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Sample records for engineering stem cells

  1. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by

  2. Stem cell evolutionary paradigm and cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Z

    2017-09-01

    Studying hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells for almost three decades revealed some similarities between the stem cell entity and the single-celled eukaryotes exhibiting the anaerobic/facultative aerobic metabolic features. A careful analysis of nowadays knowledge concerning the early eukaryotic evolution allowed us to reveal some analogies between stem cells in the metazoan tissues and the single-celled eukaryotes which existed during the first phase of eukaryotes evolution in mid-Proterozoic era. In fact, it is possible to trace the principle of the self-renewal back to the first eukaryotic common ancestor, the first undifferentiated nucleated cell possessing the primitive, mostly anaerobically-respiring mitochondria and a capacity to reproduction by a simple cell division "à l'identique". Similarly, the diversification of these single-cell eukaryotes and acquiring of complex life cycle allowed/conditioned by the increase of O2 in atmosphere (and consequently in the water environment) represents a prototype for the phenomenon of commitment/differentiation. This point of view allowed to predict the ex-vivo behavior of stem cells with respect to the O2 availability and metabolic profile which enabled to conceive the successful protocols of stem cell expansion and ex vivo conditioning based on "respecting" this relationship between the anaerobiosis and stemness. In this review, the basic elements of this paradigm and a possible application in cell engineering were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T.; Han, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer. PMID:25772134

  4. Engineering Concepts in Stem Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Mishra, Sachin; Singh, Satnam; Pei, Ming; Gulyas, Balazs; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman

    2017-09-13

    The field of regenerative medicine integrates advancements made in stem cells, molecular biology, engineering, and clinical methodologies. Stem cells serve as a fundamental ingredient for therapeutic application in regenerative medicine. Apart from stem cells, engineering concepts have equally contributed to the success of stem cell based applications in improving human health. The purpose of various engineering methodologies is to develop regenerative and preventive medicine to combat various diseases and deformities. Explosion of stem cell discoveries and their implementation in clinical setting warrants new engineering concepts and new biomaterials. Biomaterials, microfluidics, and nanotechnology are the major engineering concepts used for the implementation of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Many of these engineering technologies target the specific niche of the cell for better functional capability. Controlling the niche is the key for various developmental activities leading to organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Biomimetic understanding not only helped to improve the design of the matrices or scaffolds by incorporating suitable biological and physical components, but also ultimately aided adoption of designs that helped these materials/devices have better function. Adoption of engineering concepts in stem cell research improved overall achievement, however, several important issues such as long-term effects with respect to systems biology needs to be addressed. Here, in this review the authors will highlight some interesting breakthroughs in stem cell biology that use engineering methodologies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  6. Polymer microarray technology for stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Robert; Jia, Jia; Mei, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in developing soluble factors (e.g., small molecules and growth factors) to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activity has limited the realization of the enormous potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to a large number of materials properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties of materials) that can affect stem cell fate. This makes it challenging to design biomaterials to direct stem cell behavior. To address this, polymer microarray technology has been developed to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. In this article, we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in tissue engineering and disease modeling. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing chemically defined media to direct stem cells into a desired phenotype. However, the current lack of the suitable synthetic materials to regulate stem cell activities has been limiting the realization of the potential of stem cells. This can be attributed to the number of variables in material properties (e.g., chemical structures and physical properties) that can affect stem cells. Polymer microarray technology has shown to be a powerful tool to rapidly identify materials for a variety of stem cell applications. Here we summarize recent developments in polymer array technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  8. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Stem Cell-Based Dental Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Zivkovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biological and biomaterial sciences profiled tissue engineering as a new and powerful tool for biological replacement of organs. The combination of stem cells and suitable scaffolds is widely used in experiments today, in order to achieve partial or whole organ regeneration. This review focuses on the use of tissue engineering strategies in tooth regeneration, using stem cells and stem cells/scaffold constructs. Although whole tooth regeneration is still not possible, there are promising results. However, to achieve this goal, it is important to understand and further explore the mechanisms underlying tooth development. Only then will we be able to mimic the natural processes with the use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques.

  10. Stem cell engineering a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, Jeanne; McDevitt, Todd; Palecek, Sean; Schaffer, David; Zandstra, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This book describes a global assessment of stem cell engineering research, achieved through site visits by a panel of experts to leading institutes, followed by dedicated workshops. The assessment made clear that engineers and the engineering approach with its quantitative, system-based thinking can contribute much to the progress of stem cell research and development. The increased need for complex computational models and new, innovative technologies, such as high-throughput screening techniques, organ-on-a-chip models and in vitro tumor models require an increasing involvement of engineers and physical scientists. Additionally, this book will show that although the US is still in a leadership position in stem cell engineering, Asian countries such as Japan, China and Korea, as well as European countries like the UK, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands are rapidly expanding their investments in the field. Strategic partnerships between countries could lead to major advances of the field and scalable expansi...

  11. Bioreactor Engineering of Stem Cell Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nina; Marolt, Darja; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise to revolutionize modern medicine by development of new therapies, disease models and drug screening systems. Standard cell culture systems have limited biological relevance because they do not recapitulate the complex 3-dimensional interactions and biophysical cues that characterize the in vivo environment. In this review, we discuss the current advances in engineering stem cell environments using novel biomaterials and bioreactor technologies. We also reflect on the challenges the field is currently facing with regard to translation of stem cell based therapies into the clinic. PMID:23531529

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Johnathan; Bernhard, Jonathan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are of major interest in regenerative medicine, as they are easily harvested from a variety of sources (including bone marrow and fat aspirates) and they are able to form a range of mesenchymal tissues, in vitro and in vivo. We focus here on the use of MSCs for engineering of cartilage, bone, and complex osteochondral tissue constructs, using protocols that replicate some aspects of natural mesodermal development. For engineering of human bone, we discuss some of the current advances, and highlight the use of perfusion bioreactors for supporting anatomically exact human bone grafts. For engineering of human cartilage, we discuss the limitations of current approaches, and highlight engineering of stratified, mechanically functional human cartilage interfaced with bone by mesenchymal condensation of MSCs. Taken together, current advances enable engineering of physiologically relevant bone, cartilage and osteochondral composites, and physiologically relevant studies of osteochondral development and disease.

  13. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  15. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  16. Pluripotent stem cells and livestock genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Delia A; Ross, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    The unlimited proliferative ability and capacity to contribute to germline chimeras make pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) perfect candidates for complex genetic engineering. The utility of ESCs is best exemplified by the numerous genetic models that have been developed in mice, for which such cells are readily available. However, the traditional systems for mouse genetic engineering may not be practical for livestock species, as it requires several generations of mating and selection in order to establish homozygous founders. Nevertheless, the self-renewal and pluripotent characteristics of ESCs could provide advantages for livestock genetic engineering such as ease of genetic manipulation and improved efficiency of cloning by nuclear transplantation. These advantages have resulted in many attempts to isolate livestock ESCs, yet it has been generally concluded that the culture conditions tested so far are not supportive of livestock ESCs self-renewal and proliferation. In contrast, there are numerous reports of derivation of livestock induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), with demonstrated capacity for long term proliferation and in vivo pluripotency, as indicated by teratoma formation assay. However, to what extent these iPSCs represent fully reprogrammed PSCs remains controversial, as most livestock iPSCs depend on continuous expression of reprogramming factors. Moreover, germline chimerism has not been robustly demonstrated, with only one successful report with very low efficiency. Therefore, even 34 years after derivation of mouse ESCs and their extensive use in the generation of genetic models, the livestock genetic engineering field can stand to gain enormously from continued investigations into the derivation and application of ESCs and iPSCs.

  17. Animal and plant stem cells concepts, propagation and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlović, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a multifaceted look into the world of stem cells and explains the similarities and differences between plant and human stem cells. It explores the intersection between animals and plants and explains their cooperative role in bioengineering studies. The book treats both theoretical and practical aspects of stem cell research. It covers the advantages and limitations of many common applications related to stem cells: their sources, categories, engineering of these cells, reprogramming of their functions, and their role as novel cellular therapeutic approach. Written by experts in the field, the book focuses on aspects of stem cells ranging from expansion-propagation to metabolic reprogramming. It introduces the emergence of cancer stem cells and different modalities in targeted cancer stem cell therapies. It is a valuable source of fresh information for academics and researchers, examining molecular mechanisms of animal and plant stem cell regulation and their usage for therapeutic applicati...

  18. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. CellNet: network biology applied to stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Morris, Samantha A; Lummertz da Rocha, Edroaldo; Daley, George Q; Collins, James J

    2014-08-14

    Somatic cell reprogramming, directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, and direct conversions between differentiated cell lineages represent powerful approaches to engineer cells for research and regenerative medicine. We have developed CellNet, a network biology platform that more accurately assesses the fidelity of cellular engineering than existing methodologies and generates hypotheses for improving cell derivations. Analyzing expression data from 56 published reports, we found that cells derived via directed differentiation more closely resemble their in vivo counterparts than products of direct conversion, as reflected by the establishment of target cell-type gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Furthermore, we discovered that directly converted cells fail to adequately silence expression programs of the starting population and that the establishment of unintended GRNs is common to virtually every cellular engineering paradigm. CellNet provides a platform for quantifying how closely engineered cell populations resemble their target cell type and a rational strategy to guide enhanced cellular engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  1. Stem cells scaffolds as a carrier for tissue engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thaysa Fedalto Lopes; Agnes Levandowski; Sabrina Cunha da Fonseca; João Cesar Zielak; Moira Pedroso Leão

    2016-01-01

    ...: The aim of this paper is to provide a review about current and future materials for scaffolds to carry stem cells in tissue engineering in Dentistry, especially for bone tissue repair. Literature review...

  2. Artificial cell microencapsulated stem cells in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells, especially isolated from bone marrow, have been extensively investigated in recent years. Studies focus on their multiple plasticity oftransdifferentiating into various cell lineages and on their potential in cellular therapy in regenerative medicine. In many cases, there is the need for tissue engineering manipulation. Among the different approaches of stem cells tissue engineering, microencapsulation can immobilize stem cells to provide a favorable microenvironment for stem cells survival and functioning. Furthermore, microencapsulated stem cells are immunoisolated after transplantation. We show that one intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated bone marrow stem cells can prolong the survival of liver failure rat models with 90% of the liver removed surgically. In addition to transdifferentiation, bone marrow stem cells can act as feeder cells. For example, when coencapsulated with hepatocytes, stem cells can increase the viability and function of the hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Artificial Cell Microencapsulated Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cells, especially isolated from bone marrow, have been extensively investigated in recent years. Studies focus on their multiple plasticity of transdifferentiating into various cell lineages and on their potential in cellular therapy in regenerative medicine. In many cases, there is the need for tissue engineering manipulation. Among the different approaches of stem cells tissue engineering, microencapsulation can immobilize stem cells to provide a favorable microenvironment for stem cells survival and functioning. Furthermore, microencapsulated stem cells are immunoisolated after transplantation. We show that one intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated bone marrow stem cells can prolong the survival of liver failure rat models with 90% of the liver removed surgically. In addition to transdifferentiation, bone marrow stem cells can act as feeder cells. For example, when coencapsulated with hepatocytes, stem cells can increase the viability and function of the hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20384219

  4. Genome engineering of stem cell organoids for disease modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmin Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Precision medicine emerges as a new approach that takes into account individual variability. Successful realization of precision medicine requires disease models that are able to incorporate personalized disease information and recapitulate disease development processes at the molecular, cellular and organ levels. With recent development in stem cell field, a variety of tissue organoids can be derived from patient specific pluripotent stem cells and adult stem cells. In combination with the state-of-the-art genome editing tools, organoids can be further engineered to mimic disease-relevant genetic and epigenetic status of a patient. This has therefore enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro disease models, offering a unique system for fundamental and biomedical research as well as the development of personalized medicine. Here we summarize some of the latest advances and future perspectives in engineering stem cell organoids for human disease modeling.

  5. Dental Stem Cells and their Applications in Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperi, S; Ligoudistianou, C; Taraslia, V; Kontakiotis, E; Anastasiadou, E

    2013-01-01

    Tooth loss or absence is a common condition that can be caused by various pathological circumstances. The replacement of the missing tooth is important for medical and aesthetic reasons. Recently, scientists focus on tooth tissue engineering, as a potential treatment, beyond the existing prosthetic methods. Tooth engineering is a promising new therapeutic approach that seeks to replace the missing tooth with a bioengineered one or to restore the damaged dental tissue. Its main tool is the stem cells that are seeded on the surface of biomaterials (scaffolds), in order to create a biocomplex. Several populations of mesenchymal stem cells are found in the tooth. These different cell types are categorized according to their location in the tooth and they demonstrate slightly different features. It appears that the dental stem cells isolated from the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament are the most powerful cells for tooth engineering. Additional research needs to be performed in order to address the problem of finding a suitable source of epithelial stem cells, which are important for the regeneration of the enamel. Nevertheless, the results of the existing studies are encouraging and strongly support the belief that tooth engineering can offer hope to people suffering from dental problems or tooth loss.

  6. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Engineer Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Elliott, Morgan B; Macklin, Bria; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    Development of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a remarkable scientific advancement that allows scientists to harness the power of regenerative medicine for potential treatment of disease using unaffected cells. PSCs provide a unique opportunity to study and combat cardiovascular diseases, which continue to claim the lives of thousands each day. Here, we discuss the differentiation of PSCs into vascular cells, investigation of the functional capabilities of the derived cells, and their utilization to engineer microvascular beds or vascular grafts for clinical application. Graphical Abstract Human iPSCs generated from patients are differentiated toward ECs and perivascular cells for use in disease modeling, microvascular bed development, or vascular graft fabrication.

  7. Genetic engineering of stem cells for enhanced therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Andrzejewska, Anna; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for overcoming the limitations of current treatment methods. The modification of stem cell properties may be necessary to fully exploit their potential. Genetic engineering, with an abundance of methodology to induce gene expression in a precise and well-controllable manner, is particularly attractive for this purpose. There are virus-based and non-viral methods of genetic manipulation. Genome-integrating viral vectors are usually characterized by highly efficient and long-term transgene expression, at a cost of safety. Non-integrating viruses are also highly efficient in transduction, and, while safer, offer only a limited duration of transgene expression. There is a great diversity of transfectable forms of nucleic acids; however, for efficient shuttling across cell membranes, additional manipulation is required. Both physical and chemical methods have been employed for this purpose. Stem cell engineering for clinical applications is still in its infancy and requires further research. There are two main strategies for inducing transgene expression in therapeutic cells: transient and permanent expression. In many cases, including stem cell trafficking and using cell therapy for the treatment of rapid-onset disease with a short healing process, transient transgene expression may be a sufficient and optimal approach. For that purpose, mRNA-based methods seem ideally suited, as they are characterized by a rapid, highly efficient transfection, with outstanding safety. Permanent transgene expression is primarily based on the application of viral vectors, and, due to safety concerns, these methods are more challenging. There is active, ongoing research toward the development of non-viral methods that would induce permanent expression, such as transposons and mammalian artificial chromosomes.

  8. Genetic Engineering and Manufacturing of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The marketing approval of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs as the first-line therapy for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID is a tribute to the substantial progress that has been made regarding HSC engineering in the past decade. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade, genetically engineered HSCs is the foundation for broadening the application of this technology. Herein, the current state-of-the-art manufacturing platforms to genetically engineer HSCs as well as the challenges pertaining to production standardization and product characterization are addressed in the context of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs and other monogenic disorders.

  9. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be obtained from various organs and easily propagated in vitro, are one of the most extensively used types of stem cells and have been shown to be efficacious in a broad set of diseases. The unique and highly desirable properties of MSCs include high migratory capacities toward injured areas, immunomodulatory features, and the natural ability to differentiate into connective tissue phenotypes. These phenotypes include bone and cartilage, and these properties predispose MSCs to be therapeutically useful. In addition, MSCs elicit their therapeutic effects by paracrine actions, in which the metabolism of target tissues is modulated. Genetic engineering methods can greatly amplify these properties and broaden the therapeutic capabilities of MSCs, including transdifferentiation toward diverse cell lineages. However, cell engineering can also affect safety and increase the cost of therapy based on MSCs; thus, the advantages and disadvantages of these procedures should be discussed. In this review, the latest applications of genetic engineering methods for MSCs with regenerative medicine purposes are presented.

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Noriko Itaba; Yoshiaki Matsumi; Kaori Okinaka; An Afida Ashla; Yohei Kono; Mitsuhiko Osaki; Minoru Morimoto; Naoyuki Sugiyama; Kazuo Ohashi; Teruo Okano; Goshi Shiota

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentrat...

  11. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  13. Nano-regenerative medicine towards clinical outcome of stem cell and tissue engineering in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Sindhu, Annu; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Chaudhury, Ashok; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a fast growing area of research that aims to create nanomaterials or nanostructures development in stem cell and tissue-based therapies. Concepts and discoveries from the fields of bio nano research provide exciting opportunities of using stem cells for regeneration of tissues and organs. The application of nanotechnology to stem-cell biology would be able to address the challenges of disease therapeutics. This review covers the potential of nanotechnology approaches towards regenerative medicine. Furthermore, it focuses on current aspects of stem- and tissue-cell engineering. The magnetic nanoparticles-based applications in stem-cell research open new frontiers in cell and tissue engineering. PMID:22260258

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor engineered stem cells: a novel HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Carrillo, Mayra A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-03-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for suppressing HIV and improving patients' quality of life, HIV persists in cART-treated patients and remains an incurable disease. Financial burdens and health consequences of lifelong cART treatment call for novel HIV therapies that result in a permanent cure. Cellular immunity is central in controlling HIV replication. However, HIV adopts numerous strategies to evade immune surveillance. Engineered immunity via genetic manipulation could offer a functional cure by generating cells that have enhanced antiviral activity and are resistant to HIV infection. Recently, encouraging reports from several human clinical trials using an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cell therapy for treating B-cell malignancies have provided valuable insights and generated remarkable enthusiasm in engineered T-cell therapy. In this review, we discuss the development of HIV-specific chimeric antigen receptors and the use of stem cell based therapies to generate lifelong anti-HIV immunity.

  15. Stem cell bioprocess engineering towards cGMP production and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sart, Sébastien; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Li, Yan; Agathos, Spiros N

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, are becoming an indispensable tool for various biomedical applications including drug discovery, disease modeling, and tissue engineering. Bioprocess engineering, targeting large scale production, provides a platform to generate a controlled microenvironment that could potentially recreate the stem cell niche to promote stem cell proliferation or lineage-specific differentiation. This survey aims at defining the characteristics of stem cell populations currently in use and the present-day limits in their applications for therapeutic purposes. Furthermore, a bioprocess engineering strategy based on bioreactors and 3-D cultures is discussed in order to achieve the improved stem cell yield, function, and safety required for production under current good manufacturing practices.

  16. Different sources of stem cells and their application in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanquan; Liao, Jinfeng; Cai, Xiaoxiao

    2018-01-22

    The articular cartilage is unique in that it contains only a single type of cell and shows poor ability for spontaneous healing. Currently, approaches for treating cartilage defects include surgical and nonsurgical approaches, as well as cartilage tissue engineering. For standard cartilage tissue engineering, three elements are required, i.e., a scaffold, growth factors, and seed cells. With advancements in in stem cell research, the main sources of cells for cartilage tissue engineering are embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, which have been shown to be promising alternatives in recent years. In this review, we focus on applications of various stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering. Under certain conditions, several types of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and cartilage progenitor cells, showed potential for applications in chondrogenic differentiation. Stem cells can be developed as important cell sources for cartilage tissue engineering if appropriate microenvironments and bioactive factors are supplied. However, further studies are needed to determine the ideal cell type for cartilage repair, particularly using in vivo and clinical studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Biophysics and dynamics of natural and engineered stem cell microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Albert J; Healy, Kevin E; Kumar, Sanjay; Schaffer, David V

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into one or more mature lineages, and they reside within natural niches in many types of adult and embryonic tissues that present them with complex signals to regulate these two hallmark properties. The diverse nature of these in vivo microenvironments raises important questions about the microenvironmental cues regulating stem cell plasticity, and the stem cell field has built a strong foundation of knowledge on the biochemical identities and regulatory effects of the soluble, cellular, and extracellular matrix factors surrounding stem cells through the isolation and culture of stem cells in vitro within microenvironments that, in effect, emulate the properties of the natural niche. Recent work, however, has expanded the field's perspective to include biophysical and dynamic characteristics of the microenvironment. These include biomechanical characteristics such as elastic modulus, shear force, and cyclic strain; architectural properties such as geometry, topography, and dimensionality; and dynamic structures and ligand profiles. We will review how these microenvironmental characteristics have been shown to regulate stem cell fate and discuss future research directions that may help expand our current understanding of stem cell biology and aid its application to regenerative medicine.

  18. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald B.; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs) have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair. PMID:27688777

  19. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald B; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo; Hilkens, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs) have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair.

  20. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  1. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo; Hilkens, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be dis...

  2. [The emerging technology of tissue engineering : Focus on stem cell niche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, U; Freudenberg, U; Kruse, F E

    2017-04-01

    Limbal stem cells reside in a highly specialized complex microenvironment that is known as the stem cell niche, an anatomically protected region at the bottom of the Palisades of Vogt, where the stem cells are located and where their quiescence, proliferation and differentiation are maintained in balance. Besides the epithelial stem and progenitor cell clusters, the limbal niche comprises several types of supporting niche cells and a specific extracellular matrix mediating biochemical and biophysical signals. Stem cell-based tissue engineering aims to mimic the native stem cell niche and to present appropriate microenvironmental cues in a controlled and reproducible fashion in order to maintain stem cell function within the graft. Current therapeutic approaches for ex vivo expansion of limbal stem cells only take advantage of surrogate niches. However, new insights into the molecular composition of the limbal niche and innovative biosynthetic scaffolds have stimulated novel strategies for niche-driven stem cell cultivation. Promising experimental approaches include collagen-based organotypic coculture systems of limbal epithelial stem cells with their niche cells and biomimetic hydrogel platforms prefunctionalized with appropriate biomolecular and biophysical signals. Future translation of these novel regenerative strategies into clinical application is expected to improve long-term outcomes of limbal stem cell transplantation for ocular surface reconstruction.

  3. Wnt and BMP Signaling Crosstalk in Regulating Dental Stem Cells: Implications in Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fugui; Song, Jinglin; Zhang, Hongmei; Huang, Enyi; Song, Dongzhe; Tollemar, Viktor; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jinhua; Mohammed, Maryam; Wei, Qiang; Fan, Jiaming; Liao, Junyi; Zou, Yulong; Liu, Feng; Hu, Xue; Qu, Xiangyang; Chen, Liqun; Yu, Xinyi; Luu, Hue H; Lee, Michael J; He, Tong-Chuan; Ji, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade.

  4. Wnt and BMP signaling crosstalk in regulating dental stem cells: Implications in dental tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade.

  5. Dental stem cells: recent progresses in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João; Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Machado, Vanessa; Mendes, José João

    2017-12-01

    Since the disclosure of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), there have been an intense investigation on the characteristics of these cells and their potentialities. Dental stem cells (DSCs) are MSC-like populations with self-renewal capacity and multidifferentiation potential. Currently, there are five main DSCs, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental follicle precursor cells (DFPCs). These cells are extremely accessible, prevail during all life and own an amazing multipotency. In the past decade, DPSCs and SHED have been thoroughly studied in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering as autologous stem cells therapies and have shown amazing therapeutic abilities in oro-facial, neurologic, corneal, cardiovascular, hepatic, diabetic, renal, muscular dystrophy and auto-immune conditions, in both animal and human models, and most recently some of them in human clinical trials. In this review, we focus the characteristics, the multiple roles of DSCs and its potential translation to clinical settings. These new insights of the apparently regenerative aptitude of these DSCs seems quite promising to investigate these cells abilities in a wide variety of pathologies. Key messages Dental stem cells (DSCs) have a remarkable self-renewal capacity and multidifferentiation potential; DSCs are extremely accessible and prevail during all life; DSCs, as stem cells therapies, have shown amazing therapeutic abilities in oro-facial, neurologic, corneal, cardiovascular, hepatic, diabetic, renal, muscular dystrophy and autoimmune conditions; DSCs are becoming extremely relevant in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  6. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds...... for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell...... spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed...

  7. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Its Application in Human Disease Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Gomez, José A.; Mirotsou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The use of stem cells for tissue regeneration and repair is advancing both at the bench and bedside. Stem cells isolated from bone marrow are currently being tested for their therapeutic potential in a variety of clinical conditions including cardiovascular injury, kidney failure, cancer, and neurological and bone disorders. Despite the advantages, stem cell therapy is still limited by low survival, engraftment, and homing to damage area as well as inefficiencies in differentiating into fully functional tissues. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells is being explored as a means to circumvent some of these problems. This review presents the current understanding of the use of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells in human disease therapy with emphasis on genetic modifications aimed to improve survival, homing, angiogenesis, and heart function after myocardial infarction. Advancements in other disease areas are also discussed. PMID:20825283

  8. DENTAL STEM CELL SOURCES AND THEIR POTENTIALS FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih ASUTAY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering arouses excitement in all medical fields that deal with bone healing. The ultimate aim of these approaches are to shorten the healing process, obtain highly differentiated functional tissues and eliminate the need for a second surgical site required for autogenous bone grafts. Mesenchymal stem cells have been increasingly used in the experiments which were conducted in these fields and the results are promising. Dental stem cells have come to the forefront both because of their relative ease of access and also their superior characteristics. This article investigates the importance of dental stem cells for bone tissue engineering and their regeneration potentials.

  9. Genetic engineering of human embryonic stem cells with lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chen; Tang, Dong-Qi; Xie, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Ke-Feng; Thompson, Winston E; Chou, Wayne; Gibbons, Gary H; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun; Chen, Yuqing E

    2005-08-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells present a valuable source of cells with a vast therapeutic potential. However, the low efficiency of directed differentiation of hES cells remains a major obstacle in their uses for regenerative medicine. While differentiation may be controlled by the genetic manipulation, effective and efficient gene transfer into hES cells has been an elusive goal. Here, we show stable and efficient genetic manipulations of hES cells using lentiviral vectors. This method resulted in the establishment of stable gene expression without loss of pluripotency in hES cells. In addition, lentiviral vectors were effective in conveying the expression of an U6 promoter-driven small interfering RNA (siRNA), which was effective in silencing its specific target. Taken together, our results suggest that lentiviral gene delivery holds great promise for hES cell research and application.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells engineered to inhibit complement-mediated damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa A Soland

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC preferentially migrate to damaged tissues and, due to their immunomodulatory and trophic properties, contribute to tissue repair. Although MSC express molecules, such as membrane cofactor protein (CD46, complement decay-accelerating factor (CD55, and protectin (CD59, which confer protection from complement-mediated lysis, MSC are recruited and activated by anaphylatoxins after transplantation, potentially causing MSC death and limiting therapeutic benefit. We have previously demonstrated that transduction of MSC with a retrovirus encoding HCMV-US proteins resulted in higher levels of MSC engraftment due to decreased HLA-I expression. Here, we investigate whether engineering MSC to express US2 (MSC-US2, US3 (MSC-US3, US6 (MSC-US6, or US11 (MSC-US11 HCMV proteins can alter complement recognition, thereby better protecting MSC from complement attack and lysis. HCMV-US proteins increased MSC CD59 expression at different levels as determined by flow cytometric evaluation of the median fluorescence intensity ratio (MFI. A significant increase in CD59 expression was seen in MSC-US2, MSC-US3, and MSC-US6, but not in MSC-US11. Only MSC-US2 displayed increased expression of CD46, while US2 and US3 proteins were both able to augment the percentage of MSC expressing this molecule. Regardless of the HCMV protein expressed, none changed CD55 MFI; however, expression of US6, US11, and US2 each increased the percentage of MSC that were positive for this molecule. Because US2 protein was the most efficient in up-regulating all three complement regulatory proteins, we used a functional complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay to investigate whether MSC-US2 were protected from complement-mediated lysis. We demonstrated that over-expression of the US2 protein reduced complement lysis by 59.10±12.89% when compared to untransduced MSC. This is the first report, to our knowledge, describing a role of HCMV-US proteins in complement evasion

  11. Bioreactor systems for tissue engineering II. Strategies for the expansion and directed differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Cornelia [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie; Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institut fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Traumatologie, Wien (Austria); Poertner, Ralf (eds.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg (Germany). Inst. Biotechnologie und Verfahrenstechnik

    2010-07-01

    Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane, by S. Wolbank, M. van Griensven, R. Grillari-Voglauer, and A. Peterbauer-Scherb; - Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications, by P. Moretti, T. Hatlapatka, D. Marten, A. Lavrentieva, I. Majore, R. Hass and C. Kasper; - Isolation, Characterization, Differentiation, and Application of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, by J. W. Kuhbier, B. Weyand, C. Radtke, P. M. Vogt, C. Kasper and K. Reimers; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives, by T. Cantz and U. Martin; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology, by D. Pei, J. Xu, Q. Zhuang, H.-F. Tse and M. A. Esteban; - Production Process for Stem Cell Based Therapeutic Implants: Expansion of the Production Cell Line and Cultivation of Encapsulated Cells, by C. Weber, S. Pohl, R. Poertner, P. Pino-Grace, D. Freimark, C. Wallrapp, P. Geigle and P. Czermak; - Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells, by C. Goepfert, A. Slobodianski, A.F. Schilling, P. Adamietz and R. Poertner; - Outgrowth Endothelial Cells: Sources, Characteristics and Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, by S. Fuchs, E. Dohle, M. Kolbe, C. J. Kirkpatrick; - Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine, by I. Ribitsch, J. Burk, U. Delling, C. Geissler, C. Gittel, H. Juelke, W. Brehm; - Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms, by R. M. El Backly, R. Cancedda; - Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System, C. Stamm, K. Klose, Y.-H. Choi. (orig.)

  12. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are a mesenchymal stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. Compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs, ASCs can be derived from more sources and are harvested more easily. Three-dimensional (3D tissue engineering scaffolds are better able to mimic the in vivo cellular microenvironment, which benefits the localization, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs. Therefore, tissue-engineered ASCs are recognized as an attractive substitute for tissue and organ transplantation. In this paper, we review the characteristics of ASCs, as well as the biomaterials and tissue engineering methods used to proliferate and differentiate ASCs in a 3D environment. Clinical applications of tissue-engineered ASCs are also discussed to reveal the potential and feasibility of using tissue-engineered ASCs in regenerative medicine.

  13. Gene therapy strategies using engineered stem cells for treating gynecologic and breast cancer patients (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Seul; Hwang, Kyung-A; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-05-01

    There are three types of stem cells: embryonic stem (ES) cells, adult stem (AS) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells have many benefits including the potential ability to differentiate into various organs. In addition, engineered stem cells (GESTECs) designed for delivering therapeutic genes may be capable of treating human diseases including malignant cancers. Stem cells have been found to possess the potential for serving as novel delivery vehicles for therapeutic or suicide genes to primary or metastatic cancer formation sites as a part of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy (GEPT). Given the advantageous properties of stem cells, tissue-derived stem cells are emerging as a new tool for anticancer therapy combined with prodrugs. In this review, the effects of GESTECs with different origins, i.e., neural, amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid, introduced to treat patients with diverse types of gynecologic and breast cancers are discussed. Data from the literature indicate the therapeutic potential of these cells as a part of gene therapy strategies to selectively target malignancies in women at clinically terminal stages.

  14. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunfan; Lu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  15. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  16. Advances in tissue engineering through stem cell-based co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K; Brown, Wendy E; Eswaramoorthy, Rajalakshmanan; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cells are the future in tissue engineering and regeneration. In a co-culture, stem cells not only provide a target cell source with multipotent differentiation capacity, but can also act as assisting cells that promote tissue homeostasis, metabolism, growth and repair. Their incorporation into co-culture systems seems to be important in the creation of complex tissues or organs. In this review, critical aspects of stem cell use in co-culture systems are discussed. Direct and indirect co-culture methodologies used in tissue engineering are described, along with various characteristics of cellular interactions in these systems. Direct cell-cell contact, cell-extracellular matrix interaction and signalling via soluble factors are presented. The advantages of stem cell co-culture strategies and their applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are portrayed through specific examples for several tissues, including orthopaedic soft tissues, bone, heart, vasculature, lung, kidney, liver and nerve. A concise review of the progress and the lessons learned are provided, with a focus on recent developments and their implications. It is hoped that knowledge developed from one tissue can be translated to other tissues. Finally, we address challenges in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that can potentially be overcome via employing strategies for stem cell co-culture use. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Directed induction of functional motor neuron-like cells from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Cell replacement using stem cells is a promising therapeutic approach to treat degenerative motor neuron (MN disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are a desirable cell source for autologous cell replacement therapy to treat nervous system injury due to their plasticity, low immunogenicity, and a lower risk of tumor formation than embryonic stem cells. However, hMSCs are inefficient with regards to differentiating into MN-like cells. To solve this limitation, we genetically engineered hMSCs to express MN-associated transcription factors, Olig2 and Hb9, and then treat the hMSCs expressing Olig2 and Hb9 with optimal MN induction medium (MNIM. This method of induction led to higher expression (>30% of total cells of MN markers. Electrophysiological data revealed that the induced hMSCs had the excitable properties of neurons and were able to form functional connections with muscle fibers in vitro. Furthermore, when the induced hMSCs were transplanted into an injured organotypic rat spinal cord slice culture, an ex vivo model of spinal cord injury, they exhibited characteristics of MNs. The data strongly suggest that induced Olig2/Hb9-expressing hMSCs were clearly reprogrammed and directed toward a MN-like lineage. We propose that methods to induce Olig2 and Hb9, followed by further induction with MNIM have therapeutic potential for autologous cell replacement therapy to treat degenerative MN disorders.

  18. Nanomaterial scaffolds for stem cell proliferation and differentiation in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Tan, Aaron; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ho, Han Kiat

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a clinically driven field and has emerged as a potential alternative to organ transplantation. The cornerstone of successful tissue engineering rests upon two essential elements: cells and scaffolds. Recently, it was found that stem cells have unique capabilities of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation to serve as a versatile cell source, while nanomaterials have lately emerged as promising candidates in producing scaffolds able to better mimic the nanostructure in natural extracellular matrix and to efficiently replace defective tissues. This article, therefore, reviews the key developments in tissue engineering, where the combination of stem cells and nanomaterial scaffolds has been utilized over the past several years. We consider the high potential, as well as the main issues related to the application of stem cells and nanomaterial scaffolds for a range of tissues including bone, cartilage, nerve, liver, eye etc. Promising in vitro results such as efficient attachment, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells have been compiled in a series of examples involving different nanomaterials. Furthermore, the merits of the marriage of stem cells and nanomaterial scaffolds are also demonstrated in vivo, providing early successes to support subsequent clinical investigations. This progress simultaneously drives mechanistic research into the mechanotransduction process responsible for the observations in order to optimize the process further. Current understanding is chiefly reported to involve the interaction of stem cells and the anchoring nanomaterial scaffolds by activating various signaling pathways. Substrate surface characteristics and scaffold bulk properties are also reported to influence not only short term stem cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation, but also longer term lineage differentiation, functionalization and viability. It is expected that the combination of stem cells and nanomaterials will develop into an

  19. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  20. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  1. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human adipose-derived stem cells: definition, isolation, tissue-engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nae, S; Bordeianu, I; Stăncioiu, A T; Antohi, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent researches have demonstrated that the most effective repair system of the body is represented by stem cells - unspecialized cells, capable of self-renewal through successive mitoses, which have also the ability to transform into different cell types through differentiation. The discovery of adult stem cells represented an important step in regenerative medicine because they no longer raises ethical or legal issues and are more accessible. Only in 2002, stem cells isolated from adipose tissue were described as multipotent stem cells. Adipose tissue stem cells benefits in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are numerous. Development of adipose tissue engineering techniques offers a great potential in surpassing the existing limits faced by the classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Adipose tissue engineering clinical applications are wide and varied, including reconstructive, corrective and cosmetic procedures. Nowadays, adipose tissue engineering is a fast developing field, both in terms of fundamental researches and medical applications, addressing issues related to current clinical pathology or trauma management of soft tissue injuries in different body locations.

  3. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is...

  4. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Selekman, Joshua A; Palecek, Sean P

    2013-11-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystem technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reverse engineering the mechanical and molecular pathways in stem cell morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Gordon, Richard; Cao, Tong

    2015-03-01

    The formation of relevant biological structures poses a challenge for regenerative medicine. During embryogenesis, embryonic cells differentiate into somatic tissues and undergo morphogenesis to produce three-dimensional organs. Using stem cells, we can recapitulate this process and create biological constructs for therapeutic transplantation. However, imperfect imitation of nature sometimes results in in vitro artifacts that fail to recapitulate the function of native organs. It has been hypothesized that developing cells may self-organize into tissue-specific structures given a correct in vitro environment. This proposition is supported by the generation of neo-organoids from stem cells. We suggest that morphogenesis may be reverse engineered to uncover its interacting mechanical pathway and molecular circuitry. By harnessing the latent architecture of stem cells, novel tissue-engineering strategies may be conceptualized for generating self-organizing transplants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Applied Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Combination With Biomaterials in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza

    2017-10-01

    Due to increasing of the orthopedic lesions and fractures in the world and limitation of current treatment methods, researchers, and surgeons paid attention to the new treatment ways especially to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Innovation in stem cells and biomaterials accelerate during the last decade as two main important parts of the tissue engineering. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) introduced as cells with highly proliferation and differentiation potentials that hold great promising features for used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As another main part of tissue engineering, synthetic, and natural polymers have been shown daily grow up in number to increase and improve the grade of biopolymers that could be used as scaffold with or without stem cells for implantation. One of the developed areas of tissue engineering is bone tissue engineering; the aim of this review is present studies were done in the field of bone tissue engineering while used iPSCs in combination with natural and synthetic biomaterials. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3034-3042, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Vascular diseases await translation of blood vessels engineered from stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Rekha; Duda, Dan G; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2015-10-14

    The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) might pave the way toward a long-sought solution for obtaining sufficient numbers of autologous cells for tissue engineering. Several methods exist for generating endothelial cells or perivascular cells from hiPSCs in vitro for use in the building of vascular tissue. We discuss current developments in the generation of vascular progenitor cells from hiPSCs and the assessment of their functional capacity in vivo, opportunities and challenges for the clinical translation of engineered vascular tissue, and modeling of vascular diseases using hiPSC-derived vascular progenitor cells. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects. PMID:26176009

  9. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eAvolio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects.

  10. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects.

  11. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  12. Dissecting the stem cell niche with organoid models: an engineering-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrow, Lyndsay M; Weber, Robert J; Gartner, Zev J

    2017-03-15

    For many tissues, single resident stem cells grown in vitro under appropriate three-dimensional conditions can produce outgrowths known as organoids. These tissues recapitulate much of the cell composition and architecture of the in vivo organ from which they derive, including the formation of a stem cell niche. This has facilitated the systematic experimental manipulation and single-cell, high-throughput imaging of stem cells within their respective niches. Furthermore, emerging technologies now make it possible to engineer organoids from purified cellular and extracellular components to directly model and test stem cell-niche interactions. In this Review, we discuss how organoids have been used to identify and characterize stem cell-niche interactions and uncover new niche components, focusing on three adult-derived organoid systems. We also describe new approaches to reconstitute organoids from purified cellular components, and discuss how this technology can help to address fundamental questions about the adult stem cell niche. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates.

  14. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R; Rand, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPS cells) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) with human embryonic stem (hES)-cell-like properties has led to hPS cells with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in vitro disease modeling and drug discovery as well as mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential, it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPS cells with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double-strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPS cells. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which has limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPS cells. In this unit, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPS cells into cell lines containing genomes altered by insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Towards high throughput tissue engineering: development of chitosan-calcium phosphate scaffolds for engineering bone tissue from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Junghyuk; Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Ahmed, Farid; Jun, Martin BG; Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have shown promise for the repair of damaged organs, including bone. One of the major challenges associated with tissue engineering is how to scale up such processes for high throughput manufacturing of biomaterial scaffolds used to support stem cell culture. Generation of certain types of 3D biomaterial scaffolds, including chitosan-calcium phosphate blends, involves a slow fabrication process followed by a lengthy required freeze drying step. This work investig...

  16. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoudi, E.A.; Ribas, J.; Kaushik, G.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell-based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factors, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein-based approaches. Platelet-rich blood derivatives,

  17. Towards high throughput tissue engineering: development of chitosan-calcium phosphate scaffolds for engineering bone tissue from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Ahmed, Farid; Jun, Martin Bg; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have shown promise for the repair of damaged organs, including bone. One of the major challenges associated with tissue engineering is how to scale up such processes for high throughput manufacturing of biomaterial scaffolds used to support stem cell culture. Generation of certain types of 3D biomaterial scaffolds, including chitosan-calcium phosphate blends, involves a slow fabrication process followed by a lengthy required freeze drying step. This work investigates the use of automated microwave vacuum drying technology as an alternative to traditional freeze drying as a method of fabricating chitosan-calcium phosphate scaffolds for supporting embryonic stem cell cultures. Scaffolds produced using both drying techniques possess similar properties when characterized using scanning electron microscopy and this paper is the first to report that both types of these scaffolds support undifferentiated embryonic stem cell culture as well as promote stem cell differentiation into osteogenic lineages when treated with the appropriate factors. Compared to existing scaffold manufacturing processes using freeze drying, the use of microwave vacuum drying will lead to faster production times while reducing the costs, enabling high-throughput manufacturing of biomaterial scaffolds for stem cell applications.

  18. Engineering three dimensional micro nerve tissue using postnatal stem cells from human dental apical papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Jun, Sung-Min; Kim, So Yeon; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choe, Sung Chul; Kim, Eun-Chul; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jinseok; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Hwang, Yu-Shik

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro generation of cell-based three dimensional (3D) nerve tissue is an attractive subject to improve graft survival and integration into host tissue for neural tissue regeneration or to model biological events in stem cell differentiation. Although 3D organotypic culture strategies are well established for 3D nerve tissue formation of pluripotent stem cells to study underlying biology in nerve development, cell-based nerve tissues have not been developed using human postnatal stem cells with therapeutic potential. Here, we established a culture strategy for the generation of in vitro cell-based 3D nerve tissue from postnatal stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) of teeth, which originate from neural crest-derived ectomesenchyme cells. A stem cell population capable of differentiating into neural cell lineages was generated during the ex vivo expansion of SCAPs in the presence of EGF and bFGF, and SCAPs differentiated into neural cells, showing neural cell lineage-related molecular and gene expression profiles, morphological changes and electrophysical property under neural-inductive culture conditions. Moreover, we showed the first evidence that 3D cell-based nerve-like tissue with axons and myelin structures could be generated from SCAPs via 3D organotypic culture using an integrated bioprocess composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) microwell-mediated cell spheroid formation and subsequent dynamic culture in a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) bioreactor. In conclusion, the culture strategy in our study provides a novel approach to develop in vitro engineered nerve tissue using SCAPs and a foundation to study biological events in the neural differentiation of postnatal stem cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 903-914. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Emergence of Form from Function - Mechanical Engineering Approaches to Probe the Role of Stem Cell Mechanoadaptation in Sealing Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knothe Tate, Melissa L; Gunning, Peter W; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2016-10-14

    Stem cell "mechanomics" refers to the effect of mechanical cues on stem cell and matrix biology, where cell shape and fate are intrinsic manifestations of form and function. Before specialization, the stem cell itself serves as a sensor and actuator; its structure emerges from its local mechanical milieu as the cell adapts over time. Coupling of novel spatiotemporal imaging and computational methods allows for linking of the energy of adaptation to the structure, biology and mechanical function of the cell. Cutting edge imaging methods enable probing of mechanisms by which stem cells' emergent anisotropic architecture and fate commitment occurs. A novel cell-scale model provides a mechanistic framework to describe stem cell growth and remodeling through mechanical feedback; making use of a generalized virtual power principle, the model accounts for the rate of doing work or the rate of using energy to effect the work. This coupled approach provides a basis to elucidate mechanisms underlying the stem cell's innate capacity to adapt to mechanical stimuli as well as the role of mechanoadaptation in lineage commitment. An understanding of stem cell mechanoadaptation is key to deciphering lineage commitment, during prenatal development, postnatal wound healing, and engineering of tissues.

  20. Promising Therapeutic Strategies for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Cardiovascular Regeneration: From Cell Priming to Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Taek Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause of death among chronic diseases worldwide is ischemic cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Recent evidence indicates that adult stem cell therapies involving cardiovascular regeneration represent promising strategies to treat cardiovascular diseases. Owing to their immunomodulatory properties and vascular repair capabilities, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are strong candidate therapeutic stem cells for use in cardiovascular regeneration. However, major limitations must be overcome, including their very low survival rate in ischemic lesion. Various attempts have been made to improve the poor survival and longevity of engrafted MSCs. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies, it is necessary to first identify stem cell modulators for intracellular signal triggering or niche activation. One promising therapeutic strategy is the priming of therapeutic MSCs with stem cell modulators before transplantation. Another is a tissue engineering-based therapeutic strategy involving a cell scaffold, a cell-protein-scaffold architecture made of biomaterials such as ECM or hydrogel, and cell patch- and 3D printing-based tissue engineering. This review focuses on the current clinical applications of MSCs for treating cardiovascular diseases and highlights several therapeutic strategies for promoting the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs in vitro or in vivo from cell priming to tissue engineering strategies, for use in cardiovascular regeneration.

  1. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates. The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies.

  2. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran, Sriram; Huang, Chun-Chieh; George, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinica...

  3. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  4. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  5. Encapsulation of factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells in fibrinogen–alginate microcapsules enhances their viability and transgene secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Sayyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell microencapsulation holds significant promise as a strategy for cellular therapies; however, inadequate survival and functionality of the enclosed cells limit its application in hemophilia treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of alginate-based microcapsules to enhance the viability and transgene secretion of human cord blood–derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional cultures. Given the positive effects of extracellular matrix molecules on mesenchymal stem cell growth, we tested whether fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules can improve the efficiency of encapsulated factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment of hemophilia B. We found that fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules (a significantly enhanced the viability and proliferation of factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells and (b increased factor IX secretion by mesenchymal stem cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells in nonsupplemented microcapsules. Moreover, we observed the osteogenic, but not chondrogenic or adipogenic, differentiation capability of factor IX–engineered cord blood mesenchymal stem cells and their efficient factor IX secretion while encapsulated in fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules. Thus, the use of engineered mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrinogen-modified microcapsules may have potential application in the treatment of hemophilia or other protein deficiency diseases.

  6. Encapsulated dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in an injectable and biodegradable scaffold for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Xu, Xingtian; Chee, Winston W L; Schricker, Scott R; Shi, Songtao

    2013-11-01

    Bone grafts are currently the major family of treatment options in modern reconstructive dentistry. As an alternative, stem cell-scaffold constructs seem to hold promise for bone tissue engineering. However, the feasibility of encapsulating dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in scaffold biomaterials such as alginate hydrogel remains to be tested. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to: (1) develop an injectable scaffold based on oxidized alginate microbeads encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells in the microbeads both in vitro and in vivo. Microbeads with diameters of 1 ± 0.1 mm were fabricated with 2 × 10(6) stem cells/mL of alginate. Microbeads containing PDLSCs, GMSCs, and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a positive control were implanted subcutaneously and ectopic bone formation was analyzed by micro CT and histological analysis at 8-weeks postimplantation. The encapsulated stem cells remained viable after 4 weeks of culturing in osteo-differentiating induction medium. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the stem cells. In vivo, ectopic mineralization was observed inside and around the implanted microbeads containing the immobilized stem cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time that immobilization of PDLSCs and GMSCs in alginate microbeads provides a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique which could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density, and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency was significantly influenced by N/P ratio, polyplex dose, cell density, and cell passage number. hMSC culture conditions that inhibited cell division also decreased transfection efficiency, suggesting that strategies to promote hMSC proliferation may be useful to enhance transfection efficiency in future tissue engineering studies. Non-viral transfection treatments influenced hMSC phenotype, including the expression level of the hMSC marker CD105, and the ability of hMSCs to differentiate down the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The parameters found here to promote hMSC transfection efficiency, minimize toxicity, and influence hMSC phenotype may be instructive in future non-viral transfection studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22277991

  8. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, M Sean; Ramos, Daisy M; James, Roshan; Morozowich, Nicole L; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Doty, Steven B; Allcock, Harry R; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears.

  9. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to

  10. Vascular smooth muscle cells derived from inbred swine induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiesi; Qin, Lingfeng; Kural, Mehmet H; Schwan, Jonas; Li, Xia; Bartulos, Oscar; Cong, Xiao-Qiang; Ren, Yongming; Gui, Liqiong; Li, Guangxin; Ellis, Matthew W; Li, Peining; Kotton, Darrell N; Dardik, Alan; Pober, Jordan S; Tellides, George; Rolle, Marsha; Campbell, Stuart; Hawley, Robert J; Sachs, David H; Niklason, Laura E; Qyang, Yibing

    2017-12-01

    Development of autologous tissue-engineered vascular constructs using vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) holds great potential in treating patients with vascular disease. However, preclinical, large animal iPSC-based cellular and tissue models are required to evaluate safety and efficacy prior to clinical application. Herein, swine iPSC (siPSC) lines were established by introducing doxycycline-inducible reprogramming factors into fetal fibroblasts from a line of inbred Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine that accept tissue and organ transplants without immunosuppression within the line. Highly enriched, functional VSMCs were derived from siPSCs based on addition of ascorbic acid and inactivation of reprogramming factor via doxycycline withdrawal. Moreover, siPSC-VSMCs seeded onto biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds readily formed vascular tissues, which were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice and showed further maturation revealed by expression of the mature VSMC marker, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Finally, using a robust cellular self-assembly approach, we developed 3D scaffold-free tissue rings from siPSC-VSMCs that showed comparable mechanical properties and contractile function to those developed from swine primary VSMCs. These engineered vascular constructs, prepared from doxycycline-inducible inbred siPSCs, offer new opportunities for preclinical investigation of autologous human iPSC-based vascular tissues for patient treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Engineered Microvasculature in PDMS Networks Using Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Xiao, Yang; Han, Edward; Aryal, Binod; Zhou, Jing; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Qyang, Yibing; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we used a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based platform for the generation of intact, perfusion-competent microvascular networks in vitro. COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite-element analysis and simulation software package, was used to obtain simulated velocity, pressure, and shear stress profiles. Transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into partially arterialized endothelial cells (hiPSC-ECs) in 5 d under completely chemically defined conditions, using the small molecule glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor CHIR99021 and were thoroughly characterized for functionality and arterial-like marker expression. These cells, along with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were seeded in the PDMS system to generate microvascular networks that were subjected to shear stress. Engineered microvessels had patent lumens and expressed VE-cadherin along their periphery. Shear stress caused by flowing medium increased the secretion of nitric oxide and caused endothelial cells s to align and to redistribute actin filaments parallel to the direction of the laminar flow. Shear stress also caused significant increases in gene expression for arterial markers Notch1 and EphrinB2 as well as antithrombotic markers Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF-2)/4. These changes in response to shear stress in the microvascular platform were observed in hiPSC-EC microvessels but not in microvessels that were derived from HUVECs, which indicated that hiPSC-ECs may be more plastic in modulating their phenotype under flow than are HUVECs. Taken together, we demonstrate the feasibly of generating intact, engineered microvessels in vitro, which replicate some of the key biological features of native microvessels. PMID:28901188

  12. Cell surface glycan engineering of neural stem cells augments neurotropism and improves recovery in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2015-09-13

    Neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies offer potential for neural repair in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory and degenerative disorders. Typically, these conditions present with multifocal CNS lesions making it impractical to inject NSCs locally, thus mandating optimization of vascular delivery of the cells to involved sites. Here, we analyzed NSCs for expression of molecular effectors of cell migration and found that these cells are natively devoid of E-selectin ligands. Using glycosyltransferase-programmed stereosubstitution (GPS), we glycan engineered the cell surface of NSCs ("GPS-NSCs") with resultant enforced expression of the potent E-selectin ligand HCELL (hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand) and of an E-selectin-binding glycoform of neural cell adhesion molecule ("NCAM-E"). Following intravenous (i.v.) injection, short-term homing studies demonstrated that, compared with buffer-treated (control) NSCs, GPS-NSCs showed greater neurotropism. Administration of GPS-NSC significantly attenuated the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), with markedly decreased inflammation and improved oligodendroglial and axonal integrity, but without evidence of long-term stem cell engraftment. Notably, this effect of NSC is not a universal property of adult stem cells, as administration of GPS-engineered mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells did not improve EAE clinical course. These findings highlight the utility of cell surface glycan engineering to boost stem cell delivery in neuroinflammatory conditions and indicate that, despite the use of a neural tissue-specific progenitor cell population, neural repair in EAE results from endogenous repair and not from direct, NSC-derived cell replacement.

  13. An engineered cell-imprinted substrate directs osteogenic differentiation in stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamguyan, Khorshid; Katbab, Ali Asghar; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2018-01-01

    A cell-imprinted poly(dimethylsiloxane)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite substrate was fabricated to engage topographical, mechanical, and chemical signals to stimulate and boost stem cell osteogenic differentiation. The physicochemical properties of the fabricated substrates, with nanoscale resoluti....... Besides the physical and mechanical effects, we found that the chemical signaling of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, embedded in the nanocomposite substrates, could further improve and optimize stem cell osteogenic differentiation....

  14. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells by non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Zhengdong; Lendlein, Andreas; Ma, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an ideal cell source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as they possess self-renewal properties and multilineage differentiation potential. They can be isolated from various tissues and expanded easily through normal cell culture techniques. Genetic modifications of MSCs to further improve their therapeutic efficacy have been widely studied and extensively researched. Compared to viral gene delivery methods, non-viral methods generate less toxicity and immunogenicity and thus represent a promising and effective tool for the genetic engineering of MSCs. In the last decades, various non-viral gene delivery strategies have been developed and some of them have been applied for MSC transfection. This paper gives an overview of the techniques, influencing factors and potential applications of non-viral methods used for the genetic engineering of MSCs.

  15. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    '. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products....

  16. P01.22GENERATION OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELL-DERIVED NEURAL STEM CELLS WITHOUT USING VIRAL VECTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, T.; Kawaji, H.; Kamio, Y.; Amano, S.; Sameshima, T.; Sakai, N.; Tokuyama, T.; Namba, H.

    2014-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered stem cells are is one of the most feasible and promising approaches for glioma therapy. Various stem cells, such as neural and mesenchymal stem cells, have been tested for their tumor tropic activity. We have tested stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (HSV-TK, suicide gene) encoding a viral thymidine kinase which phosphorylates prodrug ganciclovir (GCV) for experimental glioma in rodents, because the HSV-TK/GCV system generates a potent bystander effect. Recently we found that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs) also had tumor tropic activity under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. One of the major limitations of use of HSV-TK gene-trasnduced iPSs in clinical field is the use of virus vectors that randomly integrate into the host genome and are associated with the risk of malignant transformation due to insertional mutagenesis. In the present study, we present a non-viral transfection method for obtaining HSV-TK expressing iPS-derived neural stem cells to circumvent the concerns associated with use of viral vectors. Mouse iPS cells were generated from somatic cells by the plasmid vectors expressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc and Nanog-GFP-IRES-Puror. We differentiated the mouse iPS cells into neural stem cells and then transfected with the plasmid containing HSV-TK gene using electroporation method. In this way, we obtained HSV-TK gene-trasnduced iPSs-derived neural stem cells without using viral vectors for further pre-clinical expariments of glioma therapy.

  17. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  18. The experimental study of genetic engineering human neural stem cells mediated by lentivirus to express multigene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Pei-qiang; Tang, Xun; Lin, Yue-qiu; Martin, Oudega; Sun, Guang-yun; Xu, Lin; Yang, Yun-kang; Zhou, Tian-hua

    2006-02-01

    To explore the feasibility to construct genetic engineering human neural stem cells (hNSCs) mediated by lentivirus to express multigene in order to provide a graft source for further studies of spinal cord injury (SCI). Human neural stem cells from the brain cortex of human abortus were isolated and cultured, then gene was modified by lentivirus to express both green fluorescence protein (GFP) and rat neurotrophin-3 (NT-3); the transgenic expression was detected by the methods of fluorescence microscope, dorsal root ganglion of fetal rats and slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs were successfully constructed. All of the genetic engineering hNSCs which expressed bright green fluorescence were observed under the fluorescence microscope. The conditioned medium of transgenic hNSCs could induce neurite flourishing outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The genetic engineering hNSCs expressed high level NT-3 which could be detected by using slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs mediated by lentivirus can be constructed to express multigene successfully.

  19. The Effects of Environmental Factors on Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Esophagus Tissues Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fang

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are increasingly being used for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can be differentiated from ASCs. Oxygen is a key factor influencing the stem cell differentiation. Tissue engineered esophagus has been a preferred solution......) and biochemical factor stimulation on SMCs differentiation were studied. The results showed that combined treatments promoted the late SMC-specific marker smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression. In the third part, the potential for using ASCs to replace SMCs to regenerate the smooth muscle layer...... of esophagus was studied. Our results showed that both SMCs and ASCs could attach on the porcine esophageal acellular matrix (EAM) scaffold in vitro after 24 hours and survive until 7 days. Thus ASCs might be a substitute for SMCs in the construction of tissue engineered esophageal muscle layer....

  20. Transdifferentiation of adipose-derived stem cells into keratinocyte-like cells: engineering a stratified epidermis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Nguyen, Khang T; Xu, Wei; Hong, Seok-Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    ... of inducing permanent satisfying replacements. Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) have been shown to differentiate in-vitro into both mesenchymal lineages and non-mesenchymal lineages, confirming their transdifferentiation ability...

  1. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  2. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  3. Engineering tubular bone using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Wenxin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Ma, Dongyang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China); Yan, Xingrong; Liu, Liangqi; Cui, Jihong; Xie, Xin; Li, Hongmin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: • We developed a novel engineering strategy to solve the limitations of bone grafts. • We fabricated tubular constructs using cell sheets and coral particles. • The composite constructs showed high radiological density and compressive strength. • These characteristics were similar to those of native bone. -- Abstract: The development of bone tissue engineering has provided new solutions for bone defects. However, the cell-scaffold-based approaches currently in use have several limitations, including low cell seeding rates and poor bone formation capacity. In the present study, we developed a novel strategy to engineer bone grafts using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were continuously cultured to form a cell sheet with osteogenic potential and coral particles were integrated into the sheet. The composite sheet was then wrapped around a cylindrical mandrel to fabricate a tubular construct. The resultant tubular construct was cultured in a spinner-flask bioreactor and subsequently implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in a nude mouse for assessment of its histological characteristics, radiological density and mechanical property. A similar construct assembled from a cell sheet alone acted as a control. In vitro observations demonstrated that the composite construct maintained its tubular shape, and exhibited higher radiological density, compressive strength and greater extracellular matrix deposition than did the control construct. In vivo experiments further revealed that new bone formed ectopically on the composite constructs, so that the 8-week explants of the composite sheets displayed radiological density similar to that of native bone. These results indicate that the strategy of using a combination of a cell sheet and coral particles has great potential for bone tissue engineering and repairing bone defects.

  4. The response of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteogenic signals and its impact on bone tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, R.; Fernandes, H.A.M.; Liu, J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is a multidisciplinary field that aims to treat patients with trauma, spinal fusion and large bone defects. Cell-based bone tissue engineering encompasses the isolation of multipotent hMSCs from the bone marrow of the patient, in

  5. Human milk protein production in xenografts of genetically engineered bovine mammary epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, Eugenio; Eirew, Peter; Accornero, Paolo; Eaves, Connie J; Baratta, Mario

    2010-10-19

    In the bovine species milk production is well known to correlate with mammary tissue mass. However, most advances in optimizing milk production relied on improvements of breeding and husbandry practices. A better understanding of the cells that generate bovine mammary tissue could facilitate important advances in milk production and have global economic impact. With this possibility in mind, we show that a mammary stem cell population can be functionally identified and isolated from the bovine mammary gland. We also demonstrate that this stem cell population may be a promising target for manipulating the composition of cow's milk using gene transfer. We show that the in vitro colony-forming cell assay for detecting normal primitive bipotent and lineage-restricted human mammary clonogenic progenitors are applicable to bovine mammary cells. Similarly, the ability of normal human mammary stem cells to regenerate functional bilayered structures in collagen gels placed under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice is shared by a subset of bovine mammary cells that lack aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. We also find that this activity is a distinguishing feature of luminal-restricted bovine progenitors. The regenerated structures recapitulate the organization of bovine mammary tissue, and milk could be readily detected in these structures when they were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. Transplantation of the bovine cells transduced with a lentivirus encoding human β-CASEIN led to expression of the transgene and secretion of the product by their progeny regenerated in vivo. These findings point to a common developmental hierarchy shared by human and bovine mammary glands, providing strong evidence of common mechanisms regulating the maintenance and differentiation of mammary stem cells from both species. These results highlight the potential of novel engineering and transplant strategies for a variety of commercial applications including the production of

  6. Cancer cell-oriented migration of mesenchymal stem cells engineered with an anticancer gene (PTEN: an imaging demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang ZS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhuo-Shun Yang,1,* Xiang-Jun Tang,2,* Xing-Rong Guo,1 Dan-Dan Zou,1 Xu-Yong Sun,3 Jing-Bo Feng,1 Jie Luo,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,4 Garth L Warnock4 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 3Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of PLA, Nanning, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered to hold great potential as ideal carriers for the delivery of anticancer agents since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to demonstrate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN engineering on MSCs’ capacity for cancer cell-oriented migration. Methods: MSCs were engineered with a PTEN-bearing plasmid and the expression was confirmed with Western blotting. A human glioma cell line (DBTRG was used as the target cell; DBTRG cell-oriented migration of MSCs was monitored with a micro speed photographic system. Results: The expression of transfected PTEN in MSCs was identified by immunoblotting analysis and confirmed with cell viability assessment of target cells. The DBTRG cell-oriented migration of PTEN-engineered MSCs was demonstrated by a real-time dynamic monitoring system, and a phagocytosis-like action of MSCs was also observed. Conclusion: MSCs maintained their capacity for cancer cell-directed migration after they were engineered with anticancer genes. This study provides the first direct evidence of MSCs’ tropism post-anticancer gene engineering. Keywords: gene therapy, mesenchymal stem cells, phosphatase and tensin homolog, cancer

  7. Engineered mesenchymal stem-cell-sheets patches prevents postoperative pancreatic leakage in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Ryong; Yi, Hye-Jin; Lee, Yu Na; Park, Ji Yoon; Hoffman, Robert M; Okano, Teruo; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2018-01-10

    Post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF) following pancreatic resection is a life-threatening surgical complication. Cell sheets were prepared and harvested using temperature-responsive culture dishes and transplanted as patches to seal POPF. Two different mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets were compared in terms of the preventative ability for pancreatic leakage in a rat model. Both rat adipose-derived stem cell (rADSC) and bone marrow-derived stem cell (rBMSC) sheets were transplanted. Those rADSC and rBMSC sheets are created without enzymes and thus maintained their cell-cell junctions and adhesion proteins with intact fibronectin on the basal side, as well as characteristics of MSCs. The rats with post-pancreatectomy rADSC- or rBMSC-sheet patches had significantly decreased abdominal fluid leakage compared with the control group, demonstrated by MR image analysis and measurement of the volume of abdominal fluid. Amylase level was significantly lower in the rats with rADSC-sheet and rBMSC-sheet patches compared with the control groups. The rADSC sheet patches had increased adhesive and immune-cytokine profiles (ICAM-1, L-selectin, TIMP-1), and the rBMSC sheets had reduced immune reactions compared to the control. This is first project looking at the feasibility of tissue engineering therapy using MSC-sheets as tissue patches preventing leakage of abdominal fluid caused by POPF.

  8. Isolation and characterization of canine perivascular stem/stromal cells for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Winters R.; Liang, Pei; Meyers, Carolyn A.; Lobo, Sonja; Lagishetty, Venu; Childers, Martin K.; Asatrian, Greg; Ding, Catherine; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Zou, Erin; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Soo, Chia

    2017-01-01

    For over 15 years, human subcutaneous adipose tissue has been recognized as a rich source of tissue resident mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). The isolation of perivascular progenitor cells from human adipose tissue by a cell sorting strategy was first published in 2008. Since this time, the interest in using pericytes and related perivascular stem/stromal cell (PSC) populations for tissue engineering has significantly increased. Here, we describe a set of experiments identifying, isolating and characterizing PSC from canine tissue (N = 12 canine adipose tissue samples). Results showed that the same antibodies used for human PSC identification and isolation are cross-reactive with canine tissue (CD45, CD146, CD34). Like their human correlate, canine PSC demonstrate characteristics of MSC including cell surface marker expression, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) inclusion, and osteogenic differentiation potential. As well, canine PSC respond to osteoinductive signals in a similar fashion as do human PSC, such as the secreted differentiation factor NEL-Like Molecule-1 (NELL-1). Nevertheless, important differences exist between human and canine PSC, including differences in baseline osteogenic potential. In summary, canine PSC represent a multipotent mesenchymogenic cell source for future translational efforts in tissue engineering. PMID:28489940

  9. Isolation and characterization of canine perivascular stem/stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W James

    Full Text Available For over 15 years, human subcutaneous adipose tissue has been recognized as a rich source of tissue resident mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC. The isolation of perivascular progenitor cells from human adipose tissue by a cell sorting strategy was first published in 2008. Since this time, the interest in using pericytes and related perivascular stem/stromal cell (PSC populations for tissue engineering has significantly increased. Here, we describe a set of experiments identifying, isolating and characterizing PSC from canine tissue (N = 12 canine adipose tissue samples. Results showed that the same antibodies used for human PSC identification and isolation are cross-reactive with canine tissue (CD45, CD146, CD34. Like their human correlate, canine PSC demonstrate characteristics of MSC including cell surface marker expression, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F inclusion, and osteogenic differentiation potential. As well, canine PSC respond to osteoinductive signals in a similar fashion as do human PSC, such as the secreted differentiation factor NEL-Like Molecule-1 (NELL-1. Nevertheless, important differences exist between human and canine PSC, including differences in baseline osteogenic potential. In summary, canine PSC represent a multipotent mesenchymogenic cell source for future translational efforts in tissue engineering.

  10. Immobilized WNT Proteins Act as a Stem Cell Niche for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowndes, Molly; Rotherham, Michael; Price, Joshua C; El Haj, Alicia J; Habib, Shukry J

    2016-07-12

    The timing, location, and level of WNT signaling are highly regulated during embryonic development and for the maintenance of adult tissues. Consequently the ability to provide a defined and directed source of WNT proteins is crucial to fully understand its role in tissue development and to mimic its activity in vitro. Here we describe a one-step immobilization technique to covalently bind WNT3A proteins as a basal surface with easy storage and long-lasting activity. We show that this platform is able to maintain adult and embryonic stem cells while also being adaptable for 3D systems. Therefore, this platform could be used for recapitulating specific stem cell niches with the goal of improving tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds......, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  12. Genome Engineering of Stem Cells for Autonomously Regulated, Closed-Loop Delivery of Biologic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Brunger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis are characterized by dysregulated responses to pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α. Pharmacologic anti-cytokine therapies are often effective at diminishing this inflammatory response but have significant side effects and are used at high, constant doses that do not reflect the dynamic nature of disease activity. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome-engineering system, we created stem cells that antagonize IL-1- or TNF-α-mediated inflammation in an autoregulated, feedback-controlled manner. Our results show that genome engineering can be used successfully to rewire endogenous cell circuits to allow for prescribed input/output relationships between inflammatory mediators and their antagonists, providing a foundation for cell-based drug delivery or cell-based vaccines via a rapidly responsive, autoregulated system. The customization of intrinsic cellular signaling pathways in stem cells, as demonstrated here, opens innovative possibilities for safer and more effective therapeutic approaches for a wide variety of diseases.

  13. An update clinical application of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) in cancer cell therapy and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Fardyazar, Zahra; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have elucidated that cell-based therapies are promising for cancer treatments. The human amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells are advantageous cells for such therapeutic schemes that can be innately changed to express therapeutic proteins. HAFSCs display a natural tropism to cancer cells in vivo. They can be useful in cancer cells targeting. Moreover, they are easily available from surplus diagnostic samples during pregnancy and less ethical and legal concern are associated with the collection and application than other putative cells are subjected. This review will designate representatives of amniotic fluid and stem cell derived from amniotic fluid. For this propose, we collect state of human AFS cells data applicable in cancer therapy by dividing this approach into two main classes (nonengineered and engineered based approaches). Our study shows the advantage of AFS cells over other putative cells types in terms differentiation ability to a wide range of cells by potential and effective use in preclinical studies for a variety of diseases. This study has shown the elasticity of human AFS cells and their favorable potential as a multipotent cell source for regenerative stem cell therapy and capable of giving rise to multiple lineages including such as osteoblasts and adipocyte.

  14. Engineered Microenvironments for the Maturation and Observation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salick, Max R.

    The human heart is a dynamic system that undergoes substantial changes as it develops and adapts to the body's growing needs. To better understand the physiology of the heart, researchers have begun to produce immature heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, from pluripotent stem cell sources with remarkable efficiency. These stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hold great potential in the understanding and treatment of heart disease; however, even after prolonged culture, these cells continue to exhibit an immature phenotype, as indicated by poor sarcomere organization and calcium handling, among other features. The lack of maturation that is observed in these cardiomyocytes greatly limits their applicability towards drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy applications. The mechanical environment surrounding a cell has been repeatedly shown to have a large impact on that cell's behavior. For this reason, we have implemented micropatterning methods to mimic the level of alignment that occurs in the heart in vivo in order to study how this alignment may help the cells to produce a more mature sarcomere phenotype. It was discovered that the level of sarcomere organization of a cardiomyocyte can be strongly influenced by the micropattern lane geometry on which it adheres. Steps were taken to optimize this micropattern platform, and studies of protein organization, gene expression, and myofibrillogenesis were conducted. Additionally, a set of programs was developed to provide quantitative analysis of the level of sarcomere organization, as well as to assist with several other tissue engineering applications.

  15. Mechanical modulation of nascent stem cell lineage commitment in tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2013-07-01

    Taking inspiration from tissue morphogenesis in utero, this study tests the concept of using tissue engineering scaffolds as delivery devices to modulate emergent structure-function relationships at early stages of tissue genesis. We report on the use of a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, advanced manufacturing methods, and experimental fluid mechanics (micro-piv and strain mapping) for the prospective design of tissue engineering scaffold geometries that deliver spatially resolved mechanical cues to stem cells seeded within. When subjected to a constant magnitude global flow regime, the local scaffold geometry dictates the magnitudes of mechanical stresses and strains experienced by a given cell, and in a spatially resolved fashion, similar to patterning during morphogenesis. In addition, early markers of mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment relate significantly to the local mechanical environment of the cell. Finally, by plotting the range of stress-strain states for all data corresponding to nascent cell lineage commitment (95% CI), we begin to "map the mechanome", defining stress-strain states most conducive to targeted cell fates. In sum, we provide a library of reference mechanical cues that can be delivered to cells seeded on tissue engineering scaffolds to guide target tissue phenotypes in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. Knowledge of these effects allows for prospective scaffold design optimization using virtual models prior to prototyping and clinical implementation. Finally, this approach enables the development of next generation scaffolds cum delivery devices for genesis of complex tissues with heterogenous properties, e.g., organs, joints or interface tissues such as growth plates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fibrin gel as a scaffold for photoreceptor cells differentiation from conjunctiva mesenchymal stem cells in retina tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimannejad, Mostafa; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Nadri, Samad; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Roohipoor, Ramak; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Bayat, Neda; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Ai, Jafar

    2017-07-10

    Stem cell-based therapies are attraction approaches for regenerative medicine for treating retinal diseases. One of the limitations in cell therapy is cell death following post-injection whit preventing functional integration with retinal tissue. Fibrin gel, a bio-polymeric material with excellent biocompatibility, provides numerous advantages as a tissue engineering scaffold and a stem cell carrier. Therefore, current research is focusing on developing fibrin hydrogel scaffolds to protect stem cells during delivery and to stimulate endogenous regeneration through interactions of transplanted stem cells and retinal tissue. In this study fibrin gel was used as hydrogel scaffold for immobilization of cells. The structural characteristics of fibrin gel scaffold were examined with SEM. Rheological properties of fibrin gel were measured by rheometer and biodegradation rate of fibrin were assayed for 2 weeks. After isolation of stem cells CJMSCs, the cells were differentiated into photoreceptor-like cells by exposing with taurin for 14 days in tissue culture plate (TCP group) and fibrin hydrogel (3 D group). The attachment of cells was analyzed with SEM and MTT. The expression of rhodopsin, PKC, CRX, recoverin, peripherin, nestin and RPE65 as photoreceptor-like cell markers was evaluated by immunocytochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in TCP and 3 D groups. The results of SEM analysis showed CJMSCs were well attached in fibrin gels and there were good integrity between cells and scaffold. The elastic modulus and constant degradation of the gel contributes to the growth and proliferation of cells. There was no toxicity effect of fibrin hydrogel on cells and the viability of cultured cells was higher in 3 D fibrin gels in comparison with TCP groups. After 2 weeks, the expression of rhodopsin, PKC, CRX, peripherin, recoverin, nestin and RPE65 as special markers of photoreceptor cells were detected by Real time PCR and immunofluorescence that these

  17. An engineered approach to stem cell culture: automating the decision process for real-time adaptive subculture of stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Fei Elmer Ker

    Full Text Available Current cell culture practices are dependent upon human operators and remain laborious and highly subjective, resulting in large variations and inconsistent outcomes, especially when using visual assessments of cell confluency to determine the appropriate time to subculture cells. Although efforts to automate cell culture with robotic systems are underway, the majority of such systems still require human intervention to determine when to subculture. Thus, it is necessary to accurately and objectively determine the appropriate time for cell passaging. Optimal stem cell culturing that maintains cell pluripotency while maximizing cell yields will be especially important for efficient, cost-effective stem cell-based therapies. Toward this goal we developed a real-time computer vision-based system that monitors the degree of cell confluency with a precision of 0.791±0.031 and recall of 0.559±0.043. The system consists of an automated phase-contrast time-lapse microscope and a server. Multiple dishes are sequentially imaged and the data is uploaded to the server that performs computer vision processing, predicts when cells will exceed a pre-defined threshold for optimal cell confluency, and provides a Web-based interface for remote cell culture monitoring. Human operators are also notified via text messaging and e-mail 4 hours prior to reaching this threshold and immediately upon reaching this threshold. This system was successfully used to direct the expansion of a paradigm stem cell population, C2C12 cells. Computer-directed and human-directed control subcultures required 3 serial cultures to achieve the theoretical target cell yield of 50 million C2C12 cells and showed no difference for myogenic and osteogenic differentiation. This automated vision-based system has potential as a tool toward adaptive real-time control of subculturing, cell culture optimization and quality assurance/quality control, and it could be integrated with current and

  18. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal cells on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuping; Wang, Jiao; Ling, Shixin; Li, Zhuo; Li, Mingsheng; Li, Qiongyi; Ma, Zongren; Yu, Sijiu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for supporting the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neural cells following induction with neural differentiation medium. We performed long-term, continuous observation of cell morphology, growth, differentiation, and neuronal development using several microscopy techniques in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. We examined specific neuronal proteins and Nissl bodies involved in the differentiation process in order to determine the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results show that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix display neuronal morphology with unipolar and bi/multipolar neurite elongations that express neuronal-specific proteins, including βIII tubulin. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grown on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix and induced for long periods of time with neural differentiation medium differentiated into a multilayered neural network-like structure with long nerve fibers that was composed of several parallel microfibers and neuronal cells, forming a complete neural circuit with dendrite-dendrite to axon-dendrite to dendrite-axon synapses. In addition, growth cones with filopodia were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Paraffin sectioning showed differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with the typical features of neuronal phenotype, such as a large, round nucleus and a cytoplasm full of Nissl bodies. The data suggest that the biological scaffold fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix is capable of supporting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into functional neurons and the subsequent formation of tissue engineered nerve. PMID:25598779

  19. Applicability of cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells in tissue engineering concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degistirici, O; Jäger, M; Knipper, A

    2008-06-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering concepts are becoming an important therapeutic alternative in the treatment of traumatic or chronic skeletal diseases. Here, we have evaluated cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) for use in bone and cartilage repair strategies. This type of somatic stem cell can be generated from cord blood with a current rate of 29% and we have documented excellent proliferation potential to high passage numbers. The cells have an initial population doubling time of 39 h, which slightly decreased with increasing passage number, but cells maintained their proliferation abilities up to passage 23. Cells clearly differentiated towards chondrogenic, adipogenic and osteogenic lineage as shown by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as well as by histological, biochemical and immunohistochemical stains. Differentiation potential of USSCs was observed at passage 6, passage 15 and passage 21. In addition, USSCs showed increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during osteogenic differentiation, as well as expression of key markers of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule. USSCs when transplanted into a bone defect might support the repair process not only by pure remineralization but also by installation of angiogenic environment.

  20. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  1. Organ engineering--combining stem cells, biomaterials, and bioreactors to produce bioengineered organs for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean Vincent; Atala, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Often the only treatment available for patients suffering from diseased and injured organs is whole organ transplant. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs for transplantation. The goal of organ engineering is to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Recent progress in stem cell biology, biomaterials, and processes such as organ decellularization and electrospinning has resulted in the generation of bioengineered blood vessels, heart valves, livers, kidneys, bladders, and airways. Future advances that may have a significant impact for the field include safe methods to reprogram a patient's own cells to directly differentiate into functional replacement cell types. The subsequent combination of these cells with natural, synthetic and/or decellularized organ materials to generate functional tissue substitutes is a real possibility. This essay reviews the current progress, developments, and challenges facing researchers in their goal to create replacement tissues and organs for patients. Copyright © 2013 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multilineage co-culture of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimu; Waldman, Stephen D; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell interactions through paracrine cell signalling can regulate a range of cell responses, including metabolic activity, proliferation and differentiation. Moving towards the development of optimized tissue-engineering strategies with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), the focus of this study was on developing indirect co-culture models to study the effects of mature adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts on bovine ASC multilineage differentiation. For each lineage, ASC differentiation was characterized by histology, gene expression and protein expression, in the absence of key inductive differentiation factors for the ASCs. Co-culture with each of the mature cell populations was shown to successfully induce or enhance lineage-specific differentiation of the ASCs. In general, a more homogeneous but lower-level differentiation response was observed in co-culture as compared to stimulating the bovine ASCs with inductive differentiation media. To explore the role of the Wnt canonical and non-canonical signalling pathways within the model systems, the effects of the Wnt inhibitors WIF-1 and DKK-1 on multilineage differentiation in co-culture were assessed. The data indicated that Wnt signalling may play a role in mediating ASC differentiation in co-culture with the mature cell populations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Human Developmental Chondrogenesis as a Basis for Engineering Chondrocytes from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Bluguermann, Carolina; Kyupelyan, Levon; Latour, Brooke; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Galic, Zoran; Ge, Sundi; Zhu, Yuhua; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Nsair, Ali; Miriuka, Santiago G.; Li, Xinmin; Lyons, Karen M.; Crooks, Gay M.; McAllister, David R.; Van Handel, Ben; Adams, John S.; Evseenko, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Summary Joint injury and osteoarthritis affect millions of people worldwide, but attempts to generate articular cartilage using adult stem/progenitor cells have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that recapitulation of the human developmental chondrogenic program using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) may represent a superior approach for cartilage restoration. Using laser-capture microdissection followed by microarray analysis, we first defined a surface phenotype (CD166low/negCD146low/negCD73+CD44lowBMPR1B+) distinguishing the earliest cartilage committed cells (prechondrocytes) at 5–6 weeks of development. Functional studies confirmed these cells are chondrocyte progenitors. From 12 weeks, only the superficial layers of articular cartilage were enriched in cells with this progenitor phenotype. Isolation of cells with a similar immunophenotype from differentiating human PSCs revealed a population of CD166low/negBMPR1B+ putative cartilage-committed progenitors. Taken as a whole, these data define a developmental approach for the generation of highly purified functional human chondrocytes from PSCs that could enable substantial progress in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:24371811

  4. The use of human dental pulp stem cells for in vivo bone tissue engineering: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker Junior, Alessander; Gomes Pinheiro, Carla Cristina; Lazzaretti Fernandes, Tiago; Franco Bueno, Daniela

    2018-01-01

    Dental pulp represents a promising and easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for clinical applications. Many studies have investigated the use of human dental pulp stem cells and stem cells isolated from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth for bone tissue engineering in vivo. However, the type of scaffold used to support the proliferation and differentiation of dental stem cells, the animal model, the type of bone defect created, and the methods for evaluation of results were extremely heterogeneous among these studies conducted. With this issue in mind, the main objective of this study is to present and summarize, through a systematic review of the literature, in vivo studies in which the efficacy of human dental pulp stem cells and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for bone regeneration was evaluated. The article search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science databases. Original research articles assessing potential of human dental pulp stem cells and SHED for in vivo bone tissue engineering, published from 1984 to November 2017, were selected and evaluated in this review according to the following eligibility criteria: published in English, assessing dental stem cells of human origin and evaluating in vivo bone tissue formation in animal models or in humans. From the initial 1576 potentially relevant articles identified, 128 were excluded due to the fact that they were duplicates and 1392 were considered ineligible as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. As a result, 56 articles remained and were fully analyzed in this systematic review. The results obtained in this systematic review open new avenues to perform bone tissue engineering for patients with bone defects and emphasize the importance of using human dental pulp stem cells and SHED to repair actual bone defects in an appropriate animal model.

  5. Engineering Biomaterials for Feeder-Free Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kisuk; Lee, Joan; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are capable of differentiating into any type of somatic cell, a characteristic that imparts significant therapeutic potential. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are types of hPSCs. Although hPSCs have high therapeutic potential, their clinical relevance is limited by the requirement for animal feeder layers, which maintain their pluripotency and self-renewal. hPSCs grown on animal feeder cells are at high risk for pathogen conta...

  6. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  7. Retina tissue engineering by conjunctiva mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrin gel: Hypotheses on novel approach to retinal diseases treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimannejad, Mostafa; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Nadri, Samad; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ai, Jafar

    2017-04-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age related macular degeneration (AMD) are two retinal diseases that progress by photoreceptor cells death. In retinal transplantation studies, stem and progenitor cells inject into the sub retinal space or vitreous and then these cells can be migrate to the site of retinal degeneration and locate in the host retina and restitute vision. Our hypothesis suggests that using human conjunctiva stem cells (as the source for increasing the number of human stem cells progenitor cells in retina dysfunction diseases) with fibrin gel and also assessing its relating in vitro (cellular and molecular processes) and in vivo (vision tests and pathology) could be a promising strategy for treatment of AMD and RP disorders. In this idea, we describe a novel approach for retina tissue engineering with differentiation of conjunctiva mesenchymal stem cells (CJMSCs) into photoreceptor-like cells in fibrin gel with induction medium contain taurine. For assessment of differentiation, immunocytochemistry and real time PCR are used for the expression of Rhodopsin, RPE65, Nestin as differentiated photoreceptor cell markers in 2D and 3D culture. The results show that fibrin gel will offer a proper 3D scaffold for CJMSCs derived photoreceptor cell-like cells. Application of immune-privileged, readily available sources of adult stem cells like human conjunctiva stem cells with fibrin gel would be a promising strategy to increase the number of photoreceptor progenitor cells and promote involuntary angiogenesis needed in retina layer repair and regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tissue engineering of rat bladder using marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bladder acellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Coutu

    Full Text Available Bladder replacement or augmentation is required in congenital malformations or following trauma or cancer. The current surgical solution involves enterocystoplasty but is associated with high complication rates. Strategies for bladder tissue engineering are thus actively sought to address this unmet clinical need. Because of the poor efficacy of synthetic polymers, the use of bladder acellular matrix (BAM has been proposed. Indeed when cellular components are removed from xenogenic or allogeneic bladders, the extracellular matrix scaffold thus obtained can be used alone or in combination with stem cells. In this study, we propose the use of BAM seeded with marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for bladder tissue engineering. We optimized a protocol for decellularization of bladder tissue from different species including rat, rabbit and swine. We demonstrate the use of non-ionic detergents followed by nuclease digestion results in efficient decellularization while preserving the extracellular matrix. When MSCs were seeded on acellular matrix scaffold, they remained viable and proliferative while adopting a cellular phenotype consistent with their microenvironment. Upon transplantation in rats after partial cystectomy, MSC-seeded BAM proved superior to unseeded BAM with animals recovering nearly 100% normal bladder capacity for up to six months. Histological analyses also demonstrated increased muscle regeneration.

  9. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  10. Bone tissue engineering with human mesenchymal stem cell sheets constructed using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-08-01

    An in vitro reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues without the use of scaffolds may be an alternative strategy for tissue engineering. We have developed a novel tissue engineering strategy, termed magnetic force-based tissue engineering (Mag-TE), in which magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) with a positive charge at the liposomal surface, and magnetic force were used to construct 3D tissue without scaffolds. In this study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) magnetically labeled with MCLs were seeded onto an ultra-low attachment culture surface, and a magnet (4000 G) was placed on the reverse side. The MSCs formed multilayered sheet-like structures after a 24-h culture period. MSCs in the sheets constructed by Mag-TE maintained an in vitro ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes after a 21-day culture period using each induction medium. Using an electromagnet, MSC sheets constructed by Mag-TE were harvested and transplanted into the bone defect in the crania of nude rats. Histological observation revealed that new bone surrounded by osteoblast-like cells was formed in the defect area 14 days after transplantation with MSC sheets, whereas no bone formation was observed in control rats without the transplant. These results indicated that Mag-TE could be used for the transplantation of MSC sheets using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force, providing novel methodology for bone tissue engineering.

  11. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2018-03-01

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Big-Data-Driven Stem Cell Science and Tissue Engineering: Vision and Unique Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sol, Antonio; Thiesen, Hans J; Imitola, Jaime; Carazo Salas, Rafael E

    2017-02-02

    Achieving the promises of stem cell science to generate precise disease models and designer cell samples for personalized therapeutics will require harnessing pheno-genotypic cell-level data quantitatively and predictively in the lab and clinic. Those requirements could be met by developing a Big-Data-driven stem cell science strategy and community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes-A model

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    Kanani, S. [Institut Genomique Fonctionelle, 141 Rue de la Cardonille, 34396 Montpellier (France); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pumir, A. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonne, CNRS and Universite de Nice, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)], E-mail: alain.pumir@unice.fr; Krinsky, V. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2008-01-07

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler-Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo-Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin-Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I{sub K1} channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I{sub K1} channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I{sub K1} channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I{sub K1} channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler-Reuter and in the dynamic Luo-Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below {approx}1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I{sub K1} has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  14. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron X Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light based PSL (VL-PSL system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs into a biodegradable polymer (poly-D,L-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/ poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG/hyaluronic acid (HA matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84% and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical property with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in Control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium treated group (TGF-β3 group hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 x 10(5 fold increases, respectively, compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, and Alcian blue and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group, cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL- and PLLA-PEG/HA based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint cartilage

  15. A feasibility of useful cell-based therapy by bone regeneration with deciduous tooth stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical study using tissue engineering technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoichi; Nakamura, Sayaka; Ito, Kenji; Sugito, Takayuki; Yoshimi, Ryoko; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Ueda, Minoru

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of bone regeneration with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), deciduous tooth stem cells (DTSCs), or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) for clinical study on hydroxyapatite-coated osseointegrated dental implants, using tissue engineering technology. In vitro, human DPSCs and DTSCs expressed STRO-1, CD13, CD29, CD 44, CD73, and osteogenic marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, Runx2, and osteocalcin. In vivo, prepared bone defect model was implanted using graft materials as follows: platelet-rich plasma (PRP), PRP and canine BMMSCs (cBMMSCs), PRP and canine DPSCs (cDPSCs), PRP and puppy DTSCs (pDTSCs), and control (defect only). After 8 weeks, the dental implants were installed, and 16 weeks later the sections were evaluated histologically and histometrically. The cBMMSCs/PRP, cDPSCs/PRP, and pDTSCs/PRP groups had well-formed mature bone and neovascularization. Histometrically, the bone-implant contact was significantly different between the cBMMSCs/PRP, cDPSCs/PRP, pDTSCs/PRP groups, and the control and PRP groups (p < 0.01). These results demonstrated that these stem cells with PRP have the ability to form bone, and this bone formation activity might be useful for osseointegrated hydroxyapatite-coated dental implants with good levels of bone-implant contact.

  16. Role of STRO-1 sorting of porcine dental germ stem cells in dental stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel Pekozer, Gorke; Ramazanoglu, Mustafa; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Kok, Fatma Nese; Torun Kose, Gamze

    2017-05-31

    Stem cells of dental origin emerged as a new source for the regeneration of tissues with advantages mainly including non-invasive collection procedures and lack of ethical contraversies with their harvest or use. In this study, porcine TGSCs (pTGSCs) were isolated from mandibular third molar tooth germs of 6-month-old domestic pigs. This is the first study that reports the isolation and characterization of TGSCs from porcine third molars and their differentiation depending on STRO-1 expression. PTGSCs were sorted according to their STRO-1 expression as STRO-1(+) and STRO-1(-). Sorted and unsorted heterogenous cells (US) were characterized by their osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation capabilities. STRO-1(+) cells exhibited a higher proliferation rate owing to their clonogenic properties. All three groups of cells were found differentiated into osteogenic lineage as shown by ALP activity, calcium deposition assay, detection of osteogenic mRNAs and, proteins and mineralization staining. According to differentiation analysis, STRO-1(+) cells did not show a better performance for osteogenesis compared to STRO-1(-) and US cells. This might indicate that STRO-1(+) cells might require a heterogeneous population of cells including STRO-1(-) in their niche to perform their proposed role in osteogenesis.

  17. Co-incident insertion enables high efficiency genome engineering in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, Brian R; MacDougall, Matthew S; Clarke, Ryan; Merrill, Bradley J

    2016-09-19

    CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have enabled powerful, new genome editing capabilities; however, the preponderance of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) mediated repair events over homology directed repair (HDR) in most cell types limits the ability to engineer precise changes in mammalian genomes. Here, we increase the efficiency of isolating precise HDR-mediated events in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by more than 20-fold through the use of co-incidental insertion (COIN) of independent donor DNA sequences. Analysis of on:off-target frequencies at the Lef1 gene revealed that bi-allelic insertion of a PGK-Neo cassette occurred more frequently than expected. Using various selection cassettes targeting multiple loci, we show that the insertion of a selectable marker at one control site frequently coincided with an insertion at an unlinked, independently targeted site, suggesting enrichment of a sub-population of HDR-proficient cells. When individual cell events were tracked using flow cytometry and fluorescent protein markers, individual cells frequently performed either a homology-dependent insertion event or a homology-independent event, but rarely both types of insertions in a single cell. Thus, when HDR-dependent selection donors are used, COIN enriches for HDR-proficient cells among heterogeneous cell populations. When combined with a self-excising selection cassette, COIN provides highly efficient and scarless genome editing. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  19. Functional Differences in Engineered Myocardium from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived versus Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinberg, Adam W.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; van der Meer, Peter; Sheehy, Sean P.; Domian, Ibrahim; Chien, Kenneth R.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes represent unique tools for cell-and tissue-based regenerative therapies, drug discovery and safety, and studies of fundamental heart-failure mechanisms. However, the degree to which stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes compare to mature cardiomyocytes is often debated.

  20. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  1. Comparison of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Source Differentiation Toward Human Pediatric Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells within 3D Engineered Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Das, Shoshana; Xu, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Living tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHV) would be a major benefit for children who require a replacement with the capacity for growth and biological integration. A persistent challenge for TEHV is accessible human cell source(s) that can mimic native valve cell phenotypes and matrix remodeling characteristics that are essential for long-term function. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow (BMMSC) or adipose tissue (ADMSC) are intriguing cell sources for TEHV, but they have not been compared with pediatric human aortic valve interstitial cells (pHAVIC) in relevant 3D environments. In this study, we compared the spontaneous and induced multipotency of ADMSC and BMMSC with that of pHAVIC using different induction media within three-dimensional (3D) bioactive hybrid hydrogels with material modulus comparable to that of aortic heart valve leaflets. pHAVIC possessed some multi-lineage differentiation capacity in response to induction media, but limited to the earliest stages and much less potent than either ADMSC or BMMSC. ADMSC expressed cell phenotype markers more similar to pHAVIC when conditioned in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) containing HAVIC growth medium, while BMMSC generally expressed similar extracellular matrix remodeling characteristics to pHAVIC. Finally, we covalently attached bFGF to PEG monoacrylate linkers and further covalently immobilized in the 3D hybrid hydrogels. Immobilized bFGF upregulated vimentin expression and promoted the fibroblastic differentiation of pHAVIC, ADMSC, and BMMSC. These findings suggest that stem cells retain a heightened capacity for osteogenic differentiation in 3D culture, but can be shifted toward fibroblast differentiation through matrix tethering of bFGF. Such a strategy is likely important for utilizing stem cell sources in heart valve tissue engineering applications. PMID:25594437

  2. Engineering anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment by bioprinting mesenchymal stem cells in nanoliter gel droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan, Umut A; El Assal, Rami; Yildiz, Simin E; Sung, Yuree; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Kuo, Winston P; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-07-07

    Over the past decade, bioprinting has emerged as a promising patterning strategy to organize cells and extracellular components both in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) to engineer functional tissue mimicking constructs. So far, tissue printing has neither been used for 3D patterning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiphase growth factor embedded 3D hydrogels nor been investigated phenotypically in terms of simultaneous differentiation into different cell types within the same micropatterned 3D tissue constructs. Accordingly, we demonstrated a biochemical gradient by bioprinting nanoliter droplets encapsulating human MSCs, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1), engineering an anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment. Assessment of the model tissue construct displayed multiphasic anisotropy of the incorporated biochemical factors after patterning. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results suggested genomic expression patterns leading to simultaneous differentiation of MSC populations into osteogenic and chondrogenic phenotype within the multiphasic construct, evidenced by upregulation of osteogenesis and condrogenesis related genes during in vitro culture. Comprehensive phenotypic network and pathway analysis results, which were based on genomic expression data, indicated activation of differentiation related mechanisms, via signaling pathways, including TGF, BMP, and vascular endothelial growth factor.

  3. Dental pulp tissue engineering of pulpotomized rat molars with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Kaneko, Tomoatsu; Sueyama, Yukiko; Kaneko, Reika; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The major goal of dental pulp tissue engineering is to enable the healing of inflamed tissue or to replace necrotic pulp tissue with newly formed dental pulp tissue. Here, we report a protocol for pulp tissue engineering in vivo in pulpotomized rat teeth using constructs of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, preformed biodegradable scaffolds, and hydrogel. The constructs were implanted into pulpotomized pulp chambers for 3, 7, or 14 days. At 3 days, cells were located mainly along the preformed scaffolds. At 7 days, pulp tissue regeneration was observed in almost the entire implanted region. At 14 days, pulp tissue regeneration further progressed throughout the implanted region. In immunohistochemistry, at 3 days, a number of small and round macrophages immunoreactive to CD68 were predominantly distributed around the scaffolds. The density of CD68+ macrophages decreased until 14 days. On the other hand, nestin-expressing odontoblast-like cells beneath the dentin at the border of implanted region increased until 14 days. Quantitative gene expression analysis revealed that odontoblast differentiation marker dentin sialophosphoprotein mRNA in the implanted region gradually increased until 14 days. Together, the results suggested that regeneration of dental pulp tissue had occurred. Thus, our study provides a novel experimental rat model of dental pulp regeneration.

  4. Engineering Anisotropic Biomimetic Fibrocartilage Microenvironment by Bioprinting Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Nanoliter Gel Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, bioprinting has emerged as a promising patterning strategy to organize cells and extracellular components both in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) to engineer functional tissue mimicking constructs. So far, tissue printing has neither been used for 3D patterning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiphase growth factor embedded 3D hydrogels nor been investigated phenotypically in terms of simultaneous differentiation into different cell types within the same micropatterned 3D tissue constructs. Accordingly, we demonstrated a biochemical gradient by bioprinting nanoliter droplets encapsulating human MSCs, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1), engineering an anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment. Assessment of the model tissue construct displayed multiphasic anisotropy of the incorporated biochemical factors after patterning. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results suggested genomic expression patterns leading to simultaneous differentiation of MSC populations into osteogenic and chondrogenic phenotype within the multiphasic construct, evidenced by upregulation of osteogenesis and condrogenesis related genes during in vitro culture. Comprehensive phenotypic network and pathway analysis results, which were based on genomic expression data, indicated activation of differentiation related mechanisms, via signaling pathways, including TGF, BMP, and vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:24495169

  5. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Subacromial Bursa: Potential for Cell Based Tendon Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Armstrong, April D.; Li, Feng; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common clinical problem either as a result of overuse or aging. Biological approaches to tendon repair that involve use of scaffolding materials or cell-based approaches are currently being investigated. The cell-based approaches are focused on applying multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) mostly harvested from bone marrow. In the present study, we focused on characterizing cells harvested from tissues associated with rotator cuff tendons based on an assumption that these cells would be more appropriate for tendon repair. We isolated MSCs from bursa tissue associated with rotator cuff tendons and characterized them for multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Human bursa was obtained from patients undergoing rotator cuff surgery and cells within were isolated using collagenase and dispase digestion. The cells isolated from the tissues were characterized for osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and tenogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the cells isolated from bursa tissue exhibited MSCs characteristics as evidenced by the expression of putative cell surface markers attributed to MSCs. The cells exhibited high proliferative capacity and differentiated toward cells of mesenchymal lineages with high efficiency. Bursa-derived cells expressed markers of tenocytes when treated with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) and assumed aligned morphology in culture. Bursa cells pretreated with BMP-12 and seeded in ceramic scaffolds formed extensive bone, as well as tendon-like tissue in vivo. Bone formation was demonstrated by histological analysis and immunofluorescence for DMP-1 in tissue sections made from the scaffolds seeded with the cells. Tendon-like tissue formed in vivo consisted of parallel collagen fibres typical of tendon tissues. Bursa-derived cells also formed a fibrocartilagenous tissue in the ceramic scaffolds. Taken together, the results demonstrate a new source of MSCs with a

  6. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable sca...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  7. Generation and Genetic Engineering of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Designed Zinc Finger Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; London, Viktoriya; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William; Civin, Curt

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have become powerful tools to deliver a targeted double-strand break at a pre-determined chromosomal locus in order to insert an exogenous transgene by homology-directed repair. ZFN-mediated gene targeting was used to generate both single-allele chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5)-modified human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs from human lung fibroblasts (IMR90 cells) and human primary cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) by site-specific insertion of stem cell transcription factor genes flanked by LoxP sites into the endogenous CCR5 locus. The Oct4 and Sox2 reprogramming factors, in combination with valproic acid, induced reprogramming of human lung fibroblasts to form CCR5-modified hiPSCs, while 5 factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog, induced reprogramming of CBMNCs. Subsequent Cre recombinase treatment of the CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs resulted in the removal of the Oct4 and Sox2 transgenes. Further genetic engineering of the single-allele CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs was achieved by site-specific addition of the large CFTR transcription unit to the remaining CCR5 wild-type allele, using CCR5-specific ZFNs and a donor construct containing tdTomato and CFTR transgenes flanked by CCR5 homology arms. CFTR was expressed efficiently from the endogenous CCR5 locus of the CCR5-modified tdTomato/CFTR hiPSCs. These results suggest that it might be feasible to use ZFN-evoked strategies to (1) generate precisely targeted genetically well-defined patient-specific hiPSCs, and (2) then to reshape their function by targeted addition and expression of therapeutic genes from the CCR5 chromosomal locus for autologous cell-based transgene-correction therapy to treat various recessive monogenic human diseases in the future. PMID:22931452

  8. Studying Kidney Disease Using Tissue and Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreta, Elena; González, Federico; Montserrat, Núria

    2017-10-07

    Kidney morphogenesis and patterning have been extensively studied in animal models such as the mouse and zebrafish. These seminal studies have been key to define the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex multistep process. Based on this knowledge, the last 3 years have witnessed the development of a cohort of protocols allowing efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) towards defined kidney progenitor populations using two-dimensional (2D) culture systems or through generating organoids. Kidney organoids are three-dimensional (3D) kidney-like tissues, which are able to partially recapitulate kidney structure and function in vitro. The current possibility to combine state-of-the art tissue engineering with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated systems 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering provides an unprecedented opportunity for studying kidney disease with hPSCs. Recently, hPSCs with genetic mutations introduced through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering have shown to produce kidney organoids able to recapitulate phenotypes of polycystic kidney disease and glomerulopathies. This mini review provides an overview of the most recent advances in differentiation of hPSCs into kidney lineages, and the latest implementation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the organoid setting, as promising platforms to study human kidney development and disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Mold-shaped, nanofiber scaffold-based cartilage engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjanin, Sasa; Li, Wan-Ju; Morgan, Meredith T; Shanti, Rabie M; Tuan, Rocky S

    2008-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue engineering is a promising future alternative to autologous cartilage grafting. This study evaluates the potential of using MSCs, seeded into electrospun, biodegradable polymeric nanofibrous scaffolds, to engineer cartilage with defined dimensions and shape, similar to grafts used for subcutaneous implantation in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Human bone marrow derived MSCs seeded onto nanofibrous scaffolds and placed in custom-designed molds were cultured for up to 42 days in bioreactors. Chondrogenesis was induced with either transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) alone or in combination with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Constructs exhibited hyaline cartilage histology with desired thickness and shape as well as favorable tissue integrity and shape retention, suggesting the presence of elastic tissue. Time-dependent increase in cartilage matrix gene expression was seen in both types of culture: at Day 42, TGF-beta1/IGF-I treated cultures showed higher collagen Type 2 and aggrecan expression. Both culture conditions showed significant time-dependent increase in sulfated glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline contents. TGF-beta1/IGF-I-treated samples were significantly stiffer; with equilibrium compressive Young's modulus values reaching 17 kPa by Day 42. The successful ex vivo development of geometrically defined cartilaginous construct using customized molding suggests the potential of cell-based cartilage tissue for reconstructive surgery.

  10. Unraveling the mechanistic effects of electric field stimulation towards directing stem cell fate and function: A tissue engineering perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Boda, Sunil Kumar; Basu, Bikramjit

    2018-01-01

    Electric field (EF) stimulation can play a vital role in eliciting appropriate stem cell response. Such an approach is recently being established to guide stem cell differentiation through osteogenesis/neurogenesis/cardiomyogenesis. Despite significant recent efforts, the biophysical mechanisms by which stem cells sense, interpret and transform electrical cues into biochemical and biological signals still remain unclear. The present review critically analyses the variety of EF stimulation approaches that can be employed to evoke appropriate stem cell response and also makes an attempt to summarize the underlying concepts of this notion, placing special emphasis on stem cell based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This review also discusses the major signaling pathways and cellular responses that are elicited by electric stimulation, including the participation of reactive oxygen species and heat shock proteins, modulation of intracellular calcium ion concentration, ATP production and numerous other events involving the clustering or reassembling of cell surface receptors, cytoskeletal remodeling and so on. The specific advantages of using external electric stimulation in different modalities to regulate stem cell fate processes are highlighted with explicit examples, in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Engineered human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived intestinal tissues with a functional enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J; Mahe, Maxime M; Trisno, Stephen; Poling, Holly M; Watson, Carey L; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Chang, Ching-Fang; Schiesser, Jacqueline; Aubert, Philippe; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Conklin, Bruce R; Neunlist, Michel; Brugmann, Samantha A; Helmrath, Michael A; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract controls many diverse functions, including motility and epithelial permeability. Perturbations in ENS development or function are common, yet there is no human model for studying ENS-intestinal biology and disease. We used a tissue-engineering approach with embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to generate human intestinal tissue containing a functional ENS. We recapitulated normal intestinal ENS development by combining human-PSC-derived neural crest cells (NCCs) and developing human intestinal organoids (HIOs). NCCs recombined with HIOs in vitro migrated into the mesenchyme, differentiated into neurons and glial cells and showed neuronal activity, as measured by rhythmic waves of calcium transients. ENS-containing HIOs grown in vivo formed neuroglial structures similar to a myenteric and submucosal plexus, had functional interstitial cells of Cajal and had an electromechanical coupling that regulated waves of propagating contraction. Finally, we used this system to investigate the cellular and molecular basis for Hirschsprung's disease caused by a mutation in the gene PHOX2B. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of human-PSC-derived intestinal tissue with a functional ENS and how this system can be used to study motility disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract.

  12. TRAIL-engineered pancreas-derived mesenchymal stem cells: characterization and cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, M R; Sun, X-Y; Rayat, J; Dai, D; Ao, Z; He, Z; Verchere, C B; Dai, L-J; Warnock, G L

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy owing to their tumor-oriented homing capacity and the feasibility of autologous transplantation. Currently, pancreatic cancer patients face a very poor prognosis, primarily due to the lack of therapeutic strategies with an effective degree of specificity. Anticancer gene-engineered MSCs specifically target tumor sites and can produce anticancer agents locally and constantly. This study was performed to characterize pancreas-derived MSCs and investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on pancreatic cancer cells under different culture conditions. Pancreas-derived MSCs exhibited positive expression on CD44, CD73, CD95, CD105, negative on CD34 and differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. TRAIL expression was assessed by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Different patterns of TRAIL receptor expression were observed on the pancreatic cancer cell lines, including PANC1, HP62, ASPC1, TRM6 and BXPC3. Cell viability was assessed using a real-time monitoring system. Pancreatic cancer cell death was proportionally related to conditioned media from MSC(nsTRAIL) and MSC(stTRAIL). The results suggest that MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of pancreatic cancer cells and that this effect can be potentiated by TRAIL-transfection on death receptor-bearing cell types.

  13. Reverse engineering life: physical and chemical mimetics for controlled stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuse, Gary R; Lamkin-Kennard, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to manipulate stem cells in order to induce differentiation along a desired developmental pathway has improved immeasurably in recent years. That is in part because we have a better understanding of the intracellular and extracellular signals that regulate differentiation. However, there has also been a realization that stem cell differentiation is not regulated only by chemical signals but also by the physical milieu in which a particular stem cell exists. In this regard we are challenged to mimic both chemical and physical environments. Herein we describe a method to induce stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes using a combination of chemical and physical cues. This method can be applied to produce differentiated cells for research and potentially for cell-based therapy of cardiomyopathies.

  14. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic......A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  15. Impact of Tissue Harvesting Sites on the Cellular Behaviors of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: Implication for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rezai Rad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of adipose-derived stem cells (AdSCs over bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, such as being available as a medical waste and less discomfort during harvest, have made them a good alternative instead of BMSCs in tissue engineering. AdSCs from buccal fat pad (BFP, as an easily harvestable and accessible source, have gained interest to be used for bone regeneration in the maxillofacial region. Due to scarcity of data regarding comparative analysis of isolated AdSCs from different parts of the body, we aimed to quantitatively compare the proliferation and osteogenic capabilities of AdSCs from different harvesting sites. In this study, AdSCs were isolated from BFP (BFPdSCs, abdomen (abdomen-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AbdSCs, and hip (hip-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HdSCs from one individual and were compared for surface marker expression, morphology, growth rate, and osteogenic differentiation capability. Among them, BFPdSCs demonstrated the highest proliferation rate with the shortest doubling time and also expressed vascular endothelial markers including CD34 and CD146. Moreover, the expression of osteogenic markers were significantly higher in BFPdSCs. The results of this study suggested that BFPdSCs as an encouraging source of mesenchymal stem cells are to be used for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Engineered myocardial tissues constructed in vivo using cardiomyocyte-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the feasibility of constructing engineered myocardial tissues (EMTs in vivo, using polylactic acid -co-glycolic acid (PLGA for scaffold and cardiomyocyte-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs for seeded cells. Methods BMMSCs were isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats by density-gradient centrifugation. The third passage cells were treated with 10 μmol/L 5-azacytidine (5-aza and 0.1 μmol/L angiotensin II (Ang II for 24 h, followed by culturing in complete medium for 3 weeks to differentiated into cardiomyocyte-like cells. The cardiomyocyte-like cells were seeded into PLGA scaffolds to form the grafts. The grafts were cultured in the incubator for three days and then implanted into the peritoneal cavity of SD rats. Four weeks later, routine hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemical staining for myocardium-specific cardiac troponin I (cTnI, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the morphology and microconstruction of the EMTs in host rats. Results HE staining showed that the cardiomyocyte-like cells distributed equally in the PLGA scaffold, and the nuclei arranged in the spindle shape. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that majority of engrafted cells in the PLGA -Cardiomyocyte-like cells group were positive for cTnI. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the inoculated cells well attached to PLGA and grew in 3 dimensions in construct. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the EMTs contained well arranged myofilaments paralleled to the longitudinal cell axis, the cells were rich in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, while desmosomes, gap junction and Z line-like substances were also can be observed as well within the engrafted cells. Conclusion We have developed an in vivo method to construct engineered myocardial tissue. The in vivo microenvironment helped engrafted cells/tissue survive and

  17. The role of fibrinolysis inhibition in engineered vascular networks derived from endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühleder, Severin; Pill, Karoline; Schaupper, Mira; Labuda, Krystyna; Priglinger, Eleni; Hofbauer, Pablo; Charwat, Verena; Marx, Uwe; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2018-02-12

    Co-cultures of endothelial cells with mesenchymal stem cells currently represent one of the most promising approaches in providing oxygen and nutrient supply for microvascular tissue engineering. Still, to translate this model into clinics several in vitro parameters including growth medium and scaffold degradation need to be fine-tuned. We recently described the co-culture of adipose-derived stem cells with endothelial cells in fibrin, resulting in capillary formation in vitro as well as their perfusion in vivo. Here, we aimed to further characterise microvascular tube formation in fibrin by determining the role of scaffold degradation, thrombin concentration and culture conditions on vascularisation. We observed that inhibition of cell-mediated fibrin degradation by the commonly used inhibitor aprotinin resulted in impaired vascular network formation. Aprotinin had no effect on laminin and collagen type IV deposition or formation of tube-like structures in scaffold-free co-culture, indicating that poor vascularisation of fibrin clots is primarily caused by inhibition of plasminogen-driven fibrinolysis. Co-culture in plasminogen- and factor XIII-depleted fibrin did not result in different vascular network density compared to controls. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thrombin negatively affects vascular network density at high concentrations. However, only transient activation of incorporated endothelial cells by thrombin could be observed, thus excluding a long-term inflammatory response in tissue-engineered micro-capillaries. Finally, we show that vascularisation of fibrin scaffolds in basal medium is undermined because of increased fibrinolytic activity leading to scaffold destabilisation without aprotinin. Taken together, our data reveal a critical role of fibrinolysis inhibition in in vitro cell-mediated vascularisation of fibrin scaffolds.

  18. Hybrid-spheroids incorporating ECM like engineered fragmented fibers potentiate stem cell function by improved cell/cell and cell/ECM interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Taufiq; Lee, Jinkyu; Shin, Young Min; Shin, Hyeok Jun; Madhurakat Perikamana, Sajeesh Kumar; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Shin, Heungsoo

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is critical for the viability, stemness, and differentiation of stem cells. In this study, we developed hybrid-spheroids of human turbinate mesenchymal stem cells (hTMSCs) by using extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking fragmented fibers (FFs) for improvement of the viability and functions of hTMSCs. We prepared FFs with average size of 68.26 µm by partial aminolysis of poly L-lactide (PLLA) fibrous sheet (FS), which was coated with polydopamine for improved cell adhesion. The proliferation of hTMSCs within the hybrid-spheroids mixed with fragmented fibers was significantly increased as compared to that from the cell-only group. Cells and fragmented fibers were homogenously distributed with the presence of pore like empty spaces in the structure. LOX-1 staining revealed that the hybrid-spheroids improved the cell viability, which was potentially due to enhanced transport of oxygen through void space generated by engineered ECM. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that cells within the hybrid-spheroid formed strong cell junctions and contacts with fragmented fibers. The expression of cell junction proteins including connexin 43 and E-cadherin was significantly upregulated in hybrid-spheroids by 16.53 ± 0.04 and 28.26 ± 0.11-fold greater than that from cell-only group. Similarly, expression of integrin α2, α5, and β1 was significantly enhanced at the same group by 25.72 ± 0.13, 27.48 ± 0.49, and 592.78 ± 0.06-fold, respectively. In addition, stemness markers including Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2 were significantly upregulated in hybrid-spheroids by 96.56 ± 0.06, 158.95 ± 0.06, and 115.46 ± 0.47-fold, respectively, relative to the cell-only group. Additionally, hTMSCs within the hybrid-spheroids showed significantly greater osteogenic differentiation under osteogenic media conditions. Taken together, our hybrid-spheroids can be an ideal approach for stem cell

  19. Enhanced cartilage formation via three-dimensional cell engineering of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Hun; Bhang, Suk Ho; Shin, Jung-Youn; Shin, Jaehoon; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2012-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective treatment for damaged articular cartilage. However, this method involves surgical procedures that may cause further cartilage degeneration, and in vitro expansion of chondrocytes can result in dedifferentiation. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) may be an alternative autologous cell source for cartilage regeneration. In this study, we developed an effective method for large-scale in vitro chondrogenic differentiation, which is the procedure that would be required for clinical applications, and the subsequent in vivo cartilage formation of human ADSCs (hADSCs). The spheroid formation and chondrogenic differentiation of hADSCs were induced on a large scale by culturing hADSCs in three-dimensional suspension bioreactors (spinner flasks). In vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hADSCs was enhanced by a spheroid culture compared with a monolayer culture. The enhanced chondrogenesis was probably attributable to hypoxia-related cascades and enhanced cell-cell interactions in hADSC spheroids. On hADSCs loading in fibrin gel and transplantation into subcutaneous space of athymic mice for 4 weeks, the in vivo cartilage formation was enhanced by the transplantation of spheroid-cultured hADSCs compared with that of monolayer-cultured hADSCs. This study shows that the spheroid culture may be an effective method for large-scale in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hADSCs and subsequent in vivo cartilage formation.

  20. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE. Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions.

  1. Combined transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells for tissue engineering: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kunming; Zhou, Zheng; Ju, Xinxin; Zhou, Yang; Lan, Jiaojiao; Chen, Dongdong; Chen, Hongzhi; Liu, Manli; Pang, Lijuan

    2016-10-10

    Combined cell implantation has been widely applied in tissue engineering in recent years. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to establish whether the combined transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) promotes angiogenesis and tissue repair, compared with transplantation of a single cell type, following tissue injury or during tissue regeneration. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Chinese Biomedical Literature, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Eighteen controlled preclinical studies involving MSC and EPC transplantation in animal models of disease, or in coculture in vitro, were included in this review. The vessel density and other functional indexes, which were classified according to the organ source, were used to evaluate the efficiency of cotransplantation. Publication bias was assessed. There was no obvious difference in angiogenesis following combined cell transplantation (EPCs and MSCs) and transplantation of EPCs alone; however, an improvement in the function of damaged organs was observed following cotransplantation. In addition, combined cell transplantation significantly promoted tissue recovery in cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and during bone regeneration. Compared with combined transplantation (EPCs and MSCs) and transplantation of MSCs alone, cotransplantation significantly promoted angiogenesis and bone regeneration, as well as vessel revascularization and tissue repair in cerebrovascular disease; however, no obvious effects on cardiovascular disease were observed. As an exploratory field in the discipline of tissue engineering, MSC and EPC cotransplantation offers advantages, although it is essential to assess the feasibility of this approach before clinical trials can be performed.

  2. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering: an advanced strategy for blood vessels regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yin, Pei; Bian, Guang-Liang; Huang, Hao-Yue; Shen, Han; Yang, Jun-Jie; Yang, Zi-Ying; Shen, Zhen-Ya

    2017-09-15

    Over the past years, vascular diseases have continued to threaten human health and increase financial burdens worldwide. Transplantation of allogeneic and autologous blood vessels is the most convenient treatment. However, it could not be applied generally due to the scarcity of donors and the patient's condition. Developments in tissue engineering are contributing greatly with regard to this urgent need for blood vessels. Tissue engineering-derived blood vessels are promising alternatives for patients with aortic dissection/aneurysm. The aim of this review is to show the importance of advances in biomaterials development for the treatment of vascular disease. We also provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of tissue reconstruction from stem cells and transplantable cellular scaffold constructs, focusing on the combination of stem cells and tissue engineering for blood vessel regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

  3. Immunological Properties of Murine Parthenogenetic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Engineered Heart Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Didié

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent parthenogenetic stem cells (pSCs can be derived by pharmacological activation of unfertilized oocytes. Homozygosity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in pSCs makes them an attractive cell source for applications in allogeneic tissue repair. This was recently demonstrated for pSC-based tissue-engineered heart repair. A detailed analysis of immunological properties of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and engineered heart muscle (EHM thereof is, however, lacking. The aim of this study was to determine baseline and cytokine-inducible MHC class I and MHC class II as well as programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1 and co-stimulatory protein (CD40, CD80, CD86 expression in pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and pSC-EHM in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocytes from an MHC-homologous (H2d/d pSC-line were enriched to ~90% by making use of a recently developed cardiomyocyte-specific genetic selection protocol. MHC class I and MHC class II expression in cardiomyocytes could only be observed after stimulation with interferon gamma (IFN-γ. PDL-1 was markedly upregulated under IFN-γ. CD40, CD80, and CD86 were expressed at low levels and not upregulated by IFN-γ. EHM constructed from H2d/d cardiomyocytes expressed similarly low levels of MHC class I, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules under basal conditions. However, in EHM only MHC class I, but not MHC class II, molecules were upregulated after IFN-γ-stimulation. We next employed a cocultivation system with MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched splenocytes and T-cells to analyze the immune stimulatory properties of EHMs. Despite MHC-mismatched conditions, EHM did not induce splenocyte or T-cell proliferation in vitro. To evaluate the immunogenicity of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo, we implanted pSC-derived embryoid bodies after elimination of non-cardiomyocytes (cardiac bodies under the kidney capsules of MHC-matched and -mismatched mice. Spontaneous beating of cardiac bodies could be observed for 28

  4. Immunological Properties of Murine Parthenogenetic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Engineered Heart Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didié, Michael; Galla, Satish; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Dressel, Ralf; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent parthenogenetic stem cells (pSCs) can be derived by pharmacological activation of unfertilized oocytes. Homozygosity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in pSCs makes them an attractive cell source for applications in allogeneic tissue repair. This was recently demonstrated for pSC-based tissue-engineered heart repair. A detailed analysis of immunological properties of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and engineered heart muscle (EHM) thereof is, however, lacking. The aim of this study was to determine baseline and cytokine-inducible MHC class I and MHC class II as well as programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1) and co-stimulatory protein (CD40, CD80, CD86) expression in pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and pSC-EHM in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocytes from an MHC-homologous (H2d/d) pSC-line were enriched to ~90% by making use of a recently developed cardiomyocyte-specific genetic selection protocol. MHC class I and MHC class II expression in cardiomyocytes could only be observed after stimulation with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). PDL-1 was markedly upregulated under IFN-γ. CD40, CD80, and CD86 were expressed at low levels and not upregulated by IFN-γ. EHM constructed from H2d/d cardiomyocytes expressed similarly low levels of MHC class I, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules under basal conditions. However, in EHM only MHC class I, but not MHC class II, molecules were upregulated after IFN-γ-stimulation. We next employed a cocultivation system with MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched splenocytes and T-cells to analyze the immune stimulatory properties of EHMs. Despite MHC-mismatched conditions, EHM did not induce splenocyte or T-cell proliferation in vitro. To evaluate the immunogenicity of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo, we implanted pSC-derived embryoid bodies after elimination of non-cardiomyocytes (cardiac bodies) under the kidney capsules of MHC-matched and -mismatched mice. Spontaneous beating of cardiac bodies could be observed for 28 days in the

  5. Linking transgene expression of engineered mesenchymal stem cells and angiopoietin-1-induced differentiation to target cancer angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Claudius; Hüsemann, Yves; Niess, Hanno; von Luettichau, Irene; Huss, Ralf; Bauer, Christian; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Klein, Christoph A; Bruns, Christiane; Nelson, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    To specifically target tumor angiogenesis by linking transgene expression of engineered mesenchymal stem cells to angiopoietin-1-induced differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to deliver therapeutic genes into solid tumors. These strategies rely on their homing mechanisms only to deliver the therapeutic agent. We engineered murine MSC to express reporter genes or therapeutic genes under the selective control of the Tie2 promoter/enhancer. This approach uses the differentiative potential of MSCs induced by the tumor microenvironment to drive therapeutic gene expression only in the context of angiogenesis. When injected into the peripheral circulation of mice with either, orthotopic pancreatic or spontaneous breast cancer, the engineered MSCs were actively recruited to growing tumor vasculature and induced the selective expression of either reporter red florescent protein or suicide genes [herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK) gene] when the adoptively transferred MSC developed endothelial-like characteristics. The TK gene product in combination with the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV) produces a potent toxin, which affects replicative cells. The homing of engineered MSC with selective induction of TK in concert with GCV resulted in a toxic tumor-specific environment. The efficacy of this approach was demonstrated by significant reduction in primary tumor growth and prolongation of life in both tumor models. This "Trojan Horse" combined stem cell/gene therapy represents a novel treatment strategy for tailored therapy of solid tumors.

  6. Influence of mesenchymal stem cells on stomach tissue engineering using small intestinal submucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Hiroki; Ueno, Tomio; Oga, Atsunori; Nakao, Mitsuhiro; Nishimura, Taku; Kobayashi, Sei; Oka, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a biodegradable collagen-rich matrix containing functional growth factors. We have previously reported encouraging outcomes for regeneration of an artificial defect in the rodent stomach using SIS grafts, although the muscular layer was diminutive. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of SIS in conjunction with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regeneration of the gastrointestinal tract. MSCs from the bone marrow of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were isolated and expanded ex vivo. A 1 cm whole-layer stomach defect in SD rats was repaired using: a plain SIS graft without MSCs (group 1, control); a plain SIS graft followed by intravenous injection of MSCs (group 2); a SIS graft co-cultured with MSCs (group 3); or a SIS sandwich containing an MSC sheet (group 4). Pharmacological, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical examination was performed to evaluate the regenerated stomach tissue. Contractility in response to a muscarinic receptor agonist, a nitric oxide precursor or electrical field stimulation was observed in all groups. SIS grafts seeded with MSCs (groups 3 and 4) appeared to support improved regeneration compared with SIS grafts not seeded with MSCs (groups 1 and 2), by enabling the development of well-structured smooth muscle layers of significantly increased length. GFP expression was detected in the regenerated interstitial tissue, with fibroblast-like cells in the seeded-SIS groups. SIS potently induced pharmacological and electrophysiological regeneration of the digestive tract, and seeded MSCs provided an enriched environment that supported tissue regeneration by the SIS graft in the engineered stomach. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Concise Review : Engineering Myocardial Tissue: The Convergence of Stem Cells Biology and Tissue Engineering Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, Jan Willem; Van der Meer, Peter; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced heart failure represents a leading public health problem in the developed world. The clinical syndrome results from the loss of viable and/or fully functional myocardial tissue. Designing new approaches to augment the number of functioning human cardiac muscle cells in the failing heart

  8. Effect of in vitro passaging on the stem cell-related properties of tendon-derived stem cells-implications in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qi; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Rui, Yun Feng

    2012-03-20

    This study aimed to compare clonogenicity, proliferation, stem cell-related marker expression, senescence, and differentiation potential of rat patellar tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) at early (P5), mid (P10), and late (P20, P30) passages. The clonogenicity of the cells was assessed by colony-forming assay and their proliferative potential was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine assay. The surface expression of CD90 and CD73 was assessed by flow cytometry. The cellular senescence was assessed by β-galactosidase activity. The adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials of TDSCs were assessed by standard assays after induction. The mRNA expression of tendon-related markers, scleraxis (Scx) and tenomodulin (Tnmd), was measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Both the colony numbers and proliferative potential of TDSCs increased with passaging. Concomitantly, there was significant upregulation of β-galactosidase activity with TDSC passaging. The subculture of TDSCs downregulated the expression of CD90 and CD73. Lipid droplets were formed in the early and mid passages of TDSCs upon adipogenic induction, but were absent in the late passages. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) in TDSCs after adipogenic induction decreased with passaging. Chondrogenesis, proteoglycan deposition, collagen type II protein expression, collagen type 2A1 (Col2AI), and aggrecan (Acan) mRNA expression were less in pellets formed with later passages of TDSCs after chondrogenic induction. The expression of Scx and Tnmd was lower in the late, compared with early and mid, passages of TDSCs. However, matrix mineralization and expression of alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) and osteocalcin (Bglap) mRNA after osteogenic induction increased with TDSC passaging. Researchers and clinicians should consider the changes of stem cell-related properties of

  9. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate microspheres for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanafi, M M; Ramesh, A; Gupta, P K; Bhonde, R R

    2014-07-01

    To immobilize dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in alginate microspheres and to determine cell viability, proliferation, stem cell characteristics and osteogenic potential of the immobilized DPSCs. Human DPSCs isolated from the dental pulp were immobilized in 1% w/v alginate microspheres. Viability and proliferation of immobilized DPSCs were determined by trypan blue and MTT assay, respectively. Stem cell characteristics of DPSCs post immobilization were verified by labelling the cells with CD73 and CD90. Osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs was assessed by the presence of osteocalcin. Alizarin red staining and O-cresolphthalein complexone method confirmed and quantified calcium deposition. A final reverse transcriptase PCR evaluated the expression of osteogenic markers - ALP, Runx-2 and OCN. More than 80% of immobilized DPSCs were viable throughout the 3-week study. Proliferation appeared controlled and consistent unlike DPSCs in the control group. Presence of CD73 and CD90 markers confirmed the stem cell nature of immobilized DPSCs. The presence of osteocalcin, an osteoblastic marker, was confirmed in the microspheres on day 21. Mineralization assays showed high calcium deposition indicating elevated osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs. Osteogenic genes- ALP, Runx-2 and OCN were also upregulated in immobilized DPSCs. Surprisingly, immobilized DPSCs in the control group cultured in conventional stem cell media showed upregulation of osteogenic genes and expressed osteocalcin. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate hydrogels exhibit enhanced osteogenic potential while maintaining high cell viability both of which are fundamental for bone tissue regeneration. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Potency of Stem Cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Potency of Stem Cells. Totipotent Stem Cells (Zygote + first 2 divisions). -Can form placenta, embryo, and any cell of the body. Pluripotent (Embryonic Stem Cells). -Can form any cell of the body but can not form placenta, hence no embryo. Multipotent (Adult stem cells).

  11. Isolation and expansion of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Trine; Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Lund, Pia

    2011-01-01

    For treatment of cardiac failure with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, several clinical trials are ongoing. However, more attention is gathering on the use of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs). This paper describes the optimization of isolation and propagation of ASCs...... for subsequent clinical use. In the isolation step, several enzymes were compared with respect to yield of nucleated cells and precursor cells. Our results showed, that the interdonor variablility was greater than differences between individual enzymes. For propagation of cells, different types of media, sera...... and serum replacers were evaluated regarding their ability to support cell growth and preserve differentiation potential. Most of serum replacers proved inferior to fetal calf serum. Among the media tested, modified Eagle's media alpha was superior in promoting cell growth while preserving the ability...

  12. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  13. Treatment of spinal cord injury: a review of engineering using neural and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Martin M; Harmon, Olivia A; Adeeb, Nimer; Deep, Aman; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-01-01

    Over time, various treatment modalities for spinal cord injury have been trialed, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological methods. Among these, replacement of the injured neural and paraneural tissues via cellular transplantation of neural and mesenchymal stem cells has been the most attractive. Extensive experimental studies have been done to identify the safety and effectiveness of this transplantation in animal and human models. Herein, we review the literature for studies conducted, with a focus on the human-related studies, recruitment, isolation, and transplantation, of these multipotent stem cells, and associated outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  15. Dental stem cells--characteristics and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojic, Sanja; Volarevic, Vladislav; Ljujic, Biljana; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2014-06-01

    Soft dental tissues have been identified as easily accessible sources of multipotent postnatal stem cells. Dental stem cells are mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) capable of differentiating into at least three distinct cell lineages: osteo/odontogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic. They express various markers including those specific for MSC, embryonic stem cells and neural cells. Five different types of dental stem cells have been isolated from mature and immature teeth: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle progenitor cells. Dental stem cells may be used in dental tissue engineering including dental, enamel and periodontal tissue regeneration. They could also be used as a promising tool in potential treatment of neurodegenerative, ischemic and immune diseases.

  16. Polyamine delivery as a tool to modulate stem cell differentiation in skeletal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzì, Rosa Maria; Guidotti, Serena; Minguzzi, Manuela; Facchini, Annalisa; Platano, Daniela; Trisolino, Giovanni; Filardo, Giuseppe; Cetrullo, Silvia; D'Adamo, Stefania; Stefanelli, Claudio; Facchini, Andrea; Flamigni, Flavio

    2014-03-01

    The first step in skeleton development is the condensation of mesenchymal precursors followed by any of two different types of ossification, depending on the type of bone segment: in intramembranous ossification, the bone is deposed directly in the mesenchymal anlagen, whereas in endochondral ossification, the bone is deposed onto a template of cartilage that is subsequently substituted by bone. Polyamines and polyamine-related enzymes have been implicated in bone development as global regulators of the transcriptional and translational activity of stem cells and pivotal transcription factors. Therefore, it is tempting to investigate their use as a tool to improve regenerative medicine strategies in orthopedics. Growing evidence in vitro suggests a role for polyamines in enhancing differentiation in both adult stem cells and differentiated chondrocytes. Adipose-derived stem cells have recently proved to be a convenient alternative to bone marrow stromal cells, due to their easy accessibility and the high frequency of stem cell precursors per volume unit. State-of-the-art "prolotherapy" approaches for skeleton regeneration include the use of adipose-derived stem cells and platelet concentrates, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Besides several growth factors, PRP also contains polyamines in the micromolar range, which may also exert an anti-apoptotic effect, thus helping to explain the efficacy of PRP in enhancing osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, spermidine and spermine are both able to enhance hypertrophy and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and therefore appear to be inducers of endochondral ossification. Finally, the peculiar activity of spermidine as an inducer of autophagy suggests the possibility of exploiting its use to enhance this cytoprotective mechanism to counteract the degenerative changes underlying either the aging or degenerative diseases that affect bone or cartilage.

  17. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  18. Application of platelet-rich plasma with stem cells in bone and periodontal tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gabriela; Yang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Presently, there is a high paucity of bone grafts in the United States and worldwide. Regenerating bone is of prime concern due to the current demand of bone grafts and the increasing number of diseases causing bone loss. Autogenous bone is the present gold standard of bone regeneration. However, disadvantages like donor site morbidity and its decreased availability limit its use. Even allografts and synthetic grafting materials have their own limitations. As certain specific stem cells can be directed to differentiate into an osteoblastic lineage in the presence of growth factors (GFs), it makes stem cells the ideal agents for bone regeneration. Furthermore, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which can be easily isolated from whole blood, is often used for bone regeneration, wound healing and bone defect repair. When stem cells are combined with PRP in the presence of GFs, they are able to promote osteogenesis. This review provides in-depth knowledge regarding the use of stem cells and PRP in vitro, in vivo and their application in clinical studies in the future. PMID:28018706

  19. Evaluation of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Feng; Li, Shuo; Guo, Chang-An; Xu, Du-Liang; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Mo, Xiu-Mei

    2015-08-01

    Stem cells and scaffolds play a very important role in tissue engineering. Here, we isolated synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) from synovial membrane tissue and characterized stem-cell properties. Gelatin nanoparticles (NP) were prepared using a two-step desolvation method and then pre-mixed into different host matrix (silk fibroin (SF), gelatin (Gel), or SF-Gel mixture) to generate various 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds (NP/SF, NP/SF-Gel, NP/Gel-1, and NP/Gel-2). The microstructure was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility assessment was performed through CCK-8 assay by coculturing with SMSCs at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. According to the results, SMSCs are similar to other MSCs in their surface epitope expression, which are negative for CD45 and positive for CD44, CD90, and CD105. After incubation in lineage-specific medium, SMSCs could differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes and adipocytes. 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds exhibited a good biocompatibility in the process of coculturing with SMSCs and had no negative effect on cell behavior. The study provides a strategy to obtain SMSCs and fabricate 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds, the combination of which could be used for practical applications in tissue engineering.

  20. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Nagel, Thomas; Carroll, Simon F; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin) deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  1. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Thorpe

    Full Text Available Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC. Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  2. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikina, Anna D; Strobel, Hannah A; Lai, Bradley P; Rolle, Marsha W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-06-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted into a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient myogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells by the transduction of engineered MyoD protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Min Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ji-Young [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ohsuk [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ki-Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Doo-Byoung, E-mail: dboh@kribb.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •MyoD was engineered to contain protein transduction domain and endosome-disruptive INF7 peptide. •The engineered MyoD-IT showed efficient nuclear targeting through an endosomal escape by INF7 peptide. •By applying MyoD-IT, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were differentiated into myogenic cells. •hASCs differentiated by applying MyoD-IT fused to myotubes through co-culturing with mouse myoblasts. •Myogenic differentiation using MyoD-IT is a safe method without the concern of altering the genome. -- Abstract: Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have great potential as cell sources for the treatment of muscle disorders. To provide a safe method for the myogenic differentiation of hASCs, we engineered the MyoD protein, a key transcription factor for myogenesis. The engineered MyoD (MyoD-IT) was designed to contain the TAT protein transduction domain for cell penetration and the membrane-disrupting INF7 peptide, which is an improved version of the HA2 peptide derived from influenza. MyoD-IT showed greatly improved nuclear targeting ability through an efficient endosomal escape induced by the pH-sensitive membrane disruption of the INF7 peptide. By applying MyoD-IT to a culture, hASCs were efficiently differentiated into long spindle-shaped myogenic cells expressing myosin heavy chains. Moreover, these cells differentiated by an application of MyoD-IT fused to myotubes with high efficiency through co-culturing with mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Because internalized proteins can be degraded in cells without altering the genome, the myogenic differentiation of hASCs using MyoD-IT would be a safe and clinically applicable method.

  6. Stem Cell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a general computational theory of stem cell networks and their developmental dynamics. Stem cell networks are special cases of developmental control networks. Our theory generates a natural classification of all possible stem cell networks based on their network architecture. Each stem cell network has a unique topology and semantics and developmental dynamics that result in distinct phenotypes. We show that the ideal growth dynamics of multicellular systems generated by stem cell ...

  7. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nih, Lina R; Moshayedi, Pouria; Llorente, Irene L; Berg, Andrew R; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Lowry, William E; Segura, Tatiana; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-02-01

    This article presents data related to the research article "Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain" (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016) [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs) after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1) Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2) the use of a design of Experiment (DOE) approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007) [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3) Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  8. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina R. Nih

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents data related to the research article “Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain” (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016 [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1 Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2 the use of a design of Experiment (DOE approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007 [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3 Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  9. Engineered neural tissue with Schwann cell differentiated human dental pulp stem cells: potential for peripheral nerve repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanen, Kathleen; Martens, Wendy; Georgiou, Melanie; Ameloot, Marcel; Lambrichts, Ivo; Phillips, James

    2017-01-04

    Despite the spontaneous regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, large gap peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) require bridging strategies. The limitations and suboptimal results obtained with autografts or hollow nerve conduits in the clinic urge the need for alternative treatments. Recently, we have described promising neuroregenerative capacities of Schwann cells derived from differentiated human dental pulp stem cells (d-hDPSCs) in vitro. Here, we extended the in vitro assays to show the pro-angiogenic effects of d-hDPSCs, such as enhanced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. In addition, for the first time we evaluated the performance of d-hDPSCs in an in vivo rat model of PNI. Eight weeks after transplantation of NeuraWrap™ conduits filled with engineered neural tissue (EngNT) containing aligned d-hDPSCs in 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defects, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural analysis revealed ingrowing neurites, myelinated nerve fibres and blood vessels along the construct. Although further research is required to optimize the delivery of this EngNT, our findings suggest that d-hDPSCs are able to exert a positive effect in the regeneration of nerve tissue in vivo. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Autologous valve replacement-CD133+ stem cell-plus-fibrin composite-based sprayed cell seeding for intraoperative heart valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Alexander; Klopsch, Christian; Mark, Peter; Yerebakan, Can; Donndorf, Peter; Gäbel, Ralf; Eisert, Friederike; Hasken, Stefan; Kreitz, Sebastian; Glass, Aenne; Jockenhövel, Stefan; Ma, Nan; Kundt, Guenther; Liebold, Andreas; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-03-01

    The development of biological valve prostheses with lifetime native-like performance and optimal host engraftment is an ultimate goal of heart valve tissue engineering. We describe a new concept for autologous graft coating based on a CD133(+)-stem-cells-plus-fibrin (SC+F) complex processed from bone marrow and peripheral blood of a single patient. CD133(+)-SC (1 × 10(6) cells/mL) from human bone marrow and autologous fibrin (20 mg/mL) were administered simultaneously via spray administration using the novel Vivostat Co-Delivery System. During static cultivation, SC+F performance was monitored for 20 days after delivery and compared with controls. For dynamic testing SC+F-composite was sprayed on a decellularized porcine pulmonary valve and transferred to a bioreactor under pulsatile flow conditions for 7 days. Static cultivation of SC+F-composite induced significant improvements in stem cell proliferation as compared with controls. For dynamic testing, microscopic analyses on a smooth engineered heart valve surface detected homogenous distribution of stem cells. Ultrasonic analysis revealed native-like valve performance. Applied CD133(+) stem cells differentiated into endothelial-like cells positive for CD31 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and engrafted the valve. However, occasional delamination was observed. SC+F serves as an excellent autologous matrix for intraoperative tissue engineering of valve prostheses promising optimal in vivo integration. However, stability remains an issue.

  11. Mycoplasma detection and elimination are necessary for the application of stem cell from human dental apical papilla to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, So Yeon; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choe, Sung Chul; Han, Dong-Wook; Hwang, Yu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Recently, postnatal stem cells from dental papilla with neural crest origin have been considered as one of potent stem cell sources in regenerative medicine regarding their multi-differentiation capacity and relatively easy access. However, almost human oral tissues have been reported to be infected by mycoplasma which gives rise to oral cavity in teeth, and mycoplasma contamination of ex-vivo cultured stem cells from such dental tissues and its effect on stem cell culture has received little attention. In this study, mycoplama contamination was evaluated with stem cells from apical papilla which were isolated from human third molar and premolars from various aged patients undergoing orthodontic therapy. The ex-vivo expanded stem cells from apical papilla were found to express stem cell markers such as Stro-1, CD44, nestin and CD133, but mycoplama contamination was detected in almost all cell cultures of the tested 20 samples, which was confirmed by mycoplasma-specific gene expression and fluorescence staining. Such contaminated mycoplasma could be successfully eliminated using elimination kit, and proliferation test showed decreased proliferation activity in mycoplasma-contaminated cells. After elimination of contaminated mycoplasma, stem cells from apical papilla showed osteogenic and neural lineage differentiation under certain culture conditions. Our study proposes that the evaluation of mycoplasma contamination and elimination process might be required in the use of stem cells from apical papilla for their potent applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  12. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  13. Process engineering of high voltage alginate encapsulation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr, E-mail: gryshkov@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Pogozhykh, Denys, E-mail: pogozhykh@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Zernetsch, Holger, E-mail: zernetsch@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Hofmann, Nicola, E-mail: hofmann@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Mueller, Thomas, E-mail: mueller.thomas@mh-hannover.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine, Medical School Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Glasmacher, Birgit, E-mail: glasmacher@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Encapsulation of stem cells in alginate beads is promising as a sophisticated drug delivery system in treatment of a wide range of acute and chronic diseases. However, common use of air flow encapsulation of cells in alginate beads fails to produce beads with narrow size distribution, intact spherical structure and controllable sizes that can be scaled up. Here we show that high voltage encapsulation (≥ 15 kV) can be used to reproducibly generate spherical alginate beads (200–400 μm) with narrow size distribution (± 5–7%) in a controlled manner under optimized process parameters. Flow rate of alginate solution ranged from 0.5 to 10 ml/h allowed producing alginate beads with a size of 320 and 350 μm respectively, suggesting that this approach can be scaled up. Moreover, we found that applied voltages (15–25 kV) did not alter the viability and proliferation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells post-encapsulation and cryopreservation as compared to air flow. We are the first who employed a comparative analysis of electro-spraying and air flow encapsulation to study the effect of high voltage on alginate encapsulated cells. This report provides background in application of high voltage to encapsulate living cells for further medical purposes. Long-term comparison and work on alginate–cell interaction within these structures will be forthcoming. - Highlights: • High voltage alginate encapsulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was designed. • Reproducible and spherical alginate beads were generated via high voltage. • Air flow encapsulation was utilized as a comparative approach to high voltage. • High voltage did not alter the viability and proliferation of encapsulated MSCs. • High voltage encapsulation can be scaled up and applied in cell-based therapy.

  14. Expandable and Rapidly Differentiating Human Induced Neural Stem Cell Lines for Multiple Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Cairns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited availability of human neurons poses a significant barrier to progress in biological and preclinical studies of the human nervous system. Current stem cell-based approaches of neuron generation are still hindered by prolonged culture requirements, protocol complexity, and variability in neuronal differentiation. Here we establish stable human induced neural stem cell (hiNSC lines through the direct reprogramming of neonatal fibroblasts and adult adipose-derived stem cells. These hiNSCs can be passaged indefinitely and cryopreserved as colonies. Independently of media composition, hiNSCs robustly differentiate into TUJ1-positive neurons within 4 days, making them ideal for innervated co-cultures. In vivo, hiNSCs migrate, engraft, and contribute to both central and peripheral nervous systems. Lastly, we demonstrate utility of hiNSCs in a 3D human brain model. This method provides a valuable interdisciplinary tool that could be used to develop drug screening applications as well as patient-specific disease models related to disorders of innervation and the brain.

  15. Direct Reprogramming of Human Primordial Germ Cells into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Efficient Generation of Genetically Engineered Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazley, Faith A; Liu, Cyndi F; Yuan, Xuan; Hao, Haiping; All, Angelo H; De Los Angeles, Alejandro; Zambidis, Elias T; Gearhart, John D; Kerr, Candace L

    2015-11-15

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) share many properties with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and innately express several key pluripotency-controlling factors, including OCT4, NANOG, and LIN28. Therefore, PGCs may provide a simple and efficient model for studying somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), especially in determining the regulatory mechanisms that fundamentally define pluripotency. Here, we report a novel model of PGC reprogramming to generate iPSCs via transfection with SOX2 and OCT4 using integrative lentiviral. We also show the feasibility of using nonintegrative approaches for generating iPSC from PGCs using only these two factors. We show that human PGCs express endogenous levels of KLF4 and C-MYC protein at levels similar to embryonic germ cells (EGCs) but lower levels of SOX2 and OCT4. Transfection with both SOX2 and OCT4 together was required to induce PGCs to a pluripotent state at an efficiency of 1.71%, and the further addition of C-MYC increased the efficiency to 2.33%. Immunohistochemical analyses of the SO-derived PGC-iPSCs revealed that these cells were more similar to ESCs than EGCs regarding both colony morphology and molecular characterization. Although leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) was not required for the generation of PGC-iPSCs like EGCs, the presence of LIF combined with ectopic exposure to C-MYC yielded higher efficiencies. Additionally, the SO-derived PGC-iPSCs exhibited differentiation into representative cell types from all three germ layers in vitro and successfully formed teratomas in vivo. Several lines were generated that were karyotypically stable for up to 24 subcultures. Their derivation efficiency and survival in culture significantly supersedes that of EGCs, demonstrating their utility as a powerful model for studying factors regulating pluripotency in future studies.

  16. Process engineering of high voltage alginate encapsulation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Pogozhykh, Denys; Zernetsch, Holger; Hofmann, Nicola; Mueller, Thomas; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2014-03-01

    Encapsulation of stem cells in alginate beads is promising as a sophisticated drug delivery system in treatment of a wide range of acute and chronic diseases. However, common use of air flow encapsulation of cells in alginate beads fails to produce beads with narrow size distribution, intact spherical structure and controllable sizes that can be scaled up. Here we show that high voltage encapsulation (≥ 15 kV) can be used to reproducibly generate spherical alginate beads (200-400 μm) with narrow size distribution (± 5-7%) in a controlled manner under optimized process parameters. Flow rate of alginate solution ranged from 0.5 to 10 ml/h allowed producing alginate beads with a size of 320 and 350 μm respectively, suggesting that this approach can be scaled up. Moreover, we found that applied voltages (15-25 kV) did not alter the viability and proliferation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells post-encapsulation and cryopreservation as compared to air flow. We are the first who employed a comparative analysis of electro-spraying and air flow encapsulation to study the effect of high voltage on alginate encapsulated cells. This report provides background in application of high voltage to encapsulate living cells for further medical purposes. Long-term comparison and work on alginate-cell interaction within these structures will be forthcoming. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Perception and knowledge about stem cell and tissue engineering research: a survey amongst researchers and medical practitioners in perinatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardo, Léonardo; De Koninck, Philip; Verfaillie, Catherine; Lories, Rik; Deprest, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell and tissue engineering (SC&TE) research remain controversial. Polemics are potential hurdles for raising public funds for research and clinical implementation. In view of future applications of SC&TE in perinatal conditions, we aimed to measure the background knowledge, perceptions or beliefs on SC&TE research among clinicians and academic researchers with perinatal applications on the department's research agenda. We polled three professional categories: general obstetrician gynecologists, perinatologists and basic or translational researchers in development and regeneration. The survey included questions on demographics, work environment, educational background, general knowledge, expectations, opinions and ethical reflections of the respondent about SC&TE. The response rate was 39 %. Respondents were mainly female (54 %) and under 40 years (63 %). The general background knowledge about SC&TE is low. Respondents confirm that remaining controversies still arise from the confusion that stem cell research coincides with embryo manipulation. Clinicians assume that stem cell research has reached the level of clinical implementation, and accept the risks associated of purposely harvesting fetal amniotic cells. Researchers in contrast are more cautious about both implementation and risks. Professionals in the field of perinatology may benefit of a better background knowledge and information on current SC & TE research. Though clinicians may be less aware of the current state of knowledge, they are open to clinical implementation, whereas dedicated researchers remain cautious. In view of the clinical introduction of SC & TE, purposed designed informative action should be taken and safety studies executed, hence avoid sustaining needless polemics.

  18. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...... cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  19. Placenta Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Hosted on RKKP Glass-Ceramic: A Tissue Engineering Strategy for Bone Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ledda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering protocols, the survival of transplanted stem cells is a limiting factor that could be overcome using a cell delivery matrix able to support cell proliferation and differentiation. With this aim, we studied the cell-friendly and biocompatible behavior of RKKP glass-ceramic coated Titanium (Ti surface seeded with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs from placenta. The sol-gel synthesis procedure was used to prepare the RKKP glass-ceramic material, which was then deposited onto the Ti surface by Pulsed Laser Deposition method. The cell metabolic activity and proliferation rate, the cytoskeletal actin organization, and the cell cycle phase distribution in hAMSCs seeded on the RKKP coated Ti surface revealed no significant differences when compared to the cells grown on the treated plastic Petri dish. The health of of hAMSCs was also analysed studying the mRNA expressions of MSC key genes and the osteogenic commitment capability using qRT-PCR analysis which resulted in being unchanged in both substrates. In this study, the combination of the hAMSCs’ properties together with the bioactive characteristics of RKKP glass-ceramics was investigated and the results obtained indicate its possible use as a new and interesting cell delivery system for bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  20. Cartilage tissue engineering: From biomaterials and stem cells to osteoarthritis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, C; Guicheux, J

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is a non-vascularized and poorly cellularized connective tissue that is frequently damaged as a result of trauma and degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthrtis. Because of the absence of vascularization, articular cartilage has low capacity for spontaneous repair. Today, and despite a large number of preclinical data, no therapy capable of restoring the healthy structure and function of damaged articular cartilage is clinically available. Tissue-engineering strategies involving the combination of cells, scaffolding biomaterials and bioactive agents have been of interest notably for the repair of damaged articular cartilage. During the last 30 years, cartilage tissue engineering has evolved from the treatment of focal lesions of articular cartilage to the development of strategies targeting the osteoarthritis process. In this review, we focus on the different aspects of tissue engineering applied to cartilage engineering. We first discuss cells, biomaterials and biological or environmental factors instrumental to the development of cartilage tissue engineering, then review the potential development of cartilage engineering strategies targeting new emerging pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  2. Bone tissue engineering by using a combination of polymer/Bioglass composites with human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Ji, Kun; Kirkham, Jennifer; Yan, Yu; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Kellett, Margaret; Jin, Yan; Yang, Xuebin B

    2014-04-01

    Translational research in bone tissue engineering is essential for "bench to bedside" patient benefit. However, the ideal combination of stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for bone repair/regeneration is still unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the osteogenic capacity of a combination of poly(DL-lactic acid) (PDLLA) porous foams containing 5 wt% and 40 wt% of Bioglass particles with human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Live/dead fluorescent markers, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that PDLLA/Bioglass porous scaffolds supported ADSC attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation, as confirmed by enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Higher Bioglass content of the PDLLA foams increased ALP activity compared with the PDLLA only group. Extracellular matrix deposition after 8 weeks in the in vitro cultures was evident by Alcian blue/Sirius red staining. In vivo bone formation was assessed by using scaffold/ADSC constructs in diffusion chambers transplanted intraperitoneally into nude mice and recovered after 8 weeks. Histological and immunohistochemical assays indicated significant new bone formation in the 40 wt% and 5 wt% Bioglass constructs compared with the PDLLA only group. Thus, the combination of a well-developed biodegradable bioactive porous PDLLA/Bioglass composite scaffold with a high-potential stem cell source (human ADSCs) could be a promising approach for bone regeneration in a clinical setting.

  3. Endometrial stem cell differentiation into smooth muscle cell: a novel approach for bladder tissue engineering in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander M; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Rezaie, Sassan; Verdi, Javad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate manufacturing smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for regenerative bladder reconstruction from differentiation of endometrial stem cells (EnSCs), as the recent discovery of EnSCs from the lining of women's uteri, opens up the possibility of using these cells for tissue engineering applications, such as building up natural tissue to repair prolapsed pelvic floors as well as building urinary bladder wall. Human EnSCs that were positive for cluster of differentiation 146 (CD146), CD105 and CD90 were isolated and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle/F12 medium supplemented with myogenic growth factors. The myogenic factors included: transforming growth factor β, platelet-derived growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Differentiated SMCs on bioabsorbable polyethylene-glycol and collagen hydrogels were checked for SMC markers by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot (WB) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analyses. Histology confirmed the growth of SMCs in the hydrogel matrices. The myogenic growth factors decreased the proliferation rate of EnSCs, but they differentiated the human EnSCs into SMCs more efficiently on hydrogel matrices and expressed specific SMC markers including α-smooth muscle actin, desmin, vinculin and calponin in RT-PCR, WB and ICC experiments. The survival rate of cultures on the hydrogel-coated matrices was significantly higher than uncoated cultures. Human EnSCs were successfully differentiated into SMCs, using hydrogels as scaffold. EnSCs may be used for autologous bladder wall regeneration without any immunological complications in women. Currently work is in progress using bioabsorbable nanocomposite materials as EnSC scaffolds for developing urinary bladder wall tissue. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  4. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  6. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  7. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics ......, help us both in the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells and in the further development of therapeutic strategies including tissue engineering...

  8. Influence of culture conditions and extracellular matrix alignment on human mesenchymal stem cells invasion into decellularized engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K; Moore, Dusty L; Lobo, Fluvio L; Klair, Nathaniel T; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodelling using circular and C-shaped moulds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSCs invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to differentiate toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  10. Combining Gene and Stem Cell Therapy for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuttil, Francesca; Rahim, Ahad A; Phillips, James B

    2017-02-15

    Despite a substantially increased understanding of neuropathophysiology, insufficient functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury remains a significant clinical challenge. Nerve regeneration following injury is dependent on Schwann cells, the supporting cells in the peripheral nervous system. Following nerve injury, Schwann cells adopt a proregenerative phenotype, which supports and guides regenerating nerves. However, this phenotype may not persist long enough to ensure functional recovery. Tissue-engineered nerve repair devices containing therapeutic cells that maintain the appropriate phenotype may help enhance nerve regeneration. The combination of gene and cell therapy is an emerging experimental strategy that seeks to provide the optimal environment for axonal regeneration and reestablishment of functional circuits. This review aims to summarize current preclinical evidence with potential for future translation from bench to bedside.

  11. Simple surface engineering of polydimethylsiloxane with polydopamine for stabilized mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and multipotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Koh, Yi Ting; Lim, Kaiyang; Menon, Nishanth V.; Wu, Yingnan; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been extensively exploited to study stem cell physiology in the field of mechanobiology and microfluidic chips due to their transparency, low cost and ease of fabrication. However, its intrinsic high hydrophobicity renders a surface incompatible for prolonged cell adhesion and proliferation. Plasma-treated or protein-coated PDMS shows some improvement but these strategies are often short-lived with either cell aggregates formation or cell sheet dissociation. Recently, chemical functionalization of PDMS surfaces has proved to be able to stabilize long-term culture but the chemicals and procedures involved are not user- and eco-friendly. Herein, we aim to tailor greener and biocompatible PDMS surfaces by developing a one-step bio-inspired polydopamine coating strategy to stabilize long-term bone marrow stromal cell culture on PDMS substrates. Characterization of the polydopamine-coated PDMS surfaces has revealed changes in surface wettability and presence of hydroxyl and secondary amines as compared to uncoated surfaces. These changes in PDMS surface profile contribute to the stability in BMSCs adhesion, proliferation and multipotency. This simple methodology can significantly enhance the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic devices for long-term cell analysis or mechanobiological studies. PMID:26647719

  12. Effect of the Microenvironment on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Paracrine Signaling: Opportunities to Engineer the Therapeutic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Gina D; Carthew, James; Lim, Rebecca; Frith, Jessica E

    2017-05-01

    Cues from the extracellular environment, including physical stimuli, are well known to affect mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) properties in terms of proliferation and differentiation. Many therapeutic strategies are now targeting this knowledge to increase the efficacy of cell therapies, typically employed to repair tissue functions in the event of injury, either by direct engraftment into the target tissue or differentiation into mature tissues. However, it is now envisioned that harnessing the repertoire of factors secreted by MSCs (termed the secretome) may provide an alternate to these cell therapies. Of current interest are both direct protein secretions and two major subpopulations of bioactive extracellular vesicles (EVs), namely exosomes and microvesicles. EVs released by MSCs are reflective of their cells of origin, able to impact upon the activities of other cells in the local microenvironment, making the rational design of MSC paracrine activities an encouraging strategy to reproducibly modulate cell therapies. The precise mechanisms by which the secretome is modulated by the microenvironment, however, remain elusive. Controlling MSC growth conditions with oxygen tension, growth factor composition, and mechanical properties may serve to directly influence paracrine activity. Our growing understanding implicates components of the mechanotransduction machinery in translating both mechanical and chemical cues from the environment into alterations in gene regulation and varied paracrine activity. As technologies are developed to manufacture MSCs, advances in bioengineering and novel insight of how the extracellular environment affects MSC paracrine activity will play a pivotal role in the generation of widespread, successful, clinical MSC therapies.

  13. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  14. Human acellular cartilage matrix powders as a biological scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering with synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Chia-Chun; Liao, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Feng-Huei; Hsu, Yuan-Ming; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2014-07-01

    In our previous study, we found that cartilage fragments from osteoarthritic knee promoted chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we further transformed the cartilage tissues into acellular cartilage matrix (ACM) and explored the feasibility of using ACM as a biological scaffold. Nonworn parts of cartilage tissues were obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery and were successfully fabricated into ACM powders. The ACM powders and human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) were mixed into collagen gel for in vitro culture. Histological results showed a synergistic effect of ACM powders and chondrogenic growth factors in the formation of engineered cartilage. The findings of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggested that ACM powders had the potential of promoting type II collagen gene expression in the growth factors-absent environment. Moreover, with growth factors induction, the ACM powders could reduce the hypertrophy in chondrogenesis of SMSCs. In summary, ACM powders could serve as a functional scaffold that benefited the chondrogenesis of SMSCs for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genome engineering of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells using the Cas9/RNA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Horii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs are useful for studying mammalian genes because disruption of only one allele can cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Here, we report the use of haploid ESCs and the CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system to manipulate mammalian genes. Co-transfection of haploid ESCs with vectors expressing Cas9 nuclease and single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs targeting Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 resulted in the complete disruption of all three genes and caused a loss-of-function phenotype with high efficiency (50%. Co-transfection of cells with vectors expressing Cas9 and sgRNAs targeting two loci on the same chromosome resulted in the creation of a large chromosomal deletion and a large inversion. Thus, the use of the CRISPR system in combination with haploid ESCs provides a powerful platform to manipulate the mammalian genome.

  16. Application of Graphene Based Nanotechnology in Stem Cells Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shanshan; Zeng, Yongxiang; Yang, Shuying; Qin, Han; Cai, He; Wang, Jian

    2015-09-01

    The past several years have witnessed significant advances in stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Graphene, with its unique properties such as high electrical conductivity, elasticity and good molecule absorption, have potential for creating the next generation of biomaterials. This review summarizes the interrelationship between graphene and stem cells. The analysis of graphene when applied on mesenchymal stem cells, neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, human adipose-derived stem cells and cancer stem cells, and how graphene influences cell behavior and differentiation are discussed in details.

  17. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amilton M; Herlofsen, Sarah R; Karlsen, Tommy A; Küchler, Axel M; Fløisand, Yngvar; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin), ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  18. The effects of dynamic compression on the development of cartilage grafts engineered using bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-21

    Bioreactors that subject cell seeded scaffolds or hydrogels to biophysical stimulation have been used to improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage and to explore how such constructs might respond to the application of joint specific mechanical loading. Whether a particular cell type responds appropriately to physiological levels of biophysical stimulation could be considered a key determinant of its suitability for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic compression on chondrogenesis of stem cells isolated from different tissue sources. Porcine bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP) derived stem cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium in free swelling (FS) conditions for 21 d, after which samples were subjected to dynamic compression (DC) of 10% strain (1 Hz, 1 h d(-1)) for a further 21 d. Both BM derived stem cells (BMSCs) and FP derived stem cells (FPSCs) were capable of generating cartilaginous tissues with near native levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, although the spatial development of the engineered grafts strongly depended on the stem cell source. The mechanical properties of cartilage grafts generated from both stem cell sources also approached that observed in skeletally immature animals. Depending on the stem cell source and the donor, the application of DC either enhanced or had no significant effect on the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using either BMSCs or FPSCs. BMSC seeded constructs subjected to DC stained less intensely for collagen type I. Furthermore, histological and micro-computed tomography analysis showed mineral deposition within BMSC seeded constructs was suppressed by the application of DC. Therefore, while the application of DC in vitro may only lead to modest improvements in the mechanical functionality of cartilaginous grafts, it may play an important

  19. Bioprinting Organotypic Hydrogels with Improved Mesenchymal Stem Cell Remodeling and Mineralization Properties for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Blaeser, Andreas; Buellesbach, Kate; Sen, Kshama Shree; Xun, Weiwei; Tillmann, Walter; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    3D-manufactured hydrogels with precise contours and biological adhesion motifs are interesting candidates in the regenerative medicine field for the culture and differentiation of human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). 3D-bioprinting is a powerful technique to approach one step closer the native organization of cells. This study investigates the effect of the incorporation of collagen type I in 3D-bioprinted polysaccharide-based hydrogels to the modulation of cell morphology, osteogenic remodeling potential, and mineralization. By combining thermo-responsive agarose hydrogels with collagen type I, the mechanical stiffness and printing contours of printed constructs can be improved compared to pure collagen hydrogels which are typically used as standard materials for MSC osteogenic differentiation. The results presented here show that MSC not only survive the 3D-bioprinting process but also maintain the mesenchymal phenotype, as proved by live/dead staining and immunocytochemistry (vimentin positive, CD34 negative). Increased solids concentrations of collagen in the hydrogel blend induce changes in cell morphology, namely, by enhancing cell spreading, that ultimately contribute to enhanced and directed MSC osteogenic differentiation. 3D-bioprinted agarose-collagen hydrogels with high-collagen ratio are therefore feasible for MSC osteogenic differentiation, contrarily to low-collagen blends, as proved by two-photon microscopy, Alizarin Red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Human embryonic stem cell-encapsulation in alginate microbeads in macroporous calcium phosphate cement for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Minghui; Chen, Wenchuan; Weir, Michael D.; Thein-Han, Wahwah; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are exciting for regenerative medicine applications because of their strong proliferative ability and multilineage differentiation capability. To date there has been no report on hESC seeding with calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The objective of this study was to investigate hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hESCd-MSC) encapsulation in hydrogel microbeads in macroporous CPC for bone tissue engineering. hESCs were cultured to form embryoid bodies (EBs), and the MSCs were then migrated out of the EBs. hESCd-MSCs had surface markers characteristic of MSCs, with positive alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining when cultured in osteogenic medium. hESCd-MSCs were encapsulated in alginate at a density of 1 million cells/mL, with an average microbead size of 207 µm. CPC contained mannitol porogen to create a porosity of 64% and macropores with size of 218 µm, with 20% absorbable fibers for additional porosity when the fibers degrade. hESCd-MSCs encapsulated in microbeads in CPC had good viability from 1 to 21 d. ALP gene expression at 21 d was 25-fold that at 1 d. Osteocalcin (OC) at 21 d was two orders of magnitude of that at 1 d. ALP activity in colorimetric p-nitrophenyl phosphate assay at 21 d was 5-fold that at 1 d. Mineral synthesis by the encapsulated hESCd-MSCs at 21 d was 7-fold that at 1 d. Potential benefits of the CPC-stem cell paste include injectability, intimate adaptation to complex-shaped bone defects, ease in contouring to achieve esthetics in maxillofacial repairs, and in situ setting ability. In conclusion, hESCd-MSCs were encapsulated in alginate microbeads in macroporous CPC showing good cell viability, osteogenic differentiation and mineral synthesis for the first time. The hESCd-MSC-encapsulating macroporous CPC construct is promising for bone regeneration in a wide range of orthopedic and maxillofacial applications. PMID:22633970

  1. Fascia tissue engineering with human adipose-derived stem cells in a murine model: Implications for pelvic floor reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man-Jung; Wen, Mei-Chin; Huang, Ying-Ting; Chen, Gin-Den; Chou, Min-Min; Yang, Vivian Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Mesh-augmented vaginal surgery for treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) does not meet patients' needs. This study aims to test the hypothesis that fascia tissue engineering using adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) might be a potential therapeutic strategy for reconstructing the pelvic floor. Human ADSCs were isolated, differentiated, and characterized in vitro. Both ADSCs and fibroblastic-differentiated ADSCs were used to fabricate tissue-engineered fascia equivalents, which were then transplanted under the back skin of experimental nude mice. ADSCs prepared in our laboratory were characterized as a group of mesenchymal stem cells. In vitro fibroblastic differentiation of ADSCs showed significantly increased gene expression of cellular collagen type I and elastin (p fascia equivalents could be traced up to 12 weeks after transplantation in the subsequent animal study. Furthermore, the histological outcomes differed with a thin (111.0 ± 19.8 μm) lamellar connective tissue or a thick (414.3 ± 114.9 μm) adhesive fibrous tissue formation between the transplantation of ADSCs and fibroblastic-differentiated ADSCs, respectively. Nonetheless, the implantation of a scaffold without cell seeding (the control group) resulted in a thin (102.0 ± 17.1 μm) fibrotic band and tissue contracture. Our results suggest the ADSC-seeded implant is better than the implant alone in enhancing tissue regeneration after transplantation. ADSCs with or without fibroblastic differentiation might have a potential but different role in fascia tissue engineering to repair POP in the future. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Human IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Benjamin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing a suitable level of exogenous gene expression in mammalian cells in general, and embryonic stem (ES cells in particular, is an important aspect of understanding pathways of cell differentiation, signal transduction and cell physiology. Despite its importance, this process remains challenging because of the poor correlation between the presence of introduced exogenous DNA and its transcription. Consequently, many transfected cells must be screened to identify those with an appropriate level of expression. To improve the screening process, we investigated the utility of the human interleukin 12 (IL-12 p40 cDNA as a reporter gene for studies of mammalian gene expression and for high-throughput screening of engineered mouse embryonic stem cells. Results A series of expression plasmids were used to study the utility of IL-12 p40 as an accurate reporter of gene activity. These studies included a characterization of the IL-12 p40 expression system in terms of: (i a time course of IL-12 p40 accumulation in the medium of transfected cells; (ii the dose-response relationship between the input DNA and IL-12 p40 mRNA levels and IL-12 p40 protein secretion; (iii the utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene for analyzing the activity of cis-acting genetic elements; (iv expression of the IL-12 p40 reporter protein driven by an IRES element in a bicistronic mRNA; (v utility of IL-12 p40 as a reporter gene in a high-throughput screening strategy to identify successful transformed mouse embryonic stem cells; (vi demonstration of pluripotency of IL-12 p40 expressing ES cells in vitro and in vivo; and (vii germline transmission of the IL-12 p40 reporter gene. Conclusion IL-12 p40 showed several advantages as a reporter gene in terms of sensitivity and ease of the detection procedure. The IL-12 p40 assay was rapid and simple, in as much as the reporter protein secreted from the transfected cells was accurately measured by ELISA using

  3. Engineering human pluripotent stem cells into a functional skeletal muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lingjun; Qian, Ying; Khodabukus, Alastair; Ribar, Thomas; Bursac, Nenad

    2018-01-09

    The generation of functional skeletal muscle tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has not been reported. Here, we derive induced myogenic progenitor cells (iMPCs) via transient overexpression of Pax7 in paraxial mesoderm cells differentiated from hPSCs. In 2D culture, iMPCs readily differentiate into spontaneously contracting multinucleated myotubes and a pool of satellite-like cells endogenously expressing Pax7. Under optimized 3D culture conditions, iMPCs derived from multiple hPSC lines reproducibly form functional skeletal muscle tissues (iSKM bundles) containing aligned multi-nucleated myotubes that exhibit positive force-frequency relationship and robust calcium transients in response to electrical or acetylcholine stimulation. During 1-month culture, the iSKM bundles undergo increased structural and molecular maturation, hypertrophy, and force generation. When implanted into dorsal window chamber or hindlimb muscle in immunocompromised mice, the iSKM bundles survive, progressively vascularize, and maintain functionality. iSKM bundles hold promise as a microphysiological platform for human muscle disease modeling and drug development.

  4. Tumor risk by tissue engineering: cartilaginous differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells reduces tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, I; Oxmann, D; Helfenstein, A; Mentlein, R; Schünke, M; Hassenpflug, J; Kurz, B

    2010-03-01

    Implantation of autologous chondrocytes (AC) is a promising option for the treatment of cartilage defects, but problems with cell harvesting, dedifferentiation, or the donor age limit the clinical outcome. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) gain much interest because of their simple isolation and multipotential differentiation capacity along with their immunosuppressive properties. The latter might introduce tumor manifestation. The influence of undifferentiated and chondrogenically differentiated MSC or AC on tumor growth and metastasis formation was investigated in a murine melanoma model. Allogeneic melanoma cells and either syngeneic MSC (C3H10T1/2, transduced with enhanced green fluorescent protein gene) or AC were co-injected at a distance of 3 cm into the contra lateral groins of five mice/group, and evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 4 weeks. Undifferentiated MSC migrated to the tumor site and induced strong tumor growth and metastasis formation. Even avital MSC promoted tumor growth and spreading, but insignificantly without detectable MSC at the tumor site. Chondrogenically differentiated MSC did not migrate and had a significantly lower impact on tumor growth and spreading; AC had no measurable influence on melanoma cells. Our data suggest that differentiation of MSC reduces MSC-dependent promotion of latent tumors and that native AC do not introduce any increased risk of tumor growth. The question of how far MSC should be differentiated prior to clinical application should be addressed in further studies. Copyright 2009 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetically engineered theranostic mesenchymal stem cells for the evaluation of the anticancer efficacy of enzyme/prodrug systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Faranak Salman; Wang, Xing; Hatefi, Arash

    2015-02-28

    Over the past decade, various enzyme/prodrug systems such as thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV), yeast cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (yCD/5-FC) and nitroreductase/CB1954 (NTR/CB1954) have been used for stem cell mediated suicide gene therapy of cancer. Yet, no study has been conducted to compare and demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of using one system over another. Knowing that each enzyme/prodrug system has its own strengths and weaknesses, we utilized mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a medium to perform for the first time a comparative study that illustrated the impact of subtle differences among these systems on the therapeutic outcome. For therapeutic purposes, we first genetically modified MSCs to stably express a panel of four suicide genes including TK (TK007 and TK(SR39) mutants), yeast cytosine deaminase:uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (yCD:UPRT) and nitroreductase (NTR). Then, we evaluated the anticancer efficacies of the genetically engineered MSCs in vitro and in vivo by using SKOV3 cell line which is sensitive to all four enzyme/prodrug systems. In addition, all MSCs were engineered to stably express luciferase gene making them suitable for quantitative imaging and dose-response relationship studies in animals. Considering the limitations imposed by the prodrugs' bystander effects, our findings show that yCD:UPRT/5-FC is the most effective enzyme/prodrug system among the ones tested. Our findings also demonstrate that theranostic MSCs are a reliable medium for the side-by-side evaluation and screening of the enzyme/prodrug systems at the preclinical level. The results of this study could help scientists who utilize cell-based, non-viral or viral vectors for suicide gene therapy of cancer make more informed decisions when choosing enzyme/prodrug systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using adipose-derived stem cells and bioreactor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjun; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi; Song, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the feasibility of tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in vivo and in vitro by dynamically culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with an articular cartilage acellular matrix in a bioreactor and subsequently implanting the cartilage in nude mice. ADSCs were proliferated, combined with three dimensional scaffolds (cell density: 5 × 10(7)/mL) and subsequently placed in a bioreactor and culture plate for 3 weeks. In the in vivo study, complexes cultured for 1 week under dynamic or static states were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice and collected after 3 weeks. Indicators such as gross morphology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were examined. In the in vitro study, histological observation showed that most scaffolds in the dynamic group were absorbed, and cell proliferation and matrix secretion were significant. Positive staining of safranin-O and alcian blue II collagen stain in the dynamic group was significantly stronger than that in the static culture group. In the in vivo study, cartilage-like tissues formed in the specimens of the two groups. Histological examination showed that cell distribution in the dynamic group was relatively more uniform than in the static group, and matrix secretion was relatively stronger. Bioreactor culturing can promote ADSC proliferation and cartilage differentiation and is thus a suitable method for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  7. Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the conductive PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Guan, Shui; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Wenfang; Ge, Dan; Sun, Changkai; Liu, Tianqing; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-09-26

    Engineering scaffolds with excellent electro-activity is increasingly important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Herein, conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with hyaluronic acid (PEDOT-HA) nanoparticles were firstly synthesized via chemical oxidant polymerization. A three-dimensional (3D) PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was then developed by introducing PEDOT-HA nanoparticles into a chitosan/gelatin (Cs/Gel) matrix. HA, as a bridge, not only was used as a dopant, but also combined PEDOT into the Cs/Gel via chemical crosslinking. The PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was used as a conductive substrate for neural stem cell (NSC) culture in vitro. The results demonstrated that the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold had excellent biocompatibility for NSC proliferation and differentiation. 3D confocal fluorescence images showed cells attached on the channel surface of Cs/Gel and PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffolds with a normal neuronal morphology. Compared to the Cs/Gel scaffold, the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold not only promoted NSC proliferation with up-regulated expression of Ki67, but also enhanced NSC differentiation into neurons and astrocytes with up-regulated expression of β tubulin-III and GFAP, respectively. It is expected that this electro-active and bio-active PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold will be used as a conductive platform to regulate NSC behavior for neural tissue engineering.

  8. In Vivo Tracking of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration by Optical Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Kalimuthu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available CXCR4, the stromal cell-derived factor-1 receptor, plays an important role in the migration of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells to injured and inflamed areas. Noninvasive cell tracking methods could be useful for monitoring cell fate. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs overexpressing CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4 to home to the tumor, by optical imaging. We constructed a retroviral vector containing CXCR with dual reporter genes, eGFP and Fluc2, under the control of an EF1α promoter (pBABE-EF1α-CXCR4-eGFP-IRES-Fluc2. We also developed an eGFP-Fluc2 construct in the Retro-X retroviral vector (Retro-X-eGFP-Fluc2. MSCs were transduced with retroviruses to generate CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs (MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2 and MSCs (MSC/Fluc2. CXCR4 mRNA and protein expression was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively, and it was higher in MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2 than in naive MSCs. eGFP expression was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The transfected MSC-CXCR4/Fluc2 cells showed higher migratory capacity than naive MSCs observed in Transwell migration assay. The in vivo migration of CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs to MDAMB231/Rluc tumor model by BLI imaging was also confirmed. Intravenous delivery of genetically modified MSCs overexpressing CXCR4 with a Fluc2 reporter gene may be a useful, noninvasive BLI imaging tool for tracking cell fate.

  9. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  10. Region-Specific Effect of the Decellularized Meniscus Extracellular Matrix on Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-03-01

    The meniscus is the most commonly injured knee structure, and surgical repair is often ineffective. Tissue engineering-based repair or regeneration may provide a needed solution. Decellularized, tissue-derived extracellular matrices (ECMs) have received attention for their potential use as tissue-engineered scaffolds. In considering meniscus-derived ECMs (mECMs) for meniscus tissue engineering, it is noteworthy that the inner and outer regions of the meniscus have different structural and biochemical features, potentially directing the differentiation of cells toward region-specific phenotypes. To investigate the applicability of mECMs for meniscus tissue engineering by specifically comparing region-dependent effects of mECMs on 3-dimensional constructs seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Controlled laboratory study. Bovine menisci were divided into inner and outer halves and were minced, treated with Triton X-100 and DNase, and extracted with urea. Then, hBMSCs (1 × 106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in a photo-cross-linked 10% polyethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold containing mECMs (60 μg/mL) derived from either the inner or outer meniscus, with an ECM-free scaffold as a control. The cell-seeded constructs were cultured with chondrogenic medium containing recombinant human transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) and were analyzed for expression of meniscus-associated genes as well as for the collagen (hydroxyproline) and glycosaminoglycan content as a function of time. Decellularization was verified by the absence of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cell nuclei and a reduction in the DNA content. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that collagen type I expression was significantly higher in the outer mECM group than in the other groups, while collagen type II and aggrecan expression was highest in the inner mECM group. The collagen (hydroxyproline) content was highest in the outer mECM group, while the

  11. Biomaterial stiffness determines stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Wang, Heping; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Wang; Liu, Wenbin; Li, Yulin; Li, Lisha

    2017-06-01

    Stem cells have potential to develop into numerous cell types, thus they are good cell source for tissue engineering. As an external physical signal, material stiffness is capable of regulating stem cell fate. Biomaterial stiffness is an important parameter in tissue engineering. We summarize main measurements of material stiffness under different condition, then list and compare three main methods of controlling stiffness (material amount, crosslinking density and photopolymeriztion time) which interplay with one another and correlate with stiffness positively, and current advances in effects of biomaterial stiffness on stem cell fate. We discuss the unsolved problems and future directions of biomaterial stiffness in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington′s disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington′s disease (HD. There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, Alzheimer′s disease, and some forms of Parkinson′s disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system.

  13. Stress and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Adipose stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration: Current status and concepts for the future: Tissue Engineering Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Lu, Z.F.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Wuisman, P.I.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative disc disease and emerging biological treatment approaches Stem cell sources Integration of ASC-based regenerative medicine and surgery In vitro studies Animal models Cells in disc regeneration in vivo In vivo studies Perspective Conclusions Abstract New regenerative

  15. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it is called a fetus . Embryoid bodies - Rounded collections of cells that arise when embryonic stem cells ... dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and ...

  16. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human

  17. Adaptive Immune Response Impairs the Efficacy of Autologous Transplantation of Engineered Stem Cells in Dystrophic Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Jardim, Luciana; Razini, Paola; Belicchi, Marzia; Cassinelli, Letizia; Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Parolini, Daniele; Bella, Pamela; da Silva Bizario, Joao Carlos; Garcia, Luis; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common genetic muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, leading to absence of muscular dystrophin and to progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. We have demonstrated that the exon skipping method safely and efficiently brings to the expression of a functional dystrophin in dystrophic CD133+ cells injected scid/mdx mice. Golden Retriever muscular dystrophic (GRMD) dogs represent the best preclinical model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mimicking the human pathology in genotypic and phenotypic aspects. Here, we assess the capacity of intra-arterial delivered autologous engineered canine CD133+ cells of restoring dystrophin expression in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy. This is the first demonstration of five-year follow up study, showing initial clinical amelioration followed by stabilization in mild and severe affected Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. The occurrence of T-cell response in three Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs, consistent with a memory response boosted by the exon skipped-dystrophin protein, suggests an adaptive immune response against dystrophin. PMID:27506452

  18. Development of VEGF-loaded PLGA matrices in association with mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Rosa

    Full Text Available The association of bioactive molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, with nanofibers facilitates their controlled release, which could contribute to cellular migration and differentiation in tissue regeneration. In this research, the influence of their incorporation on a polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffold produced by electrospinning on cell adhesion and viability and cytotoxicity was carried out in three groups: 1 PLGA/BSA/VEGF; 2 PLGA/BSA, and 3 PLGA. Morphology, fiber diameter, contact angle, loading efficiency and controlled release of VEGF of the biomaterials, among others, were measured. The nanofibers showed smooth surfaces without beads and with interconnected pores. PLGA/BSA/VEGF showed the smallest water contact angle and VEGF released for up to 160 h. An improvement in cell adhesion was observed for the PLGA/BSA/VEGF scaffolds compared to the other groups and the scaffolds were non-toxic for the cells. Therefore, the scaffolds were shown to be a good strategy for sustained delivery of VEGF and may be a useful tool for tissue engineering.

  19. Stem Cells in Neuroendocrinology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pfaff, Donald; Christen, Yves

    2016-01-01

    This volume starts with an elementary introduction covering stem cell methodologies used to produce specific types of neurons, possibilities for their therapeutic use, and warnings of technical problems...

  20. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  1. Mechanical stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells: Implications for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Niamh; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage is a load-bearing tissue playing a crucial mechanical role in diarthrodial joints, facilitating joint articulation, and minimizing wear. The significance of biomechanical stimuli in the development of cartilage and maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype in adult tissues has been well documented. Furthermore, dysregulated loading is associated with cartilage pathology highlighting the importance of mechanical cues in cartilage homeostasis. The repair of damaged articular cartilage resulting from trauma or degenerative joint disease poses a major challenge due to a low intrinsic capacity of cartilage for self-renewal, attributable to its avascular nature. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a promising cell type for cartilage replacement strategies due to their chondrogenic differentiation potential. Chondrogenesis of MSCs is influenced not only by biological factors but also by the environment itself, and various efforts to date have focused on harnessing biomechanics to enhance chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, recapitulating mechanical cues associated with cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, may facilitate the development of a cellular phenotype resembling native articular cartilage. The goal of this review is to summarize current literature examining the effect of mechanical cues on cartilage homeostasis, disease, and MSC chondrogenesis. The role of biological factors produced by MSCs in response to mechanical loading will also be examined. An in-depth understanding of the impact of mechanical stimulation on the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in terms of endogenous bioactive factor production and signaling pathways involved, may identify therapeutic targets and facilitate the development of more robust strategies for cartilage replacement using MSCs. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society

  2. Recapitulation of endochondral bone formation using human adult mesenchymal stem cells as a paradigm for developmental engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Celeste; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Scherberich, Arnaud; Schaeren, Stefan; Schauerte, Alexandra; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Zeller, Rolf; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2010-04-20

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are typically used to generate bone tissue by a process resembling intramembranous ossification, i.e., by direct osteoblastic differentiation. However, most bones develop by endochondral ossification, i.e., via remodeling of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. To date, endochondral bone formation has not been reproduced using human, clinically compliant cell sources. Here, we aimed at engineering tissues from bone marrow-derived, adult human MSC with an intrinsic capacity to undergo endochondral ossification. By analogy to embryonic limb development, we hypothesized that successful execution of the endochondral program depends on the initial formation of hypertrophic cartilaginous templates. Human MSC, subcutaneously implanted into nude mice at various stages of chondrogenic differentiation, formed bone trabeculae only when they had developed in vitro hypertrophic tissue structures. Advanced maturation in vitro resulted in accelerated formation of larger bony tissues. The underlying morphogenetic process was structurally and molecularly similar to the temporal and spatial progression of limb bone development in embryos. In particular, Indian hedgehog signaling was activated at early stages and required for the in vitro formation of hypertrophic cartilage. Subsequent development of a bony collar in vivo was followed by vascularization, osteoclastic resorption of the cartilage template, and appearance of hematopoietic foci. This study reveals the capacity of human MSC to generate bone tissue via an endochondral program and provides a valid model to study mechanisms governing bone development. Most importantly, this process could generate advanced grafts for bone regeneration by invoking a "developmental engineering" paradigm.

  3. Magnetic Nanocomposite Hydrogel for Potential Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytocompatibility with Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Naiyin; Lock, Jaclyn; Sallee, Amy; Liu, Huinan

    2015-09-23

    Hydrogels possess high water content and closely mimic the microenvironment of extracellular matrix. In this study, we created a hybrid hydrogel containing type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) and incorporated magnetic nanoparticles into the hybrid hydrogels of type II collagen-HA-PEG to produce a magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel (MagGel) for cartilage tissue engineering. The results showed that both the MagGel and hybrid gel (Gel) were successfully cross-linked and the MagGel responded to an external magnet while maintaining structural integrity. That is, the MagGel could travel to the tissue defect sites in physiological fluids under remote magnetic guidance. The adhesion density of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the MagGel group in vitro was similar to the control group and greater than the Gel group. The morphology of BMSCs was normal and consistent in all groups. We also found that BMSCs engulfed magnetic nanoparticles in culture and the presence of magnetic nanoparticles did not affect BMSC adhesion and morphology. We hypothesized that the ingested nanoparticles may be eventually broken down by lysosome and excreted through exocytosis; further studies are necessary to confirm this. This study reports a promising magnetic responsive nanocomposite hydrogel for potential cartilage tissue engineering applications, which should be further studied for its effects on cell functions when combined with electromagnetic stimulation.

  4. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Cashman

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS, which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and

  5. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells reduce behavioral deficits in the YAC 128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Nicholas D; Bombard, Matthew C; Roland, Bartholomew P; Davidson, Stacy; Lu, Ming; Rossignol, Julien; Sandstrom, Michael I; Skeel, Reid L; Lescaudron, Laurent; Dunbar, Gary L

    2010-12-25

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of the transplantation of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), genetically engineered to over-express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) on motor deficits and neurodegeneration in YAC 128 transgenic mice. MSCs, harvested from mouse femurs, were genetically engineered to over-express BDNF and/or NGF and these cells, or the vehicle solution, were injected into the striata of four-month old YAC 128 transgenic and wild-type mice. Assessments of motor ability on the rotarod and the severity of clasping were made one day prior to transplantation and once monthly, thereafter, to determine the effects of the transplanted cells on motor function. The mice were sacrificed at 13-months of age for immunohistological examination. All YAC 128 mice receiving transplants had reduced clasping, relative to vehicle-treated YAC 128 mice, while YAC 128 mice that were transplanted with MSCs which were genetically engineered to over-express BDNF, had the longest latencies on the rotarod and the least amount of neuronal loss within the striatum of the YAC 128 mice. These results indicate that intrastriatal transplantation of MSCs that over-express BDNF may create an environment within the striatum that slows neurodegenerative processes and provides behavioral sparing in the YAC 128 mouse model of HD. Further research on the long-term safety and efficacy of this approach is needed before its potential clinical utility can be comprehensively assessed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetically engineered stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-β migrate to human lung cancer cells and have potentially therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bo-Rim; O, Si-Na; Kang, Nam-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung U; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Yun-Bae; Heo, Gang-Joon; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) produce suicide enzymes that convert non-toxic pro-drugs to toxic metabolites which selectively migrate toward tumor sites and reduce tumor growth. In the present study, we evaluated whether these GESTECs are capable of migrating to lung cancer cells and examined the potential therapeutic efficacy of gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy against lung cancer cells in vitro. A modified transwell migration assay was performed to determine the migratory capacity of GESTECs to lung cancer cells. GESTECs [i.e., HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CD.interferon-β (IFN-β)] engineered to express a suicide gene, cytosine deaminase (CD), selectively migrated toward lung cancer cells. Treatment of a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (A549, a lung carcinoma derived from human lung epithelial cells) with the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) in the presence of HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells resulted in the inhibition of lung cancer cell growth. Based on the data presented herein, we suggest that GESTECs expressing CD may have a potent advantage for selective treatment of lung cancers. Furthermore, GESTECs expressing fusion genes (i.e., CD and IFN-β) may have a synergic antitumor effect on lung cancer cells.

  7. Epidermal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the outermost layer of the human skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. There are many origins of stem cells in the skin and skin appendages. These stem cells are localized in different part of the pilosebaseous units and also express many different genes. Epidermal stem cells in the pilosebaseous units not only ensure the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis and hair regeneration, but also contribute to repair of the epidermis after injury. In recent years, human induced pluripotent skin stem cells are produced from the epidermal cells such as keratinocytes, fibroblasts and melanocytes. These cells can be transdifferentiated to embriyonic stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. These cells provide a means to create valuable tools for basic research and may also produce a source of patient-matched cells for regenerative therapies. In this review, we aimed an overview of epidermal stem cells for better understanding their functions in the skin. Skin will be main organ for using the epidermal cells for regenerative medicine in near future.

  8. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer. PMID:21547056

  9. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  10. Genome engineering through CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the human germline and pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassena, R; Heindryckx, B; Peco, R; Pennings, G; Raya, A; Sermon, K; Veiga, A

    2016-06-01

    With the recent development of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 genome editing technology, the possibility to genetically manipulate the human germline (gametes and embryos) has become a distinct technical possibility. Although many technical challenges still need to be overcome in order to achieve adequate efficiency and precision of the technology in human embryos, the path leading to genome editing has never been simpler, more affordable, and widespread. In this narrative review we seek to understand the possible impact of CRISR/Cas9 technology on human reproduction from the technical and ethical point of view, and suggest a course of action for the scientific community. This non-systematic review was carried out using Medline articles in English, as well as technical documents from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and reports in the media. The technical possibilities of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology with regard to human reproduction are analysed based on results obtained in model systems such as large animals and laboratory rodents. Further, the possibility of CRISPR/Cas9 use in the context of human reproduction, to modify embryos, germline cells, and pluripotent stem cells is reviewed based on the authors' expert opinion. Finally, the possible uses and consequences of CRISPR/cas9 gene editing in reproduction are analysed from the ethical point of view. We identify critical technical and ethical issues that should deter from employing CRISPR/Cas9 based technologies in human reproduction until they are clarified. Overcoming the numerous technical limitations currently associated with CRISPR/Cas9 mediated editing of the human germline will depend on intensive research that needs to be transparent and widely disseminated. Rather than a call to a generalized moratorium, or banning, of this type of research, efforts should be placed on establishing an open, international, collaborative and regulated research

  11. Preclinical evaluation of the engineered stem cell chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1α analog in a translational ovine myocardial infarction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macarthur, John W; Cohen, Jeffrey E; McGarvey, Jeremy R; Shudo, Yasuhiro; Patel, Jay B; Trubelja, Alen; Fairman, Alexander S; Edwards, Bryan B; Hung, George; Hiesinger, William; Goldstone, Andrew B; Atluri, Pavan; Wilensky, Robert L; Pilla, James J; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Woo, Y Joseph

    2014-02-14

    After myocardial infarction, there is an inadequate blood supply to the myocardium, and the surrounding borderzone becomes hypocontractile. To develop a clinically translatable therapy, we hypothesized that in a preclinical ovine model of myocardial infarction, the modified endothelial progenitor stem cell chemokine, engineered stromal cell-derived factor 1α analog (ESA), would induce endothelial progenitor stem cell chemotaxis, limit adverse ventricular remodeling, and preserve borderzone contractility. Thirty-six adult male Dorset sheep underwent permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, inducing an anteroapical infarction, and were randomized to borderzone injection of saline (n=18) or ESA (n=18). Ventricular function, geometry, and regional strain were assessed using cardiac MRI and pressure-volume catheter transduction. Bone marrow was harvested for in vitro analysis, and myocardial biopsies were taken for mRNA, protein, and immunohistochemical analysis. ESA induced greater chemotaxis of endothelial progenitor stem cells compared with saline (P<0.01) and was equivalent to recombinant stromal cell-derived factor 1α (P=0.27). Analysis of mRNA expression and protein levels in ESA-treated animals revealed reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 in the borderzone (P<0.05), with elevated levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and elastin in the infarct (P<0.05), whereas immunohistochemical analysis of borderzone myocardium showed increased capillary and arteriolar density in the ESA group (P<0.01). Animals in the ESA treatment group also had significant reductions in infarct size (P<0.01), increased maximal principle strain in the borderzone (P<0.01), and a steeper slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (P=0.01). The novel, biomolecularly designed peptide ESA induces chemotaxis of endothelial progenitor stem cells, stimulates neovasculogenesis, limits infarct expansion, and preserves contractility in an ovine

  12. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  13. Tissue-engineered fabrication of an osteochondral composite graft using rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Dennis, J E; Solchaga, L A; Awadallah, A S; Goldberg, V M; Caplan, A I

    2001-08-01

    This study tested the tissue engineering hypothesis that construction of an osteochondral composite graft could be accomplished using multipotent progenitor cells and phenotype-specific biomaterials. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were culture-expanded and separately stimulated with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for chondrogenic differentiation or with an osteogenic supplement (OS). MSCs exposed to TGF-beta1 were loaded into a sponge composed of a hyaluronan derivative (HYAF-11) for the construction of the cartilage component of the composite graft, and MSCs exposed to OS were loaded into a porous calcium phosphate ceramic component for bone formation. Cell-loaded HYAFF-11 sponge and ceramic were joined together with fibrin sealant, Tisseel, to form a composite osteochondral graft, which was then implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in syngeneic rats. Specimens were harvested at 3 and 6 weeks after implantation, examined with histology for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type I, II, and X collagen. The two-component composite graft remained as an integrated unit after in vivo implantation and histologic processing. Fibrocartilage was observed in the sponge, and bone was detected in the ceramic component. Observations with polarized light indicated continuity of collagen fibers between the ceramic and HYAFF-11 components in the 6-week specimens. Type I collagen was identified in the neo-tissue in both sponge and ceramic, and type II collagen in the fibrocartilage, especially the pericellular matrix of cells in the sponge. These data suggest that the construction of a tissue-engineered composite osteochondral graft is possible with MSCs and different biomaterials and bioactive factors that support either chondrogenic or osteogenic differentiation.

  14. Stable engineered vascular networks from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells cultured in synthetic hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotelli, Matthew R; Ardalani, Hamisha; Zhang, Jue; Hou, Zhonggang; Nguyen, Eric H; Swanson, Scott; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer; Elwell, Angela; Bischel, Lauren L; Xie, Angela W; Stewart, Ron; Beebe, David J; Thomson, James A; Schwartz, Michael P; Murphy, William L

    2016-04-15

    Here, we describe an in vitro strategy to model vascular morphogenesis where human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) are encapsulated in peptide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, either on standard well plates or within a passive pumping polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tri-channel microfluidic device. PEG hydrogels permissive towards cellular remodeling were fabricated using thiol-ene photopolymerization to incorporate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable crosslinks and CRGDS cell adhesion peptide. Time lapse microscopy, immunofluorescence imaging, and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) demonstrated that iPSC-ECs formed vascular networks through mechanisms that were consistent with in vivo vasculogenesis and angiogenesis when cultured in PEG hydrogels. Migrating iPSC-ECs condensed into clusters, elongated into tubules, and formed polygonal networks through sprouting. Genes upregulated for iPSC-ECs cultured in PEG hydrogels relative to control cells on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces included adhesion, matrix remodeling, and Notch signaling pathway genes relevant to in vivo vascular development. Vascular networks with lumens were stable for at least 14days when iPSC-ECs were encapsulated in PEG hydrogels that were polymerized within the central channel of the microfluidic device. Therefore, iPSC-ECs cultured in peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogels offer a defined platform for investigating vascular morphogenesis in vitro using both standard and microfluidic formats. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) cultured in synthetic hydrogels self-assemble into capillary networks through mechanisms consistent with in vivo vascular morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human embryonic stem cell encapsulation in alginate microbeads in macroporous calcium phosphate cement for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M; Chen, W; Weir, M D; Thein-Han, W; Xu, H H K

    2012-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are promising for use in regenerative medicine applications because of their strong proliferative ability and multilineage differentiation capability. To date there have been no reports on hESC seeding with calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The objective of this study was to investigate hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hESCd-MSC) encapsulation in hydrogel microbeads in macroporous CPC for bone tissue engineering. hESC were cultured to form embryoid bodies (EB), and the MSC were then migrated out of the EB. hESCd-MSC had surface markers characteristic of MSC, with positive alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining when cultured in osteogenic medium. hESCd-MSC were encapsulated in alginate at a density of 1millioncellsml(-1), with an average microbead size of 207μm. CPC contained mannitol porogen to create a porosity of 64% and 218-μm macropores, with 20% absorbable fibers for additional porosity when the fibers degrade. hESCd-MSC encapsulated in microbeads in CPC had good viability from 1 to 21days. ALP gene expression at 21days was 25-fold that at 1day. Osteocalcin (OC) at 21days was two orders of magnitude of that at 1day. ALP activity in colorimetric p-nitrophenyl phosphate assay at 21days was fivefold that at 1day. Mineral synthesis by the encapsulated hESCd-MSC at 21days was sevenfold that at 1day. Potential benefits of the CPC-stem cell paste include injectability, intimate adaptation to complex-shaped bone defects, ease in contouring to achieve esthetics in maxillofacial repairs, and in situ setting ability. In conclusion, hESCd-MSC were encapsulated in alginate microbeads in macroporous CPC, showing good cell viability, osteogenic differentiation and mineral synthesis for the first time. The hESCd-MSC-encapsulating macroporous CPC construct is promising for bone regeneration in a wide range of orthopedic and maxillofacial applications. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  17. In vitro fabrication of autologous living tissue-engineered vascular grafts based on prenatally harvested ovine amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Benedikt; Kehl, Debora; Bleul, Ulrich; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sébastien; Frese, Laura; Ksiazek, Agnieszka; Achermann, Josef; Stranzinger, Gerald; Robert, Jérôme; Sanders, Bart; Sidler, Michele; Brokopp, Chad E; Proulx, Steven T; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schoenauer, Roman; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Falk, Volkmar; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFCs) have been proposed as a valuable source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, before clinical implementation, rigorous evaluation of this cell source in clinically relevant animal models accepted by regulatory authorities is indispensable. Today, the ovine model represents one of the most accepted preclinical animal models, in particular for cardiovascular applications. Here, we investigate the isolation and use of autologous ovine AFCs as cell source for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Fetal fluids were aspirated in vivo from pregnant ewes (n = 9) and from explanted uteri post mortem at different gestational ages (n = 91). Amniotic non-allantoic fluid nature was evaluated biochemically and in vivo samples were compared with post mortem reference samples. Isolated cells revealed an immunohistochemical phenotype similar to ovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and showed expression of stem cell factors described for embryonic stem cells, such as NANOG and STAT-3. Isolated ovine amniotic fluid-derived MSCs were screened for numeric chromosomal aberrations and successfully differentiated into several mesodermal phenotypes. Myofibroblastic ovine AFC lineages were then successfully used for the in vitro fabrication of small- and large-diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts (n = 10) and cardiovascular patches (n = 34), laying the foundation for the use of this relevant pre-clinical in vivo assessment model for future amniotic fluid cell-based therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  19. Murine and human tissue-engineered esophagus form from sufficient stem/progenitor cells and do not require microdesigned biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-03-01

    Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies.

  20. Engineering hyaluronic acid hydrogel degradation to control cellular interactions and adult stem cell fate in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir

    The design and implementation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (TE) applications requires an intensive understanding of cell-material interactions, including matrix remodeling and stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of microenvironmental cues, e.g., matrix biodegradability, on cell behavior in vitro has not been well studied in the case of direct cell encapsulation within 3-dimensional (3D) hydrogels. To address these issues, a facile sequential crosslinking technique was developed that provides spatial and temporal control of 3D hydrogel degradability to investigate the importance of material design on cell behavior. Specifically, hydrogels were synthesized from hyaluronic acid (HA) macromers in a sequential process: (1) a primary Michael-type addition crosslinking using cell adhesive and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-degradable oligopeptides to consume a portion of total reactive groups and resulting in "-UV" hydrogels permissive to cell-mediated degradation, followed by (2) a secondary, light initiated free-radical crosslinking to consume remaining reactive groups and "switch" the network to a non-degradable structure ("+UV") via the addition of non-degradable kinetic chains. Using this approach, we demonstrated control of encapsulated hMSC spreading by varying the crosslink type (i.e., the relative hydrogel biodegradability), including with spatial control. Upon incubation with bipotential soluble differentiation factors, these same degradation-mediated spreading cues resulted in an hMSC differentiation fate switch within -UV versus +UV environments. Follow-up studies demonstrated that degradation-mediated traction generation, rather than matrix mechanics or cell morphology, is the critical biophysical signal determining hMSC fate. Sequentially crosslinked HA hydrogels were also studied for the capacity to support remodeling by in vivo and ex vivo tissues, including with spatial control, toward tissue

  1. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...

  4. Gastric Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLS, JASON C.; SHIVDASANI, RAMESH A.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract include the identification of molecular markers of stem and early progenitor cells in the small intestine. Although gastric epithelial stem cells have been localized, little is known about their molecular biology. Recent reports describe the use of inducible Cre recombinase activity to indelibly label candidate stem cells and their progeny in the distal stomach, (ie, the antrum and pylorus). No such lineage labeling of epithelial stem cells has been reported in the gastric body (corpus). Among stem cells in the alimentary canal, those of the adult corpus are unique in that they lie close to the lumen and increase proliferation following loss of a single mature progeny lineage, the acid-secreting parietal cell. They are also unique in that they neither depend on Wnt signaling nor express the surface marker Lgr5. Because pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma has been associated with abnormal patterns of gastric differentiation and with chronic tissue injury, there has been much research on the response of stomach epithelial stem cells to inflammation. Chronic inflammation, as induced by infection with Helicobacter pylori, affects differentiation and promotes metaplasias. Several studies have identified cellular and molecular mechanisms in spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing (pseudopyloric) metaplasia. Researchers have also begun to identify signaling pathways and events that take place during embryonic development that eventually establish the adult stem cells to maintain the specific features and functions of the stomach mucosa. We review the cytologic, molecular, functional, and developmental properties of gastric epithelial stem cells. PMID:21144849

  5. Cryo-chemical decellularization of the whole liver for mesenchymal stem cells-based functional hepatic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Yen, Meng-Hua; Chang, Yin; Yang, Vincent W; Lee, Oscar K

    2014-04-01

    Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for severe hepatic failure to date. However, the limited supply of donor organs has severely hampered this treatment. So far, great potentials of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to replenish the hepatic cell population have been shown; nevertheless, there still is a lack of an optimal three-dimensional scaffold for generation of well-transplantable hepatic tissues. In this study, we utilized a cryo-chemical decellularization method which combines physical and chemical approach to generate acellular liver scaffolds (ALS) from the whole liver. The produced ALS provides a biomimetic three-dimensional environment to support hepatic differentiation of MSCs, evidenced by expression of hepatic-associated genes and marker protein, glycogen storage, albumin secretion, and urea production. It is also found that hepatic differentiation of MSCs within the ALS is much more efficient than two-dimensional culture in vitro. Importantly, the hepatic-like tissues (HLT) generated by repopulating ALS with MSCs are able to act as functional grafts and rescue lethal hepatic failure after transplantation in vivo. In summary, the cryo-chemical method used in this study is suitable for decellularization of liver and create acellular scaffolds that can support hepatic differentiation of MSCs and be used to fabricate functional tissue-engineered liver constructs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair chondral and osteochondral tissue in osteoarthritis: use of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässel, Susanne; Lorenz, Julia

    2014-10-01

    Focal chondral or osteochondral lesions can be painful and disabling because they have insufficient intrinsic repair potential, and constitute one of the major extrinsic risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA). Attention has, therefore, been paid to regenerative therapeutic procedures for the early treatment of cartilaginous defects. Current treatments for OA are not regenerative and have little effect on the progressive degeneration of joint tissue. One major reason for this underrepresentation of regenerative therapy is that approaches to treating OA with cell-based strategies have to take into consideration the larger sizes of the defects, as compared with isolated focal articular-cartilage defects, and the underlying disease process. Here, we review current treatment strategies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for chondral and osteochondral tissue repair in trauma and OA-affected joints. We discuss tissue-engineering approaches, in preclinical large-animal models and clinical studies in humans, which use crude bone-marrow aspirates and MSCs from different tissue sources in combination with bioactive agents and materials.

  7. Developing cell therapy techniques for respiratory disease: intratracheal delivery of genetically engineered stem cells in a murine model of airway injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Anne-Laure; Naud, Patrice; Forest, Virginie; Gourden, Clothilde; Sagan, Christine; Romefort, Bénédicte; Mathieu, Eva; Delorme, Bruno; Collin, Christine; Pagès, Jean-Christophe; Sensebé, Luc; Pitard, Bruno; Lemarchand, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest has increased in the use of exogenous stem cells to optimize lung repair and serve as carriers of a therapeutic gene for genetic airway disease such as cystic fibrosis. We investigated the survival and the engraftment of exogenous stem cells after intratracheal injection, in a murine model of acute epithelial airway injury already used in gene therapy experiments on cystic fibrosis. Embryonic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells were intratracheally injected 24hr after 2% polidocanol administration, when epithelial airway injury was maximal. Stem cells were transfected with reporter genes immediately prior to administration. Reporter gene expression was analyzed in trachea-lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages using non-fluorescent, quantitative and sensitive methods. ELISA quantitative results showed that 0.4 to 5.5% stem cells survived in the injured airway. Importantly, no stem cells survived in healthy airway or in the epithelial lining fluid. Using X-Gal staining, transduced mesenchymal stem cells were detected in injured trachea and bronchi lumen. When the epithelium was spontaneously regenerated, the in vivo amount of engrafted mesenchymal stem cells from cell line decreased dramatically. No stem cells from primary culture were located within lungs at 7 days. This study demonstrated the feasibility of the intratracheal cell delivery for airway diseases with acute epithelial injury. PMID:19606934

  8. [Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglei; Wang, Dapeng; Yin, Ruofeng

    2015-10-06

    To explorec Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor transinfected. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was separated, using BMSCs as target cells, and then vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene was transfected. Composite bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cells transfected with nano-hydroxyapatite (HA)/polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). The composition of cell and scaffold was observed. The blank plasmid transfection was 39.1%, 40.1% in VEGF group. The cell adhesion and growth was found on the scaffold pore wall after 5 days, and the number of adherent cells in the nano-HA/PLGA composite scaffold material basically had no significant difference in both. Although the nano-HA/PLGA scaffold material is still not fully meet the requirements of the matrix material for bone tissue engineering, but good biocompatibility, structure is its rich microporous satisfaction in material mechanics, toughening, enhanced obviously. Composition scaffold with BMSCs transfected by VEGF plasmid, the ability of angiogenesis is promoted.

  9. Functional consequences of glucose and oxygen deprivation on engineered mesenchymal stem cell-based cartilage constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M J; Shin, J I; Smith, L J; Mauck, R L

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering approaches for cartilage repair have focused on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). For clinical success, MSCs must survive and produce extracellular matrix in the physiological context of the synovial joint, where low nutrient conditions engendered by avascularity, nutrient utilization, and waste production prevail. This study sought to delineate the role of microenvironmental stressors on MSC viability and functional capacity in three dimensional (3D) culture. We evaluated the impact of glucose and oxygen deprivation on the functional maturation of 3D MSC-laden agarose constructs. Since MSC isolation procedures result in a heterogeneous cell population, we also utilized micro-pellet culture to investigate whether clonal subpopulations respond to these microenvironmental stressors in a distinct fashion. MSC health and the functional maturation of 3D constructs were compromised by both glucose and oxygen deprivation. Importantly, glucose deprivation severely limited viability, and so compromised the functional maturation of 3D constructs to the greatest extent. The observation that not all cells died suggested there exists heterogeneity in the response of MSC populations to metabolic stressors. Population heterogeneity was confirmed through a series of studies utilizing clonally derived subpopulations, with a spectrum of matrix production and cell survival observed under conditions of metabolic stress. Our findings show that glucose deprivation has a significant impact on functional maturation, and that some MSC subpopulations are more resilient to metabolic challenge than others. These findings suggest that pre-selection of subpopulations that are resilient to metabolic challenge may improve in vivo outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Three-dimensional-engineered matrix to study cancer stem cells and tumorsphere formation: effect of matrix modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Sarvestani, Samaneh K; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2013-03-01

    Maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is regulated by the tumor microenvironment. Synthetic hydrogels provide the flexibility to design three-dimensional (3D) matrices to isolate and study individual factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation by breast cancer cells and maintenance of CSCs in an inert microenvironment without the interference of other factors. In that regard, 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were encapsulated in inert polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogels and the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation and expression of CSC markers was investigated. The gel modulus had a strong effect on tumorsphere formation and the effect was bimodal. Tumorsphere formation and expression of CSC markers peaked after 8 days of culture. At day 8, as the matrix modulus was increased from 2.5 kPa to 5.3, 26.1, and 47.1 kPa, the average tumorsphere size changed from 37±6 μm to 57±6, 20±4, and 12±2 μm, respectively; cell number density in the gel changed from 0.8±0.1×10⁵ cells/mL to 1.7±0.2×10⁵, 0.4±0.1×10⁵, and 0.2±0.1×10⁵ cells/mL after initial encapsulation of 0.14×10⁵ cells/mL; and the expression of CD44 breast CSC marker changed from 17±4-fold to 38±9-, 3±1-, and 2±1-fold increase compared with the initial level. Similar results were obtained with MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. Mouse 4T1 and human MCF7 cells encapsulated in the gel with 5.3 kPa modulus formed the largest tumorspheres and highest density of tumorspheres, and had highest expression of breast CSC markers CD44 and ABCG2. The inert polyethylene glycol hydrogel can be used as a model-engineered 3D matrix to study the role of individual factors in the tumor microenvironment on tumorigenesis and maintenance of CSCs without the interference of other factors.

  11. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run. PMID:28616151

  12. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run.

  13. Machine Learning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Engineered Cardiac Tissue Contractility for Automated Drug Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene K. Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurately predicting cardioactive effects of new molecular entities for therapeutics remains a daunting challenge. Immense research effort has been focused toward creating new screening platforms that utilize human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissue constructs to better recapitulate human heart function and drug responses. As these new platforms become increasingly sophisticated and high throughput, the drug screens result in larger multidimensional datasets. Improved automated analysis methods must therefore be developed in parallel to fully comprehend the cellular response across a multidimensional parameter space. Here, we describe the use of machine learning to comprehensively analyze 17 functional parameters derived from force readouts of hPSC-derived ventricular cardiac tissue strips (hvCTS electrically paced at a range of frequencies and exposed to a library of compounds. A generated metric is effective for then determining the cardioactivity of a given drug. Furthermore, we demonstrate a classification model that can automatically predict the mechanistic action of an unknown cardioactive drug.

  14. Machine Learning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Engineered Cardiac Tissue Contractility for Automated Drug Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugene K; Tran, David D; Keung, Wendy; Chan, Patrick; Wong, Gabriel; Chan, Camie W; Costa, Kevin D; Li, Ronald A; Khine, Michelle

    2017-11-14

    Accurately predicting cardioactive effects of new molecular entities for therapeutics remains a daunting challenge. Immense research effort has been focused toward creating new screening platforms that utilize human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissue constructs to better recapitulate human heart function and drug responses. As these new platforms become increasingly sophisticated and high throughput, the drug screens result in larger multidimensional datasets. Improved automated analysis methods must therefore be developed in parallel to fully comprehend the cellular response across a multidimensional parameter space. Here, we describe the use of machine learning to comprehensively analyze 17 functional parameters derived from force readouts of hPSC-derived ventricular cardiac tissue strips (hvCTS) electrically paced at a range of frequencies and exposed to a library of compounds. A generated metric is effective for then determining the cardioactivity of a given drug. Furthermore, we demonstrate a classification model that can automatically predict the mechanistic action of an unknown cardioactive drug. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stem cells and solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Schier, Stefanie; Wright, Nicholas A; Alison, Malcolm R

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in our knowledge of stem cells found in tissues that can develop solid tumours. In particular, novel stem cell markers have been identified for the first time identifying multipotential cells: a required characteristic of a stem cell. The scarcity of cancer stem cells has been questioned. Current dogma states that they are rare, but novel research has suggested that this may not be the case. Here, we review the latest literature on stem cells, particularly cancer stem cells within solid tumours. We discuss current thinking on how stem cells develop into cancer stem cells and how they protect themselves from doing so and do they express unique markers that can be used to detect stem cells. We attempt to put into perspective these latest advances in stem cell biology and their potential for cancer therapy.

  16. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microscale technologies for cell engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    This book offers readers cutting-edge research at the interface of polymer science and engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science, and biology. State-of-the-art developments in microscale technologies for cell engineering applications are covered, including technologies relevant to both pluripotent and adult stem cells, the immune system, and somatic cells of the animal and human origin. This book bridges the gap in the understanding of engineering biology at multiple length scale, including microenvironmental control, bioprocessing, and tissue engineering in the areas of cardiac, cartilage, skeletal, and vascular tissues, among others. This book also discusses unique, emerging areas of micropatterning and three-dimensional printing models of cellular engineering, and contributes to the better understanding of the role of biophysical factors in determining the cell fate. Microscale Technologies for Cell Engineering is valuable for bioengineers, biomaterial scientists, tissue engineers, clinicians,...

  18. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... and differences between mouse and human gland development with particular emphasis on the identity and localization of stem cells, and the influence of the surrounding microenvironment. It is concluded that while recent advances in the field have contributed immense insight into how the normal mammary gland...... develops and is maintained, significant discrepancies exist between the mouse and human gland which should be taken into consideration in current and future models of mammary stem cell biology....

  19. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  20. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells in oral mucosa tissue engineering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, canine oral keratinocytes (OKs) and ADSCs were harvested and cultured in vitro. The affinity between the two cell lines was evaluated by analyzing their migration and proliferation patterns in a co-culture environment. The results demonstrate that both canine ADSCs and OKs showed improved migration in ...

  1. Stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Liu, Y; Wang, S

    2017-06-21

    Currently regeneration of tooth and periodontal damage still remains great challenge. Stem cell-based tissue engineering raised novel therapeutic strategies for tooth and periodontal repair. Stem cells for tooth and periodontal regeneration include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), stem cells from the dental apical papilla (SCAPs), and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), dental epithelial stem cells (DESCs), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, substantial advances have been made in stem cell-based tooth and periodontal regeneration, including dentin-pulp, whole tooth, bioroot and periodontal regeneration. Translational investigations have been performed such as dental stem cell banking and clinical trials. In this review, we present strategies for stem cell-based tissue engineering for tooth and periodontal repair, and the translational studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David T

    2014-02-26

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today's intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  3. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  5. In Vitro Behavior of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Poly(ε-caprolactone) Film for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Cecilia; Zonefrati, Roberto; Galli, Gianna; Puppi, Dario; Pirosa, Alessandro; Chiellini, Federica; Martelli, Francesco Saverio; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an emerging field, representing one of the most exciting challenges for scientists and clinicians. The possibility of combining mesenchymal stem cells and scaffolds to create engineered tissues has brought attention to a large variety of biomaterials in combination with osteoprogenitor cells able to promote and regenerate bone tissue. Human adipose tissue is officially recognized as an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs), a significant factor for use in tissue regenerative medicine. In this study, we analyze the behavior of a clonal finite cell line derived from human adipose tissue seeded on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) film, prepared by solvent casting. PCL polymer is chosen for its good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties. We observe that AMSCs are able to adhere to the biomaterial and remain viable for the entire experimental period. Moreover, we show that the proliferation process and osteogenic activity of AMSCs are maintained on the biofilm, demonstrating that the selected biomaterial ensures cell colonization and the development of an extracellular mineralized matrix. The results of this study highlight that AMSCs and PCL film can be used as a suitable model to support regeneration of new bone for future tissue engineering strategies.

  6. Single-Crystalline, Nanoporous Gallium Nitride Films With Fine Tuning of Pore Size for Stem Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Yubing; Zhang, Yu; Han, Jung; Fu, Jianping; Fan, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystalline nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) thin films were fabricated with the pore size readily tunable in 20-100 nm. Uniform adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on these thin films peak on the surface with pore size of 30 nm. Substantial cell elongation emerges as pore size increases to ∼80 nm. The osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs occurs preferentially on the films with 30 nm sized nanopores, which is correlated with the optimum condition for cell spreading, which suggests that adhesion, spreading, and stem cell differentiation are interlinked and might be coregulated by nanotopography.

  7. Skeletal Extracellular Matrix Supports Cardiac Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells: a Potential Scaffold for Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Hong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Decellularized cardiac extracellular matrix (cECM has been widely considered as an attractive scaffold for engineered cardiac tissue (ECT, however, its application is limited by immunogenicity and shortage of organ donation. Skeletal ECM (sECM is readily available and shows similarities with cECM. Here we hypothesized that sECM might be an alternative scaffold for ECT strategies. Methods: Murine ventricular tissue and anterior tibial muscles were sectioned into 300 mm-thick, and then cECM and sECM were acquired by pretreatment/SDS/TritonX-100 three-step-method. Acellularity and morphological properties of ECM was assessed. SECM was recellularized with murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs or mESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs, and was further studied by biocompatibility assessment, immunofluorescent staining, quantitative real-time PCR and electrophysiological experiment. Results: The relative residual contents of DNA, protein and RNA of sECM were comparable with cECM. The morphological properties and microstructure of sECM were similar to cECM. SECM supported mESCs to adhere, survive, proliferate and differentiate into functional cardiac microtissue with both electrical stimulated response and normal adrenergic response. Purified mESC-CMs also could adhere, survive, proliferate and form a sECM-based ECT with synchronized contraction within 6 days of recellularization. Conclusion: ECMs from murine skeletal muscle support survival and cardiac differentiation of mESCs, and are suitable to produce functional ECT patch. This study highlights the potential of patient specific of sECM to replace cECM for bioengineering ECT.

  8. Three-Dimensional-Engineered Matrix to Study Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorsphere Formation: Effect of Matrix Modulus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoming; Samaneh K Sarvestani; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is regulated by the tumor microenvironment. Synthetic hydrogels provide the flexibility to design three-dimensional (3D) matrices to isolate and study individual factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation by breast cancer cells and maintenance of CSCs in an inert microenvironment without the interference of other factors. In that regard, 4T1 mouse breast canc...

  9. The fast release of stem cells from alginate-fibrin microbeads in injectable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhi; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-encapsulating hydrogel microbeads of several hundred microns in size suitable for injection, that could quickly degrade to release the cells, are currently unavailable. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop oxidized alginate-fibrin microbeads encapsulating human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs); (2) investigate microbead degradation, cell release, and osteogenic differentiation of the released cells for the first time. Three types of microbeads were fabricated to encapsulate hUCMSCs: (1) Alginate microbeads; (2) oxidized alginate microbeads; (3) oxidized alginate-fibrin microbeads. Microbeads with sizes of about 100–500 µm were fabricated with 1×106 hUCMSCs/mL of alginate. For the alginate group, there was little microbead degradation, with very few cells released at 21 d. For oxidized alginate, the microbeads started to slightly degrade at 14 d. In contrast, the oxidized alginate-fibrin microbeads started to degrade at 4 d and released the cells. At 7 d, the number of released cells greatly increased and showed a healthy polygonal morphology. At 21 d, the oxidized alginate-fibrin group had a live cell density that was 4-fold that of the oxidized alginate group, and 15-fold that of the alginate group. The released cells had osteodifferentiation, exhibiting highly elevated bone marker gene expressions of ALP, OC, collagen I, and Runx2. Alizarin staining confirmed the synthesis of bone minerals by hUCMSCs, with the mineral concentration at 21 d being 10-fold that at 7 d. In conclusion, fast-degradable alginate-fibrin microbeads with hUCMSC encapsulation were developed that could start to degrade and release the cells at 4 d. The released hUCMSCs had excellent proliferation, osteodifferentiation, and bone mineral synthesis. The alginate-fibrin microbeads are promising to deliver stem cells inside injectable scaffolds to promote tissue regeneration. PMID:21757229

  10. Incorporating Engineering Design Challenges into STEM Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Householder, Daniel L., Ed.; Hailey, Christine E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Successful strategies for incorporating engineering design challenges into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses in American high schools are presented in this paper. The developers have taken the position that engineering design experiences should be an important component of the high school education of all American…

  11. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  12. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  13. Electrospun Collagen/Silk Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: Fiber Fabrication, Post-Treatment Optimization, and Application in Neural Differentiation of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bofan

    Biocompatible scaffolds mimicking the locally aligned fibrous structure of native extracellular matrix (ECM) are in high demand in tissue engineering. In this thesis research, unidirectionally aligned fibers were generated via a home-built electrospinning system. Collagen type I, as a major ECM component, was chosen in this study due to its support of cell proliferation and promotion of neuroectodermal commitment in stem cell differentiation. Synthetic dragline silk proteins, as biopolymers with remarkable tensile strength and superior elasticity, were also used as a model material. Good alignment, controllable fiber size and morphology, as well as a desirable deposition density of fibers were achieved via the optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters. The incorporation of silk proteins into collagen was found to significantly enhance mechanical properties and stability of electrospun fibers. Glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor post-treatment was demonstrated as a simple and effective way to tune the properties of collagen/silk fibers without changing their chemical composition. With 6-12 hours GA treatment, electrospun collagen/silk fibers were not only biocompatible, but could also effectively induce the polarization and neural commitment of stem cells, which were optimized on collagen rich fibers due to the unique combination of biochemical and biophysical cues imposed to cells. Taken together, electrospun collagen rich composite fibers are mechanically strong, stable and provide excellent cell adhesion. The unidirectionally aligned fibers can accelerate neural differentiation of stem cells, representing a promising therapy for neural tissue degenerative diseases and nerve injuries.

  14. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants Print A A A What's in this ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  15. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  16. Polypyrrole/Alginate Hybrid Hydrogels: Electrically Conductive and Soft Biomaterials for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sumi; Jang, LindyK; Kim, Semin; Yang, Jongcheol; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-11-01

    Electrically conductive biomaterials that can efficiently deliver electrical signals to cells or improve electrical communication among cells have received considerable attention for potential tissue engineering applications. Conductive hydrogels are desirable particularly for neural applications, as they can provide electrical signals and soft microenvironments that can mimic native nerve tissues. In this study, conductive and soft polypyrrole/alginate (PPy/Alg) hydrogels are developed by chemically polymerizing PPy within ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogel networks. The synthesized hydrogels exhibit a Young's modulus of 20-200 kPa. Electrical conductance of the PPy/Alg hydrogels could be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared to that of pristine alginate hydrogels. In vitro studies with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) reveal that cell adhesion and growth are promoted on the PPy/Alg hydrogels. Additionally, the PPy/Alg hydrogels support and greatly enhance the expression of neural differentiation markers (i.e., Tuj1 and MAP2) of hMSCs compared to tissue culture plate controls. Subcutaneous implantation of the hydrogels for eight weeks induces mild inflammatory reactions. These soft and conductive hydrogels will serve as a useful platform to study the effects of electrical and mechanical signals on stem cells and/or neural cells and to develop multifunctional neural tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  18. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  19. Graphene for improved femtosecond laser based pluripotent stem cell transfection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells are hugely attractive in the tissue engineering research field as they can self-renew and be selectively differentiated into various cell types. For stem cell and tissue engineering research it is important to develop new...

  20. Laboratory injection molder for the fabrication of polymeric porous poly-epsilon-caprolactone scaffolds for preliminary mesenchymal stem cells tissue engineering applications

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania

    2016-12-16

    This study presents a simple and rapid fabrication technique involving injection molding and particle leaching (IM/PL) to fabricate the porous scaffold for tissue engineering applications. Sodium chloride (NaCl) and Sucrose are separately mixed with the poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) granules using a screwed thermo regulated extruder, than the biocompatible scaffolds are fabricated through injection molding. The micro/nano structure of the samples and their different grade of porosity were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are chose to cell culture and Hoechst 33342 staining was used to verify the biocompatibility of the polymeric porous surfaces. We concluded that, by using the same fast solvent free injection/leaching process, the use of Sucrose as porogen, instead of NaCl, allowed the obtainment of biocompatible scaffolds with a higher grade of porosity with suitable cell adhesion capacity for tissue engineering purpose.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  3. Stromal cell-derived factor-1β potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2-stimulated osteoinduction of genetically engineered bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, Samuel; Fulzele, Sadanand; Yang, Nianlan; Shi, Xingming; Hess, Matthew; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M; Hill, William D

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal injuries are among the most prevalent clinical problems and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMSCs) have successfully been used for the treatment thereof. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1; CXCL12) is a member of the CXC chemokine family with multiple splice variants. The two most abundant variants, SDF-1α and SDF-1β, share identical amino acid sequences, except for four additional amino acids at the C-terminus of SDF-1β, which may mediate surface stabilization via glycosaminoglycans and protect SDF-1β from proteolytic cleavage, rendering it twice as potent as SDF-1α. Increasing evidence suggests that SDF-1 is involved in bone formation through regulation of recruitment, engraftment, proliferation, and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that SDF-1β can potentiate bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-stimulated osteogenic differentiation and chemotaxis of BMSCs in vitro. Utilizing retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to generate novel Tet-Off-SDF-1β BMSCs, we found that conditional SDF-1β expression is tightly regulated by doxycycline in a dose-dependent and temporal fashion, leading to significantly increased SDF-1β mRNA and protein levels. In addition, SDF-1β was found to enhance BMP-2-stimulated mineralization, mRNA and protein expression of key osteogenic markers, and regulate BMP-2 signal transduction via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation in genetically engineered BMSCs in vitro. We also showed that SDF-1β promotes the migratory response of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-expressing BMSCs in vitro. Taken together, these data support that SDF-1β can play an important role in BMP-2-stimulated osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs and may exert its biological activity in both an autocrine and paracrine fashion.

  4. Fake news portrayals of stem cells and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro R; Murdoch, Blake; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how stem cells and stem cell research are portrayed on websites deemed to be purveyors of distorted and dubious information. Content analysis was conducted on 224 articles from 2015 to 2016, compiled by searching with the keywords 'stem cell(s)' on a list of websites flagged for containing either 'fake' or 'junk science' news. Articles contained various exaggerated positive and negative claims about stem cells and stem cell science, health and science related conspiracy theories, and statements promoting fear and mistrust of conventional medicine. Findings demonstrate the existence of organized misinformation networks, which may lead the public away from accurate information and facilitate a polarization of public discourse.

  5. Association of 17-β Estradiol with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: New Strategy to Produce Functional Myogenic Differentiated Cells with a Nano-Scaffold for Tissue Engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Feng

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI in postmenopausal women has been proposed to be associated with a reduction in the level of 17-β estradiol (E2. E2 has also been shown to enhance the multi-differentiation ability of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs in vitro. However, studies on the potential value of E2 for tissue engineering in SUI treatment are rare. In the present study, we successfully fabricated myogenically differentiated ASCs (MD-ASCs, which were seeded onto a Poly(l-lactide/Poly(e-caprolactone electrospinning nano-scaffold, and incorporated E2 into the system, with the aim of improving the proliferation and myogenic differentiation of ASCs. ASCs were collected from the inguinal subcutaneous fat of rats. The proliferation and myogenic differentiation of ASCs, as well as the nano-scaffold biocompatibility of MD-ASCs, with or without E2 supplementation, were investigated. We demonstrated that E2 incorporation enhanced the proliferation of ASCs in vitro, and the most optimal concentration was 10-9 M. E2 also led to modulation of the MD-ASCs phenotype toward a concentrated type with smooth muscle-inductive medium. The expression of early (alpha-smooth muscle actin, mid (calponin, and late-stage (myosin heavy chain contractile markers in MD-ASCs was enhanced by E2 during the different differentiation stages. Furthermore, the nano-scaffold was biocompatible with MD-ASCs, and cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by E2. Taken together, these results demonstrate that E2 can enhance the proliferation and myogenic differentiation of ASCs and can be used to construct a biocompatible cell/nano-scaffold. These scaffolds with desirable differentiation cells show promising applications for tissue engineering.

  6. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  8. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  9. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into many ... they also retain the ability to produce more stem cells, a process termed self-renewal. There are multiple ...

  10. State of the Art in Stem Cell Research: Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, and Transdifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria de Peppo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells divide by asymmetric division and display different degrees of potency, or ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types. Owing to their unique regenerative capacity, stem cells have generated great enthusiasm worldwide and represent an invaluable tool with unprecedented potential for biomedical research and therapeutic applications. Stem cells play a central role in the understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating tissue development and regeneration in normal and pathological conditions and open large possibilities for the discovery of innovative pharmaceuticals to treat the most devastating diseases of our time. Not least, their intrinsic characteristics allow the engineering of functional tissues for replacement therapies that promise to revolutionize the medical practice in the near future. In this paper, the authors present the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and new developments of transdifferentiation technologies and explore some of the biomedical applications that this emerging technology is expected to empower.

  11. Ligament Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Porous Polycaprolactone Fumarate Scaffold and Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Platelet Lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Bravo, Dalibel; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Riester, Scott M; Chase, Steven; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Dietz, Allan B; van Wijnen, Andre J; Yaszemski, Michael J; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2015-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of intra-articular ligament injuries is hampered by the poor regenerative potential of the tissue. We hypothesized that a novel composite polymer "neoligament" seeded with progenitor cells and growth factors would be effective in regenerating native ligamentous tissue. We synthesized a fumarate-derivative of polycaprolactone fumarate (PCLF) to create macro-porous scaffolds to allow cell-cell communication and nutrient flow. Clinical grade human adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) were cultured in 5% human platelet lysate (PL) and seeded on scaffolds using a dynamic bioreactor. Cell growth, viability, and differentiation were examined using metabolic assays and immunostaining for ligament-related markers (e.g., glycosaminoglycans [GAGs], alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagens, and tenascin-C). AMSCs seeded on three-dimensional (3D) PCLF scaffolds remain viable for at least 2 weeks with proliferating cells filling the pores. AMSC proliferation rates increased in PL compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) (p human fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate that AMSCs proliferate and eventually produce a collagen-rich extracellular matrix on porous PCLF scaffolds. This novel scaffold has potential in stem cell engineering and ligament regeneration.

  12. [Perinatal sources of stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorska-Jasiulewicz, Magdalena Maria; Witkowska-Zimny, Małgorzata

    2015-03-08

    Recently, stem cell biology has become an interesting topic. Several varieties of human stem cells have been isolated and identified in vivo and in vitro. Successful application of hematopoietic stem cells in hematology has led to the search for other sources of stem cells and expanding the scale of their application. Perinatal stem cells are a versatile cell population, and they are interesting for both scientific and practical objectives. Stem cells from perinatal tissue may be particularly useful in the clinic for autologous transplantation for fetuses and newborns, and after banking in later stages of life, as well as for in utero transplantation in the case of genetic disorders. In this review paper we focus on the extraction and therapeutic potential of stem cells derived from perinatal tissues such as the placenta, the amnion, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and Wharton's jelly.

  13. Controlling Redox Status for Stem Cell Survival, Expansion, and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Sart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have long been considered as pathological agents inducing apoptosis under adverse culture conditions. However, recent findings have challenged this dogma and physiological levels of ROS are now considered as secondary messengers, mediating numerous cellular functions in stem cells. Stem cells represent important tools for tissue engineering, drug screening, and disease modeling. However, the safe use of stem cells for clinical applications still requires culture improvements to obtain functional cells. With the examples of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, this review investigates the roles of ROS in the maintenance of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. In addition, this work highlights that the tight control of stem cell microenvironment, including cell organization, and metabolic and mechanical environments, may be an effective approach to regulate endogenous ROS generation. Taken together, this paper indicates the need for better quantification of ROS towards the accurate control of stem cell fate.

  14. Engineering Encounters: From STEM to STEAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kristin; Bush, Sarah; Cox, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Teaching STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, and math) in elementary school could be even more promising than teaching STEM. This is due to its ability to cross multiple subject areas and its appeal to multiple types of learners. Intentional integration of the arts in science and engineering lessons has the potential to more deeply…

  15. Co-encapsulation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody and mesenchymal stem cells in alginate microspheres for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Shi, Songtao

    2013-09-01

    Recently, it has been shown that tethered anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap BMP ligands and thus provide BMP inductive signals for osteo-differentiation of progenitor cells. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a co-delivery system based on murine anti-BMP2 mAb-loaded alginate microspheres encapsulating human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs); and (2) investigate osteogenic differentiation of encapsulated stem cells in alginate microspheres in vitro and in vivo. Alginate microspheres of 1 ± 0.1 mm diameter were fabricated with 2 × 10(6) hBMMSCs per mL of alginate. Critical-size calvarial defects (5 mm diameter) were created in immune-compromised mice and alginate microspheres preloaded with anti-BMP mAb encapsulating hBMMSCs were transplanted into defect sites. Alginate microspheres pre-loaded with isotype-matched non-specific antibody were used as the negative control. After 8 weeks, micro CT and histologic analyses were used to analyze bone formation. In vitro analysis demonstrated that anti-BMP2 mAbs tethered BMP2 ligands that can activate the BMP receptors on hBMMSCs. The co-delivery system described herein, significantly enhanced hBMMSC-mediated osteogenesis, as confirmed by the presence of BMP signal pathway-activated osteoblast determinants Runx2 and ALP. Our results highlight the importance of engineering the microenvironment for stem cells, and particularly the value of presenting inductive signals for osteo-differentiation of hBMMSCs by tethering BMP ligands using mAbs. This strategy of engineering the microenvironment with captured BMP signals is a promising modality for repair and regeneration of craniofacial, axial and appendicular bone defects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Normal and leukemic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pelicci, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on hematopoietic stem cells have provided several critical insights in the biology of stem cells in general; as mature blood cells are generally short lived, stem cells are in fact required to guarantee, throughout the life of an organism, the replenishment of differentiated blood cells by the generation of multi-lineage progenitors and precursors committed to individual hematopoietic lineages. Similarly, acute myeloid leukemia has been considered as a model system to study cancer ste...

  17. A tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration based on a biodegradable double-layer scaffold and adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Muñoz, Fernando; Azevedo, Jorge M; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2014-09-01

    Human and canine periodontium are often affected by an inflammatory pathology called periodontitis, which is associated with severe damages across tissues, namely, in the periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. However, the therapies used in the routine dental practice, often consisting in a combination of different techniques, do not allow to fully restore the functionality of the periodontium. Tissue Engineering (TE) appears as a valuable alternative approach to regenerate periodontal defects, but for this purpose, it is essential to develop supportive biomaterial and stem cell sourcing/culturing methodologies that address the complexity of the various tissues affected by this condition. The main aim of this work was to study the in vitro functionality of a newly developed double-layer scaffold for periodontal TE. The scaffold design was based on a combination of a three-dimensional (3D) fiber mesh functionalized with silanol groups and a membrane, both made of a blend of starch and poly-ɛ-(caprolactone). Adipose-derived stem cells (canine adipose stem cells [cASCs]) were seeded and cultured onto such scaffolds, and the obtained constructs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, metabolic activity, and proliferation. The osteogenic potential of the fiber mesh layer functionalized with silanol groups was further assessed concerning the osteogenic differentiation of the seeded and cultured ASCs. The obtained results showed that the proposed double-layer scaffold supports the proliferation and selectively promotes the osteogenic differentiation of cASCs seeded onto the functionalized mesh. These findings suggest that the 3D structure and asymmetric composition of the scaffold in combination with stem cells may provide the basis for developing alternative therapies to treat periodontal defects more efficiently.

  18. Stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I K; Briddell, R A

    1995-07-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is expressed on both primitive and mature hematopoietic progenitor cells. In vitro, SCF synergizes with other growth factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-3 to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. In vivo, SCF also synergizes with other growth factors and has been shown to enhance the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells in combination with G-CSF. In phase I/II clinical studies administration of the combination of SCF and G-CSF resulted in a two- to threefold increase in cells that express the CD34 antigen compared with G-CSF alone. Other potential clinical uses include ex vivo expansion protocols and in vitro culture for gene therapy.

  19. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut Selver, Özlem; Yağcı, Ayşe; Eğrilmez, Sait; Gürdal, Mehmet; Palamar, Melis; Çavuşoğlu, Türker; Ateş, Utku; Veral, Ali; Güven, Çağrı; Wolosin, Jose Mario

    2017-10-01

    The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane) for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells) is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice using

  20. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Barut Selver

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization: updated conceptual renditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonig, H; Papayannopoulou, T

    2013-01-01

    Despite its specific clinical relevance, the field of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization has received broad attention, owing mainly to the belief that pharmacologic stem cell mobilization might provide clues as to how stem cells are retained in their natural environment, the bone marrow ‘niche’. Inherent to this knowledge is also the desire to optimally engineer stem cells to interact with their target niche (such as after transplantation), or to lure malignant stem cells out of their protective niches (in order to kill them), and in general to decipher the niche’s structural components and its organization. Whereas, with the exception of the recent addition of CXCR4 antagonists to the armamentarium for mobilization of patients refractory to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, clinical stem cell mobilization has not changed significantly over the last decade or so, much effort has been made trying to explain the complex mechanism(s) by which hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells leave the marrow. This brief review will report some of the more recent advances about mobilization, with an attempt to reconcile some of the seemingly inconsistent data in mobilization and to interject some commonalities among different mobilization regimes. PMID:22951944

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are an innovative technology that turns somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells with pluripotent potential via the exogenous expression of several key genes. It can be used as an unlimited source for cell differentiation or tissue engineering, either of which is a promising therapy ...

  3. Nanotechnology in the regulation of stem cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Chuen Wu, Ching-Li Tseng, Chi-Chang Wu, Feng-Chen Kao, Yuan-Kun Tu, Edmund C So and Yang-Kao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are known for their potential to repair damaged tissues. The adhesion, growth and differentiation of stem cells are likely controlled by the surrounding microenvironment which contains both chemical and physical cues. Physical cues in the microenvironment, for example, nanotopography, were shown to play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. Thus, controlling stem cell behavior by nanoscale topography has become an important issue in stem cell biology. Nanotechnology has emerged as a new exciting field and research from this field has greatly advanced. Nanotechnology allows the manipulation of sophisticated surfaces/scaffolds which can mimic the cellular environment for regulating cellular behaviors. Thus, we summarize recent studies on nanotechnology with applications to stem cell biology, including the regulation of stem cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, tracking and imaging. Understanding the interactions of nanomaterials with stem cells may provide the knowledge to apply to cell–scaffold combinations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of the Engineered Stem Cell Chemokine Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1–alpha Analogue in a Translational Ovine Myocardial Infarction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, John W.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; McGarvey, Jeremy R.; Shudo, Yasuhiro; Patel, Jay B.; Trubelja, Alen; Fairman, Alexander S.; Edwards, Bryan B.; Hung, George; Hiesinger, William; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Atluri, Pavan; Wilensky, Robert L.; Pilla, James J.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Following myocardial infarction (MI) there is an inadequate blood supply to the myocardium and the surrounding borderzone becomes hypocontractile. Objective To develop a clinically translatable therapy, we hypothesized that in a preclinical ovine model of MI, the modified endothelial progenitor stem cell (EPC) chemokine, engineered stromal cell-derived factor 1-alpha analogue (ESA), would induce EPC chemotaxis, limit adverse ventricular remodeling, and preserve borderzone contractility. Methods and Results Thirty six adult male Dorset sheep underwent permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, inducing an anteroapical infarction and were randomized to borderzone injection of saline (n=18) or ESA (n=18). Ventricular function, geometry, and regional strain were assessed using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and pressure-volume catheter transduction. Bone marrow was harvested for in-vitro analysis, and myocardial biopsies were taken for mRNA, protein and immunohistochemical analysis. ESA induced greater chemotaxis of EPCs compared to saline (p<0.01), and was equivalent to recombinant stromal cell-derived factor 1-alpha (p=0.27). Analysis of mRNA expression and protein levels in ESA treated animals revealed reduced MMP-2 in the borderzone (p<0.05), with elevated levels of TIMP-1 and elastin in the infarct (p<0.05), while immunohistochemical analysis of borderzone myocardium showed increased capillary and arteriolar density in the ESA group (p<0.01). Animals in the ESA treatment group also had significant reductions in infarct size (p<0.01), increased maximal principle strain in the borderzone (p<0.01), and a steeper slope of the end systolic pressure volume relationship (p=0.01). Conclusions The novel, biomolecularly-designed peptide ESA induces chemotaxis of EPCs, stimulates neovasculogenesis, limits infarct expansion, and preserves contractility in an ovine model of MI. PMID:24366171

  5. The Advancement of Biomaterials in Regulating Stem Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiew, Vun Vun; Simat, Siti Fatimah Binti; Teoh, Peik Lin

    2017-09-07

    Stem cells are well-known to have prominent roles in tissue engineering applications. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into every cell type in the body while adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from various sources. Nevertheless, an utmost limitation in harnessing stem cells for tissue engineering is the supply of cells. The advances in biomaterial technology allows the establishment of ex vivo expansion systems to overcome this bottleneck. The progress of various scaffold fabrication could direct stem cell fate decisions including cell proliferation and differentiation into specific lineages in vitro. Stem cell biology and biomaterial technology promote synergistic effect on stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Therefore, understanding the interaction of stem cell and biomaterials would allow the designation of new biomaterials for future clinical therapeutic applications for tissue regeneration. This review focuses mainly on the advances of natural and synthetic biomaterials in regulating stem cell fate decisions. We have also briefly discussed how biological and biophysical properties of biomaterials including wettability, chemical functionality, biodegradability and stiffness play their roles.

  6. Stem cell tracking by nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Razini, Paola; Fiori, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan; Belicchi, Marzia

    2010-03-12

    Advances in stem cell research have provided important understanding of the cell biology and offered great promise for developing new strategies for tissue regeneration. The beneficial effects of stem cell therapy depend also by the development of new approachs for the track of stem cells in living subjects over time after transplantation. Recent developments in the use of nanotechnologies have contributed to advance of the high-resolution in vivo imaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and X-Ray computed microtomography (microCT). This review examines the use of nanotechnologies for stem cell tracking.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Frank P

    2004-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that every tissue contains stem cells. Our understanding of the biology of stem cells reveals that these cell populations have a critical role in the homeostasis and repair of tissues. Besides the local stem cell niches, additional compartments in the body such as the bone marrow may serve as reservoirs for stem cell populations. On more extensive tissue damage, and guided by local repair responses, "reparative" cell populations are mobilized from more distant stem cell reservoirs and migrate to the site of injury, thereby contributing in many aspects of local tissue repair. Osteoarthritis has long been regarded as an imbalance between destructive and reparative processes. The lack of repair of the weight-bearing articular cartilage and the associated subchondral bone changes are considered of critical importance in the progression of the disease. Recent findings indicate a depletion and/or functional alteration of mesenchymal stem cell populations in osteoarthritis. These preliminary data suggest that in joint diseases such as osteoarthritis, it is of importance to investigate further the involvement of the stem cell pool in the mechanisms contributing to joint homeostasis and driving disease progression. In view of the emerging body of evidence pointing to a potential therapeutic utility of stem cell technology, it is not surprising that local delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has been explored as a therapeutic approach in animal models of osteoarthritis. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  8. Efficient Ex Vivo Engineering and Expansion of Highly Purified Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Populations for Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonari, Erika; Desantis, Giacomo; Petrillo, Carolina; Boccalatte, Francesco E; Lidonnici, Maria Rosa; Kajaste-Rudnitski, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ferrari, Giuliana; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard

    2017-04-11

    Ex vivo gene therapy based on CD34 + hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has shown promising results in clinical trials, but genetic engineering to high levels and in large scale remains challenging. We devised a sorting strategy that captures more than 90% of HSC activity in less than 10% of mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) CD34 + cells, and modeled a transplantation protocol based on highly purified, genetically engineered HSCs co-infused with uncultured progenitor cells. Prostaglandin E 2 stimulation allowed near-complete transduction of HSCs with lentiviral vectors during a culture time of less than 38 hr, mitigating the negative impact of standard culture on progenitor cell function. Exploiting the pyrimidoindole derivative UM171, we show that transduced mPB CD34 + CD38 - cells with repopulating potential could be expanded ex vivo. Implementing these findings in clinical gene therapy protocols will improve the efficacy, safety, and sustainability of gene therapy and generate new opportunities in the field of gene editing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Cesarz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown.

  10. Genetically engineered suicide gene in mesenchymal stem cells using a Tet-On system for anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Oh, Ji Min; Gangadaran, Prakash; Zhu, Liya; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is the most aggressive malignancy of the thyroid, during which undifferentiated tumors arise from the thyroid follicular epithelium. ATC has a very poor prognosis due to its aggressive behavior and poor response to conventional therapies. Gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is a promising therapeutic strategy. The doxycycline (DOX)-controlled Tet inducible system is the most widely utilized regulatory system and could be a useful tool for therapeutic gene-based therapies. For example, use a synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system to control the expression of the therapeutic gene thymidine kinase, which converts prodrugs to active drugs. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic MSCs, harboring an inducible suicide gene, and to validate therapeutic gene expression using optical molecular imaging of ATC. We designed the Tet-On system using a retroviral vector expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-sr39TK) with dual reporters (eGFP-Fluc2). Mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) were transduced using this system with (MSC-Tet-TK/Fluc2) or without (MSC-TK/Fluc) the Tet-On system. Transduced cells were screened and characterized. Engineered MSCs were co-cultured with ATC (CAL62/Rluc) cells in the presence of the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV) and stimulated with DOX. The efficiency of cell killing monitored by assessing Rluc (CAL62/Rluc) and Fluc (MSC-Tet-TK/Fluc and MSC-TK/Fluc) activities using IVIS imaging. Fluc activity increased in MSC-Tet-TK/Fluc cells in a dose dependent manner following DOX treatment (R2 = 0.95), whereas no signal was observed in untreated cells. eGFP could also be visualized after induction with DOX, and the HSV1-TK protein could be detected by western blotting. In MSC-TK/Fluc cells, the Fluc activity increased with increasing cell number (R2 = 0.98), and eGFP could be visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The

  11. Stem cells in veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, Lisa A; Travis, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    The stem cell field in veterinary medicine continues to evolve rapidly both experimentally and clinically. Stem cells are most commonly used in clinical veterinary medicine in therapeutic applications for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses and dogs. New technologies of assisted reproduction are being developed to apply the properties of spermatogonial stem cells to preserve endangered animal species. The same methods can be used to generate transgenic animals for production o...

  12. Fabrication of novel high surface area mushroom gilled fibers and their effects on human adipose derived stem cells under pulsatile fluid flow for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuin, Stephen A; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2016-05-01

    The fabrication and characterization of novel high surface area hollow gilled fiber tissue engineering scaffolds via industrially relevant, scalable, repeatable, high speed, and economical nonwoven carding technology is described. Scaffolds were validated as tissue engineering scaffolds using human adipose derived stem cells (hASC) exposed to pulsatile fluid flow (PFF). The effects of fiber morphology on the proliferation and viability of hASC, as well as effects of varied magnitudes of shear stress applied via PFF on the expression of the early osteogenic gene marker runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were evaluated. Gilled fiber scaffolds led to a significant increase in proliferation of hASC after seven days in static culture, and exhibited fewer dead cells compared to pure PLA round fiber controls. Further, hASC-seeded scaffolds exposed to 3 and 6dyn/cm(2) resulted in significantly increased mRNA expression of RUNX2 after one hour of PFF in the absence of soluble osteogenic induction factors. This is the first study to describe a method for the fabrication of high surface area gilled fibers and scaffolds. The scalable manufacturing process and potential fabrication across multiple nonwoven and woven platforms makes them promising candidates for a variety of applications that require high surface area fibrous materials. We report here for the first time the successful fabrication of novel high surface area gilled fiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Gilled fibers led to a significant increase in proliferation of human adipose derived stem cells after one week in culture, and a greater number of viable cells compared to round fiber controls. Further, in the absence of osteogenic induction factors, gilled fibers led to significantly increased mRNA expression of an early marker for osteogenesis after exposure to pulsatile fluid flow. This is the first study to describe gilled fiber fabrication and their potential for tissue engineering

  13. Graphene for enhanced embryonic stem cell photo-transfection efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their pluripotency properties, embryonic stem (ES) cells possess great potential in regenerative therapy. Since reported a promising tissue engineering scaffold material, here, graphene is demonstrated to significantly improve the ES cell...

  14. Construction of tissue-engineered full-thickness cornea substitute using limbal epithelial cell-like and corneal endothelial cell-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Canwei; Du, Liqun; Sun, Peng; Shen, Lin; Zhu, Jing; Pang, Kunpeng; Wu, Xinyi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a full-thickness artificial cornea substitute in vitro by coculturing limbal epithelial cell-like (LEC-like) cells and corneal endothelial cell-like (CEC-like) cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on APCM scaffold. A 400 μm thickness, 11 mm diameter APCM lamella containing Bowman's membrane was prepared as the scaffold using trephine and a special apparatus made by ourselves. LEC-like cells and CEC-like cells, derived from hESCs as our previously described, were cocultured on the scaffold using a special insert of 24-well plates that enabled seeding both sides of the scaffold. Three or four layers of epithelium-like cells and a uniform monolayer of CEC-like cells could be observed by H&E staining. The thickness, endothelial cell density, and mechanical properties of the construct were similar to that of native rabbit corneas. Immunofluorescence analysis showed expression of ABCG2 and CK3 in the epithelium-like cell layers and expression of N-cadherin, ZO-1 and Na+/K + ATPase in the CEC-like cells. The corneal substitutes were well integrated within the host corneas, and the transparency increased gradually in 8-week follow-up after transplantation in the rabbits. These results suggest that the strategy we developed is feasible and effective for construction of tissue-engineered full-thickness cornea substitute with critical properties of native cornea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Translating textiles to tissue engineering: Creation and evaluation of microporous, biocompatible, degradable scaffolds using industry relevant manufacturing approaches and human adipose derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslauer, Carla M; Avery, Matthew R; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric scaffolds have emerged as a means of generating three-dimensional tissues, such as for the treatment of bone injuries and nonunions. In this study, a fibrous scaffold was designed using the biocompatible, degradable polymer poly-lactic acid in combination with a water dispersible sacrificial polymer, EastONE. Fibers were generated via industry relevant, facile scale-up melt-spinning techniques with an islands-in-the-sea geometry. Following removal of EastONE, a highly porous fiber remained possessing 12 longitudinal channels and pores throughout all internal and external fiber walls. Weight loss and surface area characterization confirmed the generation of highly porous fibers as observed via focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. Porous fibers were then knit into a three-dimensional scaffold and seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). Confocal microscopy images confirmed hASC attachment to the fiber walls and proliferation throughout the knit structure. Quantification of cell-mediated calcium accretion following culture in osteogenic differentiation medium confirmed hASC differentiation throughout the porous constructs. These results suggest incorporation of a sacrificial polymer within islands-in-the-sea fibers generates a highly porous scaffold capable of supporting stem cell viability and differentiation with the potential to generate large three-dimensional constructs for bone regeneration and/or other tissue engineering applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wnt Signaling in Stem Cells and Tumor Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance and repair and regeneration of tissues and organs, through their respective somatic stem cells (SSCs). However, aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types and Wnt signaling is important in the so-termed cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) population. The ability to safely therapeutically target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise. However, just like the Sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review our current understanding of the role of Wnt signaling in SSCs and CSC/TICs and the potential to pharmacologically manipulate these endogenous stem cell populations (both normal and tumor). Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Engineered Biomaterials Control Differentiation and Proliferation of Human-Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes via Timed Notch Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C. Tung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For cell-based treatments of myocardial infarction, a better understanding of key developmental signaling pathways and more robust techniques for producing cardiomyocytes are required. Manipulation of Notch signaling has promise as it plays an important role during cardiovascular development, but previous studies presented conflicting results that Notch activation both positively and negatively regulates cardiogenesis. We developed surface- and microparticle-based Notch-signaling biomaterials that function in a time-specific activation-tunable manner, enabling precise investigation of Notch activation at specific developmental stages. Using our technologies, a biphasic effect of Notch activation on cardiac differentiation was found: early activation in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs promotes ectodermal differentiation, activation in specified cardiovascular progenitor cells increases cardiac differentiation. Signaling also induces cardiomyocyte proliferation, and repeated doses of Notch-signaling microparticles further enhance cardiomyocyte population size. These results highlight the diverse effects of Notch activation during cardiac development and provide approaches for generating large quantities of cardiomyocytes.

  19. Inverse Regulation of Early and Late Chondrogenic Differentiation by Oxygen Tension Provides Cues for Stem Cell-Based Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Portron

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Multipotent stem/stromal cells (MSC are considered promising for cartilage tissue engineering. However, chondrogenic differentiation of MSC can ultimately lead to the formation of hypertrophic chondrocytes responsible for the calcification of cartilage. To prevent the production of this calcified matrix at the articular site, the late hypertrophic differentiation of MSCs must be carefully controlled. Given that articular cartilage is avascular, we hypothesized that in addition to its stimulatory role in the early differentiation of chondrogenic cells, hypoxia may prevent their late hypertrophic conversion. Methods: Early and late chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated using human adipose MSC and murine ATDC5 cells cultured under either normoxic (21%O2 or hypoxic (5%O2 conditions. To investigate the effect of hypoxia on late chondrogenic differentiation, the transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α were evaluated using the NoShift DNA-binding assay and through modulation of their activity (chemical inhibitor, RNA interference. Results: Our data demonstrate that low oxygen tension not only stimulates the early chondrogenic commitment of two complementary models of chondrogenic cells, but also inhibits their hypertrophic differentiation. Conclusion: These results suggest that hypoxia can be used as an instrumental tool to prevent the formation of a calcified matrix in MSC-based cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Lozano, Francisco Javier; Insausti, Carmen Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María del Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer Henarejos, Ana Belén; Marín Atucha, Noemi Teresa; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda Jiménez, José María

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in...

  1. Subcutaneous Construction of Engineered Adipose Tissue with Fat Lobule-Like Structure Using Injectable Poly-Benzyl-L-Glutamate Microspheres Loaded with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Sun

    Full Text Available Porous microcarriers were fabricated from synthesized poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG polymer to engineer adipose tissue with lobule-like structure via the injectable approach. The adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs seeded on porous PBLG microcarriers was determined by adipogenic gene expression and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme activity. In vitro adipogenic cultivation was performed for 7 days, and induced hASC/PBLG complex (Adi-ASC/PBLG group was subcutaneously injected into nude mice. Injections of PBLG microcarriers alone (PBLG group and non-induced hASC/PBLG complex (ASC/PBLG group served as controls. Newly formed tissues were harvested after 4 and 8 weeks. Generation of subcutaneous adipose tissue with typical lobule-like structure separated by fibrous septa was observed upon injection of adipogenic-induced hASC/microsphere complex. Adipogenesis significantly increased in the Adi-ASC/PBLG group compared with the control groups. The angiogenesis in the engineered adipose tissue was comparable to that in normal tissue as determined by capillary density and luminal diameter. Cell tracking assay demonstrated that labeled hASCs remained detectable in the neo-generated tissues 8 weeks post-injection using green fluorescence protein-labeled hASCs. These results indicate that adipose tissue with typical lobule-like structure could be engineered using injectable porous PBLG microspheres loaded with adipogenic-induced hASCs.

  2. Elements of the niche for adult stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Patricia A; Pavlou, Marina; Loizidou, Marilena; Cheema, Umber

    2017-01-01

    Adult stem cells are crucial for tissue homeostasis. These cells reside within exclusive locations in tissues, termed niches, which protect adult stem cell fidelity and regulate their many functions through biophysical-, biochemical- and cellular-mediated mechanisms. There is a growing understanding of how these mechanisms and their components contribute towards maintaining stem cell quiescence, self-renewal, expansion and differentiation patterns. In vitro expansion of adult stem cells is a powerful tool for understanding stem cell biology, and for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. However, it is technically challenging, since adult stem cell removal from their native microenvironment has negative repercussions on their sustainability. In this review, we overview specific elements of the biomimetic niche and how recreating such elements can help in vitro propagation of adult stem cells.

  3. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. Significance The results from the present study show that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) priming is more

  4. Computational Tools for Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qin; Cahan, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    For over half a century, the field of developmental biology has leveraged computation to explore mechanisms of developmental processes. More recently, computational approaches have been critical in the translation of high throughput data into knowledge of both developmental and stem cell biology. In the past several years, a new subdiscipline of computational stem cell biology has emerged that synthesizes the modeling of systems-level aspects of stem cells with high-throughput molecular data. In this review, we provide an overview of this new field and pay particular attention to the impact that single cell transcriptomics is expected to have on our understanding of development and our ability to engineer cell fate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  6. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  7. Controlled Dual Growth Factor Delivery From Microparticles Incorporated Within Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aggregates for Enhanced Bone Tissue Engineering via Endochondral Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong N; Dwivedi, Neha; Phillips, Lauren M; Yu, Xiaohua; Herberg, Samuel; Bowerman, Caitlin; Solorio, Loran D; Murphy, William L; Alsberg, Eben

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue engineering via endochondral ossification has been explored by chondrogenically priming cells using soluble mediators for at least 3 weeks to produce a hypertrophic cartilage template. Although recapitulation of endochondral ossification has been achieved, long-term in vitro culture is required for priming cells through repeated supplementation of inductive factors in the media. To address this challenge, a microparticle-based growth factor delivery system was engineered to drive endochondral ossification within human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) aggregates. Sequential exogenous presentation of soluble transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) at various defined time courses resulted in varying degrees of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis as demonstrated by glycosaminoglycan and calcium content. The time course that best induced endochondral ossification was used to guide the development of the microparticle-based controlled delivery system for TGF-β1 and BMP-2. Gelatin microparticles capable of relatively rapid release of TGF-β1 and mineral-coated hydroxyapatite microparticles permitting more sustained release of BMP-2 were then incorporated within hMSC aggregates and cultured for 5 weeks following the predetermined time course for sequential presentation of bioactive signals. Compared with cell-only aggregates treated with exogenous growth factors, aggregates with incorporated TGF-β1- and BMP-2-loaded microparticles exhibited enhanced chondrogenesis and alkaline phosphatase activity at week 2 and a greater degree of mineralization by week 5. Staining for types I and II collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin revealed the presence of cartilage and bone. This microparticle-incorporated system has potential as a readily implantable therapy for healing bone defects without the need for long-term in vitro chondrogenic priming. Significance: This study demonstrates the regulation of chondrogenesis

  8. StemTextSearch: Stem cell gene database with evidence from abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chou-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have used many methods to find biomarkers in stem cells, including text mining, experimental data and image storage. However, no text-mining methods have yet been developed which can identify whether a gene plays a positive or negative role in stem cells. StemTextSearch identifies the role of a gene in stem cells by using a text-mining method to find combinations of gene regulation, stem-cell regulation and cell processes in the same sentences of biomedical abstracts. The dataset includes 5797 genes, with 1534 genes having positive roles in stem cells, 1335 genes having negative roles, 1654 genes with both positive and negative roles, and 1274 with an uncertain role. The precision of gene role in StemTextSearch is 0.66, and the recall is 0.78. StemTextSearch is a web-based engine with queries that specify (i) gene, (ii) category of stem cell, (iii) gene role, (iv) gene regulation, (v) cell process, (vi) stem-cell regulation, and (vii) species. StemTextSearch is available through http://bio.yungyun.com.tw/StemTextSearch.aspx. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  10. Application potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs) based tissue-engineering for spinal cord defect repair in rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoshuai; Yuan, Zhengwei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Hui; Zhao, Guifeng; Miao, Jiaoning; Wu, Di; Liu, Bo; Cao, Songying; An, Dong; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Henan; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Qiushi; Gu, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Spina bifida aperta are complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of fusion in the spinal neural tube during embryogenesis. Despite surgical repair of the defect, most patients who survive with spina bifida aperta have a multiple system handicap due to neuron deficiency of the defective spinal cord. Tissue engineering has emerged as a novel treatment for replacement of lost tissue. This study evaluated the prenatal surgical approach of transplanting a chitosan-gelatin scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in the healing the defective spinal cord of rat fetuses with retinoic acid induced spina bifida aperta. Scaffold characterisation revealed the porous structure, organic and amorphous content. This biomaterial promoted the adhesion, spreading and in vitro viability of the BMSCs. After transplantation of the scaffold combined with BMSCs, the defective region of spinal cord in rat fetuses with spina bifida aperta at E20 decreased obviously under stereomicroscopy, and the skin defect almost closed in many fetuses. The transplanted BMSCs in chitosan-gelatin scaffold survived, grew and expressed markers of neural stem cells and neurons in the defective spinal cord. In addition, the biomaterial presented high biocompatibility and slow biodegradation in vivo. In conclusion, prenatal transplantation of the scaffold combined with BMSCs could treat spinal cord defect in fetuses with spina bifida aperta by the regeneration of neurons and repairmen of defective region.

  11. Dental Tissue — New Source for Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been isolated from many tissues and organs, including dental tissue. Five types of dental stem cells have been established: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. The main characteristics of dental stem cells are their potential for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal capacity. Dental stem cells can differentiate into odontoblasts, adipocytes, neuronal-like cells, glial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, melanocytes, myotubes, and endothelial cells. Possible application of these cells in various fields of medicine makes them good candidates for future research as a new, powerful tool for therapy. Although the possible use of these cells in therapeutic purposes and tooth tissue engineering is still in the beginning stages, the results are promising. The efforts made in the research of dental stem cells have clarified many mechanisms underlying the biological processes in which these cells are involved. This review will focus on the new findings in the field of dental stem cell research and on their potential use in the therapy of various disorders.

  12. Counting stem cells : methodological constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Verovskaya, Evgenia; Zwart, Erik; Broekhuis, Mathilde; de Haan, Gerald

    The number of stem cells contributing to hematopoiesis has been a matter of debate. Many studies use retroviral tagging of stem cells to measure clonal contribution. Here we argue that methodological factors can impact such clonal analyses. Whereas early studies had low resolution, leading to

  13. Biomaterials Approach to Expand and Direct Differentiation of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chou; Leong, Kam W

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells play increasingly prominent roles in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells theoretically allow every cell type in the body to be regenerated. Adult stem cells have also been identified and isolated from every major tissue and organ, some possessing apparent pluripotency comparable to that of ES cells. However, a major limitation in the translation of stem cell technologies to clinical applications is the supply of cells. Advances in biomaterials engineering and scaffold fabrication enable the development of ex vivo cell expansion systems to address this limitation. Progress in biomaterial design has also allowed directed differentiation of stem cells into specific lineages. In addition to delivering biochemical cues, various technologies have been developed to introduce micro- and nano-scale features onto culture surfaces to enable the study of stem cell responses to topographical cues. Knowledge gained from these studies portends the alteration of stem cell fate in the absence of biological factors, which would be valuable in the engineering of complex organs comprising multiple cell types. Biomaterials may also play an immunoprotective role by minimizing host immunoreactivity toward transplanted cells or engineered grafts. PMID:17264853

  14. Stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Brian O; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine offers the exciting potential of developing alternatives to total joint replacement for treating osteoarthritis. In this article, we highlight recent work that addresses key challenges of stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis and provide examples of innovative ways in which stem cells can aid in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Significant progress has been made in understanding the challenges to successful stem cell therapy, such as the effects of age or disease on stem cell properties, altered stem cell function due to an inflammatory joint environment and phenotypic instability in vivo. Novel scaffold designs have been shown to enhance the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage and have also improved the integration of newly formed tissue within the joint. Emerging strategies such as injecting stem cells directly into the joint, manipulating endogenous stem cells to enhance regenerative capacity and utilizing stem cells for drug discovery have expanded the potential uses of stem cells in treating osteoarthritis. Several recent studies have greatly advanced the development and preclinical evaluation of potential stem cell-based treatments for osteoarthritis through novel approaches focused on cell therapy, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  15. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  16. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Hair Follicle Bulge Neural Crest Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Czepiel, Marcin; Krause, Tina; Schaefer, Karl-Herbert; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising candidates for the study of disease models as well as for tissue engineering purposes. Part of a strategy to develop safe reprogramming technique is reducing the number of exogenous reprogramming factors. Some cells types are more prone to

  17. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Lei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  18. Novel gene-modified-tissue engineering of cartilage using stable transforming growth factor-beta1-transfected mesenchymal stem cells grown on chitosan scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-An; Liu, Xue-Guang; Huo, Jian-Zhong; Jiang, Chun; Wen, Xue-Jun; Chen, Zheng-Rong

    2007-06-01

    Rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were stably transfected with the TGF-beta1 gene in monolayer culture using Lipofectamine 2000. After transfection, the expression of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix was upregulated, whereas matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 (MMP 1 and 3) protein expressions and enzymatic activities were downregulated. Autologous MSCs modified with the TGF-beta1 gene were seeded into chitosan scaffolds to construct gene-modified cartilage, which was then implanted into the full-thickness articular cartilage defects of rabbits' knees. Twelve weeks after implantation, the defects were filled with regenerated hyaline-like cartilage tissue as confirmed by the positive immunohistochemical staining of collagen type II and intense toluidine blue staining of proteoglycan. Our findings suggest that the repair of cartilage defects can be enhanced by TGF-beta1 gene-modified-tissue engineering of cartilage on the basis of a strategy using MSCs, chitosan, and liposomal transfection.

  19. ¬Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Jane Anderson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell BehaviourHilary J Anderson1, Jugal Kishore Sahoo2, Rein V Ulijn2,3, Matthew J Dalby1*1 Centre for Cell Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.2 Technology and Innovation centre, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. 3 Advanced Science Research Centre (ASRC and Hunter College, City University of New York, NY 10031, NY, USA. Correspondence:*Hilary Andersonh.anderson.1@research.gla.ac.ukKeywords: mesenchymal stem cells, bioengineering, materials synthesis, nanotopography, stimuli responsive material□AbstractThe materials pipeline for biomaterials and tissue engineering applications is under continuous development. Specifically, there is great interest in the use of designed materials in the stem cell arena as materials can be used to manipulate the cells providing control of behaviour. This is important as the ability to ‘engineer’ complexity and subsequent in vitro growth of tissues and organs is a key objective for tissue engineers. This review will describe the nature of the materials strategies, both static and dynamic, and their influence specifically on mesenchymal stem cell fate.

  20. Saving Stem Cells after Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Katherine Y

    2017-12-07

    Inflammatory signals can activate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but how HSCs regain quiescence after stress is unclear. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Chen et al. (2017) delineate an elegant histamine-dependent feedback mechanism through which myeloid bone marrow cells restore quiescence of myeloid-biased HSCs, with implications for blood disorders, aging, and immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly repeated culture system: a new device and method for obtaining abundant mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhengqi; Hou, Tianyong; Xing, Junchao; Wu, Xuehui; Jin, Huiyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Deng, Moyuan; Xie, Zhao; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    To date, various types of cells for seeding regenerative scaffolds have been used for bone tissue engineering. Among seed cells, the mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hUCMSCs) represent a promising candidate and hold potential for bone tissue engineering due to the the lack of ethical controversies, accessibility, sourced by non-invasive procedures for donors, a reduced risk of contamination, osteogenic differentiation capacities, and higher immunomodulatory capacity. However, the current culture methods are somewhat complicated and inefficient and often fail to make the best use of the umbilical cord (UC) tissues. Moreover, these culture processes cannot be performed on a large scale and under strict quality control. As a result, only a small quantity of cells can be harvested using the current culture methods. To solve these problems, we designed and evaluated an UC Wharton's jelly repeated culture device. Using this device, hUCMSCs were obtained from the repeated cultures and their quantities and biological characteristics were compared. We found that using our culture device, which retained all tissue blocks on the bottom of the dish, the total number of obtained cells increased 15-20 times, and the time required for the primary passage was reduced. Moreover, cells harvested from the repeated cultures exhibited no significant difference in their immunophenotype, potential for multilineage differentiation, or proliferative, osteoinductive capacities, and final osteogenesis. The application of the repeated culture frame (RCF) not only made full use of the Wharton's jelly but also simplified and specified the culture process, and thus, the culture efficiency was significantly improved. In summary, abundant hUCMSCs of dependable quality can be acquired using the RCF.

  2. Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly repeated culture system: a new device and method for obtaining abundant mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Chang

    Full Text Available To date, various types of cells for seeding regenerative scaffolds have been used for bone tissue engineering. Among seed cells, the mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hUCMSCs represent a promising candidate and hold potential for bone tissue engineering due to the the lack of ethical controversies, accessibility, sourced by non-invasive procedures for donors, a reduced risk of contamination, osteogenic differentiation capacities, and higher immunomodulatory capacity. However, the current culture methods are somewhat complicated and inefficient and often fail to make the best use of the umbilical cord (UC tissues. Moreover, these culture processes cannot be performed on a large scale and under strict quality control. As a result, only a small quantity of cells can be harvested using the current culture methods. To solve these problems, we designed and evaluated an UC Wharton's jelly repeated culture device. Using this device, hUCMSCs were obtained from the repeated cultures and their quantities and biological characteristics were compared. We found that using our culture device, which retained all tissue blocks on the bottom of the dish, the total number of obtained cells increased 15-20 times, and the time required for the primary passage was reduced. Moreover, cells harvested from the repeated cultures exhibited no significant difference in their immunophenotype, potential for multilineage differentiation, or proliferative, osteoinductive capacities, and final osteogenesis. The application of the repeated culture frame (RCF not only made full use of the Wharton's jelly but also simplified and specified the culture process, and thus, the culture efficiency was significantly improved. In summary, abundant hUCMSCs of dependable quality can be acquired using the RCF.

  3. Molecular Imaging and Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon-Young Jang; Zhaohui Ye; Linzhao Cheng

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been enormous progress in understanding both multipotent stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells and pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. However, it has been challenging to study developmental potentials of these stem cells because they reside in complex cellular environments and aspects of their distribution, migration, engraftment, survival, proliferation, and differentiation often could not be suffici...

  4. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  5. Electrospun poly(ester-Urethane- and poly(ester-Urethane-Urea fleeces as promising tissue engineering scaffolds for adipose-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Gugerell

    Full Text Available An irreversible loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue in patients after tumor removal or deep dermal burns makes soft tissue engineering one of the most important challenges in biomedical research. The ideal scaffold for adipose tissue engineering has yet not been identified though biodegradable polymers gained an increasing interest during the last years. In the present study we synthesized two novel biodegradable polymers, poly(ε-caprolactone-co-urethane-co-urea (PEUU and poly[(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone-co-(L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate-block-oligo(ethylene glycol-urethane] (PEU, containing different types of hydrolytically cleavable bondings. Solutions of the polymers at appropriate concentrations were used to fabricate fleeces by electrospinning. Ultrastructure, tensile properties, and degradation of the produced fleeces were evaluated. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs were seeded on fleeces and morphology, viability, proliferation and differentiation were assessed. The biomaterials show fine micro- and nanostructures composed of fibers with diameters of about 0.5 to 1.3 µm. PEUU fleeces were more elastic, which might be favourable in soft tissue engineering, and degraded significantly slower compared to PEU. ASCs were able to adhere, proliferate and differentiate on both scaffolds. Morphology of the cells was slightly better on PEUU than on PEU showing a more physiological appearance. ASCs differentiated into the adipogenic lineage. Gene analysis of differentiated ASCs showed typical expression of adipogenetic markers such as PPARgamma and FABP4. Based on these results, PEUU and PEU meshes show a promising potential as scaffold materials in adipose tissue engineering.

  6. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  7. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  8. Biocompatibility and enhanced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in response to surface engineered poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Catherine M; Deehan, David J; Knuth, Callie A; Rose, Felicity R A J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Oldershaw, Rachel A

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering strategies can be applied to enhancing osseous integration of soft tissue grafts during ligament reconstruction. Ligament rupture results in a hemarthrosis, an acute intra-articular bleed rich in osteogenic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). With the aim of identifying an appropriate biomaterial with which to combine hemarthrosis fluid-derived hMSCs (HF-hMSCs) for therapeutic application, this work has investigated the biocompatibility of microparticles manufactured from two forms of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), one synthesized with equal monomeric ratios of lactic acid to glycolic acid (PLGA 50:50) and the other with a higher proportion of lactic acid (PLGA 85:15) which confers a longer biodegradation time. The surfaces of both types of microparticles were functionalized by plasma polymerization with allylamine to increase hydrophilicity and promote cell attachment. HF-hMSCs attached to and spread along the surface of both forms of PLGA microparticle. The osteogenic response of HF-hMSCs was enhanced when cultured with PLGA compared with control cultures differentiated on tissue culture plastic and this was independent of the type of polymer used. We have demonstrated that surface engineered PLGA microparticles are an appropriate biomaterial for combining with HF-hMSCs and the selection of PLGA is relevant only when considering the biodegradation time for each biomedical application. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Improved chondrogenesis and engineered cartilage formation from TGF-β3-expressing adipose-derived stem cells cultured in the rotating-shaft bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Chang, Yu-Han; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have captured growing interests for cartilage regeneration. Although ASCs chondrogenesis can be stimulated by genetic modification, whether genetically engineered ASCs hold promise for the cartilaginous tissue formation remains to be explored. Since baculovirus (an emerging gene delivery vector) effectively transduced ASCs and transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) was recently shown to induce ASCs chondrogenesis more potently than TGF-β1, we constructed a baculoviral vector (Bac-CT3W) to encode TGF-β3. The Bac-CT3W-transduced ASCs expressed TGF-β3 robustly and substantiated the chondrogenesis of ASCs cultured in monolayer and in porous scaffolds. Culture of the transduced cell/scaffold constructs in the rotating-shaft bioreactor (RSB) under hypoxic and perfusion conditions for 2 weeks further augmented the ASCs chondrogenesis and deposition of cartilage-specific collagen II and glycosaminoglycans, leading to the formation of cartilage-like tissues with hyaline appearance and compressive modulus approaching 62% of the native articular cartilage. Intriguingly, prolonged culture to 3 or 4 weeks failed to further augment the construct growth, probably due to the scaffold degradation. Altogether, baculovirus-mediated TGF-β3 expression in ASCs in conjunction with dynamic culture in the RSB for 2 weeks synergistically ameliorated the ASCs chondrogenesis and formation of cartilaginous tissues, representing a novel approach to producing engineered cartilages.

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106 were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans.

  11. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from the pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    The value of stem cells has become increasingly evident in recent years with the advent of genetic engineering tools that allow site-specific modifications to the genome. The use of stem cells to induce modifications has several potential benefits for the livestock industry including improving anim...

  12. Concise Review: Carbon Nanotechnology: Perspectives in Stem Cell Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pryzhkova, Marina V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell research, only a few attempts to use carbon nanotechnology in the stem cell field have been reported. However, acquired experience with and knowledge of carbon nanomaterials may be efficiently used in the development of future personalized medicine and in tissue engineering.

  13. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belicchi, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Cancedda, R. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Fiori, F. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Gavina, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Giuliani, A. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Komlev, V.S. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); Institute for Physical Chemistry of Ceramics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ozernaya 48, 119361 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Renghini, C. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Rustichelli, F., E-mail: f.rustichelli@univpm.i [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  14. The formation of a tissue-engineered cornea using plastically compressed collagen scaffolds and limbal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Shengli; Connon, Che J

    2013-01-01

    Collagen has excellent biocompatibility, is biodegradable, and possesses low immunogenicity. Therefore, this protein is a very suitable substrate for the formation of a corneal scaffold for therapeutic use. The highly hydrated nature of conventional collagen gels, however, results in a gel that is structurally weak and difficult to manipulate. In this chapter, we describe a novel method to cultivate limbal epithelial cells (LEC) on a compressed collagen scaffold. The compressed collagen scaffold can be rapidly constructed using a cell-independent process, which produces dense and mechanically strong collagen constructs with controllable microscale features.We embedded corneal keratocytes in a collagen gel, which we subsequently compressed and coated with laminin. The resulting construct supported the physiological morphology and stratification of LEC. The expression of a specific marker for differentiated LEC, cytokeratin 3 (CK3), and a marker for undifferentiated LEC, cytokeratin 14 (CK14), were similar in LEC expanded on both the compressed collagen construct and the leading conventional scaffold, denuded amniotic membrane (AM). We therefore demonstrate that a laminin-coated, compressed collagen gel containing keratocytes can support LEC expansion, stratification, and differentiation to a degree that is comparable to denuded AM. Our novel compressed collagen/keratocyte construct has potential for use as a tissue-engineered artificial cornea.

  15. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: Individual and synergetic effects of three-dimensional environment and mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, J A; Lanceros-Mendez, S; Ribelles, J L Gomez

    2016-03-01

    Chondrogenesis of dedifferentiated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells is influenced not only by soluble molecules like growth factors, but also by the cell environment itself. The latter is achieved through both mechanical cues - which act as stimulation factor and influences nutrient transport - and adhesion to extracellular matrix cues - which determine cell shape. Although the effects of soluble molecules and cell environment have been intensively addressed, few observations and conclusions about the interaction between the two have been achieved. In this work, we review the state of the art on the single effects between mechanical and biochemical cues, as well as on the combination of the two. Furthermore, we provide a discussion on the techniques currently used to determine the mechanical properties of materials and tissues generated in vitro, their limitations and the future research needs to properly address the identified problems. The importance of biomechanical cues in chondrogenesis is well known. This paper reviews the existing literature on the effect of mechanical stimulation on chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in order to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Contradictory results found with respect to the effect of different modes of external loading can be explained by the different properties of the scaffolding system that holds the cells, which determine cell adhesion and morphology and spatial distribution of cells, as well as the stress transmission to the cells. Thus, this review seeks to provide an insight into the interplay between external loading program and scaffold properties during chondrogenic differentiation. The review of the literature reveals an important gap in the knowledge in this field and encourages new experimental studies. The main issue is that in each of the few cases in which the interplay is investigated, just two groups of scaffolds are compared, leaving intermediate adhesion conditions out of study

  16. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Baculovirus-Engineered Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhance Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chung Liao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs genetically modified with baculoviral bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bac-BMP-2 vectors could achieve successful fusion in a femur defect model or in a spinal fusion model. In this study, BMDMSCs expressing BMP-7 (Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs were generated. We hypothesized that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs could secrete more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs in vitro and achieve spinal posterolateral fusion in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent posterolateral fusion at L4-5. Group I (n = 6 was implanted with collagen-β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP-hydroxyapatite (HA, Group II (n = 6 was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus BMDMSCs, and Group III (n = 6 was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs. In vitro production of BMP-7 was quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Spinal fusion was examined using computed tomography (CT, manual palpation, and histological analysis. ELISA demonstrated that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs produced four-fold to five-fold more BMP-7 than did BMDMSCs. In the CT results, 6 fused segments were observed in Group I (50%, 6/12, 8 in Group II (67%, 8/12, and 12 in Group III (100%, 12/12. The fusion rate, determined by manual palpation, was 0% (0/6 in Group I, 0% (0/6 in Group II, and 83% (5/6 in Group III. Histology showed that Group III had more new bone and matured marrow formation. In conclusion, BMDMSCs genetically transduced with the Bac-BMP-7 vector could express more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs. These Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs on collagen-β-TCP-HA scaffolds were able to induce successful spinal fusion in rabbits.

  17. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  18. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies......-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories....

  19. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  20. Matrix control of stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Ram, Sharona; Artym, Vira; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2006-08-25

    A key challenge in stem cell research is to learn how to direct the differentiation of stem cells toward specific fates. In this issue of Cell, Engler et al. (2006) identify a new factor regulating stem cell fate: the elasticity of the matrix microenvironment. By changing the stiffness of the substrate, human mesenchymal stem cells could be directed along neuronal, muscle, or bone lineages.

  1. Translational research for injectable tissue-engineered bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: from basic research to clinical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Hibi, Hideharu; Nagasaka, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    Translational research involves application of basic scientific discoveries into clinically germane findings and, simultaneously, the generation of scientific questions based on clinical observations. At first, as basic research we investigated tissue-engineered bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in a dog mandible model. We also confirmed the correlation between osseointegration in dental implants and the injectable bone. Bone defects made with a trephine bar were implanted with graft materials as follows: PRP, dog MSCs (dMSCs) and PRP, autogenous particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM), and control (defect only). Two months later, dental implants were installed. According to the histological and histomorphometric observations at 2 months after implants, the amount of bone-implant contact at the bone-implant interface was significantly different between the PRP, PCBM, dMSCs/ PRP, native bone, and control groups. Significant differences were also found between the dMSCs/PRP, native bone, and control groups in bone density. These findings indicate that the use of a mixture of dMSCs/ PRP will provide good results in implant treatment compared with that achieved by autogenous PCBM. We then applied this injectable tissue-engineered bone to onlay plasty in the posterior maxilla or mandible in three human patients. Injectable tissue-engineered bone was grafted and, simultaneously, 2-3 threaded titanium implants were inserted into the defect area. The results of this investigation indicated that injectable tissue-engineered bone used for the plasty area with simultaneous implant placement provided stable and predictable results in terms of implant success. We regenerated bone with minimal invasiveness and good plasticity, which could provide a clinical alternative to autogenous bone grafts. This might be a good case of translational research from basic research to clinical application.

  2. Biaxial mechanics and inter-lamellar shearing of stem-cell seeded electrospun angle-ply laminates for annulus fibrosus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Tristan P; Nakasone, Ryan H; Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    The annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disk plays a critical role in vertebral load transmission that is heavily dependent on the microscale structure and composition of the tissue. With degeneration, both structure and composition are compromised, resulting in a loss of AF mechanical function. Numerous tissue engineering strategies have addressed the issue of AF degeneration, but few have focused on recapitulation of AF microstructure and function. One approach that allows for generation of engineered AF with appropriate (+/-)30° lamellar microstructure is the use of aligned electrospun scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and assembled into angle-ply laminates (APL). Previous work indicates that opposing lamellar orientation is necessary for development of near native uniaxial tensile properties. However, most native AF tensile loads are applied biaxially, as the disk is subjected to multi-axial loads and is constrained by its attachments to the vertebral bodies. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the biaxial mechanical response of engineered AF bilayers, and to determine the importance of opposing lamellar structure under this loading regime. Opposing bilayers, which replicate native AF structure, showed a significantly higher modulus in both testing directions compared to parallel bilayers, and reached ∼60% of native AF biaxial properties. Associated with this increase in biaxial properties, significantly less shear, and significantly higher stretch in the fiber direction, was observed. These results provide additional insight into native tissue structure-function relationships, as well as new benchmarks for engineering functional AF tissue constructs. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) engineered mesenchymal stem cell therapy increased pro-angiogenic factors, reduced fibrosis and improved heart function in the infarcted rat myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sumanth C; Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Goldman, Joshua W; Husain, Aaftab; Alexander Palesty, J; Sanchez, Juan A; McFadden, David W; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2015-12-15

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a powerful candidate for mediating myocardial repair. In this study, we genetically modified MSCs with an adenovector encoding thioredoxin-1 (Ad.Trx1). Trx1 has been described as a growth regulator, a transcription factor regulator, a cofactor, and a powerful antioxidant. We explored whether engineered MSCs, when transplanted, are capable of improving cardiac function and angiogenesis in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI). Rat MSCs were cultured and divided into MSC, MSC+Ad.LacZ, and MSC+Ad.Trx1 groups. The cells were assayed for proliferation, and differentiation potential. In addition, rats were divided into control-sham (CS), control-MI (CMI), MSC+Ad.LacZ-MI (MLZMI), and MSC+Ad.Trx1-MI (MTrxMI) groups. MI was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation, and MSCs preconditioned with either Ad.LacZ or Ad.Trx1 were immediately administered to four sites in the peri-infarct zone. The MSC+Ad.Trx1 cells increased the proliferation capacity and maintained pluripotency, allowing them to divide into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. Western blot analysis, 4 days after treatment showed increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). Also capillary density along with myocardial function as examined by echocardiography was found to be increased. Fibrosis was reduced in the MTrxMI group compared to MLZMI and CMI. Visualization of Connexin-43 by immunohistochemistry confirmed increased intercellular connections in the MTrxMI rats compared to MLZMI. Engineering MSCs to express Trx1 may prove to be a strategic therapeutic modality in the treatment of cardiac failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eWEI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360 and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3. Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16, AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31, AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32 and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35, were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed.

  5. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi-You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed. PMID:26029221

  6. Myocardial infarction and stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ananda Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes and scar tissue formation after myocardial infarction (MI results in an irreversible damage to the cardiac function. Cardiac repair (replacement, restoration, and regeneration is, therefore, essential to restore function of the heart following MI. Existing therapies lower early mortality rates, prevent additional damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of further heart attacks. However, there is need for treatment to improve the infarcted area by replacing the damaged cells after MI. Thus, the cardiac tissue regeneration with the application of stem cells may be an effective therapeutic option. Recently, interest is more inclined toward myocardial regeneration with the application of stem cells. However, the potential benefits and the ability to improve cardiac function with the stem cell-based therapy need to be further addressed. In this review, we focus on the clinical applications of stem cells in the cardiac repair.

  7. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  8. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Fujimaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment.

  9. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Woloszyk

    Full Text Available Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%, while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV% significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL. Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x and Collagen type I (1.7x was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and

  10. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszyk, Anna; Holsten Dircksen, Sabrina; Bostanci, Nagihan; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-01-01

    Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%), while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV%) significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL). Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x) and Collagen type I (1.7x) was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and rapid bone

  11. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  12. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ma, Ning; Hao, Chunxiang; Guo, Weimin; Zou, Gengyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Mingxue; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2017-01-01

    The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed. PMID:28246531

  13. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed.

  14. Stem cell-based photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Tej B; Seo, Gwi M; Basel, Matthew T; Kalita, Mausam; Wang, Hongwang; Villanueva, David; Pyle, Marla; Balivada, Sivasai; Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Shinogle, Heather; Thapa, Prem S; Moore, David; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2012-07-01

    We have transfected murine neural stem cells (NSCs) and rat umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells (RUCMSCs) with a plasmid expressing gaussia luciferase (gLuc). These cells are engineered to secrete the luciferase. We have used gLuc containing supernatant from culturing the NSCs to perform in vitro photodynamic therapy of murine melanoma cells (B16F10), and RUCMSCs to perform in vivo PDT of lung melanomas in C57BL/6 mice. The treatment system was comprised of aminolevulic acid as a prodrug for the synthesis of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX, gaussia luciferase, and its' substrate coelenterazine. A significant reduction of the number of live melanoma cells in vitro and a borderline significant retardation of tumour growth in vivo was observed after coelenterazine-mediated PDT.

  15. The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Frank G

    2010-12-01

    One of the key challenges in tissue engineering is to understand the host response to scaffolds and engineered constructs. We present a study in which two collagen-based scaffolds developed for bone repair: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) and biomimetic collagen-calcium phosphate (CCP) scaffold, are evaluated in rat cranial defects, both cell-free and when cultured with MSCs prior to implantation. The results demonstrate that both cell-free scaffolds showed excellent healing relative to the empty defect controls and somewhat surprisingly, to the tissue engineered (MSC-seeded) constructs. Immunological analysis of the healing response showed higher M1 macrophage activity in the cell-seeded scaffolds. However, when the M2 macrophage response was analysed, both groups (MSC-seeded and non-seeded scaffolds) showed significant activity of these cells which are associated with an immunomodulatory and tissue remodelling response. Interestingly, the location of this response was confined to the construct periphery, where a capsule had formed, in the MSC-seeded groups as opposed to areas of new bone formation in the non-seeded groups. This suggests that matrix deposited by MSCs during in vitro culture may adversely affect healing by acting as a barrier to macrophage-led remodelling when implanted in vivo. This study thus improves our understanding of host response in bone tissue engineering.

  16. Design of a hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering: Biopolymer-scaffold integrated with an autologous hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein-Oppenheimer, Caroline R; Brown, Donald I; Coloma, Rodrigo; Morales, Patricio; Reyna-Jeldes, Mauricio; Díaz, María J; Sánchez, Elizabeth; Acevedo, Cristian A

    2017-10-01

    Biologically active biomaterials as biopolymers and hydrogels have been used in medical applications providing favorable results in tissue engineering. In this research, a wound dressing device was designed by integration of an autologous clot hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells onto a biopolymeric scaffold. This hybrid biomaterial was tested in-vitro and in-vivo, and used in a human clinical case. The biopolymeric scaffold was made with gelatin, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, using a freeze-drying method. The scaffold was a porous material which was designed evaluating both physical properties (glass transition, melting temperature and pore size) and biological properties (cell viability and fibronectin expression). Two types of chitosan (120 and 300kDa) were used to manufacture the scaffold, being the high molecular weight the most biologically active and stable after sterilization with gamma irradiation (25kGy). A clot hydrogel was formulated with autologous plasma and calcium chloride, using an approach based on design of experiments. The optimum hydrogel was used to incorporate cells onto the porous scaffold, forming a wound dressing biomaterial. The wound dressing device was firstly tested in-vitro using human cells, and then, its biosecurity was evaluated in-vivo using a rabbit model. The in-vitro results showed high cell viability after one week (99.5%), high mitotic index (19.8%) and high fibronectin expression. The in-vivo application to rabbits showed adequate biodegradability capacity (between 1 and 2weeks), and the histological evaluation confirmed absence of rejection signs and reepithelization on the wound zone. Finally, the wound dressing biomaterial was used in a single human case to implant autologous cells on a skin surgery. The medical examination indicated high biocompatibility, partial biodegradation at one week, early regeneration capacity at 4weeks and absence of rejection signs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanotechnology and stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases: potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Francesca, Saverio

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases has generated significant interest in recent years. Limitations to the clinical application of this therapy center on issues of stem cell delivery, engraftment, and fate. Nanotechnology-based cell labeling and imaging techniques facilitate stem cell tracking and engraftment studies. Nanotechnology also brings exciting new opportunities to translational stem cell research as it enables the controlled engineering of nanoparticles and nanomaterials that can properly relate to the physical scale of cell-cell and cell-niche interactions. This review summarizes the most relevant potential applications of nanoscale technologies to the field of stem cell therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Nanoparticles as tools to study and control stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L

    2009-11-01

    The use of nanoparticles in stem cell research is relatively recent, although very significant in the last 5 years with the publication of about 400 papers. The recent advances in the preparation of some nanomaterials, growing awareness of material science and tissue engineering researchers regarding the potential of stem cells for regenerative medicine, and advances in stem cell biology have contributed towards the boost of this research field in the last few years. Most of the research has been focused in the development of new nanoparticles for stem cell imaging; however, these nanoparticles have several potential applications such as intracellular drug carriers to control stem cell differentiation and biosensors to monitor in real time the intracellular levels of relevant biomolecules/enzymes. This review examines recent advances in the use of nanoparticles for stem cell tracking, differentiation and biosensing. We further discuss their utility and the potential concerns regarding their cytotoxicity. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Applications of carbon nanotubes in stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Ahadian, Samad; Obregón, Raquel; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells are a key element in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, they require a suitable microenvironment to grow and regenerate. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much attention as promising materials for stem cell research due to their extraordinary properties, such as their extracellular matrix-like structure, high mechanical strength, optical properties, and high electrical conductivity. Of particular interest is the use of CNTs as biomimetic substrates to control the differentiation of stem cells. CNTs have also been combined with commonly used scaffolds to fabricate functional scaffolds to direct stem cell fate. CNTs can also be used for stem cell labeling due to their high optical absorbance in the near-infrared regime. In this paper, we review and discuss the applications of CNTs in stem cell research along with CNT toxicity issues.

  20. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Pedro M; Caicedo, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs), which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  1. Fetal stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiblad, Eleonor; Westgren, Magnus

    2008-02-01

    Fetal stem-cell transplantation is an attractive approach to the treatment of a variety of hematological, metabolic and immunological diseases before birth. The possibility of delivering a large number of cells in an early stage of life, and of taking advantage of normal fetal stem-cell migration and development, is promising. During fetal life, the capacity to mount an immune response to allogeneic cells is impaired compared with adult life. This provides an opportunity to induce tolerance to alloantigens without the need for myeloablation, although there are possible immune barriers to foreign cells in the fetus.

  2. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  3. Neuroproteomics in stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Susanne; Mix, Eilhard; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Lünser, Katja; Völker, Uwe; Rolfs, Arndt

    2007-11-01

    The term "proteome" is used to describe the entire complement of proteins in a given organism or in a system at a given time. Proteome analysis in neuroscience, also called "neuroproteomics" or "neuromics" is in its initial stage, and shows a deficit of studies in the context of brain development. It is the main objective of this review to illustrate the potential of neuroproteomics as a tool to unravel the differentiation of neural stem or progenitor cells to terminally differentiated neurons. Experimental results regarding the rat striatal progenitor model cell line ST14A are presented to illustrate the large rearrangements of the proteome during the differentiation process of neural progenitor cells and their modification by neurotrophic factors like the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Thereby native stem cells and cells transfected with GDNF gene were investigated at the proliferative state and at seven time points up to 72 h after induction of differentiation. In addition, the immortalized human fetal midbrain stem cell line ReNcell VM was analyzed in order to detect stem cell differentiation associated changes of the protein profile. This review gives also an outlook on technical improvements and perspectives of application of neural stem cell proteomics. Copyright © 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Human intestinal tissue with adult stem cell properties derived from pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forster, Ryan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Schaeffer, Lorian; Regalado, Samuel G; Lai, Christine S; Gao, Qing; Kiani, Samira; Farin, Henner F; Clevers, Hans; Cost, Gregory J; Chan, Andy; Rebar, Edward J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Gregory, Philip D; Pachter, Lior; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Hockemeyer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the

  5. Stem cell therapies for treating osteoarthritis: prescient or premature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Banks, Tania A

    2014-12-01

    There has been unprecedented interest in recent years in the use of stem cells as therapy for an array of diseases in companion animals. Stem cells have already been deployed therapeutically in a number of clinical settings, in particular the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteoarthritis in horses and dogs. However, an assessment of the scientific literature highlights a marked disparity between the purported benefits of stem cell therapies and their proven abilities as defined by rigorously controlled scientific studies. Although preliminary data generated from clinical trials in human patients are encouraging, therapies currently available to treat animals are supported by very limited clinical evidence, and the commercialisation of these treatments may be premature. This review introduces the three main types of stem cells relevant to veterinary applications, namely, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, and draws together research findings from in vitro and in vivo studies to give an overview of current stem cell therapies for the treatment of osteoarthritis in animals. Recent advances in tissue engineering, which is proposed as the future direction of stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis, are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Harris

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today’s intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source.

  7. Stem Cell Banking for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy offer the opportunity to treat and cure many of today’s intractable afflictions. These approaches to personalized medicine often utilize stem cells to accomplish these goals. However, stem cells can be negatively affected by donor variables such as age and health status at the time of collection, compromising their efficacy. Stem cell banking offers the opportunity to cryogenically preserve stem cells at their most potent state for later use in these applications. Practical stem cell sources include bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and tissue, and adipose tissue. Each of these sources contains stem cells that can be obtained from most individuals, without too much difficulty and in an economical fashion. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each stem cell source, factors to be considered when contemplating banking each stem cell source, the methodology required to bank each stem cell source, and finally, current and future clinical uses of each stem cell source. PMID:28548060

  8. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ouyang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases.

  9. Engineering zonal cartilaginous tissue by modulating oxygen levels and mechanical cues through the depth of infrapatellar fat pad stem cell laden hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; O'Reilly, Adam R; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Engineering tissues with a structure and spatial composition mimicking those of native articular cartilage (AC) remains a challenge. This study examined if infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) can be used to engineer cartilage grafts with a bulk composition and a spatial distribution of matrix similar to the native tissue. In an attempt to mimic the oxygen gradients and mechanical environment within AC, FPSC-laden hydrogels (either 2 mm or 4 mm in height) were confined to half of their thickness and/or subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confining FPSC-laden hydrogels was predicted to accentuate the gradient in oxygen tension through the depth of the constructs (higher in the top and lower in the bottom), leading to enhanced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen synthesis in 2 mm high tissues. When subjected to DC alone, both GAG and collagen accumulation increased within 2 mm high unconfined constructs. Furthermore, the dynamic modulus of constructs increased from 0.96 MPa to 1.45 MPa following the application of DC. There was no synergistic benefit of coupling confinement and DC on overall levels of matrix accumulation; however in all constructs, irrespective of their height, the combination of these boundary conditions led to the development of engineered tissues that spatially best resembled native AC. The superficial region of these constructs mimicked that of native tissue, staining weakly for GAG, strongly for type II collagen, and in 4 mm high tissues more intensely for proteoglycan 4 (lubricin). This study demonstrated that FPSCs respond to joint-like environmental conditions by producing cartilage tissues mimicking native AC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Construction of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived oriented bone matrix microstructure by using in vitro engineered anisotropic culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Ryosuke; Matsugaki, Aira; Isobe, Yoshihiro; Saku, Taro; Yun, Hui-Suk; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2017-09-16

    Bone tissue has anisotropic microstructure based on collagen/biological apatite orientation, which plays essential roles in the mechanical and biological functions of bone. However, obtaining an appropriate anisotropic microstructure during the bone regeneration process remains a great challenging. A powerful strategy for the control of both differentiation and structural development of newly-formed bone is required in bone tissue engineering, in order to realize functional bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we developed a novel anisotropic culture model by combining human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and artificially-controlled oriented collagen scaffold. The oriented collagen scaffold allowed hiPSCs-derived osteoblast alignment and further construction of anisotropic bone matrix which mimics the bone tissue microstructure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the construction of bone mimetic anisotropic bone matrix microstructure from hiPSCs. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that the hiPSCs-derived osteoblasts possess a high level of intact functionality to regulate cell alignment. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 2017. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bone Tissue Engineering with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Bioactive Composites of Laser-Sintered Porous Polycaprolactone Scaffolds and Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Tsung Liao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional porous polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds with consistent inter-pore channels, 83% porosity and 300–400 μm pore size were fabricated via selective laser sintering. The PCL scaffold was combined with platelet-rich plasma (PRP to form a bioactive composite and studied for potential application in bone tissue engineering using porcine adipose-derived stem cells (PASCs. The PCL/PRP/PASCs construct showed enhanced cell seeding efficiency and synergistically increased the differentiation capability of PASCs in osteogenic medium toward the osteoblast lineage, judging from elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and up-regulated osteogenic genes expression. For in vivo study, a 3 cm × 3 cm mandible defect was created in pigs and reconstructed by implanting acellular PCL scaffolds or PCL/PRP/PASCs constructs. Both groups showed new bone formation, however, the new bone volume was 5.1 times higher for PCL/PRP/PASCs 6 months post-operation. The bone density was less and loose in the acellular PCL group and the Young’s modulus was only 29% of normal bone. In contrast, continued and compact bone formation was found in PCL/PRP/PASCs and the Young’s modulus was 81% that of normal bone. Masson’s trichrome stain, immunohistochemical analysis of osteocalcin and collagen type I also confirmed new bone formation.

  12. Maxillary sinus floor elevation with a tissue-engineered bone composite of deciduous tooth stem cells and calcium phosphate cement in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Lu, Jia-Yu; Hao, Yong-Ming; Cao, Chun-Hua; Zou, De-Rong

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of maxillary sinus floor elevation with tissue-engineered bone constructed from deciduous tooth stem cells (DTSCs) and calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The stem cells from goat deciduous teeth (SGDs) were isolated and transfected by means of the adenovirus with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (AdEGFP). As many as 18 bilateral maxillary sinuses of nine goats were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 6/group): group A (SGDs-CPC compound), group B (CPC alone) and group C (autogenous bone obtained from an iliac crest). All the samples were evaluated by computed tomography (CT), histology and histomorphometric analysis. Furthermore, the fate of implanted SGDs was traced using an immunohistochemical staining method in the decalcified samples. SGDs might be differentiated into osteoblasts in an osteogenic medium. In the present study, three-dimensional CT analysis showed that the volume of newly formed bone in group A was greater than that in the other two groups. After a healing period of 3 months, sequential analyses of triad-colour fluorescence labelling, histology and histomorphology indicated that the SGDs-CPC compound primarily promoted bone formation and mineralization at 2 and 3 months after the operation. Moreover, the areas of new bone formation in elevated sinuses were 41.82 ± 6.24% in the SGDs-CPC group, which was significantly higher than the 30.11 ± 8.05% in the CPC-alone group or the 23.07 ± 10.21% in the autogenous bone group. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that GFP and OCN were both expressed in the new bone tissue for the samples with eGFP, which suggested that the implanted SGDs might have contributed to new bone formation on the elevated sinus floor. SGDs can promote new bone formation and maturation in the goat maxillary sinus, and the tissue-engineered bone composite of SGDs and CPC might be a potential substitute for existing maxillary sinus floor elevation methods

  13. Functional Effects of a Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Patch From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes in a Rat Infarct Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Jacqueline S; Ye, Lei; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Jianyi; Zhang, Jianhua; Kamp, Timothy J; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    A tissue-engineered cardiac patch provides a method to deliver cardiomyoctes to the injured myocardium with high cell retention and large, controlled infarct coverage, enhancing the ability of cells to limit remodeling after infarction. The patch environment can also yield increased survival. In the present study, we sought to assess the efficacy of a cardiac patch made from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) to engraft and limit left ventricular (LV) remodeling acutely after infarction. Cardiac patches were created from hiPSC-CMs and human pericytes (PCs) entrapped in a fibrin gel and implanted acutely onto athymic rat hearts. hiPSC-CMs not only remained viable after in vivo culture, but also increased in number by as much as twofold, consistent with colocalization of human nuclear antigen, cardiac troponin T, and Ki-67 staining. CM+PC patches led to reduced infarct sizes compared with myocardial infarction-only controls at week 4, and CM+PC patch recipient hearts exhibited greater fractional shortening over all groups at both 1 and 4 weeks after transplantation. However, a decline occurred in fractional shortening for all groups over 4 weeks, and LV thinning was not mitigated. CM+PC patches became vascularized in vivo, and microvessels were more abundant in the host myocardium border zone, suggesting a paracrine mechanism for the improved cardiac function. PCs in a PC-only control patch did not survive 4 weeks in vivo. Our results indicate that cardiac patches containing hiPSC-CMs engraft onto acute infarcts, and the hiPSC-CMs survive, proliferate, and contribute to a reduction in infarct size and improvements in cardiac function. In the present study, a cardiac patch was created from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and human pericytes entrapped in a fibrin gel, and it was transplanted onto infarcted rat myocardium. It was found that a patch that contained both cardiomyocytes and pericytes survived

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for nonmusculoskeletal diseases: emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tom K; Ho, Jennifer H; Lee, Oscar K

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are stem/progenitor cells originated from the mesoderm and can different into multiple cell types of the musculoskeletal system. The vast differentiation potential and the relative ease for culture expansion have established mesenchymal stem cells as the building blocks in cell therapy and tissue engineering applications for a variety of musculoskeletal diseases, including repair of fractures and bone defects, cartilage regeneration, treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and correction of genetic diseases such as osteogenesis imperfect. However, research in the past decade has revealed differentiation potentials of mesenchymal stem cells beyond lineages of the mesoderm, suggesting broader applications than originally perceived. In this article, we review the recent developments in mesenchymal stem cell research with respect to their emerging properties and applications in nonmusculoskeletal diseases.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...... better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein...

  16. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  17. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  18. Development of bioengineering system for stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Shah, R.; Shah, C.

    2016-08-01

    From last decades, intensive research in the field of stem cells proliferation had been promoted due to the unique property of stem cells to self-renew themselves into multiples and has potential to replicate into an organ or tissues and so it's highly demanding though challenging. Bioreactor, a mechanical device, works as a womb for stem cell proliferation by providing nutritious environment for the proper growth of stem cells. Various factors affecting stem cells growth are the bioreactor mechanism, feeding of continuous nutrients, healthy environment, etc., but it always remains a challenge for controlling biological parameters. The present paper unveils the design of mechanical device commonly known as bioreactor in tissues engineering and biotech field, use for proliferation of stem cells and imparts the proper growing condition for stem cells. This high functional bioreactor provides automation mixing of cell culture and stem cells. This design operates in conjunction with mechanism of reciprocating motion. Compare to commercial bioreactors, this proposed design is more convenient, easy to operate and less maintenance is required as bioreactor culture bag is made of polyethylene which is single use purpose. Development of this bioengineering system will be beneficial for better growth and expansion of stem cell

  19. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  20. Fascia tissue engineering with human adipose-derived stem cells in a murine model: Implications for pelvic floor reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Jung Hung

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest the ADSC-seeded implant is better than the implant alone in enhancing tissue regeneration after transplantation. ADSCs with or without fibroblastic differentiation might have a potential but different role in fascia tissue engineering to repair POP in the future.

  1. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  2. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  3. The potential of 3-dimensional construct engineered from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/fibrin hybrid scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for in vitro cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Rozlin; Mohamad Sukri, Norhamiza; Md Nazir, Noorhidayah; Ahmad Radzi, Muhammad Aa'zamuddin; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che Ahmad, Aminudin; Hashi, Abdurezak Abdulahi; Abdul Rahman, Suzanah; Sha'ban, Munirah

    2015-08-01

    Articular cartilage is well known for its simple uniqueness of avascular and aneural structure that has limited capacity to heal itself when injured. The use of three dimensional construct in tissue engineering holds great potential in regenerating cartilage defects. This study evaluated the in vitro cartilaginous tissue formation using rabbit's bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA/fibrin and PLGA scaffolds. The in vitro cartilaginous engineered constructs were evaluated by gross inspection, histology, cell proliferation, gene expression and sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production at week 1, 2 and 3. After 3 weeks of culture, the PLGA/fibrin construct demonstrated gross features similar to the native tissue with smooth, firm and glistening appearance, superior histoarchitectural and better cartilaginous extracellular matrix compound in concert with the positive glycosaminoglycan accumulation on Alcian blue. Significantly higher cell proliferation in PLGA/fibrin construct was noted at day-7, day-14 and day-21 (p<0.05 respectively). Both constructs expressed the accumulation of collagen type II, collagen type IX, aggrecan and sox9, showed down-regulation of collagen type I as well as produced relative sGAG content with PLGA/fibrin construct exhibited better gene expression in all profiles and showed significantly higher relative sGAG content at each time point (p<0.05). This study suggested that with optimum in vitro manipulation, PLGA/fibrin when seeded with pluripotent non-committed BMSCs has the capability to differentiate into chondrogenic lineage and may serve as a prospective construct to be developed as functional tissue engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  5. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell and Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology , included in Professional Resources. Online Now View All 16 November, 2017 Isolation and Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Human Fetal and iPSC-Derived Cone Photoreceptor Cells 16 ...

  6. Stem cells: Concepts and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Regenerative therapy for organ dysfunction is a rapidly growing domain and involves application of multiple enabling technologies incorporating stem cells, genes and growth factors that can acceler- ate the recovery of a failing organ through cell and tissue regeneration within the organ. Several strategies are currently ...

  7. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  8. Stem cells' exodus: a journey to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-28

    Stem cell niches provide a regulatory microenvironment that retains stem cells and promotes self-renewal. Recently in Developmental Cell, Rinkevich et al. (2013) showed that cell islands (CIs) of Botryllus schlosseri, a colonial chordate, provide niches for maintaining cycling stem cells that migrate from degenerated CIs to newly formed buds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tissue engineering of flexor tendons: the effect of a tissue bioreactor on adipoderived stem cell-seeded and fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Ioannis K; Thorfinn, Johan; Connolly, Ian D; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung M; Chang, James

    2010-09-01

    Tissue-engineered flexor tendons could eventually be used for reconstruction of large tendon defects. The goal of this project was to examine the effect of a tissue bioreactor on the biomechanical properties of tendon constructs seeded with adipoderived stem cells (ASCs) and fibroblasts (Fs). Rabbit rear paw flexor tendons were acellularized and seeded with ASCs or Fs. A custom bioreactor applied a cyclic mechanical load of 1.25 N at 1 cycle/minute for 5 days onto the tendon constructs. Three additional groups were used as controls: fresh tendons and tendons reseeded with either ASCs or Fs that were not exposed to the bioreactor treatment and were left in stationary incubation for 5 days. We compared the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) of bioreactor-treated tendons with the unloaded control tendons and fresh tendons. Comparison across groups was assessed using one-way analysis of variance with the significance level set at ptendons that were exposed to cyclic load were significantly higher than those of unloaded control tendons. Acellularized tendon constructs that were reseeded with ASCs and exposed to a cyclic load had a UTS of 66.76 MPa and an EM of 906.68 MPa; their unloaded equivalents had a UTS of 47.90 MPa and an EM of 715.57 MPa. Similar trends were found in the fibroblast-seeded tendon constructs that were exposed to the bioreactor treatment. The bioreactor-treated tendons approached the UTS and EM values of fresh tendons. Histologically, we found that cells reoriented themselves parallel to the direction of strain in response to cyclic strain. The application of cyclic strain on seeded tendon constructs that were treated with the bioreactor helped achieve a UTS and an EM comparable with those of fresh tendons. Bioreactor pretreatment and alternative cell lines, such as ASCs and Fs, might therefore contribute to the in vitro production of strong tendon material. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Tissue-engineered cardiac patch seeded with human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes promoted the regeneration of host cardiomyocytes in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadahisa; Hibino, Narutoshi; Breuer, Christopher K; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2016-12-01

    Thousands of babies are born with congenital heart defects that require surgical repair involving a prosthetic implant. Lack of growth in prosthetic grafts is especially detrimental in pediatric surgery. Cell seeded biodegradable tissue engineered grafts are a novel solution to this problem. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the feasibility of seeding human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) onto a biodegradable cardiac patch. The hiPS-CMs were cultured on a biodegradable patch composed of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) and a 50:50 poly (l-lactic-co-ε-caprolactone) copolymer (PLCL) for 1 week. Male athymic rats were randomly divided into 2 groups of 10 animals each: 1. hiPS-CM seeded group, and 2. Unseeded group. After culture, the cardiac patch was implanted to repair a defect with a diameter of 2 mm created in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) wall. Hearts were explanted at 4 (n = 2), 8 (n = 2), and 16 (n = 6) weeks after patch implantation. Explanted patches were assessed immunohistochemically. Seeded patch explants did not stain positive for α-actinin (marker of cardiomyocytes) at the 4 week time point, suggesting that the cultured hiPS-CMs evacuated the patch in the early phase of tissue remodeling. However, after 16 weeks implantation, the area fraction of positively stained α-actinin cells was significantly higher in the seeded group than in the unseeded group (Seeded group: 6.1 ± 2.8% vs. Unseeded group: 0.95 ± 0.50%, p = 0.004), suggesting cell seeding promoted regenerative proliferation of host cardiomyocytes. Seeded hiPS-CMs were not present in the patch after 4 weeks. However, we surmise that they influenced the regeneration of host cardiomyocytes via a paracrine mechanism. Tissue-engineered hiPS-CMs seeded cardiac patches warrant further investigation for use in the repair of congenital heart diseases.

  11. Experimental study on repairing skin defect by tissue-engineered skin substitute compositely constructed by adipose-derived stem cells and fibrin gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, R-X; He, J-Y; Zhang, Y-L; Liu, X-X; Zhang, Y; Tang, Q

    2017-07-01

    To study the application value of artificial skin substitute compositely constructed by adipose-derived stem cells and fibrin gel in skin defect. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were obtained from healthy pure green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice and were proved to have multiple differentiation potentials. They compositely constructed artificial skin substitute in vitro with fibrin gel. 24 SD rats of either gender, with the gestational age of 3-5 weeks, were divided into four groups in the experiment, namely model group (autologous skin flap transplantation), adipose-derived stem cell transplantation group, fibrin gel transplantation group and compound transplantation group, 6 rats for each group. At the skin blood flow (measured by applying laser Doppler rheometer) and survival rate of the flap on 7d and 21d respectively, the materials were transplanted at back skin injury (1 cm×1 cm) to prepare tissue slice for routine HE staining. The conditions of wound healing were observed, and the angiogenesis of flap neovascularization was detected by the immunofluorescent assay. The skin blood flow, the survival rate of flap and density of neovascularization 7d and 21d after transplantation were significantly higher than those of stem cell group, followed by the model group, with the lowest ones in the fibrin gel group. The differences had statistical significance (psubstitute compositely constructed by adipose-derived stem cells and fibrin gel could significantly shorten healing time and improve the survival rate of the flap in skin defect, with better application value.

  12. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Future Regenerative System Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Lina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential use of stem cell-based therapies for repair and regeneration of various tissues and organs offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of disease. Despite the advances, the availability of stem cells remaining a challenge for both scientist and clinicians in pursuing regenerative medicine. CONTENT: Subcutaneous human adipose tissue is an abundant and accessible cell source for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Routinely, the adipose issue is digested with collagenase or related lytic enzymes to release a heterogeneous population for stromal vascular fraction (SVF cells. The SVF cells can be used directly or can be cultured in plastic ware for selection and expansion of an adherent population known as adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs. Their potential in the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and other mesenchymal lineages, as well in their other clinically useful properties, includes stimulation of angiogenesis and suppression of inflammation. SUMMARY: Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cels suitable for the application of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The past decade has witnessed an explosion of preclinical data relating to the isolation, characterization, cryopreservation, differentiation, and transplantation of freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction cells and adherent, culture-expanded, adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and in animal models. KEYWORDS: adipose tissue, adult stem cells, regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stem cells.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell characteristics of dental pulp and periodontal ligament stem cells after in vivo transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Li, Kun; Li, Bei; Gao, Li-Na; Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human postnatal dental pulp and periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues can give rise to multilineage differentiation in vitro and generate related dental tissues in vivo. However, the cell properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and PDL stem cells (PDLSCs) after in vivo implantation remain largely unidentified. In this study, cells were re-isolated from in vivo-generated dental pulp-like and PDL-like tissues (termed re-DPCs and re-PDLCs, respectively) as a result of ectopic transplantation of human DPSC and PDLSC sheets. The cell characteristics in terms of colony-forming ability, cell surface antigens and multi-differentiation potentials were all evaluated before and after implantation. It was found that re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were of human and mesenchymal origin and positive for MSC markers such as STRO-1, CD146, CD29, CD90 and CD105; and, to some extent, re-DPCs could maintain their colony forming abilities. Moreover, both cell types were able to form mineral deposits and differentiate into adipocytes and chondrocytes; however, quantitative analysis and related gene expression determination showed that the osteo-/chondro-differentiation capabilities of re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were significantly reduced compared to those of DPSCs and PDLSCs, respectively (P dental tissue-derived stem cells in cell therapy and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Comparison of Adipose Stem Cell and Placental Stem Cell in Secretion Characteristics and in Facial Antiaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mesenchymal stem cells are the most commonly used seed cells in biomedical research and tissue engineering. Their secretory proteins have also been proven to play an important role in tissue healing. Methods. We isolated adipose stem cells and placental stem cells and performed analysis examining characteristics. The secretory proteins were extracted from conditioned medium and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF. The antiaging effect of conditioned mediums was evaluated by the results of facial skin application. Results. Adipose stem cells and placental stem cells were found to be very similar in their surface markers and multipotency. The specific proteins secreted from adipose stem cells were more adept at cell adhesion, migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling, while the proteins secreted by placental stem cells were more adept at angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, immunomodulation, and collagen degradation. While these two types of conditioned medium could improve the facial index, the improvement of Melanin index after injection of the adipose stem cell conditioned medium was much more significant. Conclusion. The results suggest that the secreted proteins are ideal cell-free substances for regeneration medicine, especially in the antiaging field.

  15. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-05-27

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction signaling pathways in two-dimensional culture. Furthermore, a putative rapid shift from original mechanosensing to de novo cell-derived matrix sensing in more physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture is pointed out. A comprehensive understanding of stem cell responses to this stimulus is essential for designing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment and advancing stem cell-based clinical applications for tissue engineering.

  16. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy.

  17. Stem Cell--Based Therapies for HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and ultimately a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theo...

  18. Stem Cell Therapy in Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-08-01

    a novel approach to many diseases. SUMMARY: Wound healing therapies continue to rapidly evolve, with advances in basic science and engineering research heralding the development of new therapies, as well as ways to modify existing treatments. Stem cell-based therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic concepts for wound healing. Advances in stem cell biology have enabled researchers and clinicians alike with access to cells capable of actively modulating the healing response.  KEYWORDS: wound healing, tissue regeneration, stem cells therapy

  19. Human Intestinal Tissue with Adult Stem Cell Properties Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Forster

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

  20. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Prospects and Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    relapse and organ toxicity. Sadly, because of these limitations, sickle cell anaemia, which is ... In this, the Federal. Government should provide adequate funding. Keywords: Stem cell, Transplantation, Nigeria. ... 11 Stem Cell Sources. 1. Bone marrow stem cells: Marrow is usually obtained from the donor's posterior iliac.

  1. European stem cell research in legal shackles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.G.; de Vries, S.A.; Geijsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised legal challenges to the patentability of stem cells and any derived technologies and processes. In 1999, Oliver Brustle was granted a patent for the generation and therapeutic use of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The patent

  2. Emerging molecular approaches in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Amritha; Vrana, Kent

    2009-04-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple adult cell types. Although substantial progress has been made over the last decade in understanding stem cell biology, recent technological advances in molecular and systems biology may hold the key to unraveling the mystery behind stem cell self-renewal and plasticity. The most notable of these advances is the ability to generate induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of molecular similarities and differences among various stem cell types. Moreover, we survey the current state of systems biology and forecast future needs and direction in the stem cell field.

  3. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Clinical Applications in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Wu, Kun-Chi; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Chondrocytes in the matrix have a relatively slow turnover rate, and the tissue itself lacks a blood supply to support repair and remodeling. Researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating osteoarthritis. All sources of stem cells, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, fetal, and adult stem cells, have potential use in stem cell therapy, which provides a permanent biological solution. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord show considerable promise for use in cartilage repair. MSCs can be sourced from any or all joint tissues and can modulate the immune response. Additionally, MSCs can directly differentiate into chondrocytes under appropriate signal transduction. They also have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory paracrine effects. This article reviews the current clinical applications of MSCs and future directions of research in osteoarthritis.

  5. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general backgrou