government and EURATOM. The mandate assigned was to develop an integrated engineering design of IFMIF together with accompanying sub-projects to validate the major technological challenges that included the construction of either full scale prototypes or cleverly devised scaled down facilities, which are essential to reliably face the construction of IFMIF on schedule and cost. The Engineering Design Activities were accomplished on-schedule with the release of its “Intermediate Engineering Design Report (IIEDR)” in June 2013 compliant with our mandate. This paper highlights the design improvements implemented from the previous Conceptual Design Phase.

  2. Phasing-in Basel III capital and liquidity requirements in post-revolution Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monal Abdel-Baki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Basel Committee has introduced a new set of capital and liquidity requirements to be introduced by the global banking system during 2013 till January 2019. Egypt possesses a well-capitalised banking sector, yet it has been exposed to the devastating shock imposed by its popular revolution. Using the GMM method, the impact of introducing the new capital and liquidity requirements on the macroeconomic performance of the Egyptian economy is examined. The results reveal that Egyptian banks are motivated to enhance capital and liquidity ratios in the case of realizing high profits and favourable conditions at the individual banking level. On the other hand, negative macroeconomic performance and a poor business environment substantially deter the preparedness of Egyptian banks to meet the Basel III requirements. The analysis is timely given the need for compliance with Basel III as one of the requirements to raise the credit rating of the devastated economy.

  3. Baseline job satisfaction and stress among pharmacists and pharmacy technicians participating in the Fleetwood Phase III Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapane, Kate L; Hughes, Carmel M

    2004-11-01

    To provide baseline levels of job satisfaction and stress among members of the long-term care pharmacy team participating in the Fleetwood Phase III evaluation. Cross-sectional design; long-term care pharmacy provider in North Carolina (the implementation site of the large-scale Fleetwood Phase III study). All current pharmacy employees as of May/June 2002. None. Health Professional Stress Inventory and job satisfaction. Ninety-four percent (16/17) of consultant pharmacists were satisfied with their job, with 89% reporting they would definitely choose to be a pharmacist again. Seventy-five percent both of dispensing pharmacists and pharmacy technicians reported overall job satisfaction. Forty-one reported that they would not choose to be a pharmacist (pharmacy technician) again. The most frequently reported sources of stress among the dispensing pharmacists and pharmacy technicians were conflicts with non-work obligations (i.e., family, personal life) and the ability to perform duties with short staffing. In addition, inadequate pay and few opportunities for job advancement were often/frequent sources of stress among pharmacy technicians. More than one third of dispensing pharmacists also reported stress frequently because of fears of mistakes in patient treatment. Overall, consultants are very satisfied with their positions, although dispensing pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are less satisfied with their work. The reasons may be because of the different nature of each job, as well as staffing shortages. The extent to which the Fleetwood Model can improve job satisfaction and impact on stress will be evaluated once we resurvey the pharmacy team after the intervention period of the Fleetwood Phase III study.

  4. Evaluation of DCS III Transmission Alternatives. Phase 1A report. Appendix B. Regulatory Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-26

    Resolution DK). B.1.1.5 Importance of the RR in the DCS III Study. The ITU Radio Regulation offers a means to appraise viability of the alternatives to be...interference 466-1 483 Measurement of performance by means of signal 482 Measurement of noise in actual traffic 481 Table B.l-6. Communication Satellite...Economic and technical aspects of the choice of transmission systems GAS 5 Economic conditions and tel ecommunication development GAS 6 Economic and

  5. Designing Preclinical Instruction for Psychomotor Skills (III)--Instructional Engineering: Design Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Pamela J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In the third of a series of articles on teaching psychomotor skills in dental education, the design of instructional materials is discussed. Steps include identifying appropriate teaching strategies for the tasks; organizing and sequencing subskills; identifying and collecting common errors; and drafting learning exercises for each subskill. (MSE)

  6. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. III. Oxygen diffusion in oxide and alpha Zircaloy phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, R.E.

    1976-10-01

    The reaction of Zircaloy in steam at elevated temperature involves the growth of discrete layers of oxide and oxygen-rich alpha Zircaloy from the parent beta phase. The multiphase, moving boundary diffusion problem involved is encountered in a number of important reaction schemes in addition to that of Zircaloy-oxygen and can be completely (albeitly ideally) characterized through an appropriate model in terms of oxygen diffusion coefficients and equilibrium concentrations for the various phases. Conversely, kinetic data for phase growth and total oxygen consumption rates can be used to compute diffusion coefficients. Equations are developed that express the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide and alpha phases in terms of the reaction rate constants and equilibrium solubility values. These equations were applied to recent experimental kinetic data on the steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 to determine the effective oxygen diffusion coefficients in these phases over the temperature range 1000--1500 0 C

  7. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial: A TITE-CRM Phase I/II Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle M; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Lao, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Sodium-NaK engineering handbook. Volume III. Sodium systems, safety, handling, and instrumentation. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, O J [ed.

    1978-01-01

    The handbook is intended for use by present and future designers in the Liquid Metals Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Program and by the engineering and scientific community performing other type investigation and exprimentation requiring high-temperature sodium and NaK technology. The arrangement of subject matter progresses from a technological discussion of sodium and sodium--potassium alloy (NaK) to discussions of varius categories and uses of hardware in sodium and NaK systems. Emphasis is placed on sodium and NaK as heat-transport media. Sufficient detail is included for basic understanding of sodium and NaK technology and of technical aspects of sodium and NaK components and instrument systems. Information presented is considered adequate for use in feasibility studies and conceptual design, sizing components and systems, developing preliminary component and system descriptions, identifying technological limitations and problem areas, and defining basic constraints and parameters.

  9. Continuous-Scan Phased Array Measurement Methods for Turbofan Engine Acoustic Testing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To allow aviation growth to continue in the face of increasingly stringent noise pollution standards, new aircraft engines must be designed with noise performance as...

  10. Automotive Stirling engine Market and Industrial Readiness Program (MIRP), phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    A program, begun in 1978, has the goal of transferring Stirling engine technology from United Stirling of Sweden to the US and, then, following design, fabrication, and prototype testing, to secure US manufacturers for the engine. The ultimate objective is the large-scale commercial use of the Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) by the year 2000. The fist phase of the Market and Industrial Readiness Program for the ASE was concerned with defining the market, product, economic and technical factors necessary to be addressed to assure a reasonable chance of ultimate commercial acceptance. Program results for this first phase are reported and discussed. These results pertain to licensing strategy development, economic analysis, market factors, product planning, market growth, cost studies, and engine performance as measured by fuel economy using conventional fuels and by vehicle speed and acceleration characteristics.

  11. Quality assurance and quality control of nuclear engineering during construction phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhihua; Deng Yue; Liu Yaoguang; Xu Xianqi; Zhou Shan; Qian Dazhi; Zhang Yang

    2007-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) is a very important work in the nuclear engineering. This paper starts with how to establish quality assurance system of nuclear engineering construction phase, then introduces several experiments and techniques such as the implementation of quality assurance program, the quality assurance and quality control of contractors, the quality surveillance and control of supervisory companies, quality assurance audit and surveillance of builders. (authors)

  12. Research prototype of remote controlled engineering vehicle system for CBRN threat. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Keisuke; Naruse, Masahiro; Shigematsu, Kosuke; Morishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    This research was triggered by the nuclear accident that successively happened after the Great East Japan Earthquake. The project focuses on the Remote Controlled Engineering Vehicle System that can be used for multi purposes such as debris/obstacle clearing operation, various reconnaissance operation, under CBRN threat. In this report, we describe research prototype of remote controlled engineering vehicle system for CBRN threat (phase 2). (author)

  13. Caltrans WeatherShare Phase II System: An Application of Systems and Software Engineering Process to Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-25

    In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has developed the WeatherShare Phase II system by applying Systems Engineering and Software Engineering processes. The system...

  14. Chromospheric oscillations observed with OSO 8. III. Average phase spectra for Si II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, O.R.; Athay, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Time series of intensity and Doppler-shift fluctuations in the Si II emission lines lambda816.93 and lambda817.45 are Fourier analyzed to determine the frequency variation of phase differences between intensity and velocity and between these two lines formed 300 km apart in the middle chromosphere. Average phase spectra show that oscillations between 2 and 9 mHz in the two lines have time delays from 35 to 40 s, which is consistent with the upward propagation of sound wave at 8.6-7.5 km s -1 . In this same frequency band near 3 mHz, maximum brightness leads maximum blueshift by 60 0 . At frequencies above 11 mHz where the power spectrum is flat, the phase differences are uncertain, but approximately 65% of the cases indicate upward propagation. At these higher frequencies, the phase lead between intensity and blue Doppler shift ranges from 0 0 to 180 0 with an average value of 90 0 . However, the phase estimates in this upper band are corrupted by both aliasing and randomness inherent to the measured signals. Phase differences in the two narrow spectral features seen at 10.5 and 27 mHz in the power spectra are shown to be consistent with properties expected for aliases of the wheel rotation rate of the spacecraft wheel section

  15. Challenges in the flow measurement engineering study phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, Liv Marit; Monnet, Jean

    2005-07-01

    Offshore development of marginal Oil and Gas fields can often be economically profitable if they can be tied in to existing platforms. This usually requires execution of comprehensive feasibility studies, which can often be a long and costly process. Close cooperation in a multi discipline engineering team is necessary to assure that all possibilities and aspects of the design task have been evaluated. Integration of a new flow measurement module on an existing installation is often the simplest solution, yielding low total cost as the module can be assembled and fully tested on shore. However on many installations one is required to integrate the new equipment in existing modules. Flow measurement is a crucial element in the development of marginal fields which has to be evaluated, taking into consideration all critical aspects such as: available space, weight, location accessibility, maintenance and integration to existing metering systems. In particular, special attention should be given to the possible use of new flow measurement technologies and principles. (author) (tk)

  16. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III) - Part 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Zirui; Li, Meng; Xin, Jinyuan; Tao, Zhining; Li, Jiawei; Kang, Jeong-Eon; Huang, Kan; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Ge, Baozhu; Wu, Qizhong; Cheng, Yafang; Wang, Yuesi; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Fu, Joshua S.; Wang, Tijian; Chin, Mian; Woo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2018-04-01

    Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China) and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5) for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean) can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs) from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity). These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemical

  17. Coping with missing data in phase III pivotal registration trials: Tolvaptan in subjects with kidney disease, a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, John; Carroll, Kevin J; Koch, Gary; Li, Junfang

    2017-07-01

    Missing data cause challenging issues, particularly in phase III registration trials, as highlighted by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US National Research Council. We explore, as a case study, how the issues from missing data were tackled in a double-blind phase III trial in subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A total of 1445 subjects were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive active treatment (tolvaptan), or placebo. The primary outcome, the rate of change in total kidney volume, favored tolvaptan (P outline the analyses undertaken to address the issue of missing data thoroughly. "Tipping point analyses" were performed to explore how extreme and detrimental outcomes among subjects with missing data must be to overturn the positive treatment effect attained in those subjects who had complete data. Nonparametric rank-based analyses were also performed accounting for missing data. In conclusion, straightforward and transparent analyses directly taking into account missing data convincingly support the robustness of the preplanned analyses on the primary and secondary endpoints. Tolvaptan was confirmed to be effective in slowing total kidney volume growth, which is considered an efficacy endpoint by EMA, and in lessening the decline in renal function in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Predicting hypothetical willingness to participate (WTP) in a future phase III HIV vaccine trial among high-risk adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocos, Georgina; Kagee, Ashraf; Swartz, Leslie

    2008-11-01

    The present study sought to determine whether the Theory of Planned Behaviour predicted stated hypothetical willingness to participate (WTP) in future Phase III HIV vaccine trials among South African adolescents. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses showed that The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) significantly predicted WTP. Of all the predictors, Subjective norms significantly predicted WTP (OR = 1.19, 95% C.I. = 1.06-1.34). A stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that Subjective Norms (OR = 1.19, 95% C.I. = 1.07-1.34) and Attitude towards participation in an HIV vaccine trial (OR = 1.32, 95% C.I. = 1.00-1.74) were significant predictors of WTP. The addition of Knowledge of HIV vaccines and HIV vaccine trials, Perceived self-risk of HIV infection, Health-promoting behaviours and Attitudes towards HIV/AIDS yielded non-significant results. These findings provide support for the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and suggest that psychosocial factors may play an important role in WTP in Phase III HIV vaccine trials among adolescents.

  19. Phase III trial of high- vs. low-dose-rate interstitial radiotherapy for early mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Shigetoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Teshima, Teruki; Furukawa, Souhei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Early mobile tongue cancer can be controlled with interstitial radiotherapy (ISRT). We carried out a Phase III trial to compare the treatment results of low-dose-rate (Ld) ISRT and high-dose-rate (HDR) ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 1992 through October 1996, 59 patients with cancer of the early mobile tongue were registered in this Phase III study. Eight patients were excluded from the evaluation because of violations of the requirements for this study. Of 51 eligible patients, 26 patients were treated with LDR-ISRT (70 Gy/4-9 days) and 25 patients with HDR-ISRT (60 Gy/10 fractions/1 week). For the hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT, the time interval between 2 fractions was more than 6 h. Results: Five-year local control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 84% and 87% respectively. Nodal metastasis occurred in 6 patients in each group. Five-year nodal control rates of the LDR and HDR groups were 77% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT for early mobile tongue cancer has the same local control compared with continuous LDR-ISRT. Hyperfractionated HDR-ISRT is an alternative treatment for continuous LDR-ISRT

  20. Novel solid phase extraction procedure for gold(III) on Dowex M 4195 prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Saygi, Kadriye O.; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    A method for solid phase extraction (SPE) of gold(III) using Dowex M 4195 chelating resin has been developed. The optimum experimental conditions for the quantitative sorption of gold(III), pH, effect of flow rates, eluent types, sorption capacity and the effect of diverse ions on the sorption of gold(III) have been investigated. The chelating resin can be reused for more than 100 cycles of sorption-desorption without any significant change in sorption of gold(III) ions. The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit (LOD) of gold were greater than 95% and 1.61 μg L -1 , respectively. The preconcentration factor was 31. The relative standard deviation of the method was -1 . The proposed method has been applied for the determination of gold(III) in some real samples including water, soil and sediment samples

  1. First-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal aluminides. III. Extension to ternary phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widom, Mike; Al-Lehyani, Ibrahim; Moriarty, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Modeling structural and mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds and alloys requires detailed knowledge of their interatomic interactions. The first two papers of this series [Phys. Rev. B 56, 7905 (1997); 58, 8967 (1998)] derived first-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal (TM) aluminides using generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT). Those papers focused on binary alloys of aluminum with first-row transition metals and assessed the ability of GPT potentials to reproduce and elucidate the alloy phase diagrams of Al-Co and Al-Ni. This paper addresses the phase diagrams of the binary alloy Al-Cu and the ternary systems Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni, using GPT pair potentials calculated in the limit of vanishing transition-metal concentration. Despite this highly simplifying approximation, we find rough agreement with the known low-temperature phase diagrams, up to 50% total TM concentration provided the Co fraction is below 25%. Full composition-dependent potentials and many-body interactions would be required to correct deficiencies at higher Co concentration. Outside this troublesome region, the experimentally determined stable and metastable phases all lie on or near the convex hull of a scatter plot of energy versus composition. We verify, qualitatively, reported solubility ranges extending binary alloys into the ternary diagram in both Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni. Finally, we reproduce previously conjectured transition-metal positions in the decagonal quasicrystal phase. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  2. First-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal aluminides. III. Extension to ternary phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Mike; Al-Lehyani, Ibrahim; Moriarty, John A.

    2000-08-01

    Modeling structural and mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds and alloys requires detailed knowledge of their interatomic interactions. The first two papers of this series [Phys. Rev. B 56, 7905 (1997); 58, 8967 (1998)] derived first-principles interatomic potentials for transition-metal (TM) aluminides using generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT). Those papers focused on binary alloys of aluminum with first-row transition metals and assessed the ability of GPT potentials to reproduce and elucidate the alloy phase diagrams of Al-Co and Al-Ni. This paper addresses the phase diagrams of the binary alloy Al-Cu and the ternary systems Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni, using GPT pair potentials calculated in the limit of vanishing transition-metal concentration. Despite this highly simplifying approximation, we find rough agreement with the known low-temperature phase diagrams, up to 50% total TM concentration provided the Co fraction is below 25%. Full composition-dependent potentials and many-body interactions would be required to correct deficiencies at higher Co concentration. Outside this troublesome region, the experimentally determined stable and metastable phases all lie on or near the convex hull of a scatter plot of energy versus composition. We verify, qualitatively, reported solubility ranges extending binary alloys into the ternary diagram in both Al-Co-Cu and Al-Co-Ni. Finally, we reproduce previously conjectured transition-metal positions in the decagonal quasicrystal phase.

  3. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meijde Jolanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1 and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1. Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2, formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1, or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8. Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b increased cholesterol secretion, c increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance

  4. Personal view of educating two-phase flow and human resource development as a nuclear engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    2010-01-01

    As an engineer who has devoted himself in the nuclear industry for almost three decades, the author gave a personal view on educating two-phase flow and developing human resources. An expected role of universities in on-going discussions of collaboration among industry-government-academia is introduced. Reformation of two-phase flow education is discussed from two extreme viewpoints, the basic structure of physics and the practical system analysis. (author)

  5. Free-piston Stirling engine conceptual design and technologies for space power, Phase 1. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penswick, L.B.; Beale, W.T.; Wood, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the SP-100 program, a phase 1 effort to design a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) for a space dynamic power conversion system was completed. SP-100 is a combined DOD/DOE/NASA program to develop nuclear power for space. This work was completed in the initial phases of the SP-100 program prior to the power conversion concept selection for the Ground Engineering System (GES). Stirling engine technology development as a growth option for SP-100 is continuing after this phase 1 effort. Following a review of various engine concepts, a single-cylinder engine with a linear alternator was selected for the remainder of the study. The relationships of specific mass and efficiency versus temperature ratio were determined for a power output of 25 kWe. This parametric study was done for a temperature ratio range of 1.5 to 2.0 and for hot-end temperatures of 875 K and 1075 K. A conceptual design of a 1080 K FPSE with a linear alternator producing 25 kWe output was completed. This was a single-cylinder engine designed for a 62,000 hour life and a temperature ratio of 2.0. The heat transport systems were pumped liquid-metal loops on both the hot and cold ends. These specifications were selected to match the SP-100 power system designs that were being evaluated at that time. The hot end of the engine used both refractory and superalloy materials; the hot-end pressure vessel featured an insulated design that allowed use of the superalloy material. The design was supported by the hardware demonstration of two of the component concepts - the hydrodynamic gas bearing for the displacer and the dynamic balance system. The hydrodynamic gas bearing was demonstrated on a test rig. The dynamic balance system was tested on the 1 kW RE-1000 engine at NASA Lewis

  6. Free-piston Stirling engine conceptual design and technologies for space power, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penswick, L. Barry; Beale, William T.; Wood, J. Gary

    1990-01-01

    As part of the SP-100 program, a phase 1 effort to design a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) for a space dynamic power conversion system was completed. SP-100 is a combined DOD/DOE/NASA program to develop nuclear power for space. This work was completed in the initial phases of the SP-100 program prior to the power conversion concept selection for the Ground Engineering System (GES). Stirling engine technology development as a growth option for SP-100 is continuing after this phase 1 effort. Following a review of various engine concepts, a single-cylinder engine with a linear alternator was selected for the remainder of the study. The relationships of specific mass and efficiency versus temperature ratio were determined for a power output of 25 kWe. This parametric study was done for a temperature ratio range of 1.5 to 2.0 and for hot-end temperatures of 875 K and 1075 K. A conceptual design of a 1080 K FPSE with a linear alternator producing 25 kWe output was completed. This was a single-cylinder engine designed for a 62,000 hour life and a temperature ratio of 2.0. The heat transport systems were pumped liquid-metal loops on both the hot and cold ends. These specifications were selected to match the SP-100 power system designs that were being evaluated at that time. The hot end of the engine used both refractory and superalloy materials; the hot-end pressure vessel featured an insulated design that allowed use of the superalloy material. The design was supported by the hardware demonstration of two of the component concepts - the hydrodynamic gas bearing for the displacer and the dynamic balance system. The hydrodynamic gas bearing was demonstrated on a test rig. The dynamic balance system was tested on the 1 kW RE-1000 engine at NASA Lewis.

  7. Solid phase extraction of Am(III) and Cm(III) from acidic feeds using tetraethyl diglycolamide (TEDGA) in ionic liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gujar, R.B.; Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Leoncini, Andrea; Verboom, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Solvent extraction of Am(III) and Cm(III) with several diglycolamide ligands in an ionic liquid, [C4mim][Tf2N] was investigated from nitric acid medium. Based on the encouraging extraction behaviour with N,N,N′,N′-tetraethyldiglycolamide (TEDGA), extraction chromatographic studies were carried out

  8. Phase engineering of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide through coupled electron doping and lattice deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqiang; Song, Jun; Guo, Yinsheng; Mi, Zetian

    2015-01-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the phase stability and transition within four monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) systems, i.e., MX 2 (M = Mo or W and X = S or Se) under coupled electron doping and lattice deformation. With the lattice distortion and electron doping density treated as state variables, the energy surfaces of different phases were computed, and the diagrams of energetically preferred phases were constructed. These diagrams assess the competition between different phases and predict conditions of phase transitions for the TMDs considered. The interplay between lattice deformation and electron doping was identified as originating from the deformation induced band shifting and band bending. Based on our findings, a potential design strategy combining an efficient electrolytic gating and a lattice straining to achieve controllable phase engineering in TMD monolayers was demonstrated

  9. Phase I/II trial of concurrent use of S-1 and radiation therapy for T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Meijin; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okamoto, Makito; Niibe, Yuzuru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2010-01-01

    A Phase I/II study of S-1 combined radiation therapy was conducted in patients with Stage II (T2N0) glottic cancer. The purpose of the Phase I study was to identify the maximum tolerated dose, the recommended dose and the dose limiting toxicity. The objectives in the phase II study were to estimate the local control and the overall survival, and the incidence of adverse events. In Phase I, S-1 was administered orally in a split-course fashion as two doses of 40 mg/m 2 , for a total daily dose of 80 mg/m 2 . The course involved a 2-week rest after a 2-week administration (Level 1) and a 1-week rest after a 3-week administration (Level 2). Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily (total 60-Gy) standard fractionation. Seven patients were enrolled in the Phase I, and 19 in the Phase II study. Mucositis was the most common toxicity encountered. All 26 patients completed radiation therapy without delay. The overall response rate was 100% (26/26) with all patients showing a complete response. One patient developed a local recurrence 28 months after the treatment. The 3-year local control and overall survival rates were 94.7 and 85.4%, respectively (limited to 22 patients from Level 2). The use of S-1 at 80 mg/m 2 per day in a split-course with 1-week rest during the course of radiation therapy was safe and effective for Stage II glottic cancer. The treatment strategy employing orally available S-1 proved to be beneficial over the conventional injection of antitumor agents for maintaining the patients' quality of life. (author)

  10. Mutagenicity of diesel engine exhaust is eliminated in the gas phase by an oxidation catalyst but only slightly reduced in the particle phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Götz A; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2012-06-05

    Concerns about adverse health effects of diesel engine emissions prompted strong efforts to minimize this hazard, including exhaust treatment by diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). The effectiveness of such measures is usually assessed by the analysis of the legally regulated exhaust components. In recent years additional analytical and toxicological tests were included in the test panel with the aim to fill possible analytical gaps, for example, mutagenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated derivatives (nPAH). This investigation focuses on the effect of a DOC on health hazards from combustion of four different fuels: rapeseed methyl ester (RME), common mineral diesel fuel (DF), SHELL V-Power Diesel (V-Power), and ARAL Ultimate Diesel containing 5% RME (B5ULT). We applied the European Stationary Cycle (ESC) to a 6.4 L turbo-charged heavy load engine fulfilling the EURO III standard. The engine was operated with and without DOC. Besides regulated emissions we measured particle size and number distributions, determined the soluble and solid fractions of the particles and characterized the bacterial mutagenicity in the gas phase and the particles of the exhaust. The effectiveness of the DOC differed strongly in regard to the different exhaust constituents: Total hydrocarbons were reduced up to 90% and carbon monoxide up to 98%, whereas nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) remained almost unaffected. Total particle mass (TPM) was reduced by 50% with DOC in common petrol diesel fuel and by 30% in the other fuels. This effect was mainly due to a reduction of the soluble organic particle fraction. The DOC caused an increase of the water-soluble fraction in the exhaust of RME, V-Power, and B5ULT, as well as a pronounced increase of nitrate in all exhausts. A high proportion of ultrafine particles (10-30 nm) in RME exhaust could be ascribed to vaporizable particles. Mutagenicity of the exhaust was low compared to previous investigations. The DOC reduced

  11. The development of two-phase flow instrumentation at PNC O-arai Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, T.; Kobori, T.; Hayamizu, Y.

    1975-10-01

    This paper reviews development works on the two-phase flow instrumentation carried out at PNC Oarai Engineering Center for FUGEN safety test. The paper describes heater surface temperature measurement, four types of void meters and two steam quality meters. (auth.)

  12. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter IX: engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiromasa; Seki, Masahiro; Sawada, Yoshio

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to Chapter IX of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made for systems engineering, magnet systems, torus systems, and NBI heating systems. R and D programme and impact on INTOR design are also specified. In addition to the data base assessment, studies have been made for several new tasks. (author)

  13. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 Glossary Version 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This document contains the glossary of terms used for the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project. This version was created for Iteration E3. The IDC applies automatic processing methods in order to produce, archive, and distribute standard IDC products on behalf of all States Parties.

  14. Single Phase Passive Rectification Versus Active Rectification Applied to High Power Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Walter; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    Stirling engine converters are being considered as potential candidates for high power energy conversion systems required by future NASA explorations missions. These types of engines typically contain two major moving parts, the displacer and the piston, in which a linear alternator is attached to the piston to produce a single phase sinusoidal waveform at a specific electric frequency. Since all Stirling engines perform at low electrical frequencies (less or equal to 100 Hz), space explorations missions that will employ these engines will be required to use DC power management and distribution (PMAD) system instead of an AC PMAD system to save on space and weight. Therefore, to supply such DC power an AC to DC converter is connected to the Stirling engine. There are two types of AC to DC converters that can be employed, a passive full bridge diode rectifier and an active switching full bridge rectifier. Due to the inherent line inductance of the Stirling Engine-Linear Alternator (SE-LA), their sinusoidal voltage and current will be phase shifted producing a power factor below 1. In order to keep power the factor close to unity, both AC to DC converters topologies will implement power factor correction. This paper discusses these power factor correction methods as well as their impact on overall mass for exploration applications. Simulation results on both AC to DC converters topologies with power factor correction as a function of output power and SE-LA line inductance impedance are presented and compared.

  15. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Ronald D. [Prairie View A& M Univ., TX (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  16. Photoluminescence Polarization Anisotropy in a Single Heterostructured III-V Nanowire with Mixed Crystal Phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, A. F.; Hoang, T. B.; Ahtapodov, L.; Dheeraj, D. L.; Fimland, B. O.; Weman, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature (10 K) micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) of single GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires with single GaAsSb inserts were measured. The PL emission from the zinc blende GaAsSb insert is strongly polarized along the nanowire axis while the PL emission from the wurtzite GaAs nanowire is perpendiculary polarized to the nanowire axis. The result indicates that the crystal phase, through the optical selection rules, has significant effect on the polarization of the PL from NWs besides the dielectric mismatch. The analysis of the PL results based on the electronic structure of these nanowires supports the correlation between the crystal phase and the PL emission.

  17. Hysteroscopic Essure Inserts for Permanent Contraception: Extended Follow-Up Results of a Phase III Multicenter International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnoff, Scott G; Nichols, John E; Levie, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To describe safety, tolerability, and effectiveness results through 5 years of follow-up of a Phase III trial with Essure inserts. Multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm international study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Thirteen clinical study centers in the United States, Europe, and Australia. A total of 518 previously fertile women seeking permanent contraception. The objective of the hysteroscopic sterilization procedure was bilateral Essure insert placement (ESS205 model) and tubal occlusion. Women with satisfactory device location and tube occlusion (based on modified hysterosalpingography [HSG]) were instructed to discontinue alternative contraception and to rely on Essure inserts for permanent contraception. The primary endpoint for the Phase III study was the rate of pregnancies occurring during the first year of relying (i.e., HSG-confirmed occlusion) on the Essure inserts for permanent contraception (i.e., 12 months after HSG). For the full 5 years of follow-up (5 years total of relying on the Essure inserts for contraception), the endpoints of interest were safety, prevention of pregnancy, and satisfaction. No pregnancies were reported among women relying on the Essure inserts who completed the full 5 years of follow-up. As of December 5, 2007, 449 women with successful bilateral placement relying on the Essure inserts contributed a total 24 942 woman-months of follow-up for assessing effectiveness. Overall, the Essure inserts were generally well tolerated, with participant comfort rated as "good" to "excellent" by 99% of women (382 of 385) after 5 years of use. Similarly, overall satisfaction was rated as "somewhat" to "very satisfied" by 98% of women (376 of 384) after 5 years of use. The majority of adverse events reported during the 5 years of follow-up were rated as either "mild" or "moderate" in severity. Three severe events (abdominal pain with very heavy periods and irregular menstrual bleeding) were reported in 2 subjects during

  18. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  19. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  20. Experimental study on heat storage system using phase-change material in a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Shon, Jungwook; Lee, Kihyung

    2017-01-01

    Engines usually use only about 25% of the total fuel energy for power, and the rest is discarded to the cooling water and exhaust gas. Therefore, a technique for utilizing external waste heat is required to improve fuel efficiency in terms of total energy consumption. In this study, a heat storage system was built using a phase-change material in order to recover about 30% of the thermal energy wasted through engine cooling. The components of the heat storage system were divided into phase-change material, a heat exchanger, and a heat-insulating container. For each component, a phase-change material that is suitable for use in vehicles was selected based on the safety, thermal properties, and durability. As a result, a stearic acid of a fatty acid series with natural extracts was determined to be appropriate. In order to measure the reduction in engine fuel consumption, a thermal storage system designed for the actual engine was applied to realize a quick warm-up by releasing stored heat energy directly on the coolant during a cold start. This technique added about 95 calories of heat storage device warm-up time compared to the non-added state, which was reduced by about 18.1% to about 27.1%. - Highlights: • The diesel engine used phase-change material with heat storage system. • The thermal storage system designed for the actual engine. • A stearic acid of a fatty acid series was determined to be appropriate. • Applied heat storage system was reduced by about 18.1%–27.1%.

  1. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  2. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  3. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin S., E-mail: zhang72@illinois.edu; Bass, Jay D. [Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shieh, Sean R. [Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Dera, Przemyslaw [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Prakapenka, Vitali [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0} = 3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0} = 1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0} = 7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0} = 2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.23(3) GPa{sup −1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.10(1) GPa{sup −1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  4. Two-phase flow in the cooling circuit of a cryogenic rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preclik, D.

    1992-07-01

    Transient two-phase flow was investigated for the hydrogen cooling circuit of the HM7 rocket engine. The nuclear reactor code ATHLET/THESEUS was adapted to cryogenics and applied to both principal and prototype experiments for validation and simulation purposes. The cooling circuit two-phase flow simulation focused on the hydrogen prechilling and pump transient phase prior to ignition. Both a single- and a multichannel model were designed and employed for a valve leakage flow, a nominal prechilling flow, and a prechilling with a subsequent pump-transient flow. The latter case was performed in order to evaluate the difference between a nominal and a delayed turbo-pump start-up. It was found that an extension of the nominal prechilling sequence in the order of 1 second is sufficient to finally provide for liquid injection conditions of hydrogen which, as commonly known, is undesirable for smooth ignition and engine starting transients.

  5. Liquid-liquid extraction of ruthenium(III) thiocyanate with hexamethylphosphoramide: direct spectrophotometric determination in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, B.K.; Pal, B.K.; Chowdhury, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ru(III) thiocyanate has been extracted with hexamethylphosphoramide(HMPA) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Thus the extractability, sensitivity and selectivity are improved over the simple binary Ru(III) thiocyanate system in spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the organic phase. The maximum colour develops on the steam bath, at the acidity range of 1.5 - 2.5 M with HCl and ammonium thiocyanate concentration range of 0.25 - O.5 M. The colour is completely extractable in MIBK when 1.5 - 3.0 ml HMPA is used and show maximum absorbance at 570 nm. The colour system obeys Beer's law for 0.7 - 13 μg Ru/ml and the optimum concentration range is 2 - 13 μg/ml. The molar absorptivity and sensitivity are 6940 l . mole -1 cm -1 and 0.0145 μg/cm 2 respectively. The percent relative error is 2.72%. The method is very simple and does not require oxidation and subsequent distillation. The method can be applied in the presence of osmium. (Author)

  6. BEMUSE Phase III Report - Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the LOFT L2-5 Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, P.; Crecy, A. de; Glaeser, H.; Skorek, T.; Joucla, J.; Probst, P.; Chung, B.; Oh, D.Y.; Kyncl, M.; Pernica, R.; Macek, J.; Meca, R.; Macian, R.; D'Auria, F.; Petruzzi, A.; Perez, M.; Reventos, F.; Fujioka, K.

    2007-02-01

    This report summarises the various contributions (ten participants) for phase 3 of BEMUSE: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of the LOFT L2-5 experiment, a Large-Break Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LB-LOCA). For this phase, precise requirements step by step were provided to the participants. Four main parts are defined, which are: 1. List and uncertainties of the input uncertain parameters. 2. Uncertainty analysis results. 3. Sensitivity analysis results. 4. Improved methods, assessment of the methods (optional). 5% and 95% percentiles have to be estimated for 6 output parameters, which are of two kinds: 1. Scalar output parameters (First Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT), Second Peak Cladding Temperature, Time of accumulator injection, Time of complete quenching); 2. Time trends output parameters (Maximum cladding temperature, Upper plenum pressure). The main lessons learnt from phase 3 of the BEMUSE programme are the following: - for uncertainty analysis, all the participants use a probabilistic method associated with the use of Wilks' formula, except for UNIPI with its CIAU method (Code with the Capability of Internal Assessment of Uncertainty). Use of both methods has been successfully mastered. - Compared with the experiment, the results of uncertainty analysis are good on the whole. For example, for the cladding temperature-type output parameters (1. PCT, 2. PCT, time of complete quenching, maximum cladding temperature), 8 participants out of 10 find upper and lower bounds which envelop the experimental data. - Sensitivity analysis has been successfully performed by all the participants using the probabilistic method. All the used influence measures include the range of variation of the input parameters. Synthesis tables of the most influential phenomena and parameters have been plotted and participants will be able to use them for the continuation of the BEMUSE programme

  7. Application of the level set method for multi-phase flow computation in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, X-Y.; Ni, M-J.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of multi-phase flow is essential to evaluate the feasibility of a liquid protection scheme for the power plant chamber. The level set method is one of the best methods for computing and analyzing the motion of interface among the multi-phase flow. This paper presents a general formula for the second-order projection method combined with the level set method to simulate unsteady incompressible multi-phase flow with/out phase change flow encountered in fusion science and engineering. The third-order ENO scheme and second-order semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson scheme is used to update the convective and diffusion term. The numerical results show this method can handle the complex deformation of the interface and the effect of liquid-vapor phase change will be included in the future work

  8. Oxidation of Cr(III)-Fe(III) Mixed-phase Hydroxides by Chlorine: Implications on the Control of Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebeir, Michelle; Liu, Haizhou

    2018-05-17

    The occurrence of chromium (Cr) as an inorganic contaminant in drinking water is widely reported. One source of Cr is its accumulation in iron-containing corrosion scales of drinking water distribution systems as Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide, i.e., FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s), where x represents the Fe(III) molar content and typically varies between 0.25 and 0.75. This study investigated the kinetics of inadvertent hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) formation via the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine as a residual disinfectant in drinking water, and examined the impacts of Fe(III) content and drinking water chemical parameters including pH, bromide and bicarbonate on the rate of Cr(VI) formation. Data showed that an increase in Fe(III) molar content resulted in a significant decrease in the stoichiometric Cr(VI) yield and the rate of Cr(VI) formation, mainly due to chlorine decay induced by Fe(III) surface sites. An increase in bicarbonate enhanced the rate of Cr(VI) formation, likely due to the formation of Fe(III)-carbonato surface complexes that slowed down the scavenging reaction with chlorine. The presence of bromide significantly accelerated the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine, resulting from the catalytic effect of bromide acting as an electron shuttle. A higher solution pH between 6 and 8.5 slowed down the oxidation of Cr(III) by chlorine. These findings suggested that the oxidative conversion of chromium-containing iron corrosion products in drinking water distribution systems can lead to the occurrence of Cr(VI) at the tap, and the abundance of iron, and a careful control of pH, bicarbonate and bromide levels can assist the control of Cr(VI) formation.

  9. Reversed phase chromatographic behaviour of Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI) in presence of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.; Kumar, Pranaw

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium is important in process conditions as well as in environmental conditions. Since plutonium possesses multiple oxidation states which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is essential to understand its physical and chemical processes. The identification of plutonium oxidation states is conventionally determined through a series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using selective extractants. Spectroscopic and laser based techniques also have been used for the identification of its oxidation state in solutions. Liquid chromatographic behavior of different oxidation states of Pu and other actinide ions is reported to correlate their retention behaviour with stability constants. Objective of the present work is to study the reversed phase chromatography behavior of the three oxidation states of plutonium viz. Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) in presence of á-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA) as an eluent

  10. Should positive phase III clinical trial data be required before proton beam therapy is more widely adopted? No

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, Herman; Kooy, Hanne; Trofimov, Alexei; Farr, Jonathan; Munzenrider, John; DeLaney, Thomas; Loeffler, Jay; Clasie, Benjamin; Safai, Sairos; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the rationale for the proposals that prior to a wider use of proton radiation therapy there must be supporting data from phase III clinical trials. That is, would less dose to normal tissues be an advantage to the patient? Methods: Assess the basis for the assertion that proton dose distributions are superior to those of photons for most situations. Consider the requirements for determining the risks of normal tissue injury, acute and remote, in the examination of the data from a trial. Analyze the probable cost differential between high technology photon and proton therapy. Evaluate the rationale for phase III clinical trials of proton vs photon radiation therapy when the only difference in dose delivered is a difference in distribution of low LET radiation. Results: The distributions of biological effective dose by protons are superior to those by X-rays for most clinical situations, viz. for a defined dose and dose distribution to the target by protons there is a lower dose to non-target tissues. This superiority is due to these physical properties of protons: (1) protons have a finite range and that range is exclusively dependent on the initial energy and the density distribution along the beam path; (2) the Bragg peak; (3) the proton energy distribution may be designed to provide a spread out Bragg peak that yields a uniform dose across the target volume and virtually zero dose deep to the target. Importantly, proton and photon treatment plans can employ beams in the same number and directions (coplanar, non-co-planar), utilize intensity modulation and employ 4D image guided techniques. Thus, the only difference between protons and photons is the distribution of biologically effective dose and this difference can be readily evaluated and quantified. Additionally, this dose distribution advantage should increase the tolerance of certain chemotherapeutic agents and thus permit higher drug doses. The cost of service (not developmental) proton

  11. Can harmonized regulation overcome intra-European differences? Insights from a European Phase III stem cell trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauskeller, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Harmonized regulation of research with human stem cells in Europe has shaped innovation in regenerative medicine. Findings from a Phase III academic clinical trial of an autologous cell procedure illustrate the obstacles that a multinational trial faces. A typology of the obstacles encountered, may help other teams embarking upon trials. The findings throw light on the situation of clinician-scientists in clinical innovation, as the expertise to run scientific trials is very complex. The innovation route of clinical translation takes insufficient account of the interdependencies between multiple social and cultural factors from outside the laboratory and the clinic. For ethical reasons, however, academic and business routes to stem cell treatments ought to be enabled by the regulators. Suggestions arise, how academics can prepare for trials, that academic research needs better institutional support and that new models of medical innovation may need to be developed for regenerative medicine.

  12. Avelumab (anti-PD-L1) in platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer: JAVELIN Ovarian 200 Phase III study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Dychter, Samuel S; Devgan, Geeta; Monk, Bradley J

    2018-03-27

    Avelumab is a human anti-PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor with clinical activity in multiple solid tumors. Here, we describe the rationale and design for JAVELIN Ovarian 200 (NCT02580058), the first randomized Phase III trial to evaluate the role of checkpoint inhibition in women with ovarian cancer. This three-arm trial is comparing avelumab administered alone or in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin alone in patients with platinum-resistant/refractory recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer. Eligible patients are not preselected based on PD-L1 expression and may have received up to three prior lines of chemotherapy for platinum-sensitive disease, but none for resistant disease. Overall survival and progression-free survival are primary end points, and secondary end points include biomarker evaluations and pharmacokinetics.

  13. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  14. Analysis of a microscale 'Saturation Phase-change Internal Carnot Engine'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, Eli [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kribus, Abraham, E-mail: kribus@eng.tau.ac.i [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2010-06-15

    A micro heat engine, based on a cavity filled with a stationary working fluid under liquid-vapor saturation conditions and encapsulated by two membranes, is described and analyzed. This engine design is easy to produce using MEMS technologies and is operated with external heating and cooling. The motion of the membranes is controlled such that the internal pressure and temperature are constant during the heat addition and removal processes, and thus the fluid executes a true internal Carnot cycle. A model of this Saturation Phase-change Internal Carnot Engine (SPICE) was developed including thermodynamic, mechanical and heat transfer aspects. The efficiency and maximum power of the engine are derived. The maximum power point is fixed in a three-parameter space, and operation at this point leads to maximum power density that scales with the inverse square of the engine dimension. Inclusion of the finite heat capacity of the engine wall leads to a strong dependence of performance on engine frequency, and the existence of an optimal frequency. Effects of transient reverse heat flow, and 'parasitic heat' that does not participate in the thermodynamic cycle are observed.

  15. Analysis of a microscale 'Saturation Phase-change Internal Carnot Engine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, Eli; Kribus, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    A micro heat engine, based on a cavity filled with a stationary working fluid under liquid-vapor saturation conditions and encapsulated by two membranes, is described and analyzed. This engine design is easy to produce using MEMS technologies and is operated with external heating and cooling. The motion of the membranes is controlled such that the internal pressure and temperature are constant during the heat addition and removal processes, and thus the fluid executes a true internal Carnot cycle. A model of this Saturation Phase-change Internal Carnot Engine (SPICE) was developed including thermodynamic, mechanical and heat transfer aspects. The efficiency and maximum power of the engine are derived. The maximum power point is fixed in a three-parameter space, and operation at this point leads to maximum power density that scales with the inverse square of the engine dimension. Inclusion of the finite heat capacity of the engine wall leads to a strong dependence of performance on engine frequency, and the existence of an optimal frequency. Effects of transient reverse heat flow, and 'parasitic heat' that does not participate in the thermodynamic cycle are observed.

  16. Phase I/II randomized trial of aerobic exercise in Parkinson disease in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uc, Ergun Y; Doerschug, Kevin C; Magnotta, Vincent; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Thomsen, Teri R; Kline, Joel N; Rizzo, Matthew; Newman, Sara R; Mehta, Sonya; Grabowski, Thomas J; Bruss, Joel; Blanchette, Derek R; Anderson, Steven W; Voss, Michelle W; Kramer, Arthur F; Darling, Warren G

    2014-07-29

    To (1) investigate effects of aerobic walking on motor function, cognition, and quality of life in Parkinson disease (PD), and (2) compare safety, tolerability, and fitness benefits of different forms of exercise intervention: continuous/moderate intensity vs interval/alternating between low and vigorous intensity, and individual/neighborhood vs group/facility setting. Initial design was a 6-month, 2 × 2 randomized trial of different exercise regimens in independently ambulatory patients with PD. All arms were required to exercise 3 times per week, 45 minutes per session. Randomization to group/facility setting was not feasible because of logistical factors. Over the first 2 years, we randomized 43 participants to continuous or interval training. Because preliminary analyses suggested higher musculoskeletal adverse events in the interval group and lack of difference between training methods in improving fitness, the next 17 participants were allocated only to continuous training. Eighty-one percent of 60 participants completed the study with a mean attendance of 83.3% (95% confidence interval: 77.5%-89.0%), exercising at 46.8% (44.0%-49.7%) of their heart rate reserve. There were no serious adverse events. Across all completers, we observed improvements in maximum oxygen consumption, gait speed, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale sections I and III scores (particularly axial functions and rigidity), fatigue, depression, quality of life (e.g., psychological outlook), and flanker task scores (p improvements on the flanker task and quality of life (p improves aerobic fitness, motor function, fatigue, mood, executive control, and quality of life in mild to moderate PD. This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with PD, an aerobic exercise program improves aerobic fitness, motor function, fatigue, mood, and cognition. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of factors associated with premature trial closure and feasibility of accrual benchmarks in phase III oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Petroni, Gina R; Wang, Hongkun; Gray, Robert; Wang, Xiaofei F; Cronin, Walter; Sargent, Daniel J; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Wickerham, Donald L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Slingluff, Craig L

    2010-08-01

    A major challenge for randomized phase III oncology trials is the frequent low rates of patient enrollment, resulting in high rates of premature closure due to insufficient accrual. We conducted a pilot study to determine the extent of trial closure due to poor accrual, feasibility of identifying trial factors associated with sufficient accrual, impact of redesign strategies on trial accrual, and accrual benchmarks designating high failure risk in the clinical trials cooperative group (CTCG) setting. A subset of phase III trials opened by five CTCGs between August 1991 and March 2004 was evaluated. Design elements, experimental agents, redesign strategies, and pretrial accrual assessment supporting accrual predictions were abstracted from CTCG documents. Percent actual/predicted accrual rate averaged per month was calculated. Trials were categorized as having sufficient or insufficient accrual based on reason for trial termination. Analyses included univariate and bivariate summaries to identify potential trial factors associated with accrual sufficiency. Among 40 trials from one CTCG, 21 (52.5%) trials closed due to insufficient accrual. In 82 trials from five CTCGs, therapeutic trials accrued sufficiently more often than nontherapeutic trials (59% vs 27%, p = 0.05). Trials including pretrial accrual assessment more often achieved sufficient accrual than those without (67% vs 47%, p = 0.08). Fewer exclusion criteria, shorter consent forms, other CTCG participation, and trial design simplicity were not associated with achieving sufficient accrual. Trials accruing at a rate much lower than predicted (accrual rate) were consistently closed due to insufficient accrual. This trial subset under-represents certain experimental modalities. Data sources do not allow accounting for all factors potentially related to accrual success. Trial closure due to insufficient accrual is common. Certain trial design factors appear associated with attaining sufficient accrual. Defining

  18. A quality assurance audit: phase iii trial of maximal androgen deprivation in prostate cancer (TROG 96.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigler, A.; Kovacev, O.; Denham, J.; Lamb, D.; North, J.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) performed a quality assurance (QA) audit of its phase III randomized clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of different durations of maximal androgen deprivation prior to and during definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the prostate (TROG 96.01). The audit reviewed a total of 60 cases from 15 centres across Australia and New Zealand. In addition to verification of technical adherence to the protocol, the audit also incorporated a survey of centre planning techniques and a QA time/cost analysis. The present report builds on TROG's first technical audit conducted in 1996 for the phase III accelerated head and neck trial (TROG 91.01) and highlights the significant progress TROG has made in the interim period. The audit provides a strong validation of the results of the 96.01 trial, as well as valuable budgeting and treatment planning information for future trials. Overall improvements were detected in data quality and quantity, and in protocol compliance, with a reduction in the rate of unacceptable protocol violations from 10 to 4%. Audit design, staff education and increased data management resources were identified as the main contributing factors to these improvements. In addition, a budget estimate of $100 per patient has been proposed for conducting similar technical audits. The next major QA project to be undertaken by TROG during the period 1998-1999 is an intercentre dosimetry study. Trial funding and staff education have been targeted as the key major issues essential to the continued success and expansion of TROG's QA programme. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Phase I/II trial of weekly docetaxel and concomitant radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Kubota, Akira; Kida, Akinori; Okami, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Docetaxel (DOC) is one of the most promising drugs for head and neck cancer (HNSCC). A phase I/II trial of concurrent DOC and radiation for HNSCC was conducted to estimate the recommended dose schedule of DOC, and then to evaluate the therapeutic benefit based on the response and toxicity of the recommended dose schedule. Patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were entered. All the patients received radiation with 2.0 Gy single daily fractions up to 60 Gy. DOC was administered weekly for 6 consecutive weeks during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicities, grade 3/4 mucositis and grade 3 pain, manifested in four patients in level 2, and that dose of DOC, 15 mg/m 2 , was considered the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The recommended dose was decided as 10 mg/m 2 . The phase II study was conducted using DOC at 10 mg/m 2 . Thirty-nine patients with stage II, III or IV were registered, and 35 patients were eligible, 32 patients were evaluable for the response and 34 patients for the toxicity. The overall response rate was 96.9%. The prognoses of the complete response (CR) patients were statistically better than for the partial response (PR) patients. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events consisted of lymphopenia in 64.7%, mucositis in 41.2% and anorexia in 20.6% of the patients. Thirty-two of the 35 eligible patients showed high compliance of over 90%, and their toxicities were manageable. Even low-dose DOC shows a strong effect on HNSCC in combination with radiation, with high survival rates in CR patients. The effect on survival will be assessed by further follow-up. (author)

  20. A quality assurance audit: phase III trial of maximal androgen deprivation in prostate cancer (TROG 96.01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigler, A; Mameghan, H; Lamb, D; Joseph, D; Matthews, J; Franklin, I; Turner, S; Spry, N; Poulsen, M; North, J; Kovacev, O; Denham, J

    2000-02-01

    In 1997 the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) performed a quality assurance (QA) audit of its phase III randomized clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of different durations of maximal androgen deprivation prior to and during definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the prostate (TROG 96.01). The audit reviewed a total of 60 cases from 15 centres across Australia and New Zealand. In addition to verification of technical adherence to the protocol, the audit also incorporated a survey of centre planning techniques and a QA time/cost analysis. The present report builds on TROG's first technical audit conducted in 1996 for the phase III accelerated head and neck trial (TROG 91.01) and highlights the significant progress TROG has made in the interim period. The audit provides a strong validation of the results of the 96.01 trial, as well as valuable budgeting and treatment planning information for future trials. Overall improvements were detected in data quality and quantity, and in protocol compliance, with a reduction in the rate of unacceptable protocol violations from 10 to 4%. Audit design, staff education and increased data management resources were identified as the main contributing factors to these improvements. In addition, a budget estimate of $100 per patient has been proposed for conducting similar technical audits. The next major QA project to be undertaken by TROG during the period 1998-1999 is an intercentre dosimetry study. Trial funding and staff education have been targeted as the key major issues essential to the continued success and expansion of TROG's QA programme.

  1. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  2. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Haanen, John B; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-02-10

    In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma.

  3. Clinical efficacy of raltegravir against B and non-B subtype HIV-1 in phase III clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Teppler, Hedy; Zhao, Jing; Sklar, Peter; Miller, Michael D; Harvey, Charlotte M; Strohmaier, Kim M; Leavitt, Randi Y; Nguyen, Bach-Yen T

    2011-07-17

    We evaluated the long-term efficacy of raltegravir according to HIV-1 subtype (B and non-B) using data from three phase III studies in treatment-experienced (BENCHMRK-1 and 2) and treatment-naive (STARTMRK) HIV-infected patients. HIV-1 subtypes were identified from baseline plasma specimens using genotypic data of the PhenoSense GT test (Monogram Biosciences, South San Francisco, California, USA). Non-B subtypes were combined for the current analyses due to small numbers of each specific subtype. An observed failure approach was used (only discontinuations due to lack of efficacy were treated as failures). Resistance evaluation was performed in patients with documented virologic failure. Seven hundred and forty-three patients received raltegravir and 519 received comparator (efavirenz in STARTMRK; optimized background therapy in BENCHMRK). Non-B subtype virus (A, A/C, A/D, A/G, A1, AE, AG, B/G, BF, C, D, D/F, F, F1, G, and complex) was isolated at baseline in 98 (13%) raltegravir recipients and 62 (12%) comparator recipients. Subtypes AE and C were most common, isolated in 41 and 43 patients, respectively. The proportion of raltegravir recipients achieving HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml was similar between non-B and B subtypes (STARTMRK: 94.5 vs. 88.7%; BENCHMRK-1 and 2: 66.7 vs. 60.7%); change in CD4 cell count also was similar between non-B and B subtypes (STARTMRK: 243 vs. 221 cells/μl; BENCHMRK-1 and 2: 121 vs. 144 cells/μl). Phenotypic resistance to raltegravir in non-B virus was associated with integrase mutations observed previously in subtype B virus. In phase III studies in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients, raltegravir showed comparable and potent clinical efficacy against B and non-B HIV-1 subtypes.

  4. A prospective phase II trial of EGCG in treatment of acute radiation-induced esophagitis for stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Xie, Peng; Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Wanqi; Sun, Xindong; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoting; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) is one of main toxicities complicated by thoracic radiotherapy, influencing patients’ quality of life and radiotherapy proceeding seriously. It is difficult to be cured rapidly so far. Our phase I trial preliminarily showed that EGCG may be a promising strategy in the treatment of ARIE. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with stage III lung cancer from the Shandong Tumor Hospital & Institute in China from January 2013 to September 2014. All patients received concurrent or sequential chemo-radiotherapy, or radiotherapy only. EGCG was administrated once ARIE appeared. EGCG was given with the concentration of 440 μmol/L during radiotherapy and additionally two weeks after radiotherapy. RTOG score, dysphagia and pain related to esophagitis were recorded every week. Results: Thirty-seven patients with stage IIIA and IIIB lung cancer were enrolled in this trial. In comparison to the original, the RTOG score in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th week after EGCG prescription and the 1st, 2nd week after radiotherapy decreased significantly (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, 0.102, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). The pain score of each week was significantly lower than the baseline (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.006, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: This trial confirmed that the oral administration of EGCG is an effective and safe method to deal with ARIE. A phase III randomized controlled trial is expected to further corroborate the consequence of EGCG in ARIE treatment

  5. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-04-02

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P < 0.0001), except local pain and pruritus. More severe adverse reactions were observed after the initial injection than after the booster injection. Serious cold or respiratory tract infections (RTI) were observed more often in children aged 6-36 months than in older children. Only the severity of local swelling was associated with body mass index. Children with throat discomfort before injection had a higher risk of serious cold or RTI. These results indicated that the human diploid cell-based vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile.

  6. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - III. Phase-only calibration and primary beam correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, T. L.; Stewart, A. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Kenyon, J. S.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-09-01

    This is the third installment in a series of papers in which we investigate calibration artefacts. Calibration artefacts (also known as ghosts or spurious sources) are created when we calibrate with an incomplete model. In the first two papers of this series, we developed a mathematical framework which enabled us to study the ghosting mechanism itself. An interesting concomitant of the second paper was that ghosts appear in symmetrical pairs. This could possibly account for spurious symmetrization. Spurious symmetrization refers to the appearance of a spurious source (the antighost) symmetrically opposite an unmodelled source around a modelled source. The analysis in the first two papers indicates that the antighost is usually very faint, in particular, when a large number of antennas are used. This suggests that spurious symmetrization will mainly occur at an almost undetectable flux level. In this paper, we show that phase-only calibration produces an antighost that is N-times (where N denotes the number of antennas in the array) as bright as the one produced by phase and amplitude calibration and that this already bright ghost can be further amplified by the primary beam correction.

  7. Targeting radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with iodine (131I) metuximab injection: Clinical Phase I/II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhinan; Mi Li; Xu Jing

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: HAb18G/CD147 is a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated antigen. We developed iodine ( 131 I) metuximab injection (Licartin), a novel 131 I-labeled HAb18G/CD147-specific monoclonal antibody F(ab') 2 fragment, and evaluated its safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy on HCC in Phase I/II trials. Methods and Materials: In a Phase I trial, 28 patients were randomly assigned to receive the injection in 9.25-, 18.5-, 27.75-, or 37-MBq/kg doses by hepatic artery infusion. In a multicenter Phase II trial, 106 patients received the injection (27.75 MBq/kg) on Day 1 of a 28-day cycle. Response rate and survival rate were the endpoints. Results: No life-threatening toxic effects were found. The safe dosage was 27.75 MBq/kg. The blood clearance fitted a biphasic model, and its half-life was 90.56-63.93 h. In the Phase II trial, the injection was found to be targeted and concentrated to tumor tissues. Of the 73 patients completing two cycles, 6 (8.22%) had a partial response, 14 (19.18%) minor response, and 43 (58.90%) stable disease. The 21-month survival rate was 44.54%. The survival rate of progression-free patients was significantly higher than that of patients with progressive disease after either one or two cycles (p 131 I) metuximab injection is safe and active for HCC patients

  8. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  9. Phase III clinical evaluation of gadoteridol injection: Experience in pediatric neuro-oncologic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Nadel, S.N.; Gray, L.; Trotter, P.; Friedman, H.S.; Hockenberger, B.; Oakes, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-two pediatric patients with known CNS neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol injection as part of a Phase IIIB open label multicenter clinical trial. Intravenous adminstration of this neutral, nonionic contrast agent was found to be safe in children. No clinically relevant changes in vital signs or laboratory values were attributed to the administration of gadoteridol injection. There were no systemic complaints. The imaging characteristics of gadoteridol in pediatric CNS disease appeared similar to those of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The very low toxicity, inherent to this nonionic low osmolal paramagnetic contrast formulation may allow administration of increased doses at increased infusion rates for an increased number of indications with improved sensitivity. (orig.)

  10. Phase II and III Clinical Studies of Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Containing Inactivated Polio Vaccine Derived from Sabin Strains (DTaP-sIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kenji; Miyazaki, Chiaki; Kino, Yoichiro; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Ueda, Kohji

    2013-07-15

    Phase II and III clinical studies were conducted to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of a novel DTaP-IPV vaccine consisting of Sabin inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV) and diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP). A Phase II study was conducted in 104 healthy infants using Formulation H of the DTaP-sIPV vaccine containing high-dose sIPV (3, 100, and 100 D-antigen units for types 1, 2, and 3, respectively), and Formulations M and L, containing half and one-fourth of the sIPV in Formulation H, respectively. Each formulation was administered 3 times for primary immunization and once for booster immunization. A Phase III study was conducted in 342 healthy infants who received either Formulation M + oral polio vaccine (OPV) placebo or DTaP + OPV. The OPV or OPV placebo was orally administered twice between primary and booster immunizations. Formulation M was selected as the optimum dose. In the Phase III study, the seropositive rate was 100% for all Sabin strains after primary immunization, and the neutralizing antibody titer after booster immunization was higher than in the control group (DTaP + OPV). All adverse reactions were clinically acceptable. DTaP-sIPV was shown to be a safe and immunogenic vaccine. JapicCTI-121902 for Phase II study, JapicCTI-101075 for Phase III study (http://www.clinicaltrials.jp/user/cte_main.jsp).

  11. Delta phase plutonium and its alloys with III B elements: a microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The plutonium belongs to the actinides where it occupies a crucial place. In the actinide series the competition between the itinerant and local character of the f-electrons is responsible of its unique properties. The series can be divided into two sub-series: the light ( 90 Th- 94 Pu) and the heavy ( 95 Am and beyond) actinides with very different characteristics. The volume behavior of the light actinides is very similar to the one found for the transitions metals with a parabolic decrease of the volume as a function of atomic number. This trend can be explained by the itinerant character of the 5 f electrons which participate to the chemical bonding, and thus the light actinides are considered to form a 5 f transition series. The density functional theory in the local-density approximation (LDA) gives a good description of the ground state of the light actinides in agreement with experiment and a simple Friedel model can explain the parabolic decrease of the volumes. As for heavy actinides, the pattern is reversed: 5 f electrons are localized. This picture places plutonium as the link between the two series, at the transition from delocalized to localized states. The density functional theory within the local density approximation is a very crude approximation for these systems where the on-site interaction between f electrons is strong enough to overcome the kinetic energy. Equilibrium properties for the δ-phase of Pu have been calculated. Taking into account strong electron correlations in the 5 f shell, we show how the equilibrium volume and the bulk modulus are improved in comparison to previous results using the local density approximation (LDA) or the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition, an augmentation of the orbital moment is observed due to the respect of Hund's rules, reducing the total magnetic moment. The stability of the δ-phase is explored and for the first time a positive value for the tetragonal shear constant is found. The

  12. The EORTC module for quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer: phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Jordan, Susan; Locati, Laura D; Pinto, Monica; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Araújo, Cláudia; Hammerlid, Eva; Vidhubala, E; Husson, Olga; Kiyota, Naomi; Brannan, Christine; Salem, Dina; Gamper, Eva M; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Ioannidis, Georgios; Andry, Guy; Inhestern, Johanna; Grégoire, Vincent; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to pilot-test a questionnaire measuring health-related quality of life (QoL) in thyroid cancer patients to be used with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. A provisional questionnaire with 47 items was administered to patients treated for thyroid cancer within the last 2 years. Patients were interviewed about time and help needed to complete the questionnaire, and whether they found the items understandable, confusing or annoying. Items were kept in the questionnaire if they fulfilled pre-defined criteria: relevant to the patients, easy to understand, not confusing, few missing values, neither floor nor ceiling effects, and high variance. A total of 182 thyroid cancer patients in 15 countries participated ( n  = 115 with papillary, n  = 31 with follicular, n  = 22 with medullary, n  = 6 with anaplastic, and n  = 8 with other types of thyroid cancer). Sixty-six percent of the patients needed 15 min or less to complete the questionnaire. Of the 47 items, 31 fulfilled the predefined criteria and were kept unchanged, 14 were removed, and 2 were changed. Shoulder dysfunction was mentioned by 5 patients as missing and an item covering this issue was added. To conclude, the EORTC quality of life module for thyroid cancer (EORTC QLQ-THY34) is ready for the final validation phase IV. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Post-treatment resistance analysis of hepatitis C virus from phase II and III clinical trials of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, David; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S; Doehle, Brian P; Martin, Ross; Afdhal, Nezam H; Kowdley, Kris V; Lawitz, Eric; Brainard, Diana M; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei; Gane, Edward J

    2017-04-01

    Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination treatment in phase III clinical trials resulted in sustained viral suppression in 94-99% of patients. This study characterized drug resistance in treatment failures, which may help to inform retreatment options. We performed NS5A and NS5B deep sequencing of hepatitis C virus (HCV) from patients infected with genotype (GT) 1 who participated in ledipasvir/sofosbuvir phase II and III clinical trials. Fifty-one of 2144 (2.4%) (42 GT1a and 9 GT1b) treated patients met the criteria for resistance analysis due to virologic failure following the end of treatment. The majority of patients with virologic failure (38 of 51; 74.5%) had detectable ledipasvir-specific resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) at the time of virologic failure (1% deep sequencing cut-off). The percent of patients with NS5A RASs at virologic failure were 37.5%, 66.7%, 94.7% and 100% in patients treated for 6, 8, 12 and 24weeks, respectively. The common substitutions detected at failure were Q30R/H, and/or Y93H/N in GT1a and Y93H in GT1b. At failure, 35.3% (18/51) of virologic failure patients' viruses had two or more NS5A RASs and the majority of patients harbored NS5A RASs conferring a 100-1000-fold (n=10) or >1000-fold (n=23) reduced susceptibility to ledipasvir. One patient in a phase II study with a known ledipasvir RAS at baseline (L31M) developed the S282T sofosbuvir (NS5B) RAS at failure. In GT1 HCV-infected patients treated with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir±ribavirin, virologic failure was rare. Ledipasvir resistance in NS5A was selected or enhanced in most patients with virologic failure, one of whom also developed resistance to sofosbuvir. Clinical studies have shown that combination treatment with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir efficiently cures most patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C infection. For the few patients failing treatment, we show that resistance to ledipasvir was observed in most patients, whereas resistance to sofosbuvir was less common. This has

  14. Thermodynamic sorption modelling in support of radioactive waste disposal safety cases - NEA sorption project phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    A central safety function of radioactive waste disposal repositories is the prevention or sufficient retardation of radionuclide migration to the biosphere. Performance assessment exercises in various countries, and for a range of disposal scenarios, have demonstrated that one of the most important processes providing this safety function is the sorption of radionuclides along potential migration paths beyond the engineered barriers. Thermodynamic sorption models (TSMs) are key for improving confidence in assumptions made about such radionuclide sorption when preparing a repository's safety case. This report presents guidelines for TSM development as well as their application in repository performance assessments. They will be of particular interest to the sorption modelling community and radionuclide migration modellers in developing safety cases for radioactive waste disposal Contents: 1 - Thermodynamic sorption models and radionuclide migration: Sorption and radionuclide migration; Applications of TSMs in radioactive waste disposal studies; Requirements for a scientifically defensible, calibrated TSM applicable to radioactive waste disposal; Current status of TSMs in radioactive waste management; 2 - Theoretical basis of TSMs and options in model development: Conceptual building blocks of TSMs and integration with aqueous chemistry; The TSM representation of sorption and relationship with Kd values; Theoretical basis of TSMs; Example of TSM for uranyl sorption; Options in TSM development; Illustration of TSM development and effects of modelling choices; Summary: TSMs for constraining Kd values - impact of modelling choices; 3 - Determination of parameters for TSMs: Overview of experimental determination of TSM parameters; Theoretical estimation methods of selected model parameters; Case study: sorption modelling of trivalent lanthanides/actinides on illite; Indicative values for certain TSM parameters; Parameter uncertainty; Illustration of parameter sensitivity

  15. Independently variable phase and stroke control for a double acting Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchowitz, David M.

    1983-01-01

    A phase and stroke control apparatus for the pistons of a Stirling engine includes a ring on the end of each piston rod in which a pair of eccentrics is arranged in series, torque transmitting relationship. The outer eccentric is rotatably mounted in the ring and is rotated by the orbiting ring; the inner eccentric is mounted on an output shaft. The two eccentrics are mounted for rotation together within the ring during normal operation. A device is provided for rotating one eccentric with respect to another to change the effective eccentricity of the pair of eccentrics. A separately controlled phase adjustment is provided to null the phase change introduced by the change in the orientation of the outer eccentric, and also to enable the phase of the pistons to be changed independently of the stroke change.

  16. Metasurfaces-based holography and beam shaping: engineering the phase profile of light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheuer Jacob

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to engineer and shape the phase profile of optical beams is in the heart of any optical element. Be it a simple lens or a sophisticated holographic element, the functionality of such components is dictated by their spatial phase response. In contrast to conventional optical components which rely on thickness variation to induce a phase profile, metasurfaces facilitate the realization of arbitrary phase distributions using large arrays with sub-wavelength and ultrathin (tens of nanometers features. Such components can be easily realized using a single lithographic step and is highly suited for patterning a variety of substrates, including nonplanar and soft surfaces. In this article, we review the recent developments, potential, and opportunities of metasurfaces applications. We focus primarily on flat optical devices, holography, and beam-shaping applications as these are the key ingredients needed for the development of a new generation of optical devices which could find widespread applications in photonics.

  17. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  18. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  19. Phase-coherent transport and spin-orbit-coupling in III/V-semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez Hernandez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires fabricated by a bottom-up approach are not only interesting for the realization of future nanoscaled devices but also appear to be very attractive model systems to tackle fundamental questions concerning the transport in strongly confined systems. In order to avoid the problem connected with carrier depletion, narrowband gap semiconductors, i.e., InAs or InN, or core-shell Nanowires, i.e., GaAs/AlGaAs, are preferred. The underlying reason is that in InAs or InN the Fermi-level pinning in the conduction band results in a carrier accumulation at the surface. In fact, the tubular topology of the surface electron gas opens up the possibility to observe unconventional quantum transport phenomena. When the phase-coherence length in the nanowire is comparable to its dimensions the conductance fluctuates if a magnetic field is applied or if the electron concentration is changed by means of a gate electrode. These so-called universal conductance fluctuations being in the order of e 2 /h originate from the fact that in small disordered samples, electron interference effects are not averaged out. In this work are analyzed universal conductance fluctuations to study the quantum transport properties in InN, InAs and GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. With the use of a magnetic field and a back-gate electrode the universal conductance fluctuations and localizations effects were analyzed. Since InN and InAs are narrow band gap semiconductors, one naturally expects spin-orbit coupling effects. Because this phenomena is of importance for spin electronic applications. However, owing to the cylindrical symmetry of the InN and InAs nanowires, the latter effect was observable and actually be used to determine the strength of spin-orbit coupling. In order to clearly separate the weak antilocalization effect from the conductance fluctuations, the averaging of the magnetoconductance at different gate voltages was essential. The low-temperature quantum transport properties of

  20. Treatment of geographic atrophy with subconjunctival sirolimus: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai T; Dresner, Samuel; Forooghian, Farzin; Glaser, Tanya; Doss, Lauren; Zhou, Mei; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2013-04-26

    To investigate the safety and effects of subconjunctival sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent, for the treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label phase II trial, enrolling 11 participants with bilateral GA; eight participants completed 24 months of follow-up. Sirolimus (440 μg) was administered every 3 months as a subconjunctival injection in only one randomly assigned eye in each participant for 24 months. Fellow eyes served as untreated controls. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in the total GA area at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in visual acuity, macular sensitivity, central retinal thickness, and total drusen area. The study drug was well tolerated with few symptoms and related adverse events. Study treatment in study eyes was not associated with structural or functional benefits relative to the control fellow eyes. At month 24, mean GA area increased by 54.5% and 39.7% in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.41), whereas mean visual acuity decreased by 21.0 letters and 3.0 letters in study and fellow eyes, respectively (P = 0.03). Substantial differences in mean changes in drusen area, central retinal thickness, and macular sensitivity were not detected for all analysis time points up to 24 months. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus was well-tolerated in patients with GA, although no positive anatomic or functional effects were identified. Subconjunctival sirolimus may not be beneficial in the prevention of GA progression, and may potentially be associated with effects detrimental to visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00766649.).

  1. Switchable CO2 electroreduction via engineering active phases of Pd nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dunfeng Gao; Fan Yang; Shu Miao; Jianguo Wang; Guoxiong Wang; Xinhe Bao; Hu Zhou; Fan Cai; Dongniu Wang; Yongfeng Hu; Bei Jiang; Wen-Bin Cai; Xiaoqi Chen; Rui Si

    2017-01-01

    Active-phase engineering is regularly utilized to tune the selectivity of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in heterogeneous catalysis.However,the lack of understanding of the active phase in electrocatalysis has hampered the development of efficient catalysts for CO2 electroreduction.Herein,we report the systematic engineering of active phases of Pd NPs,which are exploited to select reaction pathways for CO2 electroreduction.In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy,in situ attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy,and density functional theory calculations suggest that the formation of a hydrogen-adsorbed Pd surface on a mixture of the α-and β-phases of a palladium-hydride core (α+β PdHx@PdHx) above-0.2 V (vs.a reversible hydrogen electrode) facilitates formate production via the HCOO* intermediate,whereas the formation of a metallic Pd surface on the β-phase Pd hydride core (β PdHx@Pd) below-0.5 V promotes CO production via the COOH* intermediate.The main product,which is either formate or CO,can be selectively produced with high Faradaic efficiencies (>90%) and mass activities in the potential window of 0.05 to-0.9 V with scalable application demonstration.

  2. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bruyn, D.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Baeten, P.; Leysen, P.

    2015-01-01

    The MYRRHA project started in 1998 by SCK.CEN. MYRRHA is a MTR, based on the ADS concept, for material and fuel research, for studying the feasibility of transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products arising from radioactive waste reprocessing and finally for demonstrating at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The MYRRHA design has progressed through various framework programmes of the European Commission in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The design has now entered into the Front End Engineering Phase (FEED) covering the period 2012- 2015. The engineering company, which will handle this phase, has been selected and the works have begun in the late 2013. In the meantime we have made some refinements in both primary systems and plant layout, including reactor building design. In this paper, we present the most recent developments of the MYRRHA design in terms of reactor building and plant layout as existing today. (authors)

  3. Complex 3D Vortex Lattice Formation by Phase-Engineered Multiple Beam Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the computational results on the formation of diverse complex 3D vortex lattices by a designed superposition of multiple plane waves. Special combinations of multiples of three noncoplanar plane waves with a designed relative phase shift between one another are perturbed by a nonsingular beam to generate various complex 3D vortex lattice structures. The formation of complex gyrating lattice structures carrying designed vortices by means of relatively phase-engineered plane waves is also computationally investigated. The generated structures are configured with both periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic basis, while these whirling complex lattices possess a long-range order of designed symmetry in a given plane. Various computational analytical tools are used to verify the presence of engineered geometry of vortices in these complex 3D vortex lattices.

  4. Phase I/II Study of Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Nivolumab Who Had Progressed after Ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jeffrey; Gibney, Geoffrey; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Yu, Bin; Cheng, Pingyan; Martinez, Alberto J; Kroeger, Jodie; Richards, Allison; McCormick, Lori; Moberg, Valerie; Cronin, Heather; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-04-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is active in patients with metastatic melanoma who have failed ipilimumab. In this phase I/II study, we assessed nivolumab's safety in 92 ipilimumab-refractory patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, including those who experienced grade 3-4 drug-related toxicity to ipilimumab. We report long-term survival, response duration, and biomarkers in these patients after nivolumab treatment (3 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 24 weeks, then every 12 weeks for up to 2 years, with or without a multipeptide vaccine. The response rate for ipilimumab-refractory patients was 30% (95% CI, 21%-41%). The median duration of response was 14.6 months, median progression-free survival was 5.3 months, and median overall survival was 20.6 months, when patients were followed up for a median of 16 months. One- and 2-year survival rates were 68.4% and 31.2%, respectively. Ipilimumab-naïve and ipilimumab-refractory patients showed no significant difference in survival. The 21 patients with prior grade 3-4 toxicity to ipilimumab that was managed with steroids tolerated nivolumab well, with 62% (95% CI, 38%-82%) having complete or partial responses or stabilized disease at 24 weeks. High numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were associated with poor survival. Thus, survival and long-term safety were excellent in ipilimumab-refractory patients treated with nivolumab. Prior grade 3-4 immune-related adverse effects from ipilimumab were not indicative of nivolumab toxicities, and patients had a high overall rate of remission or stability at 24 weeks. Prospectively evaluating MDSC numbers before treatment could help assess the expected benefit of nivolumab. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  6. A phase III study of the efficacy and safety of a novel iron-based phosphate binder in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floege, Jürgen; Covic, Adrian C; Ketteler, Markus; Rastogi, Anjay; Chong, Edward M F; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lisk, Laura J; Sprague, Stuart M

    2014-09-01

    Efficacy of PA21 (sucroferric oxyhydroxide), a novel calcium-free polynuclear iron(III)-oxyhydroxide phosphate binder, was compared with that of sevelamer carbonate in an open-label, randomized, active-controlled phase III study. Seven hundred and seven hemo- and peritoneal dialysis patients with hyperphosphatemia received PA21 1.0-3.0 g per day and 348 received sevelamer 4.8-14.4 g per day for an 8-week dose titration, followed by 4 weeks without dose change, and then 12 weeks maintenance. Serum phosphorus reductions at week 12 were -0.71 mmol/l (PA21) and -0.79 mmol/l (sevelamer), demonstrating non-inferiority of, on average, three tablets of PA21 vs. eight of sevelamer. Efficacy was maintained to week 24. Non-adherence was 15.1% (PA21) vs. 21.3% (sevelamer). The percentage of patients that reported at least one treatment-emergent adverse event was 83.2% with PA21 and 76.1% with sevelamer. A higher proportion of patients withdrew owing to treatment-emergent adverse events with PA21 (15.7%) vs. sevelamer (6.6%). Mild, transient diarrhea, discolored feces, and hyperphosphatemia were more frequent with PA21; nausea and constipation were more frequent with sevelamer. After 24 weeks, 99 hemodialysis patients on PA21 were re-randomized into a 3-week superiority analysis of PA21 maintenance dose in 50 patients vs. low dose (250 mg per day (ineffective control)) in 49 patients. The PA21 maintenance dose was superior to the low dose in maintaining serum phosphorus control. Thus, PA21 was effective in lowering serum phosphorus in dialysis patients, with similar efficacy to sevelamer carbonate, a lower pill burden, and better adherence.

  7. Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible DI diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, J. E.; Espey, C.

    1993-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the two millsites in Slick Rock, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. The Union Carbide site has 350,000 tons of tailings and the North Continent site now owned by Union Carbide has 37,000 tons of tailings. Both tailings piles have been stabilized in accordance with regulations of the State of Colorado. Radon gas release from the tailings on the sites constitute the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact. Hence the three alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the sites (Option I), and returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material (Option II), and consolidating the two piles on the UC site and stabilizing with 2 ft of cover (Option III). Fencing around the tailings piles is included in all options. Options II and III provide 2 ft of cover material on the tailings. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $1,100,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Tuba City millsite in Arizona. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact to the inhabited area near the site. In the downwind direction, to the northeast of the site, airborne radioactivity is greater than Federal guidelines but there are no dwellings in that direction in the area of concern. Gamma radiation is significant over the tailings but is near background levels in the housing area. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact; hence, the four alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site (Option I), and returning the windblown tailings to the pile and stabilizing the pile with cover material (Options II, III, and IV). Fencing around the site or the tailings pile and the removal or decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Option II provides 2 ft of cover material on the tailings, Option III provides 4 ft of cover, and Option IV provides 13 ft of cover. Costs of the options range from $671,000 to $2,904,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is only marginally feasible and would require a more detailed economic evaluation before any action was taken

  10. Motivations to participate in a Phase I/II HIV vaccine trial: A descriptive study from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. M. Tarimo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for an efficacious HIV vaccine is a global priority. To date only one HIV vaccine trial (RV144 has shown modest efficacy in a phase III trial. With existing different HIV-1 subtypes and frequent mutations, multiple trials are needed from different geographical sites particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where most HIV infections occur. Thus, motivations to participate in HIV vaccine trials among Tanzanians need to be assessed. This paper describes the motives of Police Officers who showed great interest to volunteer in HIVIS-03 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among Police Officers who showed interest to participate in the HIVIS-03, a phase I/II HIV vaccine trial in Dar es Salaam. Prior to detailed training sessions about HIV vaccine trials, the potential participants narrated their individual motives to participate in the trial on a piece of paper. Descriptive analysis using content approach and frequency distributions were performed. Results Of the 265 respondents, 242 (91.3 % provided their socio-demographic characteristics as well as reasons that would make them take part in the proposed trial. Majority, (39.7 %, cited altruism as the main motive. Women were more likely to volunteer due to altruism compared to men (P < 0.01. Researchers’ explanations about HIV/AIDS vaccine studies motivated 15.3 %. More men (19.6 % than women (1.7 % were motivated to volunteer due to researchers’ explanations (P < 0.001. Also, compared to other groups, those unmarried and educated up to secondary level of education were motivated to volunteer due to researchers’ explanation (P < 0.05. Other reasons were: desire to become a role model (18.6 %; to get knowledge for educating others (14.0 %; to cooperate with researchers in developing an HIV vaccine (9.5 %; to get protection against HIV infection (7.0 %, and severity of the disease within families (6.2

  11. Successful completion of the Qinshan phase III nuclear power plant-a successful model for Chinese-Canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoxing

    2004-01-01

    This report documents Qinshan CANDU project construction and commissioning experience as well as management strategies and approaches that contributed to the successful completion of the project. The Qinshan phase III (CANDU) nuclear power plant was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 24, 2003, 43 days and 112 days ahead of schedule respectively. The reference plant design is the Wolsong 3 and 4 CANDU-6 units in the Republic of Korea. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 Months from First Concrete to Criticality-a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods (including open top construction, heavy lifts and modularization), electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management, specialized material control including bar coding, and planning. The introduction of new design and construction techniques was achieved by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools will benefit TQNPC in operation of the station, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China and enhancing their opportunities internationally. TQNPC's participation in Quality surveillance (QS) activities of nuclear steam plant (NSP) and Balance of Plant (BOP) offshore equipment benefited TQNPC in acquiring knowledge of specific equipment manufacturing processes, which can be applied to similar activities in China. China has established the capability of manufacturing CANDU fuel and becoming self-reliant in fuel supply. Excellent co-operation and

  12. Melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide and defibrotide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter phase I/II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Antonio; Larocca, Alessandra; Genuardi, Mariella; Kotwica, Katarzyna; Gay, Francesca; Rossi, Davide; Benevolo, Giulia; Magarotto, Valeria; Cavallo, Federica; Bringhen, Sara; Rus, Cecilia; Masini, Luciano; Iacobelli, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth; Boccadoro, Mario; Richardson, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Defibrotide is a novel orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide with anti-thrombotic and anti-adhesive effects. In SCID/NOD mice, defibrotide showed activity in human myeloma xenografts. This phase I/II study was conducted to identify the most appropriate dose of defibrotide in combination with melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and to determine its safety and tolerability as part of this regimen. This was a phase I/II, multicenter, dose-escalating, non-comparative, open label study. Oral melphalan was administered at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg on days 1-4, prednisone at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg also on days 1-4 and thalidomide at a dose of 50-100 mg/day continuously. Defibrotide was administered orally at three dose-levels: 2.4, 4.8 or 7.2 g on days 1-4 and 1.6, 3.2, or 4.8 g on days 5-35. Twenty-four patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. In all patients, the complete response plus very good partial response rate was 9%, and the partial response rate was 43%. The 1-year progression-free survival and 1-year overall survival rates were 34% and 90%, respectively. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia and fatigue. Deep vein thrombosis was reported in only one patient. This combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide together with defibrotide showed anti-tumor activity with a favorable tolerability. The maximum tolerated dose of defibrotide was identified as 7.2 g p.o. on days 1-4 followed by 4.8 g p.o. on days 5-35. Further trials are needed to confirm the role of this regimen and to evaluate the combination of defibrotide with new drugs.

  13. Large Eddy Simulations of Two-phase Turbulent Reactive Flows in IC Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2008-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method. In this method, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved with a generalized, high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme. The spray and the FMDF are implemented with Lagrangian methods. The reliability and the consistency of the numerical methods are established for different IC engines and the complex interactions among mean and turbulent velocity fields, fuel droplets and combustion are shown to be well captured with the LES/FMDF. In both spark-ignition/direct-injection and diesel engines, the droplet size and velocity distributions are found to be modified by the unsteady, vortical motions generated by the incoming air during the intake stroke. In turn, the droplets are found to change the in-cylinder flow structure. In the spark-ignition engine, flame propagation is similar to the experiment. In the diesel engine, the maximum evaporated fuel concentration is near the cylinder wall where the flame starts, which is again consistent with the experiment.

  14. Floquet engineering of Haldane Chern insulators and chiral bosonic phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekhanov, Kirill; Roux, Guillaume; Le Hur, Karyn

    2017-01-01

    The realization of synthetic gauge fields has attracted a lot of attention recently in relation to periodically driven systems and the Floquet theory. In ultracold atom systems in optical lattices and photonic networks, this allows one to simulate exotic phases of matter such as quantum Hall phases, anomalous quantum Hall phases, and analogs of topological insulators. In this paper, we apply the Floquet theory to engineer anisotropic Haldane models on the honeycomb lattice and two-leg ladder systems. We show that these anisotropic Haldane models still possess a topologically nontrivial band structure associated with chiral edge modes. Focusing on (interacting) boson systems in s -wave bands of the lattice, we show how to engineer through the Floquet theory, a quantum phase transition (QPT) between a uniform superfluid and a Bose-Einstein condensate analog of Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov states, where bosons condense at nonzero wave vectors. We perform a Ginzburg-Landau analysis of the QPT on the graphene lattice, and compute observables such as chiral currents and the momentum distribution. The results are supported by exact diagonalization calculations and compared with those of the isotropic situation. The validity of high-frequency expansion in the Floquet theory is also tested using time-dependent simulations for various parameters of the model. Last, we show that the anisotropic choice for the effective vector potential allows a bosonization approach in equivalent ladder (strip) geometries.

  15. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  16. Phase III trial of casopitant, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Apornwirat, Wichit; Shaharyar, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this phase III trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of regimens containing casopitant, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting during the first cycle in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemo...

  17. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  18. Phase III trial of cetuximab with continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) versus FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Tormod; Glimelius, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    The NORDIC-VII multicenter phase III trial investigated the efficacy of cetuximab when added to bolus fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX), administered continuously or intermittently, in previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The influence of KRAS mutation...

  19. Bortezomib before and after high-dose therapy in myeloma : Long-term results from the phase III HOVON-65/GMMGHD-4 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Lokhorst, H. M.; Mai, E. K.; van der Holt, B.; Blau, I. W.; Zweegman, S.; Weisel, K. C.; Vellenga, E.; Pfreundschuh, M.; Kersten, M. J.; Scheid, C.; Croockewit, S.; Raymakers, R.; Hose, D.; Potamianou, A.; Jauch, A.; Hillengass, J.; Stevens-Kroef, M.; Raab, M. S.; Broijl, A.; Lindemann, H. W.; Bos, G. M. J.; Brossart, P.; Kooy, M. van Marwijk; Ypma, P.; Duehrsen, U.; Schaafsma, R. M.; Bertsch, U.; Hielscher, T.; Jarari, Le; Salwender, H. J.; Sonneveld, P.

    The Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology Group-65/German-speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group-HD4 (HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4) phase III trial compared bortezomib (BTZ) before and after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM, PAD arm) compared with classical

  20. Bortezomib before and after high-dose therapy in myeloma: long-term results from the phase III HOVON-65/GMMGHD-4 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Lokhorst, H. M.; Mai, E. K.; van der Holt, B.; Blau, I. W.; Zweegman, S.; Weisel, K. C.; Vellenga, E.; Pfreundschuh, M.; Kersten, M. J.; Scheid, C.; Croockewit, S.; Raymakers, R.; Hose, D.; Potamianou, A.; Jauch, A.; Hillengass, J.; Stevens-Kroef, M.; Raab, M. S.; Broijl, A.; Lindemann, H. W.; Bos, G. M. J.; Brossart, P.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Ypma, P.; Duehrsen, U.; Schaafsma, R. M.; Bertsch, U.; Hielscher, T.; Jarari, Le; Salwender, H. J.; Sonneveld, P.

    2018-01-01

    The Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology Group-65/German-speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group-HD4 (HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4) phase III trial compared bortezomib (BTZ) before and after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM, PAD arm) compared with classical

  1. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  2. Rituximab Maintenance Treatment of Relapsed/Resistant Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Long-Term Outcome of the EORTC 20981 Phase III Randomized Intergroup Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, Marinus H. J.; van Glabbeke, Martine; Giurgea, Livia; Klasa, Richard; Marcus, Robert E.; Wolf, Max; Kimby, Eva; van 't Veer, Mars; Vranovsky, Andrej; Holte, Harald; Hagenbeek, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In 2006, we published the results of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial EORTC 20981 on the role of rituximab in remission induction and maintenance treatment of relapsed/resistant follicular lymphoma (FL). At that time, the median follow-up for the

  3. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies : Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.L.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; de Giorgi, U.; De Wit, R.; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.; European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group; Genito-Urinary Cancers Group, The

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  4. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies: Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; De Giorgi, U.; de Wit, R; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Poppel, H.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  5. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Rifle Site, Rifle, Colorado. Summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II - Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decomtamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI, and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present

  6. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings new and old Rifle site, Rifle, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decontamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present

  7. Summary of the Phase II, Title I, engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 0.5 million tons of tailings at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The nine alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through IX). Cost estimates for the nine options range from $480,000 to $5,890,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado. Summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. The Phase II-Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiometric measurements to determine radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.6 million tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The three alternative actions presented range from fencing and maintenance (Option I), to placing the tailings in an open-pit mine and adding 2 ft of stabilization cover material (Option III). Cost estimates for the three options range from $250,000 to $4,520,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Durango site, Durango, Colorado. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Durango, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.555 million tons of tailings at the Durango site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from vegetative stabilization (Option I), to contouring and stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II and III), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V to VIII). All options include remedial action costs for offsite locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimated for the eight options range from $4,340,000 to $13,590,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is sufficiently economically attractive to justify reprocessing in conjunction with each of the options

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Grand Junction site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from $470,000 to $18,130,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive at present.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings new and old Rifle site, Rifle, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decontamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Grand Junction site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from $470,000 to $18,130,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  13. Structural and electronic properties of in-plane phase engineered WSe2: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhart, Ankush; Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Sharma, Raman; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2018-04-01

    We present first principal investigations on structural and electronic properties of in-plane phase engineered WSe2 with armchair type interface. The 2H and 1T phases of WSe2, joined along x-direction is a natural metal-semiconductor heterostructure and therefore shows potential for applications in 2D electronics and opto-electronics. The electronic properties transit towards metallic 1T region. No inflections across interface shows negligible mismatch strain which is unlike what has been reported for MoS2. Charge density analysis shows charge accumulation on 1T domain. This can lead to reduction of Schottky barrier heights at the metal-semiconductor junction. STM analysis confirms transition of 1T phase towards distorted 1T' structure. The present results provide essential insights for nano-devices using 2D hybrid materials.

  14. Everolimus for Previously Treated Advanced Gastric Cancer: Results of the Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III GRANITE-1 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bai, Yu-Xian; Bang, Yung-Jue; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Pan, Hong-Ming; Sahmoud, Tarek; Shen, Lin; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chin, Keisho; Muro, Kei; Kim, Yeul Hong; Ferry, David; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Smith, Heind; Costantini, Chiara; Rizvi, Syed; Lebwohl, David; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II study of pretreated advanced gastric cancer. This international, double-blind, phase III study compared everolimus efficacy and safety with that of best supportive care (BSC) in previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of systemic chemotherapy were randomly assigned to everolimus 10 mg/d (assignment schedule: 2:1) or matching placebo, both given with BSC. Randomization was stratified by previous chemotherapy lines (one v two) and region (Asia v rest of the world [ROW]). Treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and safety. Results Six hundred fifty-six patients (median age, 62.0 years; 73.6% male) were enrolled. Median OS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 4.3 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.08; P = .124). Median PFS was 1.7 months and 1.4 months in the everolimus and placebo arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78). Common grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. The safety profile was similar in patients enrolled in Asia versus ROW. Conclusion Compared with BSC, everolimus did not significantly improve overall survival for advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of previous systemic chemotherapy. The safety profile observed for everolimus was consistent with that observed for everolimus in other cancers. PMID:24043745

  15. Current Practices in the Treatment of Alzheimer Disease: Where is the Evidence After the Phase III Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Megan J; Chamberlin, Kevin W

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to review the current place in therapy of the 4 medications, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine, approved for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) since the publication of Phase III trials. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for articles published in the past 10 years. The search was performed using the following Medical Subject Headings and text key words: Alzheimer's disease, treatment, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, memantine, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and dementia. Studies that evaluated new doses, indications, and dose formulations remain a large part of the current literature. Donepezil gained approval for the treatment of severe AD and became available in a 23-mg/d dose formulation. Rivastigmine became available in a patch formulation. Memantine became available as an extended-release capsule. Use of a combination product formulation was recently approved, memantine extended release/donepezil. Controversy among clinicians remains regarding when to initiate therapy, appropriate duration of therapy, and how and when to discontinue the treatment of AD. Only drugs that affect cholinergic function have shown consistent, but modest, clinical effects, even in late-phase trials. There is a need for a better appreciation of the various risk factors and drug targets for the treatment of AD. The wide range of targets makes it unlikely that affecting only 1 of those targets (eg, cholinergic function or N-methyl-d-aspartate) will lead to a more than minimally effective treatment option, regardless of when a treatment is started and discontinued. There is substantial opportunity for the continued growth and development of drugs and clinical trial expansion for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intravitreal sirolimus for the treatment of geographic atrophy: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Philip A; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2014-12-18

    To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Resource Use and Costs of Dengue: Analysis of Data from Phase III Efficacy Studies of a Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fezzazi, Hanna; Branchu, Marie; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Perroud, Ana Paula; Frago, Carina; Coudeville, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has recently been approved in 12 countries in southeast Asia and Latin America for individuals aged 9-45 years or 9-60 years (age indication approvals vary by country) living in endemic areas. Data on utilization of medical and nonmedical resources as well as time lost from school and work were collected during the active phase of two phase III efficacy studies performed in 10 countries in the Asia-Pacific region and Latin America (NCT01373281; NCT01374516). We compared dengue-related resource utilization and costs among vaccinated and nonvaccinated participants. Country-specific unit costs were derived from available literature. There were 901 virologically confirmed dengue episodes among participants aged ≥ 9 years ( N = 25,826): corresponding to 373 episodes in the CYD-TDV group ( N = 17,230) and 528 episodes in the control group ( N = 8,596). Fewer episodes in the CYD-TDV group resulted in hospitalization than in the control group (7.0% versus 13.3%; P = 0.002), but both had a similar average length of stay of 4 days. Overall, a two-thirds reduction in resource consumption and missed school/work days was observed in the CYD-TDV group relative to the control group. The estimated direct and indirect cost (2014 I$) associated with dengue episodes per participant in the CYD-TDV group was 73% lower than in the control group (I$6.72 versus I$25.08); representing a saving of I$I8.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]:17.05-19.78) per participant with vaccination. This is the first study providing information on dengue costs among vaccinated individuals and direct confirmation that vaccination has the potential to reduce dengue illness costs.

  18. Vandetanib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a randomized, double-blind phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samuel A; Robinson, Bruce G; Gagel, Robert F; Dralle, Henning; Fagin, James A; Santoro, Massimo; Baudin, Eric; Elisei, Rossella; Jarzab, Barbara; Vasselli, James R; Read, Jessica; Langmuir, Peter; Ryan, Anderson J; Schlumberger, Martin J

    2012-01-10

    There is no effective therapy for patients with advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Vandetanib, a once-daily oral inhibitor of RET kinase, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, has previously shown antitumor activity in a phase II study of patients with advanced hereditary MTC. Patients with advanced MTC were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive vandetanib 300 mg/d or placebo. On objective disease progression, patients could elect to receive open-label vandetanib. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), determined by independent central Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessments. Between December 2006 and November 2007, 331 patients (mean age, 52 years; 90% sporadic; 95% metastatic) were randomly assigned to receive vandetanib (231) or placebo (100). At data cutoff (July 2009; median follow-up, 24 months), 37% of patients had progressed and 15% had died. The study met its primary objective of PFS prolongation with vandetanib versus placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.69; P < .001). Statistically significant advantages for vandetanib were also seen for objective response rate (P < .001), disease control rate (P = .001), and biochemical response (P < .001). Overall survival data were immature at data cutoff (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.65). A final survival analysis will take place when 50% of the patients have died. Common adverse events (any grade) occurred more frequently with vandetanib compared with placebo, including diarrhea (56% v 26%), rash (45% v 11%), nausea (33% v 16%), hypertension (32% v 5%), and headache (26% v 9%). Vandetanib demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a phase III trial of patients with advanced MTC (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00410761).

  19. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumors with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (TREAT-ME1): study protocol of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Hanno; von Einem, Jobst C; Thomas, Michael N; Michl, Marlies; Angele, Martin K; Huss, Ralf; Günther, Christine; Nelson, Peter J; Bruns, Christiane J; Heinemann, Volker

    2015-04-08

    Adenocarcinoma originating from the digestive system is a major contributor to cancer-related deaths worldwide. Tumor recurrence, advanced local growth and metastasis are key factors that frequently prevent these tumors from curative surgical treatment. Preclinical research has demonstrated that the dependency of these tumors on supporting mesenchymal stroma results in susceptibility to cell-based therapies targeting this stroma. TREAT-ME1 is a prospective, uncontrolled, single-arm phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as delivery vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy for advanced, recurrent or metastatic gastrointestinal or hepatopancreatobiliary adenocarcinoma. Autologous bone marrow will be drawn from each eligible patient after consent for bone marrow donation has been obtained (under a separate EC-approved protocol). In the following ~10 weeks the investigational medicinal product (IMP) is developed for each patient. To this end, the patient's MSCs are stably transfected with a gamma-retroviral, replication-incompetent and self-inactivating (SIN) vector system containing a therapeutic promoter - gene construct that allows for tumor-specific expression of the therapeutic gene. After release of the IMP the patients are enrolled after given informed consent for participation in the TREAT-ME 1 trial. In the phase I part of the study, the safety of the IMP is tested in six patients by three treatment cycles consisting of re-transfusion of MSCs at different concentrations followed by administration of the prodrug Ganciclovir. In the phase II part of the study, sixteen patients will be enrolled receiving IMP treatment. A subgroup of patients that qualifies for surgery will be treated preoperatively with the IMP to verify homing of the MSCs to tumors as to be confirmed in the surgical specimen. The TREAT-ME1 clinical study involves a highly innovative therapeutic strategy combining cell

  20. Column Chromatography Of Co(II), Zn(II) And Eu(III) Using Pistachio Shell And Different Mobile Phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pistachio shell particles (0.5-1 mm) have been applied as the stationary phase for studying the column chromatography of Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III) at room temperature; 26 + - 1 oC. This solid sorbent has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Its surface area and percent of swelling have been also determined. Different eluting agents have been used for eluting the sorbed elements. The elution curves have been done from which the distribution coefficients (K d ), number of theoretical plates (N) and heights equivalent to theoretical plates (H) have been determined. Column performance studies have been conducted for a representative system under certain experimented conditions and Van Deemter equation has been applied. Thermodynamic studies have been applied and thermodynamic functions ( δG 0 ,δH 0 andδ S 0 ) have been calculated for this representative system by determining K d at three different room temperatures (18, 26 and 37 + - 1o C).

  1. Randomized phase III trial of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: analysis of the CORRECT Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Komatsu, Yoshito; Yamada, Yasuhide; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Tsuji, Akihito; Ura, Takashi; Grothey, Axel; Van Cutsem, Eric; Wagner, Andrea; Cihon, Frank; Hamada, Yoko; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    In the international, phase III, randomized, double-blind CORRECT trial, regorafenib significantly prolonged overall survival (OS) versus placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that had progressed on all standard therapies. This post hoc analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations in the CORRECT trial. Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to regorafenib 160 mg once daily or placebo for weeks 1-3 of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was OS. Outcomes were assessed using descriptive statistics. One hundred Japanese and 660 non-Japanese patients were randomized to regorafenib (n = 67 and n = 438) or placebo (n = 33 and n = 222). Regorafenib had a consistent OS benefit in the Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations, with hazard ratios of 0.81 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.43-1.51) and 0.77 (95 % CI 0.62-0.94), respectively. Regorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, proteinuria, thrombocytopenia, and lipase elevations occurred more frequently in the Japanese subpopulation than in the non-Japanese subpopulation, but were generally manageable. Regorafenib appears to have comparable efficacy in Japanese and non-Japanese subpopulations, with a manageable adverse-event profile, suggesting that this agent could potentially become a standard of care in patients with mCRC.

  2. Column Chromatography Of Co(II), Zn(II) And Eu(III) Using Pistachio Shell And Different Mobile Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, A A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Radioisotopes Production Division, Hot Laboratories Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-07-01

    Pistachio shell particles (0.5-1 mm) have been applied as the stationary phase for studying the column chromatography of Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III) at room temperature; 26{sup +}-{sup 1}oC. This solid sorbent has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Its surface area and percent of swelling have been also determined. Different eluting agents have been used for eluting the sorbed elements. The elution curves have been done from which the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), number of theoretical plates (N) and heights equivalent to theoretical plates (H) have been determined. Column performance studies have been conducted for a representative system under certain experimented conditions and Van Deemter equation has been applied. Thermodynamic studies have been applied and thermodynamic functions ( {delta}G{sup 0} ,{delta}H{sup 0} and{delta} S{sup 0}) have been calculated for this representative system by determining K{sub d} at three different room temperatures (18, 26 and 37{sup +}-{sup 1o}C)

  3. Iodixanol in cerebral computed tomography: a randomized, double-blind, phase-III, parallel study with iodixanol and iohexol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfler, A.; Wanke, I.; Forsting, M.; Fiebach, J.; Sartor, K.; Henseke, P.

    1999-01-01

    Iodixanol is a new nonionic dimer, isotonic with blood at all clinically relevant concentrations. Iodixanol (270 mg I/ml) was compared in a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, phase-III study to the monomeric nonionic iohexol (300 mg I/ml) for evaluation of safety, tolerability and radiographic efficacy during cerebral CT. One hundred adult patients scheduled to undergo contrast-enhanced cerebral CT were randomly allocated to receive either iodixanol or iohexol. All completed the trial. Safety was evaluated by recording discomfort and other adverse events, tolerance by assessing intensity and incidence of discomfort. Radiographic efficacy was assessed from the diagnostic information and the radiographic density. No serious adverse events occurred. One patient (2 %) in the iodixanol group and one patient (2 %) in the iohexol group experienced a transient reddening at the neck and lower neck-line, respectively. Both contrast agents were well tolerated. One patient (2 %) in the iodixanol group and two patients (4 %) in the iohexol group experienced a sensation of warmth (discomfort) in connection with the injection. No difference between the two contrast media were noted radiographically. This comparison between iodixanol and iohexol showed both contrast media to be safe, well-tolerated and efficacious for use in cerebral CT. (orig.)

  4. Survival and human papillomavirus in oropharynx cancer in TAX 324: a subset analysis from an international phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Lorch, J H; Goloubeva, O; Tan, M; Schumaker, L M; Sarlis, N J; Haddad, R I; Cullen, K J

    2011-05-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and overall survival (OS) in oropharynx cancer (OPC) was retrospectively examined in TAX 324, a phase III trial of sequential therapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Accrual for TAX 324 was completed in 2003 and data updated through 2008. Pretherapy tumor biopsies were studied by PCR for human papillomavirus type 16 and linked to OS, progression-free survival (PFS) and demographics. Of 264 patients with OPC, 111 (42%) had evaluable biopsies; 56 (50%) were HPV+ and 55 (50%) were HPV-. HPV+ patients were significantly younger (54 versus 58 years, P = 0.02), had T1/T2 primary cancers (49% versus 20%, P = 0.001), and had a performance status of zero (77% versus 49%, P = 0.003). OS and PFS were better for HPV+ patients (OS, hazard ratio = 0.20, P < 0.0001). Local-regional failure was less in HPV+ patients (13% versus 42%, P = 0.0006); at 5 years, 82% of HPV+ patients were alive compared with 35% of HPV- patients (P < 0.0001). HPV+ OPC has a different biology compared with HPV- OPC; 5-year OS, PFS, and local-regional control are unprecedented. These results support the possibility of selectively reducing therapy and long-term morbidity in HPV+ OPC while preserving survival and approaching HPV- disease with more aggressive treatment.

  5. "cART intensification by the HIV-1 Tat B clade vaccine: progress to phase III efficacy studies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, Aurelio; Sgadari, Cecilia; Picconi, Orietta; Tripiciano, Antonella; Moretti, Sonia; Francavilla, Vittorio; Pavone Cossut, Maria Rosaria; Buttò, Stefano; Cozzone, Giovanni; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Monini, Paolo; Ensoli, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    In spite of its success at suppressing HIV replication, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) only partially reduces immune dysregulation and loss of immune functions. These cART-unmet needs appear to be due to persistent virus replication and cell-to-cell transmission in reservoirs, and are causes of increased patients' morbidity and mortality. Up to now, therapeutic interventions aimed at cART-intensification by attacking the virus reservoir have failed. Areas covered: We briefly review the rationale and clinical development of Tat therapeutic vaccine in cART-treated subjects in Italy and South Africa (SA). Vaccination with clade-B Tat induced cross-clade neutralizing antibodies, immune restoration, including CD4 + T cell increase particularly in low immunological responders, and reduction of proviral DNA. Phase III efficacy trials in SA are planned both in adult and pediatric populations. Expert commentary: We propose the Tat therapeutic vaccine as a pathogenesis-driven intervention that effectively intensifies cART and may lead to a functional cure and provide new perspectives for prevention and virus eradication strategies.

  6. Disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest in phase III surgical trials: survey of ten general surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Valérie; Moutel, Grégoire; Schwarz, Lilian; Michot, Francis; Herve, Christian; Tuech, Jean-Jacques

    2014-10-01

    Discussions regarding disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest (COI) in published peer-reviewed journal articles are becoming increasingly more common and intense. The aim of the present study was to examine whether randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in leading surgery journals report funding sources and COI. All articles reporting randomized controlled phase III trials published January 2005 through December 2010 were chosen for review from ten international journals. We evaluated the number of disclosed funding sources and COI, and the factors associated with such disclosures. From a review of 657 RCT from the ten journals, we discovered that presence or absence of a funding source and COI was disclosed by 47 % (309) and 25.1 % (165), respectively. Most articles in "International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)-affiliated journals" did not disclose COI. Disclosure of funding was associated with a journal impact factor >3 (51.7 vs 41.6 %; p funding sources (i.e., whether or not there was a funding source), and almost three quarters did not disclose whether COI existed. Our findings suggest the need to adopt best current practices regarding disclosure of competing interests to fulfill responsibilities to readers and, ultimately, to patients.

  7. Nature of the Blue-Phase-III endash isotropic critical point: An analogy with the liquid-gas transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, M.A.; Agayan, V.A.; Collings, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The analogy with the liquid-gas critical point is analyzed to clarify the nature of the pretransitional behavior of physical properties in the vicinity of the Blue-Phase-III endash isotropic transition in chiral liquid crystalline systems. The analogy is unusual: temperature serves as the ordering field and entropy plays the role of the order parameter. Both mean field and parametric equations of state are formulated in terms of scaling fields. The scaling fields are linear combinations of the physical fields, which are temperature and chirality. It is shown that mixing of the physical field variables naturally leads to a strong asymmetry with respect to the transition temperature in the behavior of the physical properties that cannot be described by simple power laws. While the mean field theory gives a good description of the experimental data, the scaling theory, if one incorporates mixing of the field variables, gives even better agreement with the experimental data, placing this transition in the same universality class as the three-dimensional Ising model. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Myocardial perfusion imaging with Technetium-99m Sestamibi and Thallium-201. Results of the phase III clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giering, L.; Haber, S.; Joseph, J.L.; Neacy, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Technetium-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) has been compared to 201 TI and coronary angiography in a large Phase III clinical trial to assess diagnostic accuracy. Exercise and rest planar (P) and SPECT (S) MIBI, and exercise and redistribution thallium-201 studies were performed in 150 healthy volunteers and 396 patients (379 males; mean age 51.3 years). Prior myocardial infarction was present in 50% of the patients. Sensitivity and specificity for angiographically defined cardiovascular diseases - CAD (>70% stenosis) for planar imaging was 90.3% and 81.3% for MIBI and 91.6% and 50.0% for 201 TI. Agreement was 88.7% MIBI and 84.0% for 201 TI. For SPECT imaging, sensitivity and specificity were 95.1% and 46.0% for MIBI and 92.3% and 39.7% for 201 TI. Agreement was 80.0% for MIBI and 76.1% for 201 TI. Tomographic normality rates were 91.4% and 92.9% for MIBI and 201 TI. Agreement for characterisation of defect type by MIBI and 201 TI SPECT was 82.5%. In females, sensitivity was comparable for both agents. Specificity of MIBI planar and SPECT imaging was higher then for 201 TI (P: 90.9% v. 66.7%; S: 76.2% v. 61.9%). The improved imaging characteristics of MIBI results in better diagnostic confidence when interpreting myocardial perfusion studies especially in women and obese patients

  9. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  10. Randomized Phase III and Extension Studies of Naldemedine in Patients With Opioid-Induced Constipation and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Harada, Toshiyuki; Murata, Toru; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Yokota, Takaaki; Arai, Masatsugu; Tada, Yukio; Narabayashi, Masaru; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent and debilitating adverse effect (AE) of opioids-common analgesics for cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naldemedine (S-297995), for OIC, specifically in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods This phase III trial consisted of a 2-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (COMPOSE-4) and an open-label, 12-week extension study (COMPOSE-5). In COMPOSE-4, eligible adults with OIC and cancer were randomly assigned on a 1:1 basis to receive once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of spontaneous bowel movement (SBM) responders (≥ 3 SBMs/week and an increase of ≥ 1 SBM/week from baseline). The primary end point of COMPOSE-5 was safety. Results In COMPOSE-4, 193 eligible patients were randomly assigned to naldemedine (n = 97) or placebo (n = 96). The proportion of SBM responders in COMPOSE-4 was significantly greater with naldemedine than with placebo (71.1% [69 of 97 patients] v 34.4% [33 of 96 patients]; P opioid withdrawal and had no notable impact on opioid-mediated analgesia. Conclusion Once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg effectively treated OIC and was generally well tolerated in patients with OIC and cancer.

  11. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  12. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  13. Combining mechanical foaming and thermally induced phase separation to generate chitosan scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, D P; Tran, P A; Tallon, C; O'Connor, A J

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel foaming methodology consisting of turbulent mixing and thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) was used to generate scaffolds for tissue engineering. Air bubbles were mechanically introduced into a chitosan solution which forms the continuous polymer/liquid phase in the foam created. The air bubbles entrained in the foam act as a template for the macroporous architecture of the final scaffolds. Wet foams were crosslinked via glutaraldehyde and frozen at -20 °C to induce TIPS in order to limit film drainage, bubble coalescence and Ostwald ripening. The effects of production parameters, including mixing speed, surfactant concentration and chitosan concentration, on foaming are explored. Using this method, hydrogel scaffolds were successfully produced with up to 80% porosity, average pore sizes of 120 μm and readily tuneable compressive modulus in the range of 2.6 to 25 kPa relevant to soft tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds supported 3T3 fibroblast cell proliferation and penetration and therefore show significant potential for application in soft tissue engineering.

  14. Classification of criticality calculations with correlation coefficient method and its application to OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmarks phase III-A and II-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A method for classifying benchmark results of criticality calculations according to similarity was proposed in this paper. After formulation of the method utilizing correlation coefficients, it was applied to burnup credit criticality benchmarks Phase III-A and II-A, which were conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Phase III-A benchmark was a series of criticality calculations for irradiated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies, whereas Phase II-A benchmark was a suite of criticality calculations for irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. These benchmark problems and their results were summarized. The correlation coefficients were calculated and sets of benchmark calculation results were classified according to the criterion that the values of the correlation coefficients were no less than 0.15 for Phase III-A and 0.10 for Phase II-A benchmarks. When a couple of benchmark calculation results belonged to the same group, one calculation result was found predictable from the other. An example was shown for each of the Benchmarks. While the evaluated nuclear data seemed the main factor for the classification, further investigations were required for finding other factors. (author)

  15. Novel solid phase extraction procedure for gold(III) on Dowex M 4195 prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey)], E-mail: mtuzen@gop.edu.tr; Saygi, Kadriye O. [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-08-15

    A method for solid phase extraction (SPE) of gold(III) using Dowex M 4195 chelating resin has been developed. The optimum experimental conditions for the quantitative sorption of gold(III), pH, effect of flow rates, eluent types, sorption capacity and the effect of diverse ions on the sorption of gold(III) have been investigated. The chelating resin can be reused for more than 100 cycles of sorption-desorption without any significant change in sorption of gold(III) ions. The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit (LOD) of gold were greater than 95% and 1.61 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 31. The relative standard deviation of the method was <5%. The adsorption capacity of the resin was 8.1 mg g{sup -1}. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of gold(III) in some real samples including water, soil and sediment samples.

  16. Use of probabilistic design methods for NASA applications. [to be used in design phase of Space Transportation Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability evaluation process designed to improve the reliability of advanced launch systems. The work performed includes the development of a reliability prediction methodology to be used in the design phase of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). This includes prediction techniques which use historical data bases as well as deterministic and probabilistic engineering models for predicting design reliability. In summary, this paper describes a probabilistic design approach for the next-generation liquid rocket engine, the STME.

  17. Systems engineering aspects to installation of the phased multi-year LANSCE-refurbishment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieck, Martin; Erickson, John E.; Gulley, Mark S.; Jones, Kevin W.; Rybarcyk, Larry J.

    2009-01-01

    The LANSCE Refurbishment Project (LANSCE-R) is a phased, multiyear project. The project is scheduled to start refurbishment in the 2nd quarter of fiscal year 2011. Closeout will occur during the 4th quarter of FY2016. During the LANSCE-R project, installation of project components must be scheduled during six annual 6-month maintenance-outages and not conflict with annual LANSCE operational commitments to its user facilities. The project and operations schedules must be synchronized carefully. Therefore, the scheduled maintenance outages, functional testing (with beam off, by primarily project personnel) and commissioning (with beam on, by primarily Accelerator Operation Technology (AOT) personnel) must be managed to accommodate operation. Active and effective coordination and communication between the project and AOT personnel must be encouraged to identify, as early as possible, any operational issues. This paper will report on the systems engineering approach to the integration and control of engineering activities.

  18. Rotary engine research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    A development history is presented for NASA's 1983-1991 Rotary Engine Enablement Program, emphasizing the CFD approaches to various problems that were instituted from 1987 to the end of the program. In phase I, a test rig was built to intensively clarify and characterize the stratified-charge rotary engine concept. In phase II, a high pressure, electronically controlled fuel injection system was tested. In phase III, the testing of improved fuel injectors led to the achievement of the stipulated 5 hp/cu inch specific power goal. CFD-aided design of advanced rotor-pocket shapes led to additional performance improvements.

  19. TWRS privatization: Phase I monitoring well engineering study and decommissioning plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.A.

    1996-09-11

    This engineering study evaluates all well owners and users, the status or intended use of each well, regulatory programs, and any future well needs or special purpose use for wells within the TWRS Privatization Phase I demonstration area. Based on the evaluation, the study recommends retaining 11 of the 21 total wells within the demonstration area and decommissioning four wells prior to construction activities per the Well Decommissioning Plan (WHC-SD-EN-AP-161, Rev. 0, Appendix I). Six wells were previously decommissioned.

  20. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Enric, E-mail: enric.bargallo@esss.se [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Arroyo, Jose Manuel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  1. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargalló, Enric; Arroyo, Jose Manuel; Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  2. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 System Specification Document Version 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpathi, Meara Allena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, John F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This document contains the system specifications derived to satisfy the system requirements found in the IDC System Requirements Document for the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project. This System Specification Document (SSD) defines waveform data processing requirements for the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The routine processing includes characterization of events with the objective of screening out events considered to be consistent with natural phenomena or non-nuclear, man-made phenomena. This document does not address requirements concerning acquisition, processing and analysis of radionuclide data but does include requirements for the dissemination of radionuclide data and products.

  3. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a 103 Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin ≥2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  4. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hidefumi, E-mail: mimura@marianna-u.ac.jp [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com; Takeuchi, Yoshito, E-mail: yotake62@qg8.so-net.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Miki, Tsuneharu, E-mail: tmiki@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Urology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakuhara, Yusuke, E-mail: yusaku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takanobu, E-mail: tyamamot@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Tochigi Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sato, Yozo, E-mail: ysato@aichi-cc.jp [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  5. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidefumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Sone, Miyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Miki, Tsuneharu; Gobara, Hideo; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Sato, Yozo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  6. PREVENTION OF CONVERSION TO ABNORMAL TCD WITH HYDROXYUREA IN SICKLE CELL ANEMIA: A PHASE III INTERNATIONAL RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Jane S.; McCarville, M. Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E.; Lobo, Clarisse L.C.; Moura, Patricia G.; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W.; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Boyett, James M.; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was an NHLBI-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ0-thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Due to slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI 0 to 35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI 6 to 81%) in observation arm at 15 months (p=0.16). In post-hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities, compared to observation (0% versus 50%, p=0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (−15.5 versus +10.2 cm/sec, p=0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities. PMID:26414435

  7. Prevention of conversion to abnormal transcranial Doppler with hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia: A Phase III international randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Jane S; McCarville, Mary Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Moura, Patricia G; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne P; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Boyett, James M; Ware, Russell E

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ(0) -thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age = 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Because of the slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI = 0-35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI = 6-81%) in observation arm at 15 months (P = 0.16). In post hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities when compared with observation (0% vs. 50%, P = 0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (-15.5 vs. +10.2 cm/sec, P = 0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Safety and tolerability of tegaserod in patients with chronic constipation: pooled data from two phase III studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Studies show that tegaserod effectively relieves the symptoms of chronic constipation\\/idiopathic constipation (CC). This pooled analysis assessed the safety and tolerability of tegaserod in a large dataset of CC patients. METHODS: Adverse event (AE) data were pooled from 2 double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trials of 12 weeks\\' duration. Post hoc analysis was conducted for the most frequent AEs (incidence, >or=3%). RESULTS: Eight hundred eighty-one, 861, and 861 patients received tegaserod 6 mg twice a day, 2 mg twice a day, or placebo, respectively. Most AEs were mild\\/moderately severe. AE incidence was similar for the tegaserod 6 mg and 2 mg twice a day (57.1% and 56.3%, respectively) and placebo groups (59.6%) and most frequent in the gastrointestinal system (tegaserod 6 mg twice a day, 25.8%; 2 mg twice a day, 22.5%; placebo, 24.6%). Headache, the most common AE, was slightly more frequent in the placebo group (tegaserod 6 mg twice a day, 11.0%; 2 mg twice a day, 10.1%; placebo, 13.2%). Diarrhea (generally transient and resolved with continued treatment) was the only AE with a statistically significant difference between groups (tegaserod 6 mg twice a day 6.6% vs placebo 3.0%, P=.0005). Serious AE incidence (1.4% overall) was comparable across treatment groups, although abdominal surgery was less common in the combined tegaserod (0.5%) than the placebo group (1.0%). Discontinuation as a result of AEs was slightly higher in tegaserod 6 mg twice a day patients (5.7%; 2 mg twice a day, 3.3%; placebo, 3.7%), mainly because of diarrhea. Laboratory and electrocardiogram parameters were comparable across groups. CONCLUSIONS: Tegaserod is well tolerated by patients with CC during 12 weeks of treatment.

  9. Dosimetric explanations of fatigue in head and neck radiotherapy: An analysis from the PARSPORT Phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Miah, Aisha B.; Brennan, Sinead; McQuaid, Dualta; Clark, Catharine H.; Partridge, Mike; Harrington, Kevin J.; Morden, James P.; Hall, Emma; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An unexpected finding from the phase III parotid sparing radiotherapy trial, PARSPORT (ISRCTN48243537, CRUK/03/005), was a statistically significant increase in acute fatigue for those patients who were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to standard conventional radiotherapy (CRT). One possible explanation was the difference in dose to central nervous system (CNS) structures due to differing beam portals. Using data from the trial, a dosimetric analysis of individual CNS structures was performed. Method: Dosimetric and toxicity data were available for 67 patients (27 CRT, 40 IMRT). Retrospective delineation of the posterior fossa, brainstem, cerebellum, pituitary gland, pineal gland, hypothalamus, hippocampus and basal ganglia was performed. Dosimetry was reviewed using summary statistics and dose–volume atlases. Results: A statistically significant increase in maximum and mean doses to each structure was observed for patients who received IMRT compared to those who received CRT. Both maximum and mean doses were significantly higher for the posterior fossa, brainstem and cerebellum for the 42 patients who reported acute fatigue of Grade 2 or higher (p ⩽ 0.01) compared to the 25 who did not. Dose–volume atlases of the same structures indicated that regions representing larger volumes and higher doses to each structure were consistent with a higher incidence of acute fatigue. There was no association between the dose distribution and acute fatigue for the other structures tested. Conclusions: The excess fatigue reported in the IMRT arm of the trial may, at least in part, be attributed to the dose distribution to the posterior fossa, cerebellum and brainstem. Future studies that modify dose delivery to these structures may allow us to test the hypothesis that radiation-induced fatigue is avoidable.

  10. A phase I/II study of Docetaxel/TS-1 with radiation for esophageal cancer patients. Step 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hirabayashi, Youko

    2006-01-01

    The therapy 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) with radiation is thought to be the standard therapy for esophageal cancer patients by now. However, the therapy is associated with a comparatively high incidence of gastrointestinal disorders and requires hospitalization. We have proposed a new regimen of Docetaxel and TS-1 with radiation for maintaining of QOL and improving outcome. Step 1 of the clinical phase I/II study was conducted for 10 cases from May 2004 to March 2006. Treatment could be accomplished in all cases, and no treatment-related deaths or adverse events of grade 4 were observed in any case. As for hematotoxicity, one case had leucopenia of grade 3 and neutropenia of grade 2. As for non-hematotoxic adverse events, anorexia of grade 3 was recognized in one case of level 3. The response rate evaluated by RECIST was 66% (CR in 2 cases, PR in 4 cases,) and the rate based on the Guide Lines for the Clinical and Pathologic Studies on Carcinoma of Esophagus by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Cancer was 70% (CR in 3 cases, PR in 4 cases). We assumed that the recommended dosage of TXT was 30 mg/m 2 and that of TS-1 was 60 mg/m 2 with radiotherapy of 60 Gy. This combination therapy may be recommended because of fewer adverse events and a higher responsive rate than the standard therapies. We intend to continue this study to step 2 and 3, and to reveal the response rate and adverse events for more esophageal cancer patients. (author)

  11. A Multicenter Phase I/II Study of the BCNU Implant (Gliadel ® Wafer) for Japanese Patients with Malignant Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Tomokazu; NISHIKAWA, Ryo; SUGIYAMA, Kazuhiko; NONOGUCHI, Naosuke; KAWABATA, Noriyuki; MISHIMA, Kazuhiko; ADACHI, Jun-ichi; KURISU, Kaoru; YAMASAKI, Fumiyuki; TOMINAGA, Teiji; KUMABE, Toshihiro; UEKI, Keisuke; HIGUCHI, Fumi; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; TAKESHIMA, Hideo; YAMASHITA, Shinji; ARITA, Kazunori; HIRANO, Hirofumi; YAMADA, Shinobu; MATSUTANI, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel® Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe. PMID:24739422

  12. Bitopertin in Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia-Results From the Phase III FlashLyte and DayLyte Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarski-Kirola, Dragana; Blaettler, Thomas; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, Wolfgang W; Garibaldi, George; Wang, Alice; Dixon, Mark; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Nasrallah, Henry; Lawrie, Stephen; Napieralski, Julie; Ochi-Lohmann, Tania; Reid, Carol; Marder, Stephen R

    2017-07-01

    There is currently no standard of care for treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, although some previous results with glutamatergic agonists have been promising. Three (SunLyte [WN25308], DayLyte [WN25309], and FlashLyte [NN25310]) phase III, multicenter, randomized, 24-week, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of adjunctive bitopertin in stable patients with persistent predominant negative symptoms of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. SunLyte met the prespecified criteria for lack of efficacy and was declared futile. Key inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia, score ≥40 on the sum of the 14 Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptoms and disorganized thought factors, unaltered antipsychotic treatment, and clinical stability. Following a 4-week prospective stabilization period, patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to bitopertin (5 mg and 10 mg [DayLyte] and 10 mg and 20 mg [FlashLyte]) or placebo once daily for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was mean change from baseline in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom factor score at week 24. The intent-to-treat population in DayLyte and FlashLyte included 605 and 594 patients, respectively. At week 24, mean change from baseline showed improvement in all treatment arms but no statistically significant separation from placebo in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom factor score and all other end points. Bitopertin was well tolerated. These studies provide no evidence for superior efficacy of adjunctive bitopertin in any of the doses tested over placebo in patients with persistent predominant negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effectiveness of cellulose sulfate vaginal gel for the prevention of HIV infection: results of a Phase III trial in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Halpern

    Full Text Available This trial evaluated the safety and effectiveness of 6% cellulose sulfate vaginal gel in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection.This Phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted between November 2004 and March 2007 in Lagos and Port Harcourt, Nigeria. We enrolled 1644 HIV-antibody negative women at high risk of HIV acquisition. Study participants were randomized 1:1 to cellulose sulfate or placebo and asked to use gel plus a condom for each act of vaginal intercourse over one year of follow-up. The participants were evaluated monthly for HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection, and for adverse events.The trial was stopped prematurely after the data safety monitoring board of a parallel trial concluded that cellulose sulfate might be increasing the risk of HIV. In contrast, we observed fewer infections in the active arm (10 than on placebo (13, a difference that was nonetheless not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.3-1.8; p = 0.56. Rates of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection were lower in the CS group but the difference was likewise not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.5-1.1; p = 0.19 for the combined STI outcome. Rates of adverse events were similar across study arms. No serious adverse events related to cellulose sulfate use were reported.Cellulose sulfate gel appeared to be safe in the evaluated study population but we found insufficient evidence that it prevented male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea or chlamydial infection. The early closure of the trial compromised the ability to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of cellulose sulfate against HIV.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120770.

  14. Phase I-II study of multiple daily fractions for palliation of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, K J; Spanos, W J; Lindberg, R D; Jose, B; Albrink, F

    1993-03-15

    To assess palliation of advance head and neck malignancies with the use of rapid hyper fractionation studies similar to the RTOG 85-02. 37 patients with 39 lesions were entered into the non-randomized Phase I-II protocol, between 1984 and 1991. Previously untreated malignancies were present in 24 lesions, primary recurrent diseases in six patients, metastasis to the head and neck in five patients and skin primaries in the remaining two cases. At presentation 15 of 37 patients (or 17 of 39 lesions) were in operable due to poor medical status, eight patients were considered technically in operable due to extent of disease, 10 patients had distant metastasis and four patients refused surgery. The protocol uses twice a day fraction (370 cGy per fraction) for 2 consecutive days totalling 1,480 cGy per course. Three courses were given at 3-week intervals for a final tumor dose of 4,440 cGy in twelve fraction over 8-9 weeks. Eleven of 39 lesions had complete response; 19 lesions had partial response; 4 lesions had no response; 3 lesions progressed under treatment. Response could not be assessed in two patients. The average survival after completion of therapy was 4.5 months ranging from 2 weeks to 31 months. Palliation was achieved in 33 of 39 lesions. The acute reactions were minimal and no late or long term complications were noted. The absence of significant complications with reasonable response in the high rate of palliation suggests that this rapid hyper fractionation palliation study should be studied for further evaluation.

  15. Implementation of a Novel Adherence Monitoring Strategy in a Phase III, Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnik, Marla J; Brown, Elizabeth R; Marzinke, Mark; Livant, Edward; Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Hendrix, Craig W; Matovu Kiweewa, Flavia; Nair, Gonasagrie; Soto-Torres, Lydia E; Schwartz, Katie; Hillier, Sharon L; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-11-01

    Placebo-controlled HIV-1 prevention trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have not generally used concurrent measurement of adherence because of the potential risk of unblinding. However, several pre-exposure prophylaxis trials for HIV-1 prevention among women failed to show effectiveness because of low product adherence. Evaluation of product adherence objectively during a study provides the opportunity for strengthening adherence activities at sites having low adherence. During MTN-020/ASPIRE, a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of the dapivirine intravaginal ring, we implemented an adherence monitoring system. Monitoring began in quarter 1 (Q1) 2013 and continued through the conclusion of the trial. Blood plasma was collected quarterly and tested for dapivirine concentrations while maintaining blinding among study team members involved in participant management. Dapivirine concentrations >95 pg/mL, reflecting >8 hours of continuous use, were assessed as signaling product use. Study leadership monitored results on a monthly basis and provided feedback to site investigators. Experiences were shared across sites to motivate staff and counsel participants to strive toward higher adherence levels. An upward trend in adherence was observed (P dapivirine >95 pg/mL increased from 63% in Q1 2013 to 84% by Q1 2015. Ongoing drug level testing as a marker of adherence in MTN-020/ASPIRE demonstrates the feasibility of real-time adherence monitoring while maintaining study blinding at the level of participants, sites, and study leadership. This approach is novel for large-scale effectiveness studies for HIV-1 prevention.

  16. Evaluation of Angiopoietin-2 as a biomarker in gastric cancer: results from the randomised phase III AVAGAST trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Escalona-Espinosa, Laura; Consalvo, Nicola; Goede, Valentin; Schiffmann, Lars; Scherer, Stefan J; Hedge, Priti; Van Cutsem, Eric; Coutelle, Oliver; Büning, Hildegard

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the phase III AVAGAST trial, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced gastric cancer. We studied the role of Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a key driver of tumour angiogenesis, metastasis and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment, as a biomarker. Methods: Previously untreated, advanced gastric cancer patients were randomly assigned to receive bevacizumab (n=387) or placebo (n=387) in combination with chemotherapy. Plasma collected at baseline and at progression was analysed by ELISA. The role of Ang-2 as a prognostic and a predictive biomarker of bevacizumab efficacy was studied using a Cox proportional hazards model. Logistic regression analysis was applied for correlations with metastasis. Results: Median baseline plasma Ang-2 levels were lower in Asian (2143 pg ml−1) vs non-Asian patients (3193 pg ml−1), P<0.0001. Baseline plasma Ang-2 was identified as an independent prognostic marker for OS but did not predict bevacizumab efficacy alone or in combination with baseline VEGF. Baseline plasma Ang-2 correlated with the frequency of liver metastasis (LM) at any time: Odds ratio per 1000 pg ml−1 increase: 1.19; 95% CI 1.10–1.29; P<0.0001 (non-Asians) and 1.37; 95% CI 1.13–1.64; P=0.0010 (Asians). Conclusions: Baseline plasma Ang-2 is a novel prognostic biomarker for OS in advanced gastric cancer strongly associated with LM. Differences in Ang-2 mediated vascular response may, in part, account for outcome differences between Asian and non-Asian patients; however, data have to be further validated. Ang-2 is a promising drug target in gastric cancer. PMID:27031850

  17. Oral minocycline for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): results of a phase I/II clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine A; Petrou, Philip; Chew, Emily Y; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai T

    2012-06-22

    Inflammation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema (DME). In particular, retinal microglia demonstrate increased activation and aggregation in areas of DME. Study authors investigated the safety and potential efficacy of oral minocycline, a drug capable of inhibiting microglial activation, in the treatment of DME. A single-center, prospective, open-label phase I/II clinical trial enrolled five participants with fovea-involving DME who received oral minocycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 months. Main outcome measurements included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal subfield thickness (CST), and central macular volume using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and late leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA). Findings indicated that the study drug was well tolerated and not associated with significant safety issues. In study eyes, mean BCVA improved continuously from baseline at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months by +1.0, +4.0, +4.0, and +5.8 letters, respectively, while mean retinal thickness (CST) on OCT decreased by -2.9%, -5.7%, -13.9, and -8.1% for the same time points. At month 6, mean area of late leakage on FA decreased by -34.4% in study eyes. Mean changes in contralateral fellow eyes also demonstrated similar trends. Improvements in outcome measures were not correlated with concurrent changes in systemic factors. In this pilot proof-of-concept study of DME, minocycline as primary treatment was associated with improved visual function, central macular edema, and vascular leakage, comparing favorably with historical controls from previous studies. Microglial inhibition with oral minocycline may be a promising therapeutic strategy targeting the inflammatory etiology of DME. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01120899.).

  18. Active surveillance for intussusception in a phase III efficacy trial of an oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jacob; Kawade, Anand; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bavdekar, Ashish; Bhandari, Nita; Taneja, Sunita; Antony, Kalpana; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Gupta, Arun; Kabra, Madhulika; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-08-11

    Post licensure studies have identified an increased risk of intussusception following vaccination with currently licensed rotavirus vaccines, raising safety concerns generic to all rotavirus vaccines. We describe the surveillance for intussusception in a phase III clinical trial with an oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine developed from the neonatal 116E strain. Using broad screening criteria and active surveillance, the incidence of intussusception between 6 weeks and 2 years of age was measured in 4532 children who received three doses of vaccine and 2267 children who received a placebo in the clinical trial. Possible intussusceptions were evaluated with a screening ultrasonogram. An independent intussusception case adjudication committee reviewed all intussusceptions and graded them on Brighton Collaboration criteria for diagnostic certainty. We identified twenty-three intussusceptions on ultrasound from 1361 evaluated sentinel events. Eleven were of level 1 diagnostic certainty as determined by the independent intussusception case adjudication committee. None required surgical intervention, and the earliest identified intussusception was at 36 days following the third dose in a placebo recipient. Among vaccine recipients the first event of intussusception occurred 112 days after the third dose. The incidence of ultrasound-diagnosed intussusception was 200/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 120, 320) among those receiving the vaccine and 141/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 50, 310) among those receiving the placebo. The incidence rate of confirmed intussusception among vaccine recipients was 94/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 41, 185) and 71/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 15, 206) among those receiving the placebo. In this licensure study, 23 cases of intussusception were identified through an active surveillance system, but there was no temporal association with rotavirus vaccination. The use of active surveillance with broad criteria intended for ensuring safety of children

  19. Phase II/III Study of Radiofrequency Ablation Combined with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Treating Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This phase II/III, non-randomized clinical trial aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of the combination of radiofrequency ablation (RFA and cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells transfusion for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs. Experimental Design: A total of 60 eligible patients with CRLMs were enrolled and divided into Group A (RFA alone, n = 30 and Group B (RFA plus CIK, n = 30, and following enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay was performed in 8 patients with CEA > 50 ng/mL pre-RFA and 7 days post-RFA and CIK treatment, respectively. Results: The median progression-free survival (PFS times of Group A and Group B were 18.5 months and 23 months, respectively (P = 0.0336. The 3-year progression-free rates were 13.3% in Group A and 20.3% in Group B, respectively. The median overall survival time was 43 months in Group A, and not reached in Group B. The 3-year survival rates were 64.6% in Group A and 81.0% in Group B, respectively (P = 0.1187. Among the 8 patients with CEA > 50ng/mL, 6 had increase of circulating CEA-specific T cells after RFA (P = 0.010. After CIK cell therapy, the number of CEA-specific T cells increased in all the 8 patients comparing with that pre-treatment (P = 0.001 and in 7 patients comparing with that post-RFA (P = 0.028. Conclusions: We firstly confirm that the combination of RFA and CIK cells boosts CEA-specific T cell response and shows to be an efficacious and safe treatment modality for patients with CRLMs.

  20. An overview of the MIZ-1 borehole investigations during phase I/II. MIZ-1 progress report 03-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Takeuchi, Shinji; Ikeda, Koki

    2004-05-01

    Surface-based investigations have now been carried out, in a step-by-step fashion, with the main aims of the development of conceptual models of the geological environment and the enhancement of the understanding of the undisturbed deep geological environment before excavation of the shafts and experimental drifts. The MIZ-1 borehole investigation programme was launched in December 2002, as a step of the field investigations at the MIU Construction Site. The overall goals of the MIZ-1 borehole investigations are to characterise the geological environment from the surface to over 1,000 m depth in the crystalline basement, to establish baseline conditions before excavation of the shafts and experimental drifts, and to provide a deep borehole for observing hydraulic responses during the shaft and drift excavation and experiments in the drifts during the Construction and the Operation Phases. The borehole is planned to be drilled in an overall south-westerly direction from the north-eastern area of the MIU Site. The planned inclination varies from vertical at shallower depths to 12deg from vertical at greater depths down to 1,350 m along the borehole length, which will be achieved by controlled directional drilling. In MIZ-1 Phase I/II (from March to May 2003), the borehole was drilled vertically, through the entire sedimentary formations, down to 123.00 m in the uppermost part of the Toki granite at the MIU Construction Site. The new method of wireline core drilling with a downhole motor was introduced for the drilling. Planned geological, geophysical and hydrochemical investigations and complementary hydraulic and hydrochemical monitoring were performed. In addition, as a complete loss of drilling fluid was encountered at 115.85 m along the borehole length, modified work procedures resulted in the execution of hydraulic tests with groundwater sampling, from necessity, in that section and of further drilling work. The local QC system was applied to all the

  1. Selumetinib in Combination With Dacarbazine in Patients With Metastatic Uveal Melanoma: A Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized Trial (SUMIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Richard D; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Chapman, Paul B; Frank, Stephen; Joshua, Anthony M; Piulats, Josep M; Wolter, Pascal; Cocquyt, Veronique; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Evans, T R Jeffry; Gastaud, Lauris; Linette, Gerald; Berking, Carola; Schachter, Jacob; Rodrigues, Manuel J; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Clemett, Delyth; Ghiorghiu, Dana; Mariani, Gabriella; Spratt, Shirley; Lovick, Susan; Barker, Peter; Kilgour, Elaine; Lai, Zhongwu; Schwartz, Gary K; Nathan, Paul

    2018-04-20

    Purpose Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults with no effective systemic treatment option in the metastatic setting. Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) is an oral, potent, and selective MEK1/2 inhibitor with a short half-life, which demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma in a randomized phase II trial. Methods The Selumetinib (AZD6244: ARRY-142886) (Hyd-Sulfate) in Metastatic Uveal Melanoma (SUMIT) study was a phase III, double-blind trial ( ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT01974752) in which patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and no prior systemic therapy were randomly assigned (3:1) to selumetinib (75 mg twice daily) plus dacarbazine (1,000 mg/m 2 intravenously on day 1 of every 21-day cycle) or placebo plus dacarbazine. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) by blinded independent central radiologic review. Secondary end points included overall survival and objective response rate. Results A total of 129 patients were randomly assigned to receive selumetinib plus dacarbazine (n = 97) or placebo plus dacarbazine (n = 32). In the selumetinib plus dacarbazine group, 82 patients (85%) experienced a PFS event, compared with 24 (75%) in the placebo plus dacarbazine group (median, 2.8 v 1.8 months); the hazard ratio for PFS was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.48 to 1.27; two-sided P = .32). The objective response rate was 3% with selumetinib plus dacarbazine and 0% with placebo plus dacarbazine (two-sided P = .36). At 37% maturity (n = 48 deaths), analysis of overall survival gave a hazard ratio of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.39 to 1.46; two-sided P = .40). The most frequently reported adverse events (selumetinib plus dacarbazine v placebo plus dacarbazine) were nausea (62% v 19%), rash (57% v 6%), fatigue (44% v 47%), diarrhea (44% v 22%), and peripheral edema (43% v 6%). Conclusion In patients with metastatic uveal melanoma, the combination of selumetinib plus dacarbazine had a tolerable safety

  2. Biodegradability engineering of biodegradable Mg alloys: Tailoring the electrochemical properties and microstructure of constituent phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Pil-Ryung; Han, Hyung-Seop; Yang, Gui-Fu; Kim, Yu-Chan; Hong, Ki-Ha; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jung, Jae-Young; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Kim, Young-Yul; Cho, Sung-Youn; Byun, Ji Young; Lee, Kang-Sik; Yang, Seok-Jo; Seok, Hyun-Kwang

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline Mg-based alloys with a distinct reduction in hydrogen evolution were prepared through both electrochemical and microstructural engineering of the constituent phases. The addition of Zn to Mg-Ca alloy modified the corrosion potentials of two constituent phases (Mg + Mg2Ca), which prevented the formation of a galvanic circuit and achieved a comparable corrosion rate to high purity Mg. Furthermore, effective grain refinement induced by the extrusion allowed the achievement of much lower corrosion rate than high purity Mg. Animal studies confirmed the large reduction in hydrogen evolution and revealed good tissue compatibility with increased bone deposition around the newly developed Mg alloy implants. Thus, high strength Mg-Ca-Zn alloys with medically acceptable corrosion rate were developed and showed great potential for use in a new generation of biodegradable implants. PMID:23917705

  3. Controlling phase separation in vanadium dioxide thin films via substrate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert Corder, Stephanie N.; Jiang, Jianjuan; Chen, Xinzhong; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Tung, I.-Cheng; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Jiawei; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Wen, Haidan; Tao, Tiger H.; Liu, Mengkun

    2017-10-01

    The strong electron-lattice interactions in correlated electron systems provide unique opportunities for altering the material properties with relative ease and flexibility. In this Rapid Communication, we use localized strain control via a focused-ion-beam patterning of Ti O2 substrates to demonstrate that one can selectively engineer the insulator-to-metal transition temperature, the fractional component of the insulating and metallic phases, and the degree of optical anisotropy down to the length scales of the intrinsic phase separation in V O2 thin films without altering the quality of the films. The effects of localized strain control on the strongly correlated electron system are directly visualized by state-of-the-art IR near-field imaging and spectroscopy techniques and x-ray microdiffraction measurements.

  4. Time to Angiographic Reperfusion and Clinical Outcome after Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Interventional Management of Stroke Phase III (IMS III) Trial: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Mazighi, Mikael; Broderick, Joseph P.; Liebeskind, David S.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Amarenco, Pierre; Carrozzella, Janice; Spilker, Judith; Foster, Lydia D.; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Jauch, Edward C.; Haley, E. Clarke; Vagal, Achala; Tomsick, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The IMS III Trial did not demonstrate clinical benefit of the endovascular approach compared to IV rt-PA alone for moderate or severe ischemic strokes (NIHSS≥8) enrolled within three hours of stroke onset. Late reperfusion of tissue that is no longer salvageable may be one explanation, as suggested by prior exploratory studies showing an association between time to reperfusion and good clinical outcome. We sought to validate this relationship in the large-scale IMS III trial, and consider its implications for future endovascular trials. METHODS The analysis consisted of the endovascular cohort with proximal arterial occlusions in the anterior circulation that achieved angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) during the endovascular procedure (within 7 hours from the onset of symptoms). Logistic regression was used to model good clinical outcome (90-day modified Rankin 0–2) as a function of the time to reperfusion, and prespecified variables were considered for adjustment. FINDINGS Among 240 proximal vessel occlusions, angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) was achieved in 182 (76%). Mean time to reperfusion was 325 minutes (range 180–418 minutes). Longer time for reperfusion was associated with a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome (RR [95% CI] for every 30 minute delay: unadjusted 0·85 [0·77–0·94]; adjusted 0·88 [0·80–0·98]). INTERPRETATION We confirm that delay in time to angiographic reperfusion leads to a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome. Achieving rapid reperfusion may be critical for the successes of future acute endovascular trials. FUNDING: NIH/NINDS (study sponsor), Genentech Inc. (study drug - intra-arterial t-PA), EKOS Corp. (device), Concentric Inc. (device), Cordis Neurovascular, Inc. (device), and Boehringer Ingelheim (European Investigator Meeting support). PMID:24784550

  5. Structural systematics of rare earth complexes. III. Structural characterization of lanthanoid (III) picrate hydrates: gadolinium picrate dodecahydrate - an x-ray-induced phase modifications? - and some general aspects of structural chemistry of lanthanoid picrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrowfield, J.M.; Weimin, Lu; Brian, W.S.; White, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    In the course of the previous studies (Parts I and II), an unusual result was observed in the case of the structure determination of hydrated gadolinium(III) picrate. Midway through data collection, the monoclinic P2 1 /c phase modification (X-ray-induced?) to a similar cell more nearly resembling that of the La→Pr structure type recorded previously, with no loss of crystal integrity, and with useful data sets being obtained on both forms. Redetermination of the structure with a fresh sample yielded no reproduction of the anomaly. These results are recorded and discussed, together with an overview of the consequences of the data of Parts I-III in relation to those of other literature in the field. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  6. Record mobility in transparent p-type tin monoxide films and devices by phase engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso

    2013-06-25

    Here, we report the fabrication of nanoscale (15 nm) fully transparent p-type SnO thin film transistors (TFT) at temperatures as low as 180 C with record device performance. Specifically, by carefully controlling the process conditions, we have developed SnO thin films with a Hall mobility of 18.71 cm2 V-1 s-1 and fabricated TFT devices with a linear field-effect mobility of 6.75 cm2 V-1 s -1 and 5.87 cm2 V-1 s-1 on transparent rigid and translucent flexible substrates, respectively. These values of mobility are the highest reported to date for any p-type oxide processed at this low temperature. We further demonstrate that this high mobility is realized by careful phase engineering. Specifically, we show that phase-pure SnO is not necessarily the highest mobility phase; instead, well-controlled amounts of residual metallic tin are shown to substantially increase the hole mobility. A detailed phase stability map for physical vapor deposition of nanoscale SnO is constructed for the first time for this p-type oxide. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Statewide Transportation Engineering Warehouse for Archived Regional Data (STEWARD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This report documents Phase III of the development and operation of a prototype for the Statewide Transportation : Engineering Warehouse for Archived Regional Data (STEWARD). It reflects the progress on the development and : operation of STEWARD sinc...

  8. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  9. Zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres as a sorbent for solid phase extraction of trace levels of V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) prior to their determination by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Gong, Dirong; Zhao, Junyi; Ren, Hongyun; Wang, Jiani; Zhang, Xian

    2018-03-19

    This paper describes the preparation of zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres (ZPMs) and their application to simultaneous enrichment of V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) from environmental water samples. The ZPMs were prepared by emulsion copolymerization of ethyl methacrylate, 2-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate followed by modification with 1,3-propanesultone. The components were analyzed by elemental analyses as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ZPMs were packed into a mini-column for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) of the above metal ions. Following extraction with 40 mM NH 4 NO 3 and 0.5 M HNO 3 solution, the ions were quantified by ICP-MS. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors (from a 40 mL sample) are up to 60 for the ions V(V), As(III), Sb(III) and Hg(II), and 55 for Cr(III) and Sn(IV). The detection limits are 1.2, 3.4, 1.0, 3.7, 2.1 and 1.6 ng L -1 for V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II), respectively, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are below 5.2%. The feasibility and accuracy of the method were validated by successfully analyzing six certified reference materials as well as lake, well and river waters. Graphical abstract Zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres (ZPMs) were prepared and packed into a mini-column for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) via pump 1. Then V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) ions in environmental waters were eluted and submitted to ICP-MS via pump 2.

  10. Bleeding and infection with external ventricular drainage: a systematic review in comparison with adjudicated adverse events in the ongoing Clot Lysis Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage Phase III (CLEAR-III IHV) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Mahua; Stadnik, Agnieszka; Riad, Fady; Zhang, Lingjiao; McBee, Nichol; Kase, Carlos; Carhuapoma, J Ricardo; Ram, Malathi; Lane, Karen; Ostapkovich, Noeleen; Aldrich, Francois; Aldrich, Charlene; Jallo, Jack; Butcher, Ken; Snider, Ryan; Hanley, Daniel; Ziai, Wendy; Awad, Issam A

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective series report varied rates of bleeding and infection with external ventricular drainage (EVD). There have been no prospective studies of these risks with systematic surveillance, threshold definitions, or independent adjudication. To analyze the rate of complications in the ongoing Clot Lysis: Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage Phase III (CLEAR III) trial, providing a comparison with a systematic review of complications of EVD in the literature. Patients were prospectively enrolled in the CLEAR III trial after placement of an EVD for obstructive intraventricular hemorrhage and randomized to receive recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator or placebo. We counted any detected new hemorrhage (catheter tract hemorrhage or any other distant hemorrhage) on computed tomography scan within 30 days from the randomization. Meta-analysis of published series of EVD placement was compiled with STATA software. Growing or unstable hemorrhage was reported as a cause of exclusion from the trial in 74 of 5707 cases (1.3%) screened for CLEAR III. The first 250 patients enrolled have completed adjudication of adverse events. Forty-two subjects (16.8%) experienced ≥1 new bleeds or expansions, and 6 of 250 subjects (2.4%) suffered symptomatic hemorrhages. Eleven cases (4.4%) had culture-proven bacterial meningitis or ventriculitis. Risks of bleeding and infection in the ongoing CLEAR III trial are comparable to those previously reported in EVD case series. In the present study, rates of new bleeds and bacterial meningitis/ventriculitis are very low despite multiple daily injections, blood in the ventricles, the use of thrombolysis in half the cases, and generalization to >60 trial sites.

  11. Liquid crystalline phase as a probe for crystal engineering of lactose: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharvil S; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2015-02-20

    The current work was undertaken to assess suitability of liquid crystalline phase for engineering of lactose crystals and their utility as a carrier in dry powder inhalation formulations. Saturated lactose solution was poured in molten glyceryl monooleate which subsequently transformed into gel. The gel microstructure was analyzed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Lactose particles recovered from gels after 48 h were analyzed for polymorphism using techniques such as FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Particle size, morphology and aerosolisation properties of prepared lactose were analyzed using Anderson cascade impactor. In situ seeding followed by growth of lactose crystals took place in gels with cubic microstructure as revealed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Elongated (size ∼ 71 μm) lactose particles with smooth surface containing mixture of α and β-lactose was recovered from gel, however percentage of α-lactose was more as compared to β-lactose. The aerosolisation parameters such as RD, ED, %FPF and % recovery of lactose recovered from gel (LPL) were found to be comparable to Respitose® ML001. Thus LC phase (cubic) can be used for engineering of lactose crystals so as to obtain particles with smooth surface, high elongation ratio and further they can be used as carrier in DPI formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxygen sensor equipped engine operation on methanol/gasoline blends and phase separation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, A J; Lawson, A; Simmons, E W; Mackay, D; Tsang, M; Maund, G B

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to address problems related to Canadian utilization of methanol/gasoline blends. These problems are: (1) cold weather operation; (2) water sensitivity to phase separation in winter; (3) vehicle compatibility: fuel/air ratio control, flexibility for vehicle movement outside of areas where methanol might be available. Specifically, the operation of the HydroShear (an in-line hydraulic emulsifier) on the two separated phases of a methanol/gasoline/water blend was examined. Fuel maps, by engine dynamometer testing, were generated using methanol/gasoline blends containing 15% to 65% methanol. The capability of an oxygen sensor, located in the exhaust system, to control the fuel/air ratio was found to be adequate within the 15% to 65% methanol/gasoline blends. A fuel injected Volvo 244DL with lambda-sond emission control and a carburetted Chevrolet Monza with 3-way catalyst closed loop feedback emission control system were the two engines selected for this study.

  13. Impact of baseline covariates on the immunogenicity of the 9-valent HPV vaccine - A combined analysis of five phase III clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone K; Restrepo, Jaime; Moreira, Edson D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The immunogenicity profile of the 9-valent HPV (9vHPV) vaccine was evaluated across five phase III clinical studies conducted in girls and boys 9-15 years of age and young women 16-26 years of age. The effect of baseline characteristics of subjects on vaccine-induced HPV antibody...... responses was assessed. METHODS: Immunogenicity data from 11,304 subjects who received ≥1 dose of 9vHPV vaccine in five Phase III studies were analyzed. Vaccine was administered as a 3-dose regimen. HPV antibody titers were assessed 1 month after dose 3 using a competitive Luminex immunoassay and summarized...... as geometric mean titers (GMTs). Covariates examined were age, gender, race, region of residence, and HPV serostatus and PCR status at day 1. RESULTS: GMTs to all 9 vaccine HPV types decreased with age at vaccination initiation, and were otherwise generally similar among the demographic subgroups defined...

  14. A phase III trial of zoladex and flutamide versus orchiectomy in the treatment of patients with advanced carcinoma of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Christensen, M G; Friis, E

    1990-01-01

    In a multicenter Phase III trial 264 patients with advanced prostatic cancer were randomized to either bilateral orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex supplemented by flutamide. Presently, median follow-up time is 30 months. A small difference in objective response was recorded in favor of the co......In a multicenter Phase III trial 264 patients with advanced prostatic cancer were randomized to either bilateral orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex supplemented by flutamide. Presently, median follow-up time is 30 months. A small difference in objective response was recorded in favor...... of the combination therapy, whereas no statistically significant difference was found in subjective response to therapy, time to progression, and overall survival. Adverse effects were more commonly encountered in the pharmacologically treated patients. It is concluded that the combination of zoladex plus flutamide...... is not clinically superior to orchiectomy in the treatment of patients with advanced carcinoma of the prostate....

  15. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a phase I/II prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, One Chul; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook; Kim, Yong Man; Kim, Young Tak; Nam, Joo Hyun; Mok, Jung Eun; Lee, Moo Song

    1998-01-01

    Prospective, single arm. Phase I/II clinical trial was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the concurrent chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy (RT) in patients with previously untreated locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. From May 1992 to January 1997, a total of 73 patients with advanced cervical carcinoma were entered on the protocol but 5 patients were excluded in analysis because of patients' refusal of treatment. Their ages ranged from 31 to 77 years, median 58 years. The international Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage distribution was as follows: IIB 46, IIIA 2, IIIB 15 and IVA 5. RT consisted of external beam irradiation to 4, 140-5, 040 cGy/23-28 fractions plus high dose rate intracavitary treatments to deliver a dose of 30-35 Gy to point A in 6-7 fractions. During the intracavitary treatments parametrial boost was delivered for point B dose of 60 Gy in stage IIB and 65 Gy in stage IIIB. Two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin (FP) chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion for 4 days, day 1-4, 29-32 and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 /dy intravenous bolus for 3 days, day 1-3, 29-31) administered starting on day 1 of 1 of RT. The median follow-up was 24 months (range 4-68+). Sixty-four patients were evaluable for survival rate in this protocol: The 5-year actuarial and disease-free survival rate were 52% and 64%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial survival for stage IIB and II+IVA patients were 58% and 36%, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rate for stage IIB and III+IVA patients were 71% and 46%, respectively. Of the 68 patients evaluated for patterns of failure, overall recurrence rate was 27.9% (19/68): local failure in 5.9% (4/68), distant metastasis in 10.3% (7/68) and both in 11.8% (8/68). Of the 64 patients evaluated for response at one month after the completion of treatment, the complete response rate was 78% (50/64). Concurrent chemoradiation appear to be a

  16. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Berle, Lisa; Graham, Roger; Chung, Maureen; Rothschild, Janice; Graves, Theresa; Cady, Blake; Ulin, Kenneth; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  17. Effect of silodosin on specific urinary symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of international prostate symptom scores in 2 phase III clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gittelman, Marc C; Marks, Leonard S; Hill, Lawrence A; Volinn, Weining; Hoel, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Marc C Gittelman1, Leonard S Marks2, Lawrence A Hill3, Weining Volinn3, Gary Hoel31South Florida Medical Research, Aventura, Florida, USA; 2University of California at Los Angeles and Urological Sciences Research Foundation, Los Angeles, California, USA; 3Watson Laboratories, Salt Lake City, Utah, USAPurpose: Pooled results from 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, US phase III studies (NCT00224107, NCT00224120) showed that silodosin, a uroselective α-blocker, significantly improved In...

  18. Comparison between publicly accessible publications, registries, and protocols of phase III trials indicated persistence of selective outcome reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Liang, Fei; Li, Wenfeng

    2017-11-01

    The decision to make protocols of phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) publicly accessible by leading journals was a landmark event in clinical trial reporting. Here, we compared primary outcomes defined in protocols with those in publications describing the trials and in trial registration. We identified phase III RCTs published between January 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015, in The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and The BMJ with available protocols. Consistency in primary outcomes between protocols and registries (articles) was evaluated. We identified 299 phase III RCTs with available protocols in this analysis. Out of them, 25 trials (8.4%) had some discrepancy for primary outcomes between publications and protocols. Types of discrepancies included protocol-defined primary outcome reported as nonprimary outcome in publication (11 trials, 3.7%), protocol-defined primary outcome omitted in publication (10 trials, 3.3%), new primary outcome introduced in publication (8 trials, 2.7%), protocol-defined nonprimary outcome reported as primary outcome in publication (4 trials, 1.3%), and different timing of assessment of primary outcome (4 trials, 1.3%). Out of trials with discrepancies in primary outcome, 15 trials (60.0%) had discrepancies that favored statistically significant results. Registration could be seen as a valid surrogate of protocol in 237 of 299 trials (79.3%) with regard to primary outcome. Despite unrestricted public access to protocols, selective outcome reporting persists in a small fraction of phase III RCTs. Only studies from four leading journals were included, which may cause selection bias and limit the generalizability of this finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Combination Process for Preparative Separation and Purification of Paclitaxel and 10-Deacetylbaccatin III Using Diaion® Hp-20 Followed by Hydrophilic Interaction Based Solid Phase Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshekanb, Mahsa; Rezadoost, Hassan; Javanbakht, Mehran; Ghassempour, Ali Reza

    2017-01-01

    There is no other naturally occurring defense agent against cancer that has a stronger effect than paclitaxel, commonly known under the brand name of Taxol®. The major drawback for the more widespread use of paclitaxel and its precious precursor, 10-deacetylbaccatin III (10-DAB III), is that they require large-scale extraction from different parts of yew trees (Taxus species), cell cultures, taxane-producing endophytic fungi, and Corylus species. In our previous work, a novel online two-dimensional heart-cut liquid chromatography process using hydrophilic interaction/ reversed-phase chromatography was used to introduce a semi-preparative treatment for the separation of polar (10-deacetylbaccatin III) and non-polar (paclitaxel) taxanes from Taxus baccata L. In this work, a combination of the absorbent (Diaion® HP-20) and a silica based solid phase extraction is utilized as a new, efficient, and cost effective method for large-scale production of taxanes. This process avoids the technical problem of two-dimensional preparative liquid chromatography. The first stage of the process involves discarding co-extractive polar compounds including chlorophylls and pigments using a non-polar synthetic hydrophobic absorbent, Diaion® HP-20. Extract was then loaded on to a silica based hydrophilic interaction solid phase extraction (silica 40-60 micron). Taxanes was eluted using a mixture of water and methanol at the optimized ratio of 70:30. Finally, the fraction containing taxanes was applied to semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC. The results revealed that using this procedure, paclitaxel and 10-DAB III could be obtained at 8 and 3 times more, respectively than by the traditional method of extraction. PMID:29552048

  20. The Combination Process for Preparative Separation and Purification of Paclitaxel and 10-Deacetylbaccatin III Using Diaion® Hp-20 Followed by Hydrophilic Interaction Based Solid Phase Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshekanb, Mahsa; Rezadoost, Hassan; Javanbakht, Mehran; Ghassempour, Ali Reza

    2017-01-01

    There is no other naturally occurring defense agent against cancer that has a stronger effect than paclitaxel, commonly known under the brand name of Taxol ® . The major drawback for the more widespread use of paclitaxel and its precious precursor, 10-deacetylbaccatin III (10-DAB III), is that they require large-scale extraction from different parts of yew trees ( Taxus species), cell cultures, taxane-producing endophytic fungi, and Corylus species. In our previous work, a novel online two-dimensional heart-cut liquid chromatography process using hydrophilic interaction/ reversed-phase chromatography was used to introduce a semi-preparative treatment for the separation of polar (10-deacetylbaccatin III) and non-polar (paclitaxel) taxanes from Taxus baccata L. In this work, a combination of the absorbent (Diaion ®  HP-20) and a silica based solid phase extraction is utilized as a new, efficient, and cost effective method for large-scale production of taxanes. This process avoids the technical problem of two-dimensional preparative liquid chromatography. The first stage of the process involves discarding co-extractive polar compounds including chlorophylls and pigments using a non-polar synthetic hydrophobic absorbent, Diaion ®  HP-20. Extract was then loaded on to a silica based hydrophilic interaction solid phase extraction (silica 40-60 micron). Taxanes was eluted using a mixture of water and methanol at the optimized ratio of 70:30. Finally, the fraction containing taxanes was applied to semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC. The results revealed that using this procedure, paclitaxel and 10-DAB III could be obtained at 8 and 3 times more, respectively than by the traditional method of extraction.

  1. Analysis of Regional Timelines To Set Up a Global Phase III Clinical Trial in Breast Cancer: the Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; Azambuja, Evandro de; Bradbury, Ian; Saini, Kamal S.; Bines, Jose; Simon, Sergio D. [UNIFESP; Van Dooren, Veerle; Aktan, Gursel; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Smith, Ian; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Boyle, Frances

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study measured the time taken for setting up the different facets of Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization (ALTTO), an international phase III study being conducted in 44 participating countries.Methods. Time to regulatory authority (RA) approval, time to ethics committee/institutional review board (EC/IRB) approval, time from study approval by EC/IRB to first randomized patient, and time from first to last randomized patient were prospectively collected i...

  2. Opioid Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) use during the Initial Experience with the IMPROVE PCA Trial: A Phase III Analgesic Trial for Hospitalized Sickle Cell Patients with Painful Episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dampier, Carlton D.; Smith, Wally R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Wager, Carrie Greene; Bell, Margaret C.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Keefer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Lewis; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Mack, A. Kyle; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M.; Miller, Scott T.; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Seaman, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Opioid analgesics administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) are frequently used for pain relief in children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) hospitalized for persistent vaso-occlusive pain, but optimum opioid dosing is not known. To better define PCA dosing recommendations, a multi-center phase III clinical trial was conducted comparing two alternative opioid PCA dosing strategies (HDLI-higher demand dose with low constant infusion or LDHI- lower demand dose and higher const...

  3. Strain engineering of topological phase transition in elemental gray tin: Dirac semimetal phase in the missing half of strain spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaqing; Liu, Feng

    Gray tin was previously found to be a strong topological insulator under compressive uniaxial strain. Here, based on effective k . p analysis and first-principles calculations, we discover that gray tin becomes a Dirac semimetal in the other missing half of strain spectrum, under tensile uniaxial strain. In this newly found Dirac semimetal state, two Dirac points which are tunable by tensile [001] strains, lie in the kz axis and Fermi arcs appear in the (100) surface. A large negative magnetoresistance is anticipated in this half of strain spectrum, which shows as a strong signature of the chiral anomaly effect. Comparing to other Dirac semimetal materials, the proposed Dirac semimetal state in the nontoxic elemental gray tin can be more easily manipulated and accurately controlled. We envision that gray tin provides a perfect platform for strain engineering of topological phase transitions by sweeping through the strain spectrum from positive to negative and vice versa. This work was support by DOE-BES (Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER46148).

  4. Safety and hemostatic efficacy of fibrin pad in partial nephrectomy: Results of an open-label Phase I and a randomized, standard-of-care-controlled Phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nativ Ofer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleeding severity, anatomic location, tissue characteristics, and visibility are common challenges encountered while managing intraoperative bleeding, and conventional hemostatic measures (suture, ligature, and cautery may sometimes be ineffective or impractical. While topical absorbable hemostats (TAH are useful hemostatic adjuvants, each TAH has associated disadvantages. Methods We evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a new advanced biologic combination product―fibrin pad―to potentially address some gaps associated with TAHs. Fibrin pad was assessed as adjunctive hemostat in open partial nephrectomy in single-center, open-label, Phase I study (N = 10, and as primary hemostat in multicenter, single-blind, randomized, standard-of-care (SOC-controlled Phase I/II study (N = 7 in Israel. It was used to control mild-to-moderate bleeding in Phase I and also spurting arterial bleeding in Phase I/II study. Phase I study assessed safety and Phase I/II study, proportion of successes at 10 min following randomization, analyzed by Fisher exact tests at 5% significance level. Results Phase I (N = 10: All patients completed the study. Hemostasis was achieved within 3–4 min (average = 3.1 min of a single application in all patients. Fibrin pad was found to be safe for human use, with no product-related adverse events reported. Phase I/II (N = 7: Hemostatic success at 10 min (primary endpoint was achieved in 3/4 patients treated with fibrin pad versus 0/3 patients treated with SOC. No clinically significant change in laboratory or coagulation parameters was recorded, except a case of post-procedural hemorrhage with fibrin pad, which was considered serious and related to the fibrin pad treatment, and required re-operation. Although Data Safety Monitoring Board authorized trial continuation, the sponsor decided against proceeding toward an indication for primary treatment of severe arterial

  5. Project 8, Phase III Design: Placing an eV-Scale Limit on the Neutrino Mass using Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblath, Noah; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design concept for Phase III of the Project 8 experiment. In the third phase of Project 8 we aim to place a limit on the neutrino mass that is similar to the current limits set by tritium beta-decay experiments, mν radioastronomy will be employed to search for and track electron signals in the fiducial volume. This talk will present the quantitative design concept for the phased-array receiver, and illustrate how we are progressing towards the Phase IV experiment, which will have sensitivity to the neutrino mass scale allowed by the inverted mass hierarchy. This work is supported by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program, and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  6. Thermal decomposition of phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAM), HTPB based propellants. The effect of iron(III)oxide burning-rate catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalheira, P.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L.; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    1995-01-01

    Phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAN) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) are the main ingredients of propellants used with success in some pyrotechnic igniter components of the VULCAIN liquid rocket engine for the ARIANE 5. Small amounts of selected additives play an important role in

  7. Whole brain radiotherapy after local treatment of brain metastases in melanoma patients - a randomised phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, Gerald; Shivalingam, Brindha; Dhillon, Haryana; Thompson, John F; Morton, Rachael L; Vardy, Janette; Nowak, Anna K; Mandel, Catherine; Forder, Peta M; Hong, Angela; Hruby, George; Burmeister, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metastases are a common cause of death in patients with melanoma. Systemic drug treatment of these metastases is rarely effective, and where possible surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are the preferred treatment options. Treatment with adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) following neurosurgery and/or SRS is controversial. Proponents of WBRT report prolongation of intracranial control with reduced neurological events and better palliation. Opponents state melanoma is radioresistant; that WBRT yields no survival benefit and may impair neurocognitive function. These opinions are based largely on studies in other tumour types in which assessment of neurocognitive function has been incomplete. This trial is an international, prospective multi-centre, open-label, phase III randomised controlled trial comparing WBRT to observation following local treatment of intracranial melanoma metastases with surgery and/or SRS. Patients aged 18 years or older with 1-3 brain metastases excised and/or stereotactically irradiated and an ECOG status of 0-2 are eligible. Patients with leptomeningeal disease, or who have had previous WBRT or localised treatment for brain metastases are ineligible. WBRT prescription is at least 30 Gy in 10 fractions commenced within 8 weeks of surgery and/or SRS. Randomisation is stratified by the number of cerebral metastases, presence or absence of extracranial disease, treatment centre, sex, radiotherapy dose and patient age. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with distant intracranial failure as determined by MRI assessment at 12 months. Secondary end points include: survival, quality of life, performance status and neurocognitive function. Accrual to previous trials for patients with brain metastases has been difficult, mainly due to referral bias for or against WBRT. This trial should provide the evidence that is currently lacking in treatment decision-making for patients with melanoma brain

  8. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  9. Continued Benefit to Rectal Separation for Prostate Radiation Therapy: Final Results of a Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: Daniel.Hamstra@gmail.com [Texas Oncology, Texas Center for Proton Therapy, Irving, Texas (United States); Mariados, Neil [Associated Medical Professionals of NY, PLLC, Syracuse, New York (United States); Sylvester, John [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Lakewood Ranch, East Bradenton, Florida (United States); Shah, Dhiren [Western New York Urology Associates, LLC, Doing Business as Cancer Care of WNY, Cheektowaga, New York (United States); Karsh, Lawrence [The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Hudes, Richard [Chesapeake Urology Associates, Doing Business as Chesapeake Urology Research Associates (The Prostate Center), Owings Mills, Maryland (United States); Beyer, David [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kurtzman, Steven [Urological Surgeons of Northern California Inc, Campbell, California (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey [The Research Foundation of State University of New York/State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Hsi, R. Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, Washington (United States); Kos, Michael [Urology Nevada, Reno, Nevada (United States); Ellis, Rodney [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Logsdon, Mark [Sutter Health Sacramento Sierra Region, Doing Business as Sutter Institute for Medical Research, Sacramento, California (United States); Zimberg, Shawn [Advanced Radiation Centers of New York, Lake Success, New York (United States); Forsythe, Kevin [Oregon Urology Institute, Springfield, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Hong [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Soffen, Edward [CentraState Medical Center, Freehold, New Jersey (United States); Francke, Patrick [Carolina Regional Cancer Center, LLC, 21st Century Oncology, Inc, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (United States); Mantz, Constantine [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Fort Meyers, Florida (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: SpaceOAR, a Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrogel intended to create a rectal–prostate space, was evaluated in a single-blind phase III trial of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy. A total of 222 men were randomized 2:1 to the spacer or control group and received 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles. The present study reports the final results with a median follow-up period of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Cumulative (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) toxicity was evaluated using the log-rank test. Quality of life (QOL) was examined using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the mean changes from baseline in the EPIC domains were tested using repeated measures models. The proportions of men with minimally important differences (MIDs) in each domain were tested using repeated measures logistic models with prespecified thresholds. Results: The 3-year incidence of grade ≥1 (9.2% vs 2.0%; P=.028) and grade ≥2 (5.7% vs 0%; P=.012) rectal toxicity favored the spacer arm. Grade ≥1 urinary incontinence was also lower in the spacer arm (15% vs 4%; P=.046), with no difference in grade ≥2 urinary toxicity (7% vs 7%; P=0.7). From 6 months onward, bowel QOL consistently favored the spacer group (P=.002), with the difference at 3 years (5.8 points; P<.05) meeting the threshold for a MID. The control group had a 3.9-point greater decline in urinary QOL compared with the spacer group at 3 years (P<.05), but the difference did not meet the MID threshold. At 3 years, more men in the control group than in the spacer group had experienced a MID decline in bowel QOL (41% vs 14%; P=.002) and urinary QOL (30% vs 17%; P=.04). Furthermore, the control group were also more likely to have experienced large declines (twice the MID) in bowel QOL (21% vs 5%; P=.02) and urinary QOL (23% vs 8%; P=.02). Conclusions: The benefit of a hydrogel spacer in

  10. Intravitreal Sirolimus for Noninfectious Uveitis: A Phase III Sirolimus Study Assessing Double-masKed Uveitis TReAtment (SAKURA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Merrill, Pauline T; Clark, W Lloyd; Banker, Alay S; Fardeau, Christine; Franco, Pablo; LeHoang, Phuc; Ohno, Shigeaki; Rathinam, Sivakumar R; Thurau, Stephan; Abraham, Abu; Wilson, Laura; Yang, Yang; Shams, Naveed

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal sirolimus in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis (NIU) of the posterior segment (i.e., posterior, intermediate, or panuveitis). Phase III, randomized, double-masked, active-controlled, 6-month study with intravitreal sirolimus. Adults with active NIU of the posterior segment (intermediate, posterior, or panuveitis), defined as a vitreous haze (VH) score >1+. Subjects discontinued NIU medications before baseline, except for systemic corticosteroids, which were allowed only for those already receiving them at baseline and were rapidly tapered after baseline per protocol. Intravitreal sirolimus assigned 1:1:1 at doses of 44 (active control), 440, or 880 μg, administered on Days 1, 60, and 120. The primary efficacy outcome was the percentage of subjects with VH 0 response at Month 5 (study eye) without use of rescue therapy. Secondary outcomes at Month 5 were VH 0 or 0.5+ response rate, corticosteroid tapering success rate (i.e., tapering to a prednisone-equivalent dosage of ≤5 mg/day), and changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Adverse events during the double-masked treatment period are presented. A total of 347 subjects were randomized. Higher proportions of subjects in the intravitreal sirolimus 440 μg (22.8%; P = 0.025) and 880 μg (16.4%; P = 0.182) groups met the primary end point than in the 44 μg group (10.3%). Likewise, higher proportions of subjects in the 440 μg (52.6%; P = 0.008) and 880 μg (43.1%; P = 0.228) groups achieved a VH score of 0 or 0.5+ than in the 44 μg group (35.0%). Mean BCVA was maintained throughout the study in each dose group, and the majority of subjects receiving corticosteroids at baseline successfully tapered off corticosteroids (44 μg [63.6%], 440 μg [76.9%], and 880 μg [66.7%]). Adverse events in the treatment and active control groups were similar in incidence, and all doses were well tolerated. Intravitreal sirolimus 440 μg demonstrated a significant

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE: the IEO phase I-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, Lisa; Grana, Chiara M.; Baio, Silvia M.; Lombardo, Dario; Chinol, Marco; Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Cremonesi, Marta; Ferrari, Mahila E. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Fazio, Nicola [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Oncology, Milan (Italy); Iodice, Simona [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Bartolomei, Mirco [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); M. Bufalini Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Cesena, FC (Italy); Sansovini, Maddalena [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Unit of Radiometabolic Medicine, Meldola, FC (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is used in tumours expressing type 2 somatostatin receptors (sst{sub 2}), mainly neuroendocrine. The aim of this prospective phase I-II study was to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE in multiple cycles. Fifty-one consecutive patients with unresectable/metastatic sst{sub 2}-positive tumours, divided into two groups, received escalating activities (3.7-5.18 GBq/cycle, group 1; 5.18-7.4 GBq/cycle, group 2) of {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE. Cumulative activities ranged from 3.7 to 29.2 GBq (median 26.4 GBq in median 6 cycles, group 1, 21 patients) and 5.55 to 28.9 GBq (median 25.2 GBq in 4 cycles, group 2, 30 patients), based on dosimetry. No major acute or delayed renal or haematological toxicity occurred (one grade 3 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia). Cumulative renal absorbed doses were 8-37 Gy (9-41 Gy bioeffective doses). A median decrease of creatinine clearance of 21.7% 6 months after PRRT, 23.9% after 1 year and 27.6% after 2 years was observed. Higher losses (>20%) occurred in patients with risk factors for renal toxicity, particularly hypertension and diabetes. Cumulative bone marrow doses were <1.5 Gy. Blood elements showed a progressive mild drop during cycles and recovered during follow-up (median 30 months). Thirty-nine patients were progressive at enrolment. Partial and complete responses occurred in 15 of 46 (32.6%) assessable patients. The median time to progression was 36 months. Overall survival was 68% at 36 months. Non-responders and patients with extensive tumour involvement had lower survival. {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE was well tolerated up to 29 GBq cumulative activity (up to 7.4 GBq/cycle). The maximum tolerated dose/cycle was not reached. However, considering the individual bone marrow function and the presence of risk factors for kidney toxicity, it seems safer to divide cumulative activities into lower activity cycles. (orig.)

  12. Continued Benefit to Rectal Separation for Prostate Radiation Therapy: Final Results of a Phase III Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Mariados, Neil; Sylvester, John; Shah, Dhiren; Karsh, Lawrence; Hudes, Richard; Beyer, David; Kurtzman, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hsi, R. Alex; Kos, Michael; Ellis, Rodney; Logsdon, Mark; Zimberg, Shawn; Forsythe, Kevin; Zhang, Hong; Soffen, Edward; Francke, Patrick; Mantz, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: SpaceOAR, a Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrogel intended to create a rectal–prostate space, was evaluated in a single-blind phase III trial of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy. A total of 222 men were randomized 2:1 to the spacer or control group and received 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles. The present study reports the final results with a median follow-up period of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Cumulative (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) toxicity was evaluated using the log-rank test. Quality of life (QOL) was examined using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the mean changes from baseline in the EPIC domains were tested using repeated measures models. The proportions of men with minimally important differences (MIDs) in each domain were tested using repeated measures logistic models with prespecified thresholds. Results: The 3-year incidence of grade ≥1 (9.2% vs 2.0%; P=.028) and grade ≥2 (5.7% vs 0%; P=.012) rectal toxicity favored the spacer arm. Grade ≥1 urinary incontinence was also lower in the spacer arm (15% vs 4%; P=.046), with no difference in grade ≥2 urinary toxicity (7% vs 7%; P=0.7). From 6 months onward, bowel QOL consistently favored the spacer group (P=.002), with the difference at 3 years (5.8 points; P<.05) meeting the threshold for a MID. The control group had a 3.9-point greater decline in urinary QOL compared with the spacer group at 3 years (P<.05), but the difference did not meet the MID threshold. At 3 years, more men in the control group than in the spacer group had experienced a MID decline in bowel QOL (41% vs 14%; P=.002) and urinary QOL (30% vs 17%; P=.04). Furthermore, the control group were also more likely to have experienced large declines (twice the MID) in bowel QOL (21% vs 5%; P=.02) and urinary QOL (23% vs 8%; P=.02). Conclusions: The benefit of a hydrogel spacer in

  13. Efficacy and tolerability of lodenafil carbonate for oral therapy of erectile dysfunction: a phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Fonseca, Gilvan N; Bertero, Eduardo B; Damião, Ronaldo; Rocha, Luíz C A; Jardim, Carlos R F; Cairoli, Carlos E; Teloken, Cláudio; Torres, Luiz O; Faria, Geraldo E; da Silva, Marcelo B; Pagani, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    This is a phase III, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on lodenafil carbonate (LC), a novel phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor developed in Brazil. Expanding information on LC efficacy and safety. International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) erectile domain, positive answers to the sexual encounter profile (SEP)-2 and SEP-3 questions and incidence of adverse events (AEs). A total of 350 men with erectile dysfunction (ED) of all degrees were randomized to placebo, LC 40 mg or LC 80 mg and followed for 4 weeks. They completed the IIEF and answered the SEP questions 2 and 3 after each intercourse without and with the use of LC. IIEF Erectile Domain scores without and with the use of medication were the following (mean [M] +/- standard deviation [SD]): placebo = 13.9 +/- 5.2 and 14.8 +/- 7.8; LC 40 mg = 13.6 +/- 5.3 and 18.6 +/- 8.0; LC 80 mg = 13.4 +/- 4.9 and 20.6 +/- 7.7 (analysis of variance [ANOVA] P < 0.01). Positive answers to SEP-2 without and with the use of medication were the following (M +/- SD): placebo = 55.3 +/- 43.2% and 52.1 +/- 41.4%; LC 40 mg = 46.4 +/- 44.3% and 63.5 +/- 42.0%; LC 80 mg = 50.2 +/- 40.9% and 80.8 +/- 32.3% (ANOVA P < 0.01). Positive answers to SEP-3 were the following: placebo = 20.2 +/- 32.3% and 29.7 +/- 38.1%; LC 40 mg = 19.6 +/- 34.3% and 50.8 +/- 44.4%; LC 80 mg = 20.8 +/- 33.2% and 66.0 +/- 39.3% (ANOVA P < 0.01). The patients with at least one AE were placebo = 28.7%, LC 40 mg = 40.9%, and LC 80 mg = 49.5%. AEs whose incidence was significantly higher with LC than with placebo included rhinitis, headache, flushing, visual disorder, and dizziness. LC showed a satisfactory efficacy-safety profile for oral therapy of ED.

  14. Engineering the Flow of Liquid Two-Phase Systems by Passive Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeyi; Kong, Tiantian; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Liqiu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a passive noise-control approach to engineering the two-phase flow in a microfluidic coflow system. The presence or absence of the jet breakup is studied for two immiscible oil phases, in a straight microchannel (referred to as the J device in the main text), an expansion microchannel (the W device) and a microchannel with the expansion-contraction geometry (the S device), respectively. We show that the jet breaks into droplets, in the jetting regime and the dripping regime (also referred to as the widening-jetting regime) for the straight channel and expansion channel, respectively, while a stable long jet does not break for the expansion-contraction geometry. As the inner phase passes the expansion-contraction functional unit, the random noise on the interface is significantly reduced and the hydrodynamic instability is suppressed, for a range of experimental parameters including flow rates, device geometry, liquid viscosity, and interfacial tension. We further present scale-up devices with multiple noise-control units and achieve decimeter-long yet stable jets. Our simple, effective, and robust noise-control approach can benefit microfluidic applications such as microfiber fabrication, interface chemical reaction, and on-chip distance transportation.

  15. The Systems Approach to Functional Job Analysis. Task Analysis of the Physician's Assistant: Volume II--Curriculum and Phase I Basic Core Courses and Volume III--Phases II and III--Clinical Clerkships and Assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake Forest Univ., Winston Salem, NC. Bowman Gray School of Medicine.

    This publication contains a curriculum developed through functional job analyses for a 24-month physician's assistant training program. Phase 1 of the 3-phase program is a 6-month basic course program in clinical and bioscience principles and is required of all students regardless of their specialty interest. Phase 2 is a 6 to 10 month period of…

  16. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  17. Modelling the continuous cooling transformation diagram of engineering steels using neural networks. Part I. Phase regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, P.J. van der; Wang, J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Sietsma, J.; Zwaag, S. van der [Delft Univ. of Technology, Lab. for Materials Science (Netherlands)

    2002-12-01

    A neural network model for the calculation of the phase regions of the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram of engineering steels has been developed. The model is based on experimental CCT diagrams of 459 low-alloy steels, and calculates the CCT diagram as a function of composition and austenitisation temperature. In considering the composition, 9 alloying elements are taken into account. The model reproduces the original diagrams rather accurately, with deviations that are not larger than the average experimental inaccuracy of the experimental diagrams. Therefore, it can be considered an adequate alternative to the experimental determination of the CCT diagram of a certain steel within the composition range used. The effects of alloying elements can be quantified, either individually or in combination, with the model. Nonlinear composition dependencies are observed. (orig.)

  18. Engineering reliability in design phase: An application to AP-600 reactor passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdr, D.; Siahpush, A.S.; Hills, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    A computerized reliability enhancement methodology is described that can be used at the engineering design phase to help the designer achieve a desired reliability of the system. It can take into account the limitation imposed by a constraint such as budget, space, or weight. If the desired reliability of the system is known, it can determine the minimum reliabilities of the components, or how many redundant components are needed to achieve the desired reliability. This methodology is applied to examine the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) of the new passively safe AP-600 reactor. The safety goal of a nuclear reactor dictates a certain reliability level of its components. It is found that a series parallel valve configuration instead of the parallel-series configuration of the four valves in one stage would improve the reliability of the ADS. Other valve characteristics and arrangements are explored to examine different reliability options for the system

  19. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-10

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas.

  20. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  1. Preliminary Investigation of Several Root Designs for Cermet Turbine Blades in Turbojet Engine III : Curved-root Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Deutsch, George C; Morgan, William C

    1955-01-01

    Stresses om tje root fastenings of turbine blades were appreciably reduced by redesign of the root. The redesign consisted in curving the root to approximately conform to the camber of the airfoil and elimination of the blade platform. Full-scale jet-engine tests at rated speed using cermet blades of the design confirmed the improvement.

  2. SCOPE1: a randomised phase II/III multicentre clinical trial of definitive chemoradiation, with or without cetuximab, in carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, Christopher N; Nixon, Lisette S; Griffiths, Gareth O; Al-Mokhtar, Ruby; Gollins, Simon; Staffurth, John N; Phillips, Ceri J; Blazeby, Jane M; Crosby, Tom D

    2011-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for patients with oesophageal cancer unsuitable for surgery due to the presence of co-morbidity or extent of disease, and is a standard treatment option for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Modern regimens of chemoradiotherapy can lead to significant long-term survival. However the majority of patients will die of their disease, most commonly with local progression/recurrence of their tumours. Cetuximab may overcome one of the principal mechanisms of tumour radio-resistance, namely tumour repopulation, in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of this research is first to determine whether the addition of cetuximab to definitive chemoradiotherapy for treatment of patients with non-metastatic carcinoma of the oesophagus is active (in terms of failure-free rate), safe, and feasible within the context of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in the UK. If the first stage is successful then the trial will continue to accrue sufficient patients to establish whether the addition of cetuximab to the standard treatment improves overall survival. SCOPE1 is a two arm, open, randomised multicentre Phase II/III trial. Eligible patients will have histologically confirmed carcinoma of the oesophagus and have been chosen to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy by an accredited multidisciplinary team including a specialist Upper GI surgeon. 420 patients will be randomised to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy with or without cetuximab using a 1:1 allocation ratio. During Phase II of the study, the trial will assess safety (toxicity), activity (failure-free rate) and feasibility (recruitment rate and protocol dose modifications/delays) in 90 patients in the experimental arm. If the experimental arm is found to be active, safe, and feasible by the Independent Data Monitoring Committee then recruitment will continue into Phase III. This second stage will recruit a further 120 patients into each arm

  3. SCOPE1: a randomised phase II/III multicentre clinical trial of definitive chemoradiation, with or without cetuximab, in carcinoma of the oesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffurth John N

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for patients with oesophageal cancer unsuitable for surgery due to the presence of co-morbidity or extent of disease, and is a standard treatment option for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Modern regimens of chemoradiotherapy can lead to significant long-term survival. However the majority of patients will die of their disease, most commonly with local progression/recurrence of their tumours. Cetuximab may overcome one of the principal mechanisms of tumour radio-resistance, namely tumour repopulation, in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of this research is first to determine whether the addition of cetuximab to definitive chemoradiotherapy for treatment of patients with non-metastatic carcinoma of the oesophagus is active (in terms of failure-free rate, safe, and feasible within the context of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in the UK. If the first stage is successful then the trial will continue to accrue sufficient patients to establish whether the addition of cetuximab to the standard treatment improves overall survival. Methods/Design SCOPE1 is a two arm, open, randomised multicentre Phase II/III trial. Eligible patients will have histologically confirmed carcinoma of the oesophagus and have been chosen to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy by an accredited multidisciplinary team including a specialist Upper GI surgeon. 420 patients will be randomised to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy with or without cetuximab using a 1:1 allocation ratio. During Phase II of the study, the trial will assess safety (toxicity, activity (failure-free rate and feasibility (recruitment rate and protocol dose modifications/delays in 90 patients in the experimental arm. If the experimental arm is found to be active, safe, and feasible by the Independent Data Monitoring Committee then recruitment will continue into Phase III. This second

  4. A novel solid phase extraction procedure on Amberlite XAD-1180 for speciation of Cr(III), Cr(VI) and total chromium in environmental and pharmaceutical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narin, Ibrahim; Kars, Ayse; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Due to the toxicity of chromium, species depend on their chemical properties and bioavailabilities, speciation of chromium is very important in environmental samples. A speciation procedure for chromium(III), chromium(VI) and total chromium in environmental samples is presented in this work, prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of chromium. The procedure is based on the adsorption of Cr(III)-diphenylcarbazone complex on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin. After oxidation of Cr(III), the developed solid phase extraction system was applied to determinate the total chromium. Cr(III) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(VI) content. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of Cr(VI) on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin were investigated. The effects of some alkaline, earth alkaline, metal ions and also some anions were also examined. Preconcentration factor was found to be 75. The detection limits (LOD) based on three times sigma of the blank (N: 21) for Cr(VI) and total chromium were 7.7 and 8.6 μg/L, respectively. Satisfactory results for the analysis of total chromium in the stream sediment (GBW7310) certified reference material for the validation of the presented method was obtained. The procedure was applied to food, water and pharmaceutical samples successfully

  5. Phase-coherent transport and spin-orbit-coupling in III/V-semiconductor nanowires; Phasenkohaerenter Transport und Spin-Bahn-Wechselwirkung in III/V-Halbleiternanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez Hernandez, Sergio

    2009-10-16

    Semiconductor nanowires fabricated by a bottom-up approach are not only interesting for the realization of future nanoscaled devices but also appear to be very attractive model systems to tackle fundamental questions concerning the transport in strongly confined systems. In order to avoid the problem connected with carrier depletion, narrowband gap semiconductors, i.e., InAs or InN, or core-shell Nanowires, i.e., GaAs/AlGaAs, are preferred. The underlying reason is that in InAs or InN the Fermi-level pinning in the conduction band results in a carrier accumulation at the surface. In fact, the tubular topology of the surface electron gas opens up the possibility to observe unconventional quantum transport phenomena. When the phase-coherence length in the nanowire is comparable to its dimensions the conductance fluctuates if a magnetic field is applied or if the electron concentration is changed by means of a gate electrode. These so-called universal conductance fluctuations being in the order of e{sup 2}/h originate from the fact that in small disordered samples, electron interference effects are not averaged out. In this work are analyzed universal conductance fluctuations to study the quantum transport properties in InN, InAs and GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. With the use of a magnetic field and a back-gate electrode the universal conductance fluctuations and localizations effects were analyzed. Since InN and InAs are narrow band gap semiconductors, one naturally expects spin-orbit coupling effects. Because this phenomena is of importance for spin electronic applications. However, owing to the cylindrical symmetry of the InN and InAs nanowires, the latter effect was observable and actually be used to determine the strength of spin-orbit coupling. In order to clearly separate the weak antilocalization effect from the conductance fluctuations, the averaging of the magnetoconductance at different gate voltages was essential. The low-temperature quantum transport properties

  6. Resonance vibrations in intake and exhaust pipes of in-line engines III : the inlet process of a four-stroke-cycle engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, O

    1940-01-01

    Using a previously developed method, the boundary process of four-stroke-cycle engines are set up. The results deviate considerably from those obtained under the assumption that the velocity fluctuation is proportional to the cylinder piston motion. The deviation is less at the position of resonance frequencies. By the method developed, the effect of the resonance vibrations on the volumetric efficiency can be demonstrated.

  7. Postoperative opioid sparing with injectable hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-diclofenac: pooled analysis of data from two Phase III clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan TJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tong J Gan,1 Neil Singla,2 Stephen E Daniels,3 Douglas A Hamilton,4,5 Peter G Lacouture,6,7 Christian RD Reyes,8 Daniel B Carr4,9 1Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, NY, 2Lotus Clinical Research, LLC, Pasadena, CA, 3Premier Research, Austin, TX, 4Javelin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 5New Biology Ventures, LLC, San Mateo, CA, 6Magidom Discovery, LLC, St Augustine, FL, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, 8Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, IL, 9Department of Anesthesiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Use of nonopioid analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management can reduce opioid consumption and potentially prevent opioid-related adverse events. This study examined the postoperative opioid-sparing effect of repeated-dose injectable diclofenac formulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD-diclofenac. Patients and methods: Pooled data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled Phase III trials were analyzed. Patients received HPβCD-diclofenac, placebo, or ketorolac by intravenous injection every 6 hours for up to 5 days following abdominal/pelvic or orthopedic surgery. Rescue opioid use was evaluated from the time of first study drug administration to up to 120 hours following the first dose in the overall study population and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity, age, and HPβCD-diclofenac dose. Results: Overall, 608 patients received ≥1 dose of study medication and were included in the analysis. While 93.2% of patients receiving placebo required opioids, the proportion of patients requiring opioids was significantly lower for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (18.75, 37.5, or 50 mg or ketorolac (P<0.005 for all comparisons. Mean cumulative opioid dose and number of doses were significantly lower among patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac versus placebo

  8. Decommissioning of the SPERT-III large leach pond at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning of the SPERT-III large leach pond. Prior to decontamination and decommissioning the pond basin was enclosed by a mesh and barbed wire fence. An 8-in. carbon steel discharge pipe ran from the SPERT-III reactor building to the pond basin. The outlet of the discharge pipe rested on a concrete apron in the pond basin. The soil in the pond basin contained low-level radioactive contamination. The fence and apron were removed, radiologically surveyed, found to be uncontaminated, and sent to the sanitary landfill for disposal. The discharge pipe was left buried in place. The pond basin was backfilled with radiologically clean soil to reduce the surface activity to background. The area was then seeded with crested wheatgrass. A permanent marker was erected at the center of the pond basin to indicate the presence of subsurface radioactive contamination and the location of the buried discharge pipe. 5 references, 32 figures, 2 tables

  9. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  10. The PACOVAR-trial: A phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichbaum, Michael; Fersis, Nikos; Schmidt, Marcus; Wallwiener, Markus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Mayer, Christine; Eickhoff, Regina; Bischofs, Esther; Gebauer, Gerhard; Fehm, Tanja; Lenz, Florian; Fricke, Hans-Christian; Solomayer, Erich

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic tyrosinkinaseinhibitor GW 786034 (pazopanib) in

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Mexican Hat site, Mexican Hat, Utah. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat millsite in Utah. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2,200,000 tons of tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. The six alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site (Option I), returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material (Options II, III, and IV), and consolidating the two piles into one pile and stabilizing it with cover material (Options V and VI). Fencing around the site or the tailings and the decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Options II and V provide 2 ft of cover material on the tailings, Options III, IV, and VI provide 4 ft, 13 ft, and 10 ft of cover, respectively. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $4,390,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not feasible at present

  12. Synchrotron Phase Tomography: An Emerging Imaging Method for Microvessel Detection in Engineered Bone of Craniofacial Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giuliani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of large 3D constructs, such as certain craniofacial bone districts, is nowadays a critical challenge. Indeed, the amount of oxygen needed for cell survival is able to reach a maximum diffusion distance of ~150–200 μm from the original vascularization vector, often hampering the long-term survival of the regenerated tissues. Thus, the rapid growth of new blood vessels, delivering oxygen and nutrients also to the inner cells of the bone grafts, is mandatory for their long-term function in clinical practice. Unfortunately, significant progress in this direction is currently hindered by a lack of methods with which to visualize these processes in 3D and reliably quantify them. In this regard, a challenging method for simultaneous 3D imaging and analysis of microvascularization and bone microstructure has emerged in recent years: it is based on the use of synchrotron phase tomography. This technique is able to simultaneously identify multiple tissue features in a craniofacial bone site (e.g., the microvascular and the calcified tissue structure. Moreover, it overcomes the intrinsic limitations of both histology, achieving only a 2D characterization, and conventional tomographic approaches, poorly resolving the vascularization net in the case of an incomplete filling of the newly formed microvessels by contrast agents. Indeed, phase tomography, being based on phase differences among the scattered X-ray waves, is capable of discriminating tissues with similar absorption coefficients (like vessels and woven bone in defined experimental conditions. The approach reviewed here is based on the most recent experiences applied to bone regeneration in the craniofacial region.

  13. Room temperature ionic liquids enhanced the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Chujie; Lin, Yao; Zhou, Neng; Zheng, Jiaoting; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► First reported enhancement effect of RTILs in HF-LPME for the speciation of chromium. ► The addition of RTILs led to 3.5 times improvement of the sensitivity of Cr(VI). ► The proposed method is a simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, green method. - Abstract: A new method for the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) based on enhancement effect of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) were used enhancement reagents and chelating reagent, respectively. The addition of room temperature ionic liquids led to 3.5 times improvement in the determination of Cr(VI). In this method, Cr(VI) reacts with DDTC yielding a hydrophobic complex, which is subsequently extracted into the lumen of hollow fiber, whereas Cr(III) is remained in aqueous solutions. The extraction organic phase was injected into FAAS for the determination of Cr(VI). Total Cr concentration was determined after oxidizing Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the presence of KMnO 4 and using the extraction procedure mentioned above. Cr(III) was calculated by subtracting of Cr(VI) from the total Cr. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.7 ng mL −1 and an enrichment factor of 175 were achieved. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 4.9% for Cr(VI) (40 ng mL −1 , n = 5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Room temperature ionic liquids enhanced the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chujie, E-mail: cjzeng@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Material, Yulin Normal College, Yulin, Guangxi 537000 (China); Lin, Yao; Zhou, Neng; Zheng, Jiaoting; Zhang, Wei [Department of Chemistry and Material, Yulin Normal College, Yulin, Guangxi 537000 (China)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First reported enhancement effect of RTILs in HF-LPME for the speciation of chromium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of RTILs led to 3.5 times improvement of the sensitivity of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is a simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, green method. - Abstract: A new method for the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) based on enhancement effect of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) were used enhancement reagents and chelating reagent, respectively. The addition of room temperature ionic liquids led to 3.5 times improvement in the determination of Cr(VI). In this method, Cr(VI) reacts with DDTC yielding a hydrophobic complex, which is subsequently extracted into the lumen of hollow fiber, whereas Cr(III) is remained in aqueous solutions. The extraction organic phase was injected into FAAS for the determination of Cr(VI). Total Cr concentration was determined after oxidizing Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the presence of KMnO{sub 4} and using the extraction procedure mentioned above. Cr(III) was calculated by subtracting of Cr(VI) from the total Cr. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.7 ng mL{sup -1} and an enrichment factor of 175 were achieved. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 4.9% for Cr(VI) (40 ng mL{sup -1}, n = 5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Adsorption of As(III), As(V) and Cu(II) on zirconium oxide immobilized alginate beads in aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Cho, Dong-Wan; Kumar, Rahul; Baek, Seung Han; Kurade, Mayur B; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-10-01

    A composite adsorbent to remove arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], and copper [Cu(II)] from aqueous phase was synthesized by immobilizing zirconium oxide on alginate beads (ZOAB). The composition (wt%) of ZOAB (Zr-34.0; O-32.7; C-21.3; Ca-1.0) was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Sorption studies were conducted on single and binary sorbate systems, and the effects of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, and pH on the adsorption performance of ZOAB (pHPZC = 4.3) were monitored. The sorption process for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) reached an equilibrium state within 240 h and 24 h, respectively, with maximum sorption capacities of 32.3, 28.5, and 69.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The addition of Cu(II) was favorable for As(V) sorption in contrast to As(III). In the presence of 48.6 mg L(-1) Cu(II), the sorption capacity of As(V) increased from 1.5 to 3.8 mg g(-1) after 240 h. The sorption data for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) conformed the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. The adsorption of As(III), As(V), and Cu(II) followed pseudo second order kinetics. The effect of arsenic species on Cu(II) sorption was insignificant. The results of present study demonstrated that the synthesized sorbent could be useful for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic contaminants from wastewaters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong-mei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Yan-hong; Lian, Hong-zhen; Hu, Xin

    2013-11-15

    A new approach of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using zincon-immobilized silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Zincon-Si-MNPs) as the MSPE absorbent. Cr(III) was quantitatively reserved on the absorbent at pH 9.1 while total Cr was reserved at pH 6.5. The absorbed Cr species were eluted by using 2 mol/L HCl and detected by GFAAS. The concentration of Cr(VI) could be calculated by subtracting Cr(III) from total Cr. All the parameters affecting the separation and extraction efficiency of Cr species such as pH, extraction time, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume and influence of co-existing ions were systematically examined and the optimized conditions were established accordingly. The detection limit (LOD) of the method was 0.016 and 0.011 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100 and 150. The precisions of this method (Relative standard deviation, RSD, n=7) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) at 0.1 ng mL(-1) were 6.0% and 6.2%, respectively. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified reference material of environmental water was analyzed, and the result of Cr speciation was in good agreement with the certified value. This MSPE-GFAAS method has been successfully applied for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in lake and tap waters with the recoveries of 88-109% for the spiked samples. Moreover, the MSPE separation mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) based on their adsorption-desorption on Zincon-Si-MNPs has been explained through various spectroscopic characterization. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Obtaining valid laboratory data in clinical trials conducted in resource diverse settings: lessons learned from a microbicide phase III clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Crucitti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS [1].In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL, responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL.Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented.Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity of final study data. It is essential that sponsors

  18. Alterations in the Rate of Limb Movement Using a Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Do Not Influence Respiratory Rate or Phase III Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Buono; Marissa Burnsed-Torres; Bethany Hess; Kristine Lopez; Catherine Ortiz; Ariel Girodo; Karen Lolli; Brett Bloom; David Bailey; Fred W. Kolkhorst

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of alterations in rate of limb movement on Phase III ventilation during exercise, independent of metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline. Subjects completed five submaximal exercise bouts on a lower body positive pressure treadmill (AlterG P 200). The percent body weight for the five exercise bouts was 100, 87, 75, 63, and 50% and each was matched for carbon dioxide production (V CO2 ). Naturally, to match the V CO2 while reducin...

  19. Phase III Randomized Study of SB5, an Adalimumab Biosimilar, Versus Reference Adalimumab in Patients With Moderate‐to‐Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Weinblatt, Michael E.; Baranauskaite, Asta; Niebrzydowski, Jaroslaw; Dokoupilova, Eva; Zielinska, Agnieszka; Jaworski, Janusz; Racewicz, Artur; Pileckyte, Margarita; Jedrychowicz‐Rosiak, Krystyna; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Ghil, Jeehoon; Sokolovic, S.; Mekic, M.; Prodanovic, N.; Gajic, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective SB5 is a biosimilar agent for adalimumab (ADA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and immunogenicity of SB5 in comparison with reference ADA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this phase III, randomized, double‐blind, parallel‐group study, patients with moderately to severely active RA despite treatment with methotrexate were randomized 1:1 to receive SB5 or reference ADA at a dosage of 40 mg subcutaneously every o...

  20. Pre-Preliminary results from the phase III of the IAEA CRP: optimizing of reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumovsky, M; Gillemot, F; Kryukov, A; Levit, V

    1994-12-31

    This paper gives preliminary results and some conclusions from Phase III of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on ``Optimizing the Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Programmes and their Analyses`` carried out during the last seven years in 15 member states. First analysis concerned: comparison of results from initial, un-irradiated materials condition, comparison of transition temperature shifts (from notch toughness testing) with respect to content of residual (P, Cu) and alloying (Ni) elements, type of material (base and weld metal), irradiation temperature (288 and 265 C), and type of fluence dependence. Special effort has been taken to the analysis of the behaviour of a chosen reference steel. (JRQ). 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Parameters for calculation of nuclear reactions of relevance to non-energy nuclear applications (Reference Input Parameter Library: Phase III). Summary report of the first research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Noy, R.

    2004-08-01

    A summary is given of the First Research Coordination Meeting on Parameters for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions of Relevance to Non-Energy Nuclear Applications (Reference Input Parameter Library: Phase III), including a critical review of the RIPL-2 file. The new library should serve as input for theoretical calculations of nuclear reaction data at incident energies up to 200 MeV, as needed for energy and non-energy modern applications of nuclear data. Technical discussions and the resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Programme are summarized, along with actions and deadlines. Participants' contributions to the RCM are also attached. (author)

  2. Retinoid production using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli with a two-phase culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hui-Jeong; Yoon, Sang-Hwal; Ryu, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Jung-Hun; Wang, Chong-Long; Kim, Jae-Yean; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2011-07-29

    Retinoids are lipophilic isoprenoids composed of a cyclic group and a linear chain with a hydrophilic end group. These compounds include retinol, retinal, retinoic acid, retinyl esters, and various derivatives of these structures. Retinoids are used as cosmetic agents and effective pharmaceuticals for skin diseases. Retinal, an immediate precursor of retinoids, is derived by β-carotene 15,15'-mono(di)oxygenase (BCM(D)O) from β-carotene, which is synthesized from the isoprenoid building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Retinoids are chemically unstable and biologically degraded via retinoic acid. Although extensive studies have been performed on the microbial production of carotenoids, retinoid production using microbial metabolic engineering has not been reported. Here, we report retinoid production using engineered Escherichia coli that express exogenous BCM(D)O and the mevalonate (MVA) pathway for the building blocks synthesis in combination with a two-phase culture system using a dodecane overlay. Among the BCM(D)O tested in E. coli, the synthetic retinoid synthesis protein (SR), based on bacteriorhodopsin-related protein-like homolog (Blh) of the uncultured marine bacteria 66A03, showed the highest β-carotene cleavage activity with no residual intracellular β-carotene. By introducing the exogenous MVA pathway, 8.7 mg/L of retinal was produced, which is 4-fold higher production than that of augmenting the MEP pathway (dxs overexpression). There was a large gap between retinal production and β-carotene consumption using the exogenous MVA pathway; therefore, the retinal derivatives were analyzed. The derivatives, except for retinoic acid, that formed were identified, and the levels of retinal, retinol, and retinyl acetate were measured. Amounts as high as 95 mg/L retinoids were obtained from engineered E. coli DH5α harboring the synthetic SR gene and the exogenous MVA pathway in addition to dxs overexpression, which

  3. Systems engineering implementation in the preliminary design phase of the Giant Magellan Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiten, J.; Johns, M.; Trancho, G.; Sawyer, D.; Mady, P.

    2012-09-01

    Like many telescope projects today, the 24.5-meter Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is truly a complex system. The primary and secondary mirrors of the GMT are segmented and actuated to support two operating modes: natural seeing and adaptive optics. GMT is a general-purpose telescope supporting multiple science instruments operated in those modes. GMT is a large, diverse collaboration and development includes geographically distributed teams. The need to implement good systems engineering processes for managing the development of systems like GMT becomes imperative. The management of the requirements flow down from the science requirements to the component level requirements is an inherently difficult task in itself. The interfaces must also be negotiated so that the interactions between subsystems and assemblies are well defined and controlled. This paper will provide an overview of the systems engineering processes and tools implemented for the GMT project during the preliminary design phase. This will include requirements management, documentation and configuration control, interface development and technical risk management. Because of the complexity of the GMT system and the distributed team, using web-accessible tools for collaboration is vital. To accomplish this GMTO has selected three tools: Cognition Cockpit, Xerox Docushare, and Solidworks Enterprise Product Data Management (EPDM). Key to this is the use of Cockpit for managing and documenting the product tree, architecture, error budget, requirements, interfaces, and risks. Additionally, drawing management is accomplished using an EPDM vault. Docushare, a documentation and configuration management tool is used to manage workflow of documents and drawings for the GMT project. These tools electronically facilitate collaboration in real time, enabling the GMT team to track, trace and report on key project metrics and design parameters.

  4. Two-phase plate-fin heat exchanger modeling for waste heat recovery systems in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Jager, de A.G.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and model validation for a modular two-phase heat exchanger that recovers energy in heavy-duty diesel engines. The model is developed for temperature and vapor quality prediction and for control design of the waste heat recovery system. In the studied waste heat

  5. Clinical translation of autologous cell-based tissue engineering techniques as Class III therapeutics in China: Taking cartilage tissue engineering as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autologous cell-based tissue engineering (TE techniques have been clinically approved for approximately 4 years in China, since the first cartilage TE technique was approved for clinical use by the Zhejiang Health Bureau. TE techniques offer a promising alternative to traditional transplantation surgery, and are different from those for transplanted tissues (biologics or pharmaceutical, the clinical translational procedures are unique and multitasked, and the requirements may differ from those of the target tissues. Thus, the translational procedure is still unfamiliar to most researchers and needs further improvement. This perspectives paper describes the key guidelines and regulations involved in the current translational process, and shares our translational experiences in cartilage TE to provide an example of autologous cell-based TE translation in China. Finally, we discuss the scientific and social challenges and provide some suggestions for future improvements.

  6. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phases 3 and 4. [variable cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, R. D.; Joy, W.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of various advanced propulsion concepts for supersonic cruise aircraft resulted in the identification of the double-bypass variable cycle engine as the most promising concept. This engine design utilizes special variable geometry components and an annular exhaust nozzle to provide high take-off thrust and low jet noise. The engine also provides good performance at both supersonic cruise and subsonic cruise. Emission characteristics are excellent. The advanced technology double-bypass variable cycle engine offers an improvement in aircraft range performance relative to earlier supersonic jet engine designs and yet at a lower level of engine noise. Research and technology programs required in certain design areas for this engine concept to realize its potential benefits include refined parametric analysis of selected variable cycle engines, screening of additional unconventional concepts, and engine preliminary design studies. Required critical technology programs are summarized.

  7. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Minamino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  8. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  9. Solution and gas phase evidence of anion binding through the secondary bonding interactions of a bidentate bis-antimony(iii) anion receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, J; Song, B; Li, X; Cozzolino, A F

    2017-12-20

    The solution and gas phase halide binding to a bis-antimony(iii) anion receptor was studied. This new class of anion receptors utilizes the strong Sb-centered secondary bonding interactions (SBIs) that are formed opposite to the polar Sb-O primary bond. 1 H NMR titration data were fitted statistically to binding models and solution-phase binding energetics were extracted, while the formation of anion-to-receptor complexes was observed using ESI-MS. Density functional theory calculations suggest that their affinity towards binding halide anions is mitigated by the strong explicit solvation effect in DMSO, which gives insights into future designs that circumvent direct solvent binding and are anticipated to yield tighter and perhaps more selectivity in anion binding.

  10. Design of the randomized, Phase III, QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roboz, Gail J; Montesinos, Pau; Selleslag, Dominik; Wei, Andrew; Jang, Jun-Ho; Falantes, Jose; Voso, Maria T; Sayar, Hamid; Porkka, Kimmo; Marlton, Paula; Almeida, Antonio; Mohan, Sanjay; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Skikne, Barry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have worse rates of complete remission and shorter overall survival than younger patients. The epigenetic modifier CC-486 is an oral formulation of azacitidine with promising clinical activity in patients with AML in Phase I studies. The Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial (CC-486-AML-001) examines CC-486 maintenance therapy (300 mg/day for 14 days of 28-day treatment cycles) for patients aged ≥55 years with AML in first complete remission. The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points include relapse-free survival, safety, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. This trial will investigate whether CC-486 maintenance can prolong remission and improve survival for older patients with AML.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of published phase I/II clinical trials between 1990-2010 in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma confirms limited outcomes and need for translational investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maldegem Annemiek M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High grade primary bone sarcomas are rare cancers that affect mostly children and young adults. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma are the most common histological subtypes in this age group, with current multimodality treatment strategies achieving 55-70% overall survival. As there remains an urgent need to develop new therapeutic interventions, we have reviewed published phase I/II trials that have been reported for osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma in the last twenty years. Results We conducted a literature search for clinical trials between 1990 and 2010, either for trials enrolling bone sarcoma patients as part of a general sarcoma indication or trials specifically in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. We identified 42 clinical trials that fulfilled our search criteria for general sarcoma that enrolled these patient groups, and eight and twenty specific trials for Ewing and osteosarcoma patients, respectively. For the phase I trials which enrolled different tumour types our results were incomplete, because the sarcoma patients were not mentioned in the PubMed abstract. A total of 3,736 sarcoma patients were included in these trials over this period, 1,114 for osteosarcoma and 1,263 for Ewing sarcoma. As a proportion of the worldwide disease burden over this period, these numbers reflect a very small percentage of the potential patient recruitment, approximately 0.6% for Ewing sarcoma and 0.2% for osteosarcoma. However, these data show an increase in recent activity overall and suggest there is still much room for improvement in the current trial development structures. Conclusion Lack of resources and commercial investment will inevitably limit opportunity to develop sufficiently rapid improvements in clinical outcomes. International collaboration exists in many well founded co-operative groups for phase III trials, but progress may be more effective if there were also more investment of molecular and translational research into

  12. Study Protocol: Phase III single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brafman-Kennedy Barbara

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breathlessness in advanced disease causes significant distress to patients and carers and presents management challenges to health care professionals. The Breathlessness Intervention Service (BIS seeks to improve the care of breathless patients with advanced disease (regardless of cause through the use of evidence-based practice and working with other healthcare providers. BIS delivers a complex intervention (of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments via a multi-professional team. BIS is being continuously developed and its impact evaluated using the MRC's framework for complex interventions (PreClinical, Phase I and Phase II completed. This paper presents the protocol for Phase III. Methods/Design Phase III comprises a pragmatic, fast-track, single-blind randomised controlled trial of BIS versus standard care. Due to differing disease trajectories, the service uses two broad service models: one for patients with malignant disease (intervention delivered over two weeks and one for patients with non-malignant disease (intervention delivered over four weeks. The Phase III trial therefore consists of two sub-protocols: one for patients with malignant conditions (four week protocol and one for patients with non-malignant conditions (eight week protocol. Mixed method interviews are conducted with patients and their lay carers at three to five measurement points depending on randomisation and sub-protocol. Qualitative interviews are conducted with referring and non-referring health care professionals (malignant disease protocol only. The primary outcome measure is 'patient distress due to breathlessness' measured on a numerical rating scale (0-10. The trial includes economic evaluation. Analysis will be on an intention to treat basis. Discussion This is the first evaluation of a breathlessness intervention for advanced disease to have followed the MRC framework and one of the first palliative care trials to use fast

  13. The structure of the blue luminescent delta-phase of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium(III) (Alq3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cölle, Michael; Dinnebier, Robert E; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2002-12-07

    The existence of the facial isomer in the delta-phase of Alq3 is proven by X-ray structural analysis, revealing that both the different molecular structure and the weaker overlap of the pi-orbitals of hydroxyquinoline ligands belonging to neighboring Alq3 molecules as compared to other phases (alpha, beta) are likely to be the origin of the significantly different optical properties of delta-Alq3.

  14. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Mirna, E-mail: msigrist@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Tudino, Mabel [Laboratorio de Analisis de Trazas, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH{sub 3} generation using 3.5 mol L{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4} in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -} on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 {mu}L sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h{sup -1}. The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species

  15. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, Mirna; Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio; Tudino, Mabel

    2011-01-01

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH 3 generation using 3.5 mol L -1 HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH 4 in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl - , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , HPO 4 2- , HCO 3 - on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C 6 H 8 O 6 solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 μg L -1 and 0.6 μg L -1 for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 μL sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h -1 . The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species separation was performed through the employ of a serial connection of membrane filters and

  16. Electronic properties of in-plane phase engineered 1T'/2H/1T' MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rajesh; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Sharma, Raman

    2018-04-01

    We present the first principles studies of semi-infinite phase engineered MoS2 along zigzag direction. The semiconducting (2H) and semi-metallic (1T') phases are known to be stable in thin-film MoS2. We described the electronic and structural properties of the infinite array of 1T'/2H/1T'. It has been found that 1T'phase induced semi-metallic character in 2H phase beyond interface but, only Mo atoms in 2H phase domain contribute to the semi-metallic nature and S atoms towards semiconducting state. 1T'/2H/1T' system can act as a typical n-p-n structure. Also high holes concentration at the interface of Mo layer provides further positive potential barriers.

  17. Engineering and design of a CO2 phase contrast interferometer system for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.D.; Coda, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes the development of a CO 2 laser interferometer system, the engineering, design and installation of the hardware, and the selection of materials specific to the requirements of a CO 2 laser diagnostic. A brief description of system operation is included. A phase contrast interferometer diagnostic has been designed and installed on the DIII-D tokamak to enhance studies of the physical characteristics of plasma turbulence, and specifically to analyze plasma density fluctuations in the boundary region of the plasma. A 20 watt CO 2 laser beam, operating at the 10.6 micron wavelength, is expanded to a diameter of 76 mm and directed through a series of mirrors which provide for entry of the beam into the vessel at a point 70 cm above the midplane at the 285 degree toroidal location. After being reflected from a mirror inside the vessel, the beam is directed downward so that it passes through the edge of the plasma immediately in front of a four-strap fast wave current drive rf antenna. The laser beam is then reflected by a second internal mirror and exits the vessel 70 cm below the midplane (also at 285 degrees) returning to an optical table through a final series of external steering mirrors

  18. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.7 million tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The 11 alternative actions presented range from completion of the present ongoing EPA site decontamination plan (Option I), to stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II-IV), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V-XI). All options include remedial action costs for off-site locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimates for the 11 options range from $540,000 to $12,500,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  19. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-31

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.7 million tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The 11 alternative actions presented range from completion of the present ongoing EPA site decontamination plan (Option I), to stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II-IV), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V-XI). All options include remedial action costs for off-site locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimates for the 11 options range from $540,000 to $12,500,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible.

  20. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  1. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings, the performance of radiometric measurements to determine the extent of radium contamination, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 704,000 tons of tailings at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. Ranchers Exploration and Development Company has been licensed by the State of Colorado to reprocess the tailings at a location 3 mi from the present site where they will be stabilized for long-term storage. The remedial action options include remedial action for structures in Naturita and Nucla (Option I) at an estimated cost of $270,000 and remedial action for structures and open land adjacent to the tailings site (Option II) at an estimated cost of $950,000

  2. Flow injection microfluidic device with on-line fluorescent derivatization for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in water samples after solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment of Three Gorges Region of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045 (China); Department of Chemistry, Beijing Key Laboratory of Microanalytical Methods and Instrumentation, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); He, Qiang, E-mail: heqiang0980@163.com [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment of Three Gorges Region of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045 (China); Lu, Ying [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Armed Police College, Chengdu, 610213 (China); Huang, Jing [Research Center for Advanced Computation, College of Science, Xihua University, Chengdu, 610039 (China); Lin, Jin-Ming, E-mail: jmlin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Beijing Key Laboratory of Microanalytical Methods and Instrumentation, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2017-02-22

    In this paper, a rapid and simple method using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS), as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent, was successfully developed for extraction and preconcentration trace amounts of Cr(III) in water samples. The synthesized magnetic-MWCNTs nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rhodamine derivative (R1) was synthesized and characterized as a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent derivatizing agent for Cr(III). After SPE procedure, Cr(III) analysis was performed by flow injection microfluidic chip with on-line fluorescent derivatization and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy detection. The parameters, which affected the efficiency of the developed method were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0–10.0 nM, with a detection limit of 0.094 nM and an enrichment factor of 38. Furthermore, real water samples were analyzed and good recoveries were obtained from 91.0 to 101.6%. - Graphical abstract: Flow injection microfluidic device with on-line fluorescent derivatization and detection coupled to LIF. - Highlights: • A highly selective and sensitive derivatizing reagent for Cr(III) was synthesized and characterized. • The magnetic-MWCNTs nanocomposite as a SPE sorbent was successfully synthesized and characterized. • A new portable detection system was developed for microfluidic chip FIA platform.

  3. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc, proposes an SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane mechanism to switch...

  4. Alterations in the rate of limb movement using a lower body positive pressure treadmill do not influence respiratory rate or phase III ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Michael J; Burnsed-Torres, Marissa; Hess, Bethany; Lopez, Kristine; Ortiz, Catherine; Girodo, Ariel; Lolli, Karen; Bloom, Brett; Bailey, David; Kolkhorst, Fred W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of alterations in rate of limb movement on Phase III ventilation during exercise, independent of metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline. Subjects completed five submaximal exercise bouts on a lower body positive pressure treadmill (AlterG P 200). The percent body weight for the five exercise bouts was 100, 87, 75, 63, and 50% and each was matched for carbon dioxide production (V CO2 ). Naturally, to match the V CO2 while reducing the body weight up to 50% of normal required a significant increase in the treadmill speed from 3.0 ± 0.1 to 4.1 ± 0.2 mph, which resulted in a significant (P body weight) to 133 ± 6 at 4.1 mph (i.e., 50% of body weight). The most important finding was that significant increases in step frequency did not significantly alter minute ventilation or respiratory rate. Such results do not support an important role for the rate of limb movement in Phase III ventilation during submaximal exercise, when metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline are controlled.

  5. Facilitating the implementation of the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery phase III skills curriculum: training faculty in the assessment of team skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Arora, Sonal; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-11-01

    Effective teamwork is critical to safety in the operating room; however, implementation of phase III of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) Curriculum that focuses on team-based skills remains worryingly low. Training and assessing the complexities of teamwork is challenging. The objective of this study was to establish guidelines and recommendations for training faculty in assessing/debriefing team skills. A multistage survey-based consensus study was completed by 108 experts responsible for training and assessing surgical residents from the ACS Accredited Educational Institutes. Experts agreed that a program to teach faculty to assess team-based skills should include training in the recognition of teamwork skills, practice rating these skills, and training in the provision of feedback/debriefing. Agreement was reached that faculty responsible for conducting team-based skills assessment should be revalidated every 2 years and stringent proficiency criteria should be met. Faculty development is critical to ensure high-quality, standardized training and assessment. Training faculty to assess team-based skills has the potential to facilitate the effective implementation of phase III of the ACS and APDS Curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alterations in the Rate of Limb Movement Using a Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Do Not Influence Respiratory Rate or Phase III Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Buono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of alterations in rate of limb movement on Phase III ventilation during exercise, independent of metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline. Subjects completed five submaximal exercise bouts on a lower body positive pressure treadmill (AlterG P 200. The percent body weight for the five exercise bouts was 100, 87, 75, 63, and 50% and each was matched for carbon dioxide production (VCO2. Naturally, to match the VCO2 while reducing the body weight up to 50% of normal required a significant increase in the treadmill speed from 3.0±0.1 to 4.1±0.2 mph, which resulted in a significant (P<0.05 increase in the mean step frequency (steps per minute from 118±10 at 3 mph (i.e., 100% of body weight to 133±6 at 4.1 mph (i.e., 50% of body weight. The most important finding was that significant increases in step frequency did not significantly alter minute ventilation or respiratory rate. Such results do not support an important role for the rate of limb movement in Phase III ventilation during submaximal exercise, when metabolic rate, gait style, and treadmill incline are controlled.

  7. Clinical Signatures of Mucinous and Poorly Differentiated Subtypes of Colorectal Adenocarcinomas by a Propensity Score Analysis of an Independent Patient Database from Three Phase III Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Oba, Koji; Aoyama, Toru; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Mayanagi, Shuhei; Maeda, Hiromichi; Honda, Michitaka; Hamada, Chikuma; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Sakamoto, Junichi; Saji, Shigetoyo; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2018-04-01

    Although colorectal cancer comprises several histological subtypes, the influences of histological subtypes on disease progression and treatment responses remain controversial. We sought to evaluate the prognostic relevance of mucinous and poorly differentiated histological subtypes of colorectal cancer by the propensity score weighting analysis of prospectively collected data from multi-institute phase III trials. Independent patient data analysis of a pooled database from 3 phase III trials was performed. An integrated database of 3 multicenter prospective clinical trials (the Japanese Foundation for Multidisciplinary Treatment of Cancer 7, 15, and 33) was the source of study data. Surgery alone or postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was offered in patients with resectable colorectal cancer. To balance essential variables more strictly for the comparison analyses, propensity score weighting was conducted with the use of a multinomial logistic regression model. We evaluated the clinical signatures of mucinous and poorly differentiated subtypes with regard to postoperative survival, recurrence, and chemosensitivity. Of 5489 patients, 136 (2.5%) and 155 (2.8%) were pathologically diagnosed with poorly differentiated and mucinous subtypes. The poorly differentiated subtypes were associated with a poorer prognosis than the "others" group (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.00-2.87; p = 0.051), particularly in the patient subgroup of adjuvant chemotherapy (HR, 2.16). Although the mucinous subtype had a marginal prognostic impact among patients with stage I to III colorectal cancer (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.90-1.96), it was found to be an independent prognostic factor in the subpopulation of patients with stage II disease, being associated with a higher prevalence of peritoneal recurrence. The treatment regimens of postoperative chemotherapy are now somewhat outdated. Both mucinous and poorly differentiated subtypes have distinct clinical characteristics. Patients with the mucinous subtype

  8. Simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) using reversed-phased ion-pairing liquid chromatography with dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R.E.; Morrison, J.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) species in waters, soil leachates and synthetic bio-fluids is described. The method uses reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography to separate the chromium species and a dynamic reaction cell (DRC??) equipped ICP-MS for detection of chromium. Separation of the chromium species is carried out in less than 2 min. Cr(iii) is complexed with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) prior to separation by mixing samples with the mobile phase containing 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), 0.5 mM EDTA (dipotassium salt), and 5% (vol/vol) methanol, adjusted to pH 7.6. The interfering 40Ar 12C+ background peak at mass 52 was reduced by over four orders of magnitude to less than 200 cps by using 0.65 mL min-1 ammonia as a reaction gas and an RPq setting on the DRC of 0.75. Method detection limits (MDLs) of 0.09 ??g L-1 for Cr(iii) and 0.06 ??g L-1 for Cr(vi) were obtained based on peak areas at mass 52 for 50 ??L injections of low level spikes. Reproducibility at 2 ??g L-1 was 3% RSD for 5 replicate injections. The tolerance of the method to various levels of common cations and anions found in natural waters and to matrix constituents found in soil leachates and simulated gastric and lung fluids was tested by performing spike recovery calculations for a variety of samples. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    execution phases of the project. The implementation included an HSE Bridging Document, which served to unify the HSE policies of the project partners and key subcontractors. The HSE plan and actual HSE results are presented in this document. There were no recordable HSE incidents during the project. A detailed logging program was developed based on project needs. The log data were acquired in accordance with the plan, and both the plan and log results are presented in this report. Log data were heavily utilized by the research staff, modelers, reservoir engineers, and for technical and permitting efforts. 5 Several key lessons were learned during the project: • Safety in operations and execution is paramount and is only achieved through proper planning and behavior control. The certainty of this was reinforced through implementation of this lesson and the resultant flawless HSE performance during the project. • Losses of drilling fluid circulation were larger than anticipated within the Potosi Formation. Circulation was only recovered through cementing the loss zones. • When possible, minimizing complexity in permit requirements and well designs is preferable. • The size of the wells were outside of the standard experience and expertise typical within the basin, and therefore required substantial planning and ramp-up of contractors and partners to meet project objectives. • With multiple stakeholders and research partners, establishing objectives and requirements early and adhering to change request procedures throughout the project are critical to manage competing data and sampling objectives that may be detrimental to overall progress. The well construction and completion operations were successfully executed, with all wells built in a manner that achieved excellent wellbore integrity. Log planning involved a number of stakeholders and technical specialists. Data collection from logging, coring, and testing was excellent. Time and effort spent with the

  10. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials. Part III - Biodegradation of thermoformed rigid PLA packaging under industrial composting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musioł, Marta; Sikorska, Wanda; Adamus, Grazyna; Janeczek, Henryk; Richert, Jozef; Malinowski, Rafal; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a forensic engineering study on the biodegradation behaviour of prototype packaging thermoformed from PLA-extruded film and plain PLA film under industrial composting conditions. Hydrolytic degradation in water was conducted for reference. The effects of composting duration on changes in molar mass, glass transition temperature and degree of crystallinity of the polymeric material were monitored using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The chemical structure of water soluble degradation products of the polymeric material was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results show that the biodegradation process is less dependent on the thermoforming process of PLA and more dependent on the composting/degradation conditions that are applied. The increase in the dispersity index, leading to the bimodal molar mass distribution profile, suggests an autocatalytic hydrolysis effect at the early stage of the composting process, during which the bulk hydrolysis mechanism dominantly operates. Both the prototype PLA-packaging and PLA rigid film samples were shown to have a gradual increase in opacity due to an increase in the degree of crystallinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Two-phase screw-type engine - problems of the filling process; Zweiphasen-Schraubenmotor - Probleme des Fuellungsvorganges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauder, K.; Kliem, B. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). FG Fluidenergiemaschinen

    1998-12-31

    The two-phase screw-type engine presents itself as a expansion engine in a trilateral-flash-cycle to use waste heat in the lower temperature range, because this displacement engine is able to expand working fluids with a high proportion of liquid. Due to the low critical velocity and the blocking flow, the two-phase flow in the inlet port of the screw-type engine has a great influence on the quality of energy transformation. A novel filling system with rotating short nozzles is presented. Less dissipation during the filling process is expected by this system, because the flash evaporation of the fluid will occur in the working chamber and not in the inlet port of the screw-type engine. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Zweiphasen-Schraubenmotor besitzt als Expansionsmaschine in Trilateral-Flash-Cycle-Prozessen zur Nutzung von Abwaerme mit niedriger Temperatur deutliche Vorteile, da dieser Maschinentyp in der Lage ist, Arbeitsfluide mit einem hohen Fluessigkeitsanteil zu expandieren. Die Zweiphasenstroemung im Einlassbereich des Schraubenmotors hat aufgrund ihrer geringen kritischen Geschwindigkeit und der damit verbundenen blockierten Stroemung einen signifikanten Einfluss auf die Fuellung der Arbeitskammer und der Energiewandlungsguete des Motors. Ein hier vorgestelltes neuartiges Fuellungssystem mit rotierenden Kurzduesen laesst eine verbesserte Fuellung des Zweiphasen-Schraubenmotors erwarten, da es erst in den Arbeitskammern zur Flashverdampfung kommt. (orig.)

  12. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik V; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (O) and capecitabine (C), and evaluate the safety and efficacy of this regimen in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods. In the Phase I part of the study a dose-escalation schedule of FDR G, O and C, administered every two weeks, was performed in patients with solid tumours...... and no other treatments or advanced CC. In the Phase II part response rate, toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival was evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed advanced CC. Results. Thirty-six patients entered the Phase I part and G 1 000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 15, O 60 mg/m(2) day 1...... and 15, and C 1 000 mg/m(2) BID day 1-7 and day 15-21 were established as MTD. In the Phase II part, 41 patients with advanced CC were included. Overall response rate was 34% and 51% had stable disease, resulting in a clinical benefit rate of 85%. Grade III and IV adverse events were rare. Median...

  13. Phase I/II study of azacitidine and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in refractory CIMP-high metastatic colorectal cancer: evaluation of circulating methylated vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michael J; Morris, Van; Moinova, Helen; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ensor, Joe; Lee, Michael S; Eng, Cathy; Kee, Bryan; Fogelman, David; Shroff, Rachna T; LaFramboise, Thomas; Mazard, Thibault; Feng, Tian; Hamilton, Stanley; Broom, Bradley; Lutterbaugh, James; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Markowitz, Sanford D; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-10-11

    Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands (CIMP) has been strongly implicated in chemotherapy resistance and is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs) termed CIMP-high. This phase I/II study in CRC (phase II portion restricted to CIMP-high CRC), treated fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin refractory patients with azacitidine (75 mg/m2/day subcutaneously D1-5) and CAPOX (capecitibine and oxaliplatin) every three weeks. Twenty-six patients (pts) were enrolled in this study: 15 pts (12 treated at MTD) in phase I and 11 pts in phase II. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. A total of 14 pts were CIMP-high. No responses were seen. CIMP-high status did not correlate with efficacy endpoints [stable disease (SD) or progression-free survival (PFS)] or baseline vimentin methylation level. Changes in vimentin methylation over time did not correlate with efficacy outcomes. Baseline methylated vimentin correlated with tumor volume (PCIMP-high pts, but no objective responses. Serum methylated vimentin may be associated with benefit from a regimen including a hypomethylation agent, although this study is not able to separate a potential prognostic or predictive role for the biomarker.

  14. Santé de l'écosystème urbain à Katmandou, au Népal - phase III ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les deux phases antérieures de ce projet (nos 003320 et 101277) ont permis la création et le renforcement de 18 groupes locaux ainsi que l'élaboration d'une nouvelle loi sur ... Assistance in synthesis and documentation of health, environment and development outcomes in urban eco-health project, Katmandu : report.

  15. "Brief Report: Increase in Production of Spoken Words in Some Children with Autism after PECS Teaching to Phase III"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah; Felce, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The context for this work was an evaluation study [Carr, D., & Felce, J. A. (in press)] of the early phases of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) [Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S. (1994). "The picture exchange communication system training manual." Cherry Hill, NJ: Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.; Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S.…

  16. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As{sup III}) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Y., E-mail: yiannisgeorgiou@hotmail.com [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Mouzourakis, E., E-mail: emouzou@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bourlinos, A.B., E-mail: bourlino@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Zboril, R., E-mail: radek.zboril@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Karakassides, M.A., E-mail: mkarakas@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Douvalis, A.P., E-mail: adouval@uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bakas, Th., E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Deligiannakis, Y., E-mail: ideligia@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Novel hybrid based on carbon nitride and iron nanoparticles (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe). • gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe superior As{sup III} sorbent(76.5 mg g{sup −1}). • Surface complexation modeling of As{sup III} adsorption. • Dual mode EPR,monitoring of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} evolution. - Abstract: A novel hybrid material (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10 nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20–100 nm). {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O{sub 2}. The as-prepared gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears Fe{sup 2+} and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O{sub 2}, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As{sup III} uptake capacity of 76.5 mg g{sup −1}, i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe is a superior As{sup III} sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11–36 mg g{sup −1}). The present results demonstrate that the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity.

  17. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service