WorldWideScience

Sample records for engineered drug therapies

  1. Non-genetic engineering of cells for drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Cheng, Hao; Peng, Haisheng; Zhou, Hao; Li, Peter Y; Langer, Robert

    2015-08-30

    Cell-based therapy is a promising modality to address many unmet medical needs. In addition to genetic engineering, material-based, biochemical, and physical science-based approaches have emerged as novel approaches to modify cells. Non-genetic engineering of cells has been applied in delivering therapeutics to tissues, homing of cells to the bone marrow or inflammatory tissues, cancer imaging, immunotherapy, and remotely controlling cellular functions. This new strategy has unique advantages in disease therapy and is complementary to existing gene-based cell engineering approaches. A better understanding of cellular systems and different engineering methods will allow us to better exploit engineered cells in biomedicine. Here, we review non-genetic cell engineering techniques and applications of engineered cells, discuss the pros and cons of different methods, and provide our perspectives on future research directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ri-Hui; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first summarizes the therapy of addiction disorder, and elaborates on the progress of medication. First, the difference between dependency and addiction are introduced. The basic principles of the therapy of substance and non-substance addiction are then put forward. It is also pointed out in this chapter that with the progress of the study, the goal of addiction disorder therapy is expected to transfer from reducing the relapse and harm of the addiction to completely eliminating and recovering from it. This chapter also introduces the progress of psychological addiction elimination technology, especially the "Unconditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm and Conditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm" and PITDH technology. Finally it is pointed out that in addiction disorder therapy, comprehensive intervention has become a trend. With regard to the medication for addiction disorders, this chapter also includes the progress and deficiencies of substance and non-substance addiction. In terms of addiction disorder rehabilitation, the foundation of substance addiction is medication which is, however, limited for non-substance addiction. The key to the rehabilitation of addiction disorder is psycho-behavioral therapy, which is especially effective in eliminating craving.

  3. Drug‑Drug and Drug‑Nutraceutical Cocrystal/Salt as Alternative Medicine for Combination Therapy: A Crystal Engineering Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Thakuria

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The pre-formulation of pharmaceutical cocrystals and salts is a concept of crystal engineering that has emerged as a promising technique for drug development in pharmaceutical industry. Recent introduction of pharmaceutical cocrystals in regulatory guidelines of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA made them one of the potential alternatives when salt preparation is not feasible. Apart from generally regarded as safe (GRAS coformers, drug‑drug and drug‑nutraceutical cocrystals are recent additions to pharmaceutical cocrystal family that have additional health benefits. Indeed, preparation of salt forms is a routine practice to deal with inadequacies associated with the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API and happens to be a potentially reliable method. Amongst them, drug-drug and drug-nutraceutical cocrystals have drawn significant importance in the recent past as they reduce drug load and cost effects during multiple disease diagnosis. However, one has to be prudent in the selection of drug molecules, the presence of complementary hydrogen bond synthon, disease management during multiple disease therapy, etc. that play important roles in their preparation. That is the reason why drug–drug cocrystals are scarce in the literature compared to pharmaceutical cocrystals containing GRAS coformers and salt forms. Herein, we discuss case studies preferably the reported drug‑drug, drug‑nutraceutical cocrystals, and a few salts with an emphasis on their role in physicochemical property modulation.

  4. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  5. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  6. Drug‑Drug and Drug‑Nutraceutical Cocrystal/Salt as Alternative Medicine for Combination Therapy: A Crystal Engineering Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjit Thakuria; Bipul Sarma

    2018-01-01

    The pre-formulation of pharmaceutical cocrystals and salts is a concept of crystal engineering that has emerged as a promising technique for drug development in pharmaceutical industry. Recent introduction of pharmaceutical cocrystals in regulatory guidelines of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made them one of the potential alternatives when salt preparation is not feasible. Apart from generally regarded as safe (GRAS) coformers, drug‑drug and drug‑nutraceutical cocrystals are recent ad...

  7. Drug therapy in headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    All physicians will encounter patients with headaches. Primary headache disorders are common, and often disabling. This paper reviews the principles of drug therapy in headache in adults, focusing on the three commonest disorders presenting in both primary and secondary care: tension-type headache, migraine and cluster headache. The clinical evidence on the basis of which choices can be made between the currently available drug therapies for acute and preventive treatment of these disorders is presented, and information given on the options available for the emergency parenteral treatment of refractory migraine attacks and cluster headache. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  8. Antiretroviral therapy: current drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Alice K; George, Jomy M

    2014-09-01

    The rapid advances in drug discovery and the development of antiretroviral therapy is unprecedented in the history of modern medicine. The administration of chronic combination antiretroviral therapy targeting different stages of the human immunodeficiency virus' replicative life cycle allows for durable and maximal suppression of plasma viremia. This suppression has resulted in dramatic improvement of patient survival. This article reviews the history of antiretroviral drug development and discusses the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and toxicities of the antiretroviral agents most commonly used in clinical practice to date. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  10. [Combination drug therapy in leprosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio de las Aguas, J

    1983-01-01

    The importance of polichemotherapy in multibacilar leprosy (LL and LD) in patients without any previous therapy as in those diagnosticated and under monotherapy most of all in the resistance patients is presented. Sulphones, clofazimine and rifampicine are selected as first rate drugs and protionamide-etionamide as second rate drugs. The therapy plans with the association of two and three drugs and the convenience of continuing indefinitely with at least one of the drugs are presented insisting on the advantages of the clofazimine-sulphones and rifampicine-sulphones associations. The necessity of immunotherapy for recover of celular immunity against the bacilus, is the only form of preventing relapses and drug resistance.

  11. Engineering Exosomes for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Katie E; Dwyer, Róisín M

    2017-05-24

    There remains an urgent need for novel therapeutic strategies to treat metastatic cancer, which results in over 8 million deaths annually worldwide. Following secretion, exosomes are naturally taken up by cells, and capable of the stable transfer of drugs, therapeutic microRNAs and proteins. As knowledge of the biogenesis, release and uptake of exosomes continues to evolve, and thus also has interest in these extracellular vesicles as potential tumor-targeted vehicles for cancer therapy. The ability to engineer exosome content and migratory itinerary holds tremendous promise. Studies to date have employed viral and non-viral methods to engineer the parent cells to secrete modified exosomes, or alternatively, to directly manipulate exosome content following secretion. The majority of studies have demonstrated promising results, with decreased tumor cell invasion, migration and proliferation, along with enhanced immune response, cell death, and sensitivity to chemotherapy observed. The studies outlined in this review highlight the exciting potential for exosomes as therapeutic vehicles for cancer treatment. Successful implementation in the clinical setting will be dependent upon establishment of rigorous standards for exosome manipulation, isolation, and characterisation.

  12. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. Methods One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface and JavaScript (program logic. Results Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs

  13. Targeted drugs in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.; Hennequin, C.; Hennequin, C.

    2004-01-01

    New drugs aiming at the development of targeted therapies have been assayed in combination with ionizing radiation over the past few years. The rationale of this concept comes from the fact that the cytotoxic potential of targeted drugs is limited, thus requiring concomitant association with a cytotoxic agent for the eradication of tumor cells. Conversely a low level of cumulative toxicity is expected from targeted drugs. Most targeted drugs act through inhibition of post-translational modifications of proteins, such as dimerization of growth factor receptors, prenylation reactions, or phosphorylation of tyrosine or serine-threonine residues. Many systems involving the proteasome, neo-angiogenesis promoters, TGF-β, cyclooxygenase or the transcription factor NF-κB, are currently under investigation in hopes they will allow a control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. A few drugs have demonstrated an antitumor potential in particular phenotypes. In most instances, however, radiation-drug interactions proved to be strictly additive in terms of cell growth inhibition or induced cell death. Strong potentiation of the response to radiotherapy is expected to require interaction with DNA repair mechanisms. (authors)

  14. Alternative Drugs in Pain Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Various treatment modalities of acute and chronic pain have been an area of interest of medicine and investigators for centuries. There are two major classes of drugs that are used to control pain: opioid and non-opioid analgesics. They could be used in the case of monotherapy or combination therapy in pain management. However, these agents are not accepted as ideal drugs in clinical approaches against pain because of their serious side effects such as development of tolerance and addiction, renal failure and gastrointestinal bleeding. As a consequent, developing new forms of pain relievers that are more safe and effective without any other side effects has became the main goal of researchers. In recent studies, it has been shown that conotoxin therapies are not addictive, and have tolerable indexes unlike opioids. In addition, conotoxins side effects are much milder and easier to manage than those of opioids. In this regard, it has been emphasized that biotoxins such as conotoxins obtained from marine creatures can be better choices in pain management for future prospects.

  15. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pu Shi, Joshua A Gustafson, J Andrew MacKayDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins.Keywords: polymeric drug carrier, non-polymeric drug carrier, gene delivery, GE drug carriers

  16. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  17. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Eunah Kang,1 Jong Wook Shin2 1School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, 2Division of Allergic and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. Keywords: pericytes, pericyte-targeting drug delivery, tissue engineering, platelet-derived growth factor, angiogenesis, vascular remodeling

  18. Drug interactions between common illicit drugs and prescription therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Wesley T; Stewart, David; Childress, Darrell

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to summarize the clinical literature on interactions between common illicit drugs and prescription therapies. Medline, Iowa Drug Information Service, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, EBSCO Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were searched from date of origin of database to March 2011. Search terms were cocaine, marijuana, cannabis, methamphetamine, amphetamine, ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, heroin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, sodium oxybate, and combined with interactions, drug interactions, and drug-drug interactions. This review focuses on established clinical evidence. All applicable full-text English language articles and abstracts found were evaluated and included in the review as appropriate. The interactions of illicit drugs with prescription therapies have the ability to potentiate or attenuate the effects of both the illicit agent and/or the prescription therapeutic agent, which can lead to toxic effects or a reduction in the prescription agent's therapeutic activity. Most texts and databases focus on theoretical or probable interactions due to the kinetic properties of the drugs and do not fully explore the pharmacodynamic and clinical implications of these interactions. Clinical trials with coadministration of illicit drugs and prescription drugs are discussed along with case reports that demonstrate a potential interaction between agents. The illicit drugs discussed are cocaine, marijuana, amphetamines, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, heroin, and sodium oxybate. Although the use of illicit drugs is widespread, there are little experimental or clinical data regarding the effects of these agents on common prescription therapies. Potential drug interactions between illicit drugs and prescription drugs are described and evaluated on the Drug Interaction Probability Scale by Horn and Hansten.

  19. Drug therapy for chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, A. F. J. E.; van Schaik, I. N.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Notermans, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy is an insidiously progressive sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy that affects elderly people. Although severe disability or handicap does not occur, it reduces quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether drug therapy for chronic idiopathic

  20. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  1. Laboratory markers in personalized drug therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, A.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade two major trends have influenced the thinking about the benefit-risk balance in drug therapy.The first trend showed that this balance is not only determined by the interaction of the pharmacological properties of the drug with the patient’s (patho)physiological profile, but is

  2. System engineering approach to planning anticancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Smieja, Jaroslaw; Puszynski, Krzysztof; Psiuk-Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis of cancer dynamics and the mathematically based synthesis of anticancer therapy. It summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this field and clarifies common misconceptions about mathematical modeling in cancer. Additionally, it encourages closer cooperation between engineers, physicians and mathematicians by showing the clear benefits of this without stating unrealistic goals. Development of therapy protocols is realized from an engineering point of view, such as the search for a solution to a specific control-optimization problem. Since in the case of cancer patients, consecutive measurements providing information about the current state of the disease are not available, the control laws are derived for an open loop structure. Different forms of therapy are incorporated into the models, from chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy to immunotherapy and gene therapy, but the class of models introduced is broad enough to incorporate other forms of therapy as well. The book be...

  3. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH TUBERCULOSIS THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    ous toxicity and a low therapeutic index, where relatively small changes in drug level can have ... Paracetamol. Increased clearance of paracetamol ... Rifampicin reduces ritonavir levels by Monitoring of liver function advised ritonavir enzyme ...

  4. Drug delivery system and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the review of radiation therapy, neutron capture therapy (NCT) and drug delivery system for the latter. In cancer radiation therapy, there are problems of body movement like breathing, needless irradiation of normal tissues, difficulty to decide the correct irradiation position and tumor morphology. NCT has advantages to overcome these, and since boron has a big cross section for thermal neutron, NPT uses the reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li in the target cancer which previously incorporated the boron-containing drug. During the period 1966-1996, 246 patients were treated with this in Japan and the treatment has been continued thereafter. The tasks for NCT are developments of drug delivery system efficient to deliver the drug into the tumor and of convenient neutron source like the accelerator. (S.I.)

  5. Controlled drug release for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-10

    Tissue engineering is often referred to as a three-pronged discipline, with each prong corresponding to 1) a 3D material matrix (scaffold), 2) drugs that act on molecular signaling, and 3) regenerative living cells. Herein we focus on reviewing advances in controlled release of drugs from tissue engineering platforms. This review addresses advances in hydrogels and porous scaffolds that are synthesized from natural materials and synthetic polymers for the purposes of controlled release in tissue engineering. We pay special attention to efforts to reduce the burst release effect and to provide sustained and long-term release. Finally, novel approaches to controlled release are described, including devices that allow for pulsatile and sequential delivery. In addition to recent advances, limitations of current approaches and areas of further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  7. [Pharmacogenetics and tailored drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F.C.; Borregaard, N.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics traditionally designates the study of genetically determined variation in metabolism of drugs and toxins from the environment. The concept of phamacogenetics has been widened to encompass how essential genetic alterations central to the development of diseases may by used to target...

  8. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Drug Therapy in Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Salem

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The behavior and dietary treatments are not so successful for extremely obese adolescents. Therefore, using drugs to treat extremely obese children and adolescents are among the modern approaches. This research aims to study the pharmaceutical interventions performed for treatment of obese children. Materials and Methods: The strategy of research was using of key words ‘obesity’, ‘adolescence’, ‘treatment’ and ‘anti-obesity drugs’ were searched in websites of PubMed, Iranian Medical Digital Library, SID, Iran Medex, Magiran. This study reviewed all the available published papers in English and Farsi languages during 2000-2010. The Criteria for exclusion was The papers that had been published on interventions and treatment of eating disorders, type II diabetes or the obesity caused by the secondary syndromes. Results: Twelve papers were found as short-term clinical trials and/or long-term follow-ups. In these studies, the positive effects of ‘sibutramine’ in some studies are shown; although some other side effects are reported as well. A significant weight-loss had been reported on ‘orlistat’ medicine, but digestive complications had been observed as well. None of the studies had followed up patients for more than one year. Apparently, ‘Metformin’ requires further studies.Conclusion: The FDA has only approved ‘sibutramine’ and ‘orlistat’ drugs. But side effects of long-term these drugs have already been unknown. However, it seems that ‘orlistat’ is applied for ≥12-year-old children and ‘sibutramine’ for ≥ 16-year-old children.

  10. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  11. Smart Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsoy, Gozde; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2018-02-08

    Smart nanocarriers have been designed for tissue-specific targeted drug delivery, sustained or triggered drug release and co-delivery of synergistic drug combinations to develop safer and more efficient therapeutics. Advances in drug delivery systems provide reduced side effects, longer circulation half-life and improved pharmacokinetics. Smart drug delivery systems have been achieved successfully in the case of cancer. These nanocarriers can serve as an intelligent system by considering the differences of tumor microenvironment from healthy tissue, such as low pH, low oxygen level, or high enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinases. The performance of anti-cancer agents used in cancer diagnosis and therapy is improved by enhanced cellular internalization of smart nanocarriers and controlled drug release. Here, we review targeting, cellular internalization; controlled drug release and toxicity of smart drug delivery systems. We are also emphasizing the stimulus responsive controlled drug release from smart nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Manufacturing Cell Therapies Using Engineered Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Amr A; Saha, Krishanu

    2017-10-01

    Emerging manufacturing processes to generate regenerative advanced therapies can involve extensive genomic and/or epigenomic manipulation of autologous or allogeneic cells. These cell engineering processes need to be carefully controlled and standardized to maximize safety and efficacy in clinical trials. Engineered biomaterials with smart and tunable properties offer an intriguing tool to provide or deliver cues to retain stemness, direct differentiation, promote reprogramming, manipulate the genome, or select functional phenotypes. This review discusses the use of engineered biomaterials to control human cell manufacturing. Future work exploiting engineered biomaterials has the potential to generate manufacturing processes that produce standardized cells with well-defined critical quality attributes appropriate for clinical testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  14. VNS Therapy versus the latest antiepileptic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Menachem, Elinor; French, Jacqueline A

    2005-09-01

    Pro AED: The central issue in medical decision-making is risk-benefit assessment. Surgery of any type is still considered to be a major undertaking. To warrant these risks, the patient has a right to expect that they have a greater chance of a good outcome with an invasive therapy than with a non-invasive one. The main question is when, if ever, this becomes the case when comparing implantation of a VNS Therapy System versus adding an antiepileptic drug (AED)? After the first drug? The second? After all AEDs have failed? To date, no randomized trial comparing the addition of an AED against vagus nerve stimulation (VNS Therapy) has been undertaken, although several are currently being contemplated. Without this information, it is more difficult to make a case for early implementation of VNS Therapy. Unfortunately, few data are available regarding the potential for patients to become seizure-free after implantation of a VNS Therapy System. Another issue is side effects. It is important to remember that VNS Therapy also produces adverse events, albeit very different in character than those associated with AEDs, to which physicians have become accustomed. These include cough, dyspnea, pharyngitis, voice alteration and sleep apnea. A less frequently discussed, potentially negative consequence of VNS Therapy relates to the ability to obtain imaging of the patient. Patients who have undergone VNS Therapy System implantation are not candidates for imaging of the chest, breast, or abdomen. A second issue is that imaging of the brain can only be performed with MRI scanners that meet certain requirements, and as MRI technology develops, scanners meeting these requirements may become harder to find. However, to summarize, VNS Therapy is an excellent and useful treatment choice. Fortunately, the choice between AEDs and VNS Therapy is not an "either/or" decision. Each has a role in the treatment of patients with epilepsy, and the advantages and disadvantages of each should be

  15. Engineering toxins for 21st century therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-04-01

    'Engineering Toxins for 21st Century Therapies' (9-10 September 2010) was part of the Royal Society International Seminar series held at the Kavli International Centre, UK. Participants were assembled from a range of disciplines (academic, industry, regulatory, public health) to discuss the future potential of toxin-based therapies. The meeting explored how the current structural and mechanistic knowledge of toxins could be used to engineer future toxin-based therapies. To date, significant progress has been made in the design of novel recombinant biologics based on domains of natural toxins, engineered to exhibit advantageous properties. The meeting concluded, firstly that future product development vitally required the appropriate combination of creativity and innovation that can come from the academic, biotechnology and pharma sectors. Second, that continued investigation into understanding the basic science of the toxins and their targets was essential in order to develop new opportunities for the existing products and to create new products with enhanced properties. Finally, it was concluded that the clinical potential for development of novel biologics based on toxin domains was evident. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  16. [Combination drug therapy in patients with BPH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, A V; Kuzmenko, V V; Gyaurgiev, T A

    2018-03-01

    Introuction. One of the risk factors for LUTS is an infravesical obstruction, which is most often caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH symptoms are formed due to three components: static (mechanical), dynamic, and impaired functional capacity of the bladder. Medical treatment with 1-blockers decreases the outflow obstruction. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors are used to inhibit the static component of BPH. To investigate the effectiveness of various modifications of medical therapy of BPH using -blockers and 5-reductase inhibitors and combinations thereof. The study comprised 90 BPH patients who were divided into three groups, with each group containing 30 people. Patients of group I, II and III received monotherapy with -blockers, a combination of 5-reductase and -blockers, and fixed-dose combination drug Duodart, respectively. Evaluation of the treatment effectiveness included filling out voiding diaries, completing the I-PSS and QL questionnaires, uroflowmetry, transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate and estimation of the incidence of adverse effects. Also, compliance with the treatment was evaluated, and the number of patients who had episodes of acute urinary retention and required surgical treatment during the 12 month treatment course was registered. Compared to monotherapy, combination therapy with -blockers and 5-reductase inhibitors more effectively reduces the LUTS, increases Qmax and prevents the disease progression, which manifests in a lower incidence of AUR and fewer surgical interventions in groups II and III. However, the combination therapy can be associated with some side effects. Patients who received fixed-dose combination drug Duodart had a greater compliance rate than patients on the combination of drugs, which, in our opinion, is associated with fewer cases of AUR and surgical interventions. The use of Duodart in patients with BPH effectively alleviates LUTS and reduces the risk of the disease progression, which manifests itself

  17. Validation of GPU based TomoTherapy dose calculation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Yu; Chen, Mingli; Henderson, Douglas; Sterpin, Edmond

    2012-04-01

    The graphic processing unit (GPU) based TomoTherapy convolution/superposition(C/S) dose engine (GPU dose engine) achieves a dramatic performance improvement over the traditional CPU-cluster based TomoTherapy dose engine (CPU dose engine). Besides the architecture difference between the GPU and CPU, there are several algorithm changes from the CPU dose engine to the GPU dose engine. These changes made the GPU dose slightly different from the CPU-cluster dose. In order for the commercial release of the GPU dose engine, its accuracy has to be validated. Thirty eight TomoTherapy phantom plans and 19 patient plans were calculated with both dose engines to evaluate the equivalency between the two dose engines. Gamma indices (Γ) were used for the equivalency evaluation. The GPU dose was further verified with the absolute point dose measurement with ion chamber and film measurements for phantom plans. Monte Carlo calculation was used as a reference for both dose engines in the accuracy evaluation in heterogeneous phantom and actual patients. The GPU dose engine showed excellent agreement with the current CPU dose engine. The majority of cases had over 99.99% of voxels with Γ(1%, 1 mm) engine also showed similar degree of accuracy in heterogeneous media as the current TomoTherapy dose engine. It is verified and validated that the ultrafast TomoTherapy GPU dose engine can safely replace the existing TomoTherapy cluster based dose engine without degradation in dose accuracy.

  18. Gene therapy for cartilage and bone tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    "Gene Therapy for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering" outlines the tissue engineering and possible applications of gene therapy in the field of biomedical engineering as well as basic principles of gene therapy, vectors and gene delivery, specifically for cartilage and bone engineering. It is intended for tissue engineers, cell therapists, regenerative medicine scientists and engineers, gene therapist and virologists. Dr. Yu-Chen Hu is a Distinguished Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University and has received the Outstanding Research Award (National Science Council), Asia Research Award (Society of Chemical Engineers, Japan) and Professor Tsai-Teh Lai Award (Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers). He is also a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and a member of the Tissue Engineering International & Regenerative Medicine Society (TERMIS)-Asia Pacific Council.

  19. Metabolomics has the potential to improve drug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Claus; Jürgens, Gesche; Dalhoff, Kim Peder

    2014-01-01

    Until now drug therapy has primarily been controlled by dose titration on the basis of effects and side effects. However, a lot of people being treated with a drug experience too little effect or too many side effects. Therefore it will be advantageous to improve drug therapy and make it even more...

  20. Radioiodine therapy and thyrostatic drugs and iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmannstrasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Radioiodine therapy is now the most common definite treatment for persistent hyperthyroidism. The outcome of radioiodine therapy depends mainly on the absorbed energy dose in the diseased thyroid tissue. The administered activity and the resulting target dose in the thyroid depend on both the biokinetics of radioiodine and the actual therapeutic effect of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thyrostatic drugs have a major influence on the kinetics of radioiodine in the thyroid and may additionally have a radioprotective effect. Pre-treatment with thyrostatic medication lowers the effective half-life and uptake of radioiodine. This can reduce the target dose in the thyroid and have a negative influence on the outcome of the therapy. Discontinuation of medication shortly before radioiodine administration can increase the absorbed energy dose in the thyroid without increasing the whole-body exposure to radiation as much as would a higher or second radioiodine administration. Furthermore, administration of non-radioactive iodine-127 2-3 days after radioiodine administration can also increase the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thus, improving the biokinetics of radioiodine will allow lower activities to be administered with lower effective doses to the rest of the body, while achieving an equally effective target dose in the thyroid. (orig.)

  1. Treatment of a solid tumor using engineered drug-resistant immunocompetent cells and cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent

    2012-07-01

    Multimodal therapy approaches, such as combining chemotherapy agents with cellular immunotherapy, suffers from potential drug-mediated toxicity to immune effector cells. Overcoming such toxic effects of anticancer cellular products is a potential critical barrier to the development of combined therapeutic approaches. We are evaluating an anticancer strategy that focuses on overcoming such a barrier by genetically engineering drug-resistant variants of immunocompetent cells, thereby allowing for the coadministration of cellular therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, a method we refer to as drug-resistant immunotherapy (DRI). The strategy relies on the use of cDNA sequences that confer drug resistance and recombinant lentiviral vectors to transfer nucleic acid sequences into immunocompetent cells. In the present study, we evaluated a DRI-based strategy that incorporates the immunocompetent cell line NK-92, which has intrinsic antitumor properties, genetically engineered to be resistant to both temozolomide and trimetrexate. These immune effector cells efficiently lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, which we show are also sensitive to both chemotherapy agents. The antitumor efficacy of the DRI strategy was demonstrated in vivo, whereby neuroblastoma-bearing NOD/SCID/γ-chain knockout (NSG) mice treated with dual drug-resistant NK-92 cell therapy followed by dual cytotoxic chemotherapy showed tumor regression and significantly enhanced survival compared with animals receiving either nonengineered cell-based therapy and chemotherapy, immunotherapy alone, or chemotherapy alone. These data show there is a benefit to using drug-resistant cellular therapy when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy approaches.

  2. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  3. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  4. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan HY

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Yi Tan,1 Aniruddha Agarwal,2 Cecilia S Lee,3 Jay Chhablani,4 Vishali Gupta,5 Manoj Khatri,6 Jayabalan Nirmal,7 Carlos Pavesio,8 Rupesh Agrawal1,7–9 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Vitreoretina, Stanley M Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Department of Vitreoretina, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 5Department of Retina and Uvea, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 6Department of Retina, Rajan Eye Care Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 8Department of Medical Retina, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 9Department of Ophthalmology, National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis. Keywords: intravitreal therapy, noninfectious uveitis, posterior uveitis

  5. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  6. Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse planning in ... drugs are being used as artificial problem-solvers such as frustrations, stress or ... Drug use is a problem to users when it begins to cause some damage to their ...

  7. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Personalized Drug Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis: From Fiction to Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Personalized drug therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) is a long-term dream for CF patients, caregivers, physicians and researchers. After years of study, the fiction of personalized treatment has turned to hope. Basic information about CFTR mutations classes and new treatments is needed if we are to deal properly with the new CF era. The problems involved in this issue, however, should be evaluated with greater care and attention. VX-770 is a new drug available to treat CF patients with some class III CFTR mutations and other drugs are being studied regarding other classes. The scientific literature has constantly given information about each therapy, both in vitro and in vivo. The hope is increasing. Nevertheless the "scientific world" still lacks information about patients' reality and daily health related practical needs. Clinical trials have showed good evaluation of some drugs so far, but clinical response is a wide spectrum yet to be analyzed: CFTR mutations spectrum, costs related to the treatment with new drugs (for VX-770 therapy), variability of CF clinical expression, limitations to test in vitro drugs, absence of good clinical markers to evaluate drug response, absence of long-term studies and with patients below six years old, multidrug treatment used to improve the expression response, and finally, the most important problem, who will benefit from the new drugs therapy, are issues that constitute a barrier that should be overcome. Personalized drug therapy may not be a fiction anymore, but it is not yet a reality for all CF patients.

  9. Antifungal therapy: drug-drug interactions at your fingertips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempers, V.J.; Bruggemann, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Information Age has revolutionized the ability of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to oversee a substantial body of clinically relevant information literally at one's fingertips. In the field of clinical pharmacology, this may be particularly useful for managing drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A

  10. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (pproducts and the released drug did not cause measurable negative effects on the bioactivity of the tested drugs. The therapeutic effects of the SCPC-Cis hybrid were evaluated using a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Animals were treated by either systemic cisplatin injection (sCis), or with SCPC-Cis hybrid placed adjacent (ADJ) to, or within (IT), the tumor. Five days after implantation 50-55% of the total cisplatin loaded was released from the SCPC-Cis hybrids resulting in an approximately 50% decrease in tumor volume compared to

  11. Approaches and Challenges of Engineering Implantable Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS Drug Delivery Systems for in Vitro and in Vivo Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Tye Yong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advancements made in drug delivery systems over the years, many challenges remain in drug delivery systems for treating chronic diseases at the personalized medicine level. The current urgent need is to develop novel strategies for targeted therapy of chronic diseases. Due to their unique properties, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS technology has been recently engineered as implantable drug delivery systems for disease therapy. This review examines the challenges faced in implementing implantable MEMS drug delivery systems in vivo and the solutions available to overcome these challenges.

  12. Re: Engineered Nanoparticles Induce Cell Apoptosis: Potential for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs have been widely applied in industry, biology and medicine recently (i.e. clothes, sunscreens, cosmetics, foods, diagnostic medicine, imaging and drug delivery. There are many kinds of manufactured nanomaterial products including TiO2, ZnO, CeO2, Fe2O3, and CuO (as metal oxide nanoparticles as well as gold, silver, platinum and palladium (as metal nanoparticles, and other carbon-based ENP’s such as carbon nanotububes and quantum dots. ENPs with their sizes no larger than 100 nm are able to enter the human body and accumulate in organs and cause toxic effects. In many researches, ENP effects on the cancer cells of different organs with related cell apoptosis were noted (AgNP, nano-Cr2O3, Au-Fe2O3 NPs, nano-TiO2, nano-HAP, nano-Se, MoO3 nanoplate, Realgar nanoparticles. ENPs, with their unique properties, such as surface charge, particle size, composition and surface modification with tissue recognition ligands or antibodies, has been increasingly explored as a tool to carry small molecular weight drugs as well as macromolecules for cancer therapy, thus generating the new concept “nanocarrier”. Direct induction of cell apoptosis by ENPs provides an opportunity for cancer treatment. In the century of nanomedicine that depends on development of the nanotechnology, ENPs have a great potential for application in cancer treatment with minimal side effects.

  13. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  14. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson's disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α -synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson's disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson's Disease therapy and reduce its side effects.

  15. Drug Therapy Problems in Patients on Antihypertensives and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug therapy problems (DTPs), with the associated risks inherent in antihypertensive and antidiabetic therapy require utmost attention. This present study was aimed at assessing the DTPs observed in the management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) in two tertiary health facilities in Niger Delta region. In this ...

  16. Drug addiction therapy. A dance to the music of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodison, L; Schafer, H

    1999-10-21

    Dance therapy can play a useful role in the treatment and rehabilitation of women with drug addiction. It works by raising self-esteem through an improved relationship with the body, giving women the strength to help combat their habit. The benefits of dance therapy for women at the detox unit of Holloway Prison have been confirmed by prison staff.

  17. Recent advances in targeted drug therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Yongqiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available More and more clinical trials have proved the efficacy of targeted drugs in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. With the development of science and technology, more and more targeted drugs have appeared. In recent years, targeted drugs such as regorafenib and ramucirumab have shown great potential in related clinical trials. In addition, there are ongoing clinical trials for second-line candidate drugs, such as c-Met inhibitors tivantinib and cabozantinib and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor ramucirumab. This article summarizes the advances in targeted drug therapy for HCC and related trial data, which provides a reference for further clinical trials and treatment.

  18. Bone scintigraphy during therapy with cytostatically acting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, U.; Pries, H.H.; Joseph, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Marburg Univ.

    1976-01-01

    Case reports show up, that bone scintigraphy during therapy of metastasing cancer of mamma or prostata with cytostatically acting drugs may reveal 'pseudonormal' results. False negative diagnosis can be excluded only by carefully regarding drug history. Gamma-camera with wholebody scan device for scintigraphy in two projections simplifies safe evaluation significantly. (orig.) [de

  19. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris

    2013-01-01

    -standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I (Top1...

  20. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  1. Chitosan nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for biomedical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, L.E.S.; Chen, M.; XINF, L.Y.; Guo, X.F.; Zhao, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan is a rather abundant material, which has been widely used in food industrial and bioengineering aspects, including in encapsulating active food ingredients, in enzyme immobilization, and as a carrier for drug delivery, due to its significant biological and chemical properties such as biodegradable, biocompatible, bioactive and polycationic. This review discussed preparation and applications of chitosan nanoparticles in the biomedical engineering field, namely as a drug delivery carrier for biopharmaceuticals. (author)

  2. Potential drug therapies for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Kim

    2016-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common, complex chronic widespread pain condition is characterized by fatigue, sleep disturbance and cognitive dysfunction. Treatment of FM is difficult, requiring both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches, with an empiric approach to drug therapy focused toward individual symptoms, particularly pain. The effectiveness of current medications is limited with many patients discontinuing use. A systemic database search has identified 26 molecular entities as potential emerging drug therapies. Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of FM provides clues to targets for new medications. Investigation of bioamine modulation and α2δ ligands and novel targets such as dopamine receptors, NMDA receptors, cannabinoid receptors, melatonin receptors and potassium channels has identified potential drug therapies. Modest improvement of health status in patients with FM has been observed with drugs targeting a diverse range of molecular mechanisms. No single drug, however, offered substantial efficacy against all the symptoms characteristic of FM. Identification of new and improved therapies for FM needs to address the heterogeneity of the condition, which suggests existence of patient subgroups, the relationship of central and peripheral aspects of the pathophysiology and a requirement of combination therapy with drugs targeting multiple molecular mechanisms.

  3. Predicting Drug Recalls From Internet Search Engine Queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Batches of pharmaceuticals are sometimes recalled from the market when a safety issue or a defect is detected in specific production runs of a drug. Such problems are usually detected when patients or healthcare providers report abnormalities to medical authorities. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective production lots can be detected earlier by monitoring queries to Internet search engines. We extracted queries from the USA to the Bing search engine, which mentioned one of the 5195 pharmaceutical drugs during 2015 and all recall notifications issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) during that year. By using attributes that quantify the change in query volume at the state level, we attempted to predict if a recall of a specific drug will be ordered by FDA in a time horizon ranging from 1 to 40 days in future. Our results show that future drug recalls can indeed be identified with an AUC of 0.791 and a lift at 5% of approximately 6 when predicting a recall occurring one day ahead. This performance degrades as prediction is made for longer periods ahead. The most indicative attributes for prediction are sudden spikes in query volume about a specific medicine in each state. Recalls of prescription drugs and those estimated to be of medium-risk are more likely to be identified using search query data. These findings suggest that aggregated Internet search engine data can be used to facilitate in early warning of faulty batches of medicines.

  4. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Aloorkar, Nagesh H; Ingale, Dipti J; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-10-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug-polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and particle size analysis, and evaluated for morphology, drug loading, in vitro drug release and ex vivo diffusion as well. There were no chemical interactions between drug and polymers used as revealed by compatibility studies outcomes. The drug polymer ratio reflected notable effect on drug content, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. SEM results revealed spherical microsponges with porous surface, and had 7.21 μm mean particle size. The microsponges were then incorporated in gel; which exhibited viscous modulus along with pseudoplastic behavior. In vitro drug release results depicted that microsponges with 1:2 drug-polymer ratio were more efficient to give extended drug release of 75.88% at the end of 8 h; while conventional formulation get exhausted incredibly earlier by releasing 81.11% drug at the end of 4 h only. Thus the formulated microsponge-based gel of diclofenac diethylamine would be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for safer and efficient treatment of arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders.

  5. DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2017-11-25

    DNA as a novel biomaterial can be used to fabricate different kinds of DNA nanostructures based on its principle of GC/AT complementary base pairing. Studies have shown that DNA nanostructure is a nice drug carrier to overcome big obstacles existing in cancer therapy such as systemic toxicity and unsatisfied drug efficacy. Thus, different types of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems have been designed in cancer therapy. To improve treating efficacy, they are also developed into more functional drug delivery nanosystems. In recent years, some important progresses have been made. The objective of this review is to make a retrospect and summary about these different kinds of DNA nanostructure-based drug delivery nanosystems and their latest progresses: (1) active targeting; (2) mutidrug co-delivery; (3) construction of stimuli-responsive/intelligent nanosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgons, R; Seliger, C; Hilpert, A; Trahms, L; Odenbach, S; Alexiou, C

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. In medicine they are used for several approaches such as magnetic cell separation or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is the focus of medical research, especially for the treatment of cancer and diseases of the vascular system. In an experimental cancer model, we performed targeted drug delivery and used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, bound to a chemotherapeutic agent, which were attracted to an experimental tumour in rabbits by an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting). Complete tumour remission could be achieved. An important advantage of these carriers is the possibility for detecting these nanoparticles after treatment with common imaging techniques (i.e. x-ray-tomography, magnetorelaxometry, magnetic resonance imaging), which can be correlated to histology

  7. Electrospun materials for affinity-based engineering and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sill, T J; Von Recum, H A

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning is a process which can quickly and cheaply create materials of high surface to volume and aspect ratios from many materials, however in application toward drug delivery this can be a strong disadvantage as well. Diffusion of drug is proportional to the thickness of that device. In moving from macro to micro to nano-sized electrospun materials drug release rates change to profiles that are too fast to be therapeutically beneficial. In this work we use molecular interactions to further control the rate of release beyond that capable of diffusion alone. To do this we create materials with molecular pockets, which can 'hold' therapeutic drugs through a reversible interaction such as a host/guest complexation. Through these complexes we show we are able to impact delivery of drug from electrospun materials, and also apply them in tissue engineering for the reversible presentation of biomolecules on a fiber surface. (paper)

  8. Engineering and evaluating drug delivery particles in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnmalm, Mattias; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank

    2014-09-28

    The development of new and improved particle-based drug delivery is underpinned by an enhanced ability to engineer particles with high fidelity and integrity, as well as increased knowledge of their biological performance. Microfluidics can facilitate these processes through the engineering of spatiotemporally highly controlled environments using designed microstructures in combination with physical phenomena present at the microscale. In this review, we discuss microfluidics in the context of addressing key challenges in particle-based drug delivery. We provide an overview of how microfluidic devices can: (i) be employed to engineer particles, by providing highly controlled interfaces, and (ii) be used to establish dynamic in vitro models that mimic in vivo environments for studying the biological behavior of engineered particles. Finally, we discuss how the flexible and modular nature of microfluidic devices provides opportunities to create increasingly realistic models of the in vivo milieu (including multi-cell, multi-tissue and even multi-organ devices), and how ongoing developments toward commercialization of microfluidic tools are opening up new opportunities for the engineering and evaluation of drug delivery particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  10. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  11. [Non-drug therapies, working on emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detournay-Hentgen, Marie-Carmel

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapies are indicated for people in mental pain and also recommended in the treatment of a variety of psychological disorders. The aim is to replace the inappropriate behaviour by more adapted behaviour. Positive psychology is interested not so much in mental health disorders as in well-being and happiness. A variety of therapeutic trends which the caregiver can use to help and support patients in regaining their bearings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of renal aging on drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Scibona, Paula; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Macías Núñez, Juan F

    2015-08-01

    Elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years old) use up to 30% of all commonly prescribed medication, and they suffer more their adverse effects than the general population. In order to minimize this risk, physicians should avoid polypharmacy, dangerous pharmacological interactions and take into account pharmacodynamic and senile pharmacokinetic changes before prescribing any medication to the elderly. The present review article originally describes how renal physiology changes secondary to aging such as dysautonomia, glomerular filtration rate reduction, tubular back-filtration, sodium, calcium and magnesium loss, potassium retention, altered dilution-concentration capability, tubular frailty, genetics, internal milieu and body composition are senile changes that when combined predispose elderly people to suffer from pharmacological adverse effects. Knowledge of these physiological modifications associated with aging and their impact on the pharmacology of particular drugs may help to optimize drug use and to avoid complications in this age group.

  13. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  14. Spiritual self-schema therapy, drug abuse, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, David; Avants, S Kelly; Margolin, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes the use of Spiritual Self-Schema (3-S) therapy in the treatment of an HIV-positive inner-city drug user maintained on methadone and referred for additional treatment due to unremitting cocaine use. 3-S therapy is a manual-guided intervention based on cognitive self-schema theory. Its goal is to help the patient create, elaborate, and make accessible a cognitive schema--the "spiritual" self-schema-that is incompatible with drug use and other HIV risk behaviors. 3-S therapy facilitates a cognitive shift from the habitual activation of the "addict" self-schema, with its drug-related cognitions, scripts and action plans, to the "spiritual" self-schema, with its associated repertoire of harm reduction beliefs and behaviors.

  15. Optimal Control of Drug Therapy in a Hepatitis B Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Forde

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Combination antiviral drug therapy improves the survival rates of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus by controlling viral replication and enhancing immune responses. Some of these drugs have side effects that make them unsuitable for long-term administration. To address the trade-off between the positive and negative effects of the combination therapy, we investigated an optimal control problem for a delay differential equation model of immune responses to hepatitis virus B infection. Our optimal control problem investigates the interplay between virological and immunomodulatory effects of therapy, the control of viremia and the administration of the minimal dosage over a short period of time. Our numerical results show that the high drug levels that induce immune modulation rather than suppression of virological factors are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus.

  16. Clinical management of drug-drug interactions in HCV therapy: Challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.; Back, D.; Buggisch, P.; Buti, M.; Craxi, A.; Foster, G.; Klinker, H.; Larrey, D.; Nikitin, I.; Pol, S. van der; Puoti, M.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Wedemeyer, H.; Zeuzem, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often take multiple co-medications to treat adverse events related to HCV therapy, or to manage other co-morbidities. Drug-drug interactions associated with this polypharmacy are relatively new to the field of HCV pharmacotherapy. With the advent of the

  17. Gene engineering biological therapy for juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Mikhel's

    2011-01-01

    However, GEBA therapy cannot completely cure the disease as before despite the progress achieved. GEBAs have potentially a number of serious side effects, among which there are severe infections and there is a risk of developing malignancies and autoimmune processes. Their administration requires careful monitoring to reveal the early development of serious adverse reactions, thus preventing a poor outcome.

  18. Alveolar bone tissue engineering using composite scaffolds for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Matsuno

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For many years, bone graft substitutes have been used to reconstruct bone defects in orthopedic and dental fields. However, synthetic bone substitutes such as hydroxyapatite or β-tricalcium phosphate have no osteoinductive or osteogenic abilities. Bone tissue engineering has also been promoted as an alternative approach to regenerating bone tissue. To succeed in bone tissue engineering, osteoconductive scaffolding biomaterials should provide a suitable environment for osteogenic cells and provide local controlled release of osteogenic growth factors. In addition, the scaffold for the bone graft substitute should biodegrade to replace the newly formed bone. Recent advances in bone tissue engineering have allowed the creation of composite scaffolds with tailored functional properties. This review focuses on composite scaffolds that consist of synthetic ceramics and natural polymers as drug delivery carriers for alveolar bone tissue engineering.

  19. Role of Nanodiamonds in Drug Delivery and Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shakeel Ahmed; Satar, Rukhsana; Jafri, Mohammad Alam; Rasool, Mahmood; Ahmad, Waseem; Kashif Zaidi, Syed

    2016-09-01

    The use of nanotechnology in medicine and more specifically drug delivery is set to spread rapidly. Currently many substances are under investigation for drug delivery and more specifically for cancer therapy. Nanodiamonds (NDs) have contributed significantly in the development of highly efficient and successful drug delivery systems, and in stem cell therapy. Drug delivery through NDs is an intricate and complex process that deserves special attention to unravel underlying molecular mechanisms in order to overcome certain bottlenecks associated with it. It has already been established that NDs based drug delivery systems have excellent biocompatibility, nontoxicity, photostability and facile surface functionalization properties. There is mounting evidence that suggests that such conjugated delivery systems well retain the properties of nanoparticles like small size, large surface area to volume ratio that provide greater biocatalytic activity to the attached drug in terms of selectivity, loading and stability. NDs based drug delivery systems may form the basis for the development of effective novel drug delivery vehicles with salient features that may facilitate their utility in fluorescence imaging, target specificity and sustainedrelease.

  20. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  1. Electrospun nanofibrous materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguo Cui, Yue Zhou and Jiang Chang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrospinning technique, which was invented about 100 years ago, has attracted more attention in recent years due to its possible biomedical applications. Electrospun fibers with high surface area to volume ratio and structures mimicking extracellular matrix (ECM have shown great potential in tissue engineering and drug delivery. In order to develop electrospun fibers for these applications, different biocompatible materials have been used to fabricate fibers with different structures and morphologies, such as single fibers with different composition and structures (blending and core-shell composite fibers and fiber assemblies (fiber bundles, membranes and scaffolds. This review summarizes the electrospinning techniques which control the composition and structures of the nanofibrous materials. It also outlines possible applications of these fibrous materials in skin, blood vessels, nervous system and bone tissue engineering, as well as in drug delivery.

  2. Effects of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) on Nonopioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to quantitatively synthesize study results.  Results: The search yielded five studies that met inclusion criteria. MDFT was found to be more effective than other treatments on drug abuse problem severity and drug use frequency in the short run but not in the long...... run and demonstrated positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions.  Discussion: While additional research is needed, the review offers support for MDFT as a treatment to young nonopioid drug abusers. The number of studies included in this review was limited, however......Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence of the effects of multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) on drug use reduction in young people for the treatment of nonopioid drug use.  Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized...

  3. Pharmokinetics in Drug Therapy as a Required Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    This course is offered in the third quarter of the fourth year of the five-year curriculum in pharmacology. The year includes (1) a 350-hour clinical clerkship, (2) two courses in "Case Studies in Drug Therapy," (3) one course in "Case Studies in Pharmacy Practice," and (4) professional electives. (LBH)

  4. Assessment of patients' knowledge of their drug therapy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' knowledge of their medications is an important factor in ensuring adherence. Medication adherence is essential for rational drug use and derivation of optimal therapy. This study was conducted to assess knowledge of outpatients regarding their medications. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 200 ...

  5. Novel Drug Delivery Technique for Breast Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Esenaliev, Rinat O

    2004-01-01

    .... We proposed to complete Task 3 and to implement Task 4 in the third year of the project. Task 3 focuses on in vivo studies of efficacy of cancer therapy with the use of ultrasound-enhanced delivery of anti-cancer drug 5-FU...

  6. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbach, D.Y.; Usanov, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  7. Bioinformatics in cancer therapy and drug design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horbach, D Y [International A. Sakharov environmental univ., Minsk (Belarus); Usanov, S A [Inst. of bioorganic chemistry, National academy of sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2005-05-15

    One of the mechanisms of external signal transduction (ionizing radiation, toxicants, stress) to the target cell is the existence of membrane and intracellular proteins with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. No wonder that etiology of malignant growth links to abnormalities in signal transduction through tyrosine kinases. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases play fundamental roles in development, proliferation and differentiation of tissues of epithelial, mesenchymal and neuronal origin. There are four types of EGFR: EGF receptor (ErbB1/HER1), ErbB2/Neu/HER2, ErbB3/HER3 and ErbB4/HER4. Abnormal expression of EGFR, appearance of receptor mutants with changed ability to protein-protein interactions or increased tyrosine kinase activity have been implicated in the malignancy of different types of human tumors. Bioinformatics is currently using in investigation on design and selection of drugs that can make alterations in structure or competitively bind with receptors and so display antagonistic characteristics. (authors)

  8. Drug therapy for recurrence after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Most head and neck cancer patients are advanced stage when first diagnosed and about half of them receive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) because the cancer is unresectable or there is hope of functional preservation. In subsequent treatment for recurrence after CRT, many of them receive chemotherapy with or without reirradiation. There are three situations when chemotherapy is used for recurrence after CRT: 1. Re-chemoradiotherapy (Re-CRT) in the adjuvant setting after salvage surgery 2. Re-CRT for cases who cannot receive salvage surgery. 3. Chemotherapy for cases who cannot receive salvage surgery or Re-CRT. In the first situation, Re-CRT is expected to yield a better outcome, but there is concern about severe adverse events, so special care in selecting patients is required. In the second situation, there are some negative comments about Re-CRT, and so cases must be judged individually. In the third situation, there are some choices of treatment, but EBM is based on past large clinical trials, so the treatment based on a guideline or guidance is recommended. Recently, new drugs have been invented and approved in the world, though their cost is increasing rapidly. It is necessary to provide the best treatment that also takes cost-effectiveness into consideration. (author)

  9. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  10. Nanotechnology inspired advanced engineering fundamentals for optimizing drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Ahmed Alaa

    2018-02-06

    Drug toxicity and inefficacy are commonly experienced problems with drug therapy failure. To face these problems, extensive research work took place aiming to design new dosage forms for drug delivery especially nanoparticulate systems. These systems are designed to increase the quantity of the therapeutic molecule delivered to the desired site concurrently with reduced side effects. In order to achieve this objective, nanocarriers must principally display suitable drug vehiculization abilities and a controlled biological destiny of drug molecules. Only the intelligent design of the nanomedicine will accomplish these fundamentals. The present review article is dedicated to the discussion of the important fundamentals to be considered in the fabrication of nanomedicines. These include the therapeutic agent, the nanocarrier and the functionalization moieties. Special consideration is devoted to the explanation and compilation of highly potential fabrication approaches assisting how to control the in vivo destiny of the nanomedicine. Finally, some nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, for the development of nanomedicine, are also discussed. The nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems showed remarkable outcomes based on passive and active targeting as well as improvement of the drug pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Multifunctional nanocarrier concept affords a revolutionary drug delivery approach for maximizing the efficacy, safety and monitoring the biological fate of the therapeutic molecule. Nanomedicines may enhance the efficacy of therapeutic molecules and reduce their toxic effects. Meanwhile, further research works are required to rightly optimize (and define) the effectiveness, nanotoxicity, in vivo destiny and feasibility of these nanomedicines which, from a preclinical standpoint, are actually promising. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Stem cells in drug discovery, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine: emerging opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalanandhan, Victor Sanjit; Sittampalam, G Sitta

    2009-08-01

    Stem cells, irrespective of their origin, have emerged as valuable reagents or tools in human health in the past 2 decades. Initially, a research tool to study fundamental aspects of developmental biology is now the central focus of generating transgenic animals, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine to address degenerative diseases of multiple organ systems. This is because stem cells are pluripotent or multipotent cells that can recapitulate developmental paths to repair damaged tissues. However, it is becoming clear that stem cell therapy alone may not be adequate to reverse tissue and organ damage in degenerative diseases. Existing small-molecule drugs and biologicals may be needed as "molecular adjuvants" or enhancers of stem cells administered in therapy or adult stem cells in the diseased tissues. Hence, a combination of stem cell-based, high-throughput screening and 3D tissue engineering approaches is necessary to advance the next wave of tools in preclinical drug discovery. In this review, the authors have attempted to provide a basic account of various stem cells types, as well as their biology and signaling, in the context of research in regenerative medicine. An attempt is made to link stem cells as reagents, pharmacology, and tissue engineering as converging fields of research for the next decade.

  12. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  13. Salvage Therapy of Multiple Myeloma: The New Generation Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, overall results of treatment of multiple myeloma (MM have been improved and survival curves are now significantly better with respect to those obtained with historical treatment. These improvements are linked to a deeper knowledge of the biology of disease and to the introduction in clinical practice of drugs with different mechanism of action such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs. However, MM remains in most cases an incurable disease. For patients who relapse after treatment with novel agents, the prognosis is dismal and new drugs and therapeutic strategies are required for continued disease control. In this review, we summarize new insights in salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory MM as emerging from recent clinical trials exploring the activity of bendamustine, new generation proteasome inhibitors, novel IMiDs, monoclonal antibodies, and drugs interfering with growth pathways.

  14. Salvage Therapy of Multiple Myeloma: The New Generation Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Di Raimondo, Cosimo; Schinocca, Elena; La Fauci, Alessia; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Chiarenza, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, overall results of treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) have been improved and survival curves are now significantly better with respect to those obtained with historical treatment. These improvements are linked to a deeper knowledge of the biology of disease and to the introduction in clinical practice of drugs with different mechanism of action such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). However, MM remains in most cases an incurable disease. For patients who relapse after treatment with novel agents, the prognosis is dismal and new drugs and therapeutic strategies are required for continued disease control. In this review, we summarize new insights in salvage therapy for relapsed/refractory MM as emerging from recent clinical trials exploring the activity of bendamustine, new generation proteasome inhibitors, novel IMiDs, monoclonal antibodies, and drugs interfering with growth pathways. PMID:24967371

  15. Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingwang; Xiao, Yanni; Rong, Libin; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Bellan, Steven E

    2017-06-28

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of infection and modelled the patients' life expectancy as a function of ART initiation timing. We fitted this model to the annual AIDS incidence and death data directly, and to resistance data and demographic data indirectly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. Using counterfactual scenarios, we assessed the impact on total and drug-resistant HIV incidence of ART initiation timing, frequency of acquired drug resistance, and second-line drug effectiveness (defined as the combination of resistance monitoring, biomedical drug efficacy and adherence). Earlier ART initiation could decrease the number of both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence when second-line drug effectiveness is sufficiently high (greater than 80%), but increase the proportion of new infections that are drug resistant. Thus, resistance may paradoxically appear to be increasing while actually decreasing. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surinder Batra

    2006-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches against the advanced stages of human solid tumors are palliative rather than curative. Many modalities, including, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, either alone or in combination have met with only modest success for advanced metastatic cancers. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies with cytotoxic effects of radioisotopes. It is the ''smart'' way of delivering radiation to the known and occult metastatic cancer cells and is independent of drug toxicity and/or hormone resistance. The tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) containing the unique disaccharide sialyl-Tn, is highly expressed in majority of adenocarcinomas, including carcinomas of the prostate, breast, ovaries, pancreas and colon (80-90%) compared to undetectable expression in normal tissues. Monoclonal antibody CC49, reactive with TAG-72, after conjugation to potent gamma- and beta-emitting radionuclides, has been useful in selective systemic radiolocalization of disease and therapy of primary and metastatic tumor sites. However, limited therapeutic responses were observed in patients. Limited success of antibody based delivery of radioisotopes can be attributed to several factors including undesirable pharmacokinetics, poor tumor uptake and high immunogenicity of intact antibodies (IgGs). The primary factors contributing towards the failure of RIT include: (1) longer serum half-lives of the intact IgG molecules resulting in the radiotoxicity, (2) generation of human antibodies against murine antibodies (HAMA) that limits the frequency of dose administration, (3) poor diffusion rates of intact IgG due to the large size and (4) high interstitial fluid pressures (IFP) encountered in solid tumors. The major goal of our multidisciplinary project was to develop specific novel radiopharmaceuticals, with desired pharmacokinetics, for the diagnosis and therapy of solid tumors. To overcome the low uptake of radioactivity by tumors and to

  17. Treating Women Drug Abusers: Action Therapy and Trauma Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Ann S.; Parker, Olga V.

    2002-01-01

    The authors suggest that action therapy, a group of techniques including psychodrama, drama therapy, and role training, warrants research attention to determine whether it is well suited to the special characteristics and needs of women clients. In addition, the authors call on researchers to develop a new standardized tool for counselors to use during initial interviews to determine whether women presenting for drug abuse treatment also have significant issues related to trauma. The authors believe the use of unassisted clinical judgment for trauma assessment in first interviews may drive patients away by probing for painful information that clients are not yet ready to confront or divulge. PMID:18567963

  18. Pulmonary fibrosis associated with psychotropic drug therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton Clare

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sertraline and Risperidone are commonly used psychotropic drugs. Sertraline has previously been associated with eosinopilic pneumonia. Neither drug is recognised as a cause of diffuse fibrotic lung disease. Our report represents the first such case. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 33 year old Asian male with chronic schizophrenia who had been treated for three years with sertraline and risperidone. He presented to hospital in respiratory failure following a six month history of progressive breathlessness. High resolution CT scan demonstrated diffuse pulmonary fibrosis admixed with patchy areas of consolidation. Because the aetiology of this man's diffuse parenchymal lung disease remained unclear a surgical lung biopsy was undertaken. Histological assessment disclosed widespread fibrosis with marked eosinophillic infiltration and associated organising pneumonia - features all highly suggestive of drug induced lung disease. Following withdrawal of both sertraline and risperidone and initiation of corticosteroid therapy the patient's respiratory failure resolved and three years later he remains well albeit limited by breathlessness on heavy exertion. Conclusion Drug induced lung disease can be rapidly progressive and if drug exposure continues may result in respiratory failure and death. Prompt recognition is critical as drug withdrawal may result in marked resolution of disease. This case highlights sertraline and risperidone as drugs that may, in susceptible individuals, cause diffuse pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  20. Geriatric drug therapy and healthcare utilization in the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerfalk, Anita; Ruigómez, Ana; Wallander, Mari-Ann; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Johansson, Saga

    2002-05-01

    To describe the use of prescription drug therapy, especially polypharmacy, in an elderly general population; to relate that use to age, gender, and different types of healthcare utilization; and to investigate the influence of selection of different time windows on the result of the quantity as well as the categories of drugs used. Data on a sample of 5000 patients aged 65-90 years in 1996 were derived from the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). The population covered by GPRD is broadly representative of the UK population treated in general practice. Drug use was assessed using 2 time windows - current use of individual drugs on a random day (index date) and 1 month following the index date. Healthcare utilization was analyzed by use of information on visits to general practitioners (GPs), hospitalizations, and referrals to specialists. Women used more drugs than men; however, the prevalence of polypharmacy, defined as concomitant use of > or =5 drugs, was similar in both genders. The most frequently used therapeutic groups were cardiovascular, central nervous, and gastrointestinal system drugs. Almost 80% of both women and men visited a GP at least once a year. Overall, women used more ambulatory care services and men were hospitalized more often. Use of random date compared with 1-month period resulted in a significant underestimation of the amount of drugs used for acute conditions and, consequently, the risk of polypharmacy. The overall results confirm the findings in earlier studies suggesting that the GPRD might be a useful tool in further studies on prescription drug use among elderly persons. More information on the appropriateness of drug use is needed to prevent overuse as well as underuse of medications among the elderly.

  1. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myofibers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid Implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postimtotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  3. Synergistic gene and drug tumor therapy using a chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Chen, Si; Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Co-delivery of gene and drug for synergistic therapy has provided a promising strategy to cure devastating diseases. Here, an amphiphilic chimeric peptide (Fmoc)2KH7-TAT with pH-responsibility for gene and drug delivery was designed and fabricated. As a drug carrier, the micelles self-assembled from the peptide exhibited a much faster doxorubicin (DOX) release rate at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. As a non-viral gene vector, (Fmoc)(2)KH(7)-TAT peptide could satisfactorily mediate transfection of pGL-3 reporter plasmid with or without the existence of serum in both 293T and HeLa cell-lines. Besides, the endosome escape capability of peptide/DNA complexes was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To evaluate the co-delivery efficiency and the synergistic anti-tumor effect of gene and drug, p53 plasmid and DOX were simultaneously loaded in the peptide micelles to form micelleplexes during the self-assembly of the peptide. Cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of gene and drug were studied by CLSM and flow cytometry respectively. And p53 protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor inhibition effect were also studied. Results suggest that the co-delivery of gene and drug from peptide micelles resulted in effective cell growth inhibition in vitro and significant tumor growth restraining in vivo. The chimeric peptide-based gene and drug co-delivery system will find great potential for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Products for Chondral Knee Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Flórez Cabrera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is prone to suffer lesions of different etiology, being the articular cartilage lesions of the knee the most common. Although most conventional treatments reduce symptoms they lead to the production of fibrocartilage, which has different characteristics than the hyaline cartilage of the joint. There are few therapeutic approaches that promote the replacement of damaged tissue by functional hyaline cartilage. Among them are the so-called advanced therapies, which use cells and tissue engineering products to promote cartilage regeneration. Most of them are based on scaffolds made of different biomaterials, which seeded or not with endogenous or exogenous cells, can be used as cartilage artificial replacement to improve joint function. This paper reviews some therapeutic approaches focused on the regeneration of articular cartilage of the knee and the biomaterials used to develop scaffolds for cell therapy and tissue engineering of cartilage.

  5. Microwave coagulation therapy and drug injection to treat splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoming; Sun, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jie; Dong, Lei; Mu, Nannan; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Lanfen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaofei; Liang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the efficacy of 915- and 2450-MHz contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)-guided percutaneous microwave coagulation with that of CEUS-guided thrombin injection for the treatment of trauma-induced spleen hemorrhage. In a canine splenic artery hemorrhage model with two levels of arterial diameter (A, microwaves and drug injection. Therapy efficacy was measured by comparing bleeding rate, hemostatic time, bleeding index, bleeding volume, and pathology. The most efficient technique was CEUS-guided 915-MHz percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy in terms of action time and total blood loss. The success rate of the 915-MHz microwave group was higher than that of the 2450-MHz microwave and the drug injection groups (except A level, P microwave group than those in the 2450-MHz microwave and drug injection groups (P microwave group, but pathologic changes of light injury could be seen in the other groups. The present study provides evidence that microwave coagulation therapy is more efficient than thrombin injection for the treatment of splenic hemorrhage. Furthermore, treatment with 915-MHz microwaves stops bleeding more rapidly and generates a wider cauterization zone than does treatment with 2450-MHz microwaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  7. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  8. Chitosan in Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery: Focus on Local Vaginal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toril Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucoadhesive drug therapy destined for localized drug treatment is gaining increasing importance in today’s drug development. Chitosan, due to its known biodegradability, bioadhesiveness and excellent safety profile offers means to improve mucosal drug therapy. We have used chitosan as mucoadhesive polymer to develop liposomes able to ensure prolonged residence time at vaginal site. Two types of mucoadhesive liposomes, namely the chitosan-coated liposomes and chitosan-containing liposomes, where chitosan is both embedded and surface-available, were made of soy phosphatidylcholine with entrapped fluorescence markers of two molecular weights, FITC-dextran 4000 and 20,000, respectively. Both liposomal types were characterized for their size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and the in vitro release profile, and compared to plain liposomes. The proof of chitosan being both surface-available as well as embedded into the liposomes in the chitosan-containing liposomes was found. The capability of the surface-available chitosan to interact with the model porcine mucin was confirmed for both chitosan-containing and chitosan-coated liposomes implying potential mucoadhesive behavior. Chitosan-containing liposomes were shown to be superior in respect to the simplicity of preparation, FITC-dextran load, mucoadhesiveness and in vitro release and are expected to ensure prolonged residence time on the vaginal mucosa providing localized sustained release of entrapped model substances.

  9. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery for Therapy of Lung Cancer: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed enormous advances in the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy culminating in the development of the nascent field of “cancer nanomedicine.” A nanoparticle as per the National Institutes of Health (NIH guidelines is any material that is used in the formulation of a drug resulting in a final product smaller than 1 micron in size. Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic therapies, and preferentially target disease sites. Currently, many formulations of nanocarriers are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. Innovative strategies have been employed to exploit the multicomponent, three-dimensional constructs imparting multifunctional capabilities. Engineering such designs allows simultaneous drug delivery of chemotherapeutics and anticancer gene therapies to site-specific targets. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. However, translating such advances from the bench to the bedside has been severely hampered by challenges encountered in the areas of pharmacology, toxicology, immunology, large-scale manufacturing, and regulatory issues. This review summarizes current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, citing recent examples targeted at lung cancer treatment.

  11. Cost-utility analysis of antithyroid drug therapy versus 131I therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Abe, Katsumi; Sakata, Ikuko; Sakaguchi, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Kosuda, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    There is no comparative cost-utility study between 131 I therapy and antithyroid drugs (ATD) therapy for Graves' disease, though 131 I therapy has higher remission rate and less side effects. The objective of the study was to analyze the cost-utility of ATD therapy versus 131 I therapy by calculating life-long medical costs and utility, based on the responses of Graves' disease patients to questionnaires. To determine the expected cost and expected utility, a decision tree analysis was designed on the basis of the 2 competing strategies of ATD therapy versus 131 I therapy. A simulation of 1,000 female patients weighing≥50 kg who assumed to experience the onset of Graves' disease at the age of 30, to first complain of thyrotoxic symptoms and moderate goiter 2-3 mo. previously, and to undergo a 40-years-long cohort study, was created for each strategy using a decision tree and baselines of other relevant variables. The variables and costs were based on the literature and hospital bills. The maximum and minimum values of utility were defined as 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Future costs and utilities were discounted 5%. The medical costs and utilities were 85,739-88,650 yen/patient/40 years and 16.47-16.56/patient/40 years, respectively, for the ATD therapy strategy, and 81,842 yen/patient/40 years and 17.41/patient/40 years, respectively, for the 131 I therapy strategy. These results quantitatively demonstrated that the 131 I therapy strategy was superior to the ATD therapy strategy in terms of both cost and utility. 131 I therapy should be used more widely in Japan because of its greater utility and lower cost. (author)

  12. Polycaprolactone thin films for retinal tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, Mark Rory

    This dissertation focuses on the development of polycaprolactone thin films for retinal tissue engineering and drug delivery. We combined these thin films with techniques such as micro and nanofabrication to develop treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease that leads to the death of rod and cone photoreceptors. Current treatments are only able to slow or limit the progression of the disease, and photoreceptors cannot be regenerated or replaced by the body once lost. The first experiments presented focus on a potential treatment for AMD after photoreceptor death has occurred. We developed a polymer thin film scaffold technology to deliver retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to the affected area of the eye. Earlier research showed that RPCs destined to become photoreceptors are capable of incorporating into a degenerated retina. In our experiments, we showed that RPC attachment to a micro-welled polycaprolactone (PCL) thin film surface enhanced the differentiation of these cells toward a photoreceptor fate. We then used our PCL thin films to develop a drug delivery device capable of sustained therapeutic release over a multi-month period that would maintain an effective concentration of the drug in the eye and eliminate the need for repeated intraocular injections. We first investigated the biocompatibility of PCL in the rabbit eye. We injected PCL thin films into the anterior chamber or vitreous cavity of rabbit eyes and monitored the animals for up to 6 months. We found that PCL thin films were well tolerated in the rabbit eye, showing no signs of chronic inflammation due to the implant. We then developed a multilayered thin film device containing a microporous membrane. We loaded these devices with lyophilized proteins and quantified drug elution for 10 weeks, finding that both bovine serum albumin and immunoglobulin G elute from these devices with zero order release kinetics. These experiments demonstrate that PCL is an extremely useful

  13. Engineered CRISPR Systems for Next Generation Gene Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Michael; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Ebrahimkhani, Mo R; Kiani, Samira

    2017-09-15

    An ideal in vivo gene therapy platform provides safe, reprogrammable, and precise strategies which modulate cell and tissue gene regulatory networks with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), a bacterial adoptive immune system, and its CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have gained attention for the ability to target and modify DNA sequences on demand with unprecedented flexibility and precision. The precision and programmability of Cas9 is derived from its complexation with a guide-RNA (gRNA) that is complementary to a desired genomic sequence. CRISPR systems open-up widespread applications including genetic disease modeling, functional screens, and synthetic gene regulation. The plausibility of in vivo genetic engineering using CRISPR has garnered significant traction as a next generation in vivo therapeutic. However, there are hurdles that need to be addressed before CRISPR-based strategies are fully implemented. Some key issues center on the controllability of the CRISPR platform, including minimizing genomic-off target effects and maximizing in vivo gene editing efficiency, in vivo cellular delivery, and spatial-temporal regulation. The modifiable components of CRISPR systems: Cas9 protein, gRNA, delivery platform, and the form of CRISPR system delivered (DNA, RNA, or ribonucleoprotein) have recently been engineered independently to design a better genome engineering toolbox. This review focuses on evaluating CRISPR potential as a next generation in vivo gene therapy platform and discusses bioengineering advancements that can address challenges associated with clinical translation of this emerging technology.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  15. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  16. 78 FR 26375 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...] Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship... Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE), is announcing a conference entitled ``Redefining the `C' in CGMP: Creating, Implementing and Sustaining a Culture of Quality'' Pharmaceutical Quality System (ICH...

  17. Pharmacomicrobiomics: exploiting the drug-microbiota interactions in anticancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Concetta; Andriulli, Angelo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2018-05-22

    Cancer is a major health burden worldwide, and despite continuous advances in medical therapies, resistance to standard drugs and adverse effects still represent an important cause of therapeutic failure. There is a growing evidence that gut bacteria can affect the response to chemo- and immunotherapeutic drugs by modulating either efficacy or toxicity. Moreover, intratumor bacteria have been shown to modulate chemotherapy response. At the same time, anticancer treatments themselves significantly affect the microbiota composition, thus disrupting homeostasis and exacerbating discomfort to the patient. Here, we review the existing knowledge concerning the role of the microbiota in mediating chemo- and immunotherapy efficacy and toxicity and the ability of these therapeutic options to trigger dysbiotic condition contributing to the severity of side effects. In addition, we discuss the use of probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, postbiotics, and antibiotics as emerging strategies for manipulating the microbiota in order to improve therapeutic outcome or at least ensure patients a better quality of life all along of anticancer treatments.

  18. Vibrio cholerae infection, novel drug targets and phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazil, Mobashar Hussain Urf Turabe; Singh, Durg V

    2011-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. Although antibiotic therapy shortens the duration of diarrhea, excessive use has contributed to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in V. cholerae. Mobile genetic elements have been shown to be largely responsible for the shift of drug resistance genes in bacteria, including some V. cholerae strains. Quorum sensing communication systems are used for interaction among bacteria and for sensing environmental signals. Sequence analysis of the ctxB gene of toxigenic V. cholerae strains demonstrated its presence in multiple cholera toxin genotypes. Moreover, bacteriophage that lyse the bacterium have been reported to modulate epidemics by decreasing the required infectious dose of the bacterium. In this article, we will briefly discuss the disease, its clinical manifestation, antimicrobial resistance and the novel approaches to locate drug targets to treat cholera.

  19. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  20. Should pediatric patients with hyperlipidemia receive drug therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2002-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is now established as a major risk factor for causation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adults; however, there is much debate on the level of coronary risk at which lipid-lowering drugs should be used. These issues of possible harm or lack of benefit from long-term use of lipid-lowering therapy, and cost effectiveness, are also pertinent in the pediatric setting. Evidence from several countries indicates that children have an increasing prevalence of obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Children who have high serum lipids 'track' these increased levels into adulthood. In some countries there is a trend to screen children for hypercholesterolemia. Family history itself is a poor discriminator in determining which children need to be screened and treated. Estimation of apolipoprotein B and/or apolipoprotein E genotype can improve prediction. Measuring high density lipoprotein cholesterol also helps, but obesity appears to be the best marker for screening children at high risk. These considerations should not cloud the need for case finding and treatment of children with genetic disorders. Low fat diets have been shown to be well tolerated and effective in children; however, there are no major long-term studies demonstrating harm or benefit in those on lipid-lowering drugs. Nevertheless, concerns regarding the psychological effect and the theoretical metabolic effects of long-term lipid lowering remain. Lipid-lowering drugs should be generally restricted to children with genetic disorders of lipid metabolism. Children with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or nonlipid-related inherited disorders leading to premature CHD in adults should be treated with diet, and with lipid-lowering drugs when they reach adulthood. Children with secondary hyperlipidemia should be assessed individually. A number of drugs and nutriceuticals are available for use in children, but only a few drugs are licensed for use in children.

  1. [Experimental therapy of cardiac remodeling with quercetin-containing drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, M A; Pavlyuchenko, V B; Tumanovskaya, L V; Dosenko, V E; Moybenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that continuous beta-adrenergic hyperstimulation resulted in cardiac function disturbances and fibrosis of cardiac tissue. Treatment with quercetin-containing drugs, particularly, water-soluble corvitin and tableted quertin exerted favourable effect on cardiac hemodynamics, normalized systolic and diastolic function in cardiac remodeling, induced by sustained beta-adrenergic stimulation. It was estimated that conducted experimental therapy limited cardiac fibrosis area almost three-fold, that could be associated with first and foremost improved cardiac distensibility, characteristics of diastolic and also pump function in cardiac remodeling.

  2. The neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, as a target for drug delivery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Szoka, Francis C

    2015-08-30

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-based drugs are arguably the most successful class of protein therapeutics due in part to their remarkably long blood circulation. This arises from IgG interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn. FcRn is the central regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis throughout life and is increasingly being recognized as an important player in autoimmune disease, mucosal immunity, and tumor immune surveillance. Various engineering approaches that hijack or disrupt the FcRn-mediated transport pathway have been devised to develop long-lasting and non-invasive protein therapeutics, protein subunit vaccines, and therapeutics for treatment of autoimmune and infectious disease. In this review, we highlight the diverse biological functions of FcRn, emerging therapeutic opportunities, as well as the associated challenges of targeting FcRn for drug delivery and disease therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering adeno-associated viruses for clinical gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Schaffer, David V

    2014-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been increasingly successful owing both to an enhanced molecular understanding of human disease and to progressively improving gene delivery technologies. Among these technologies, delivery vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have emerged as safe and effective and, in one recent case, have led to regulatory approval. Although shortcomings in viral vector properties will render extension of such successes to many other human diseases challenging, new approaches to engineer and improve AAV vectors and their genetic cargo are increasingly helping to overcome these barriers.

  4. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs – provision of due diligence in the treatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on “off-label use”. The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug. PMID:24592133

  5. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs - provision of due diligence in the treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Justyna; Zajdel, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on "off-label use". The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug.

  6. Progress in psoriasis therapy via novel drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitha Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment.

  7. 3-D Bioprinting of Neural Tissue for Applications in Cell Therapy and Drug Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of individuals in North America and cost the health-care industry billions of dollars for treatment. Current treatment options for degenerative diseases focus on physical rehabilitation or drug therapies, which temporarily mask the effects of cell damage, but quickly lose their efficacy. Cell therapies for the central nervous system remain an untapped market due to the complexity involved in growing neural tissues, controlling their differentiation, and protecting them from the hostile environment they meet upon implantation. Designing tissue constructs for the discovery of better drug treatments are also limited due to the resolution needed for an accurate cellular representation of the brain, in addition to being expensive and difficult to translate to biocompatible materials. 3-D printing offers a streamlined solution for engineering brain tissue for drug discovery or, in the future, for implantation. New microfluidic and bioplotting devices offer increased resolution, little impact on cell viability and have been tested with several bioink materials including fibrin, collagen, hyaluronic acid, poly(caprolactone, and poly(ethylene glycol. This review details current efforts at bioprinting neural tissue and highlights promising avenues for future work.

  8. Engineering a clinically-useful matrix for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-01-01

    The design criteria for matrices for encapsulation of cells for cell therapy include chemical, biological, engineering, marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints. What is required is a biocompatible material for culture of cells in three-dimensions (3-D) that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility to alter composition and compliance, and a composition that would permit a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo use. The challenge is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild a given tissue. Our approach is to deconstruct the ECM to a few modular components that can be reassembled into biomimetic materials that meet these criteria. These semi-synthetic ECMs (sECMs) employ thiol-modified derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) that can form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels. These sECMs are "living" biopolymers, meaning that they can be crosslinked in the presence of cells or tissues to enable cell therapy and tissue engineering. Moreover, the sECMs allow inclusion of the appropriate biological cues needed to simulate the complexity of the ECM of a given tissue. Taken together, the sECM technology offers a manufacturable, highly reproducible, flexible, FDA-approvable, and affordable vehicle for cell expansion and differentiation in 3-D.

  9. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  10. Hypericin-bearing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery in photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unterweger H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Harald Unterweger,1 Daniel Subatzus,1 Rainer Tietze,1 Christina Janko,1 Marina Poettler,1 Alfons Stiegelschmitt,2 Matthias Schuster,3 Caroline Maake,4 Aldo R Boccaccini,5 Christoph Alexiou11ENT Department, Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung Professorship, University Hospital Erlangen; 2Institute of Glass and Ceramics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 3Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany; 4Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr, Zurich, Switzerland; 5Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Combining the concept of magnetic drug targeting and photodynamic therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. A high selectivity as well as significant fewer side effects can be achieved by this method, since the therapeutic treatment only takes place in the area where accumulation of the particles by an external electromagnet and radiation by a laser system overlap. In this article, a novel hypericin-bearing drug delivery system has been developed by synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs with a hypericin-linked functionalized dextran coating. For that, sterically stabilized dextran-coated SPIONs were produced by coprecipitation and crosslinking with epichlorohydrin to enhance stability. Carboxymethylation of the dextran shell provided a functionalized platform for linking hypericin via glutaraldehyde. Particle sizes obtained by dynamic light scattering were in a range of 55–85 nm, whereas investigation of single magnetite or maghemite particle diameter was performed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and resulted in approximately 4.5–5.0 nm. Surface chemistry of those

  11. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. investigar potenciais interações droga-droga (PDDI) em pacientes infectados com HIV em terapia de antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga

  12. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  13. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  14. [Injecting drug users and antiretroviral therapy: perceptions of pharmacy teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokaichiya, Chizuru Minami; Figueiredo, Wagner dos Santos; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

    2007-12-01

    To understand the perceptions of pharmacy teams about their role in the healthcare assistance challenges and adherence to antiretroviral therapy by injecting drug users living with HIV/AIDS. Qualitative study through focus groups and thematic discourse analysis of pharmacists, technicians and assistants with more than six months of experience with medication supply, in 15 assisting units for STD/AIDS in the city of São Paulo, in 2002. Three groups were formed, totaling 29 participants, originating from 12 out of the 15 existing services, and including 12 university level professionals and 17 high-school level professionals. The groups concluded that the pharmacy has an important role in the antiretroviral drug supply, which is reflected in the treatment adherence, because trust-based relationships can be built up through their procedures. In spite of this, they pointed out that such building-up does not take place through excessively bureaucratic activities. This has negative repercussions for all patients, especially for injecting drug users, considered "difficult people". Such concept sums up their behavior: they are supposed to be confused and incapable to adhere to treatment, and have limited understanding. Staff members, however, affirm they treat these patients equally. They do not realize that, by this acting, the specific needs of injecting drug users may become invisible in the service. There is also the possibility that stigmatizing stereotypes may be created, resulting in yet another barrier to the work on adherence. Although the pharmacy is recommended as a potentially favorable place to listen to and form bonds with users, the results show objective and subjective obstacles to render it suitable for the work on adherence.

  15. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  16. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  17. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  18. Biologic Drugs: A New Target Therapy in COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Ahmed; Brightling, Christopher E

    2018-04-23

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current diagnostic criteria based on the presence of fixed airflow obstruction and symptoms do not integrate the complex pathological changes occurring within the lung and they do not define different airway inflammatory patterns. The current management of COPD is based on 'one size fits all' approach and does not take the importance of heterogeneity in COPD population into account. The available treatments aim to alleviate symptoms and reduce exacerbation frequency but do not alter the course of the disease. Recent advances in molecular biology have furthered our understanding of inflammatory pathways in pathogenesis of COPD and have led to development of targeted therapies (biologics and small molecules) based on predefined biomarkers. Herein we shall review the trials of biologics in COPD and potential future drug developments in the field.

  19. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy for alcohol and drug use disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangé, Bernard P; Marlatt, G Alan

    2008-10-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapies have been successfully used to treat addiction. This article is in part a review on addiction models such as relapse prevention by Marlatt & Gordon, stages of change by Prochaska, DiClemente & Norcross, deriving from motivational interview, developed by Miller & Rollnick, as well as the cognitive models by Beck et al. Based on literature evidence for the development of effective treatment programs, we report on a group treatment model used in a group of alcoholics referred by the Department of Worker's Health Surveillance at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro to the Alcoholism Rehabilitation and Research Center. Results are presented indicating that this type of treatment could be one alternative to others treatments in use. New research is needed to better validate cognitive-behavioral approach to alcohol and drug problems.

  20. Necrotizing gingivostomatitis and osteonecrosis associated with antithyroid drug propylthiouracil therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Haixia; Guan, Xiaobing

    2015-02-01

    A 43-year-old Chinese female had been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism 15 years ago. She was recently administered 150 mg/day propylthiouracil (PTU). After 3 weeks of PTU administration, she developed necrotizing stomatitis and osteonecrosis, most likely due to secondary effects from the PTU treatment. Her neutrophil count was reduced below normal to 0.24×10(9)/L but normalized after withdrawal of PTU therapy. About 1 month after onset, the patient came to our hospital and began to receive intravenous treatments of metronidazole and amoxicillin. Following review of her medical history and a series of clinical and laboratory examinations, the patient was diagnosed with secondary necrotizing gingivostomatitis and osteonecrosis possibly associated with PTU-induced agranulocytosis. One-year after treatment, the patient's oral manifestations remained unchanged. This case demonstrates the need for dental practitioners to more closely monitor oral symptoms in patients with hyperthyroidism treated with antithyroid drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Gerard J.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Thomas G.; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The “Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy” session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  2. The therapy of kidney cancer with biomolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, G; Buonerba, C; Biglietto, M; Scognamiglio, F; Chiurazzi, B; Riccardi, F; Cartenì, G

    2010-11-01

    Over the last few years, targeted agents have assumed a predominant role in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Our aim is to discuss recent developments on this rapidly evolving topic. Sunitinib represents front-line standard treatment for the good- and intermediate prognosis groups of patients with clear cell renal carcinoma. Bevacizumab/interferon and pazopanib have also been FDA-approved as first-line agents, while sorafenib has moved toward second-line and later therapy. Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is recommended as front line therapy for patients in the poor-risk group and is the best front-line choice for patients with non-clear cell histology. Another mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, has shown clinical benefit post-tyrosine kinasis inhibitors failure in a phase III study and is considered the standard of care in this setting. Novel prognostic and efficacy markers might help to define most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Best sequence of use of these effective agents in mRCC patients remains up to the discretion of treating physician. In light of the considerable advances in understanding the biology of mRCC, several new drugs have been recently developed, with an increasing number of treatment options. Several markers are under evaluation for diagnostic, prognostic and efficacy purposes. A treatment algorithm, based on the best scientific evidence produce so far, is presented and it will evolve as data from ongoing trials will be available. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical engineering and medical physics on boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The contents of physical engineering and medical physics that support boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be roughly classified to the four items, (1) neutron irradiation system, (2) development and improvement of dose assessment techniques, (3) development and improvement of dose planning system, and (4) quality assurance and quality control. This paper introduces the BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, with a focus on the basic physics of BNCT, thermal neutron irradiation and epithermal neutron irradiation, heavy water neutron irradiation facilities of KUR, and medical irradiation system of KUR. It also introduces the world's first BNCT clinical cyclotron irradiation system (C-BENS) of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, BNCT dose assessment techniques, dose planning system, and quality assurance and quality control. (A.O.)

  4. Genetic engineering of stem cells for enhanced therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Andrzejewska, Anna; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for overcoming the limitations of current treatment methods. The modification of stem cell properties may be necessary to fully exploit their potential. Genetic engineering, with an abundance of methodology to induce gene expression in a precise and well-controllable manner, is particularly attractive for this purpose. There are virus-based and non-viral methods of genetic manipulation. Genome-integrating viral vectors are usually characterized by highly efficient and long-term transgene expression, at a cost of safety. Non-integrating viruses are also highly efficient in transduction, and, while safer, offer only a limited duration of transgene expression. There is a great diversity of transfectable forms of nucleic acids; however, for efficient shuttling across cell membranes, additional manipulation is required. Both physical and chemical methods have been employed for this purpose. Stem cell engineering for clinical applications is still in its infancy and requires further research. There are two main strategies for inducing transgene expression in therapeutic cells: transient and permanent expression. In many cases, including stem cell trafficking and using cell therapy for the treatment of rapid-onset disease with a short healing process, transient transgene expression may be a sufficient and optimal approach. For that purpose, mRNA-based methods seem ideally suited, as they are characterized by a rapid, highly efficient transfection, with outstanding safety. Permanent transgene expression is primarily based on the application of viral vectors, and, due to safety concerns, these methods are more challenging. There is active, ongoing research toward the development of non-viral methods that would induce permanent expression, such as transposons and mammalian artificial chromosomes.

  5. Genetic engineering and therapy for inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Sharlene; Davis, Jennifer; Westfall, Margaret; Metzger, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    The cardiac myofilaments consist of a highly ordered assembly of proteins that collectively generate force in a calcium-dependent manner. Defects in myofilament function and its regulation have been implicated in various forms of acquired and inherited human heart disease. For example, during cardiac ischemia, cardiac myocyte contractile performance is dramatically downregulated due in part to a reduced sensitivity of the myofilaments to calcium under acidic pH conditions. Over the last several years, the thin filament regulatory protein, troponin I, has been identified as an important mediator of this response. Mutations in troponin I and other sarcomere genes are also linked to several distinct inherited cardiomyopathic phenotypes, including hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathies. With the cardiac sarcomere emerging as a central player for such a diverse array of human heart diseases, genetic-based strategies that target the myofilament will likely have broad therapeutic potential. The development of safe vector systems for efficient gene delivery will be a critical hurdle to overcome before these types of therapies can be successfully applied. Nonetheless, studies focusing on the principles of acute genetic engineering of the sarcomere hold value as they lay the essential foundation on which to build potential gene-based therapies for heart disease.

  6. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiou, Christoph; Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline; Jurgons, Roland; Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz; Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: →Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. → Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. → Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. → HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  7. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, Christoph, E-mail: c.alexiou@web.d [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Jurgons, Roland [Franz Penzoldt Center, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz [PTB Berlin (Germany); Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan [TU Dresden, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lyer, Stefan [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  8. A guided interview process to improve student pharmacists' identification of drug therapy problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovers, John; Miller, Michael J; Koenigsfeld, Carrie; Haack, Sally; Hegge, Karly; McCleeary, Erin

    2011-02-10

    To measure agreement between advanced pharmacy practice experience students using a guided interview process and experienced clinical pharmacists using standard practices to identify drug therapy problems. Student pharmacists enrolled in an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) and clinical pharmacists conducted medication therapy management interviews to identify drug therapy problems in elderly patients recruited from the community. Student pharmacists used a guided interview tool, while clinical pharmacists' interviews were conducted using their usual and customary practices. Student pharmacists also were surveyed to determine their perceptions of the interview tool. Fair to moderate agreement was observed on student and clinical pharmacists' identification of 4 of 7 drug therapy problems. Of those, agreement was significantly higher than chance for 3 drug therapy problems (adverse drug reaction, dosage too high, and needs additional drug therapy) and not significant for 1 (unnecessary drug therapy). Students strongly agreed that the interview tool was useful but agreed less strongly on recommending its use in practice. The guided interview process served as a useful teaching aid to assist student pharmacists to identify drug therapy problems.

  9. [Experience of rapid drug desensitization therapy in the treatment of mycobacterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Watanabe, Masato; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Gotoh, Hajime; Kudoh, Shoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    Drugs for tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial diseases are limited. In particular, no new drugs for non-tuberculosis mycobacterial disease have been developed in recent years. Antimycobacterial drugs have many adverse reactions, for which drug desensitization therapy has been used. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) therapy, including antituberculosis drugs and clarithromycin, has been implemented in many regions in Europe and the United States. We investigated the validity of RDD therapy in Japan. We report our experience with RDD therapy in 13 patients who developed severe drug allergy to antimycobacterial treatment. The desensitization protocol reported by Holland and Cernandas was adapted. The underlying diseases were 7 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease and 6 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Isoniazid was readministered in 2 (100%) of 2 patients; rifampicin, in 8 (67.7%) of 12 patients; ethambutol, in 4 (67.7%) of 6 patients; and clarithromycin, in 2 (100%) of 2 patients. In Japan, the desensitization therapy recommended by the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have been implemented generally. We think RDD therapy is effective and safe as the other desensitization therapy. We will continue to investigate the efficiency of RDD therapy in patients who had discontinued antimycobacterial treatment because of the drug allergic reaction.

  10. Impact of Active Drug Use on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Viral Suppression in HIV-infected Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Arnsten, Julia H; Demas, Penelope A; Grant, Richard W; Gourevitch, Marc N; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Howard, Andrea A; Schoenbaum, Ellie E

    2002-01-01

    Despite a burgeoning literature on adherence to HIV therapies, few studies have examined the impact of ongoing drug use on adherence and viral suppression, and none of these have utilized electronic monitors to quantify adherence among drug users. We used 262 electronic monitors to measure adherence with all antiretrovirals in 85 HIV-infected current and former drug users, and found that active cocaine use, female gender, not receiving Social Security benefits, not being married, screening po...

  11. [Pain therapy in pediatric oncology: pain experience, drugs and pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    Paediatric cancer patients often experience fear and pain from the disease but also in connection with the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The treatment of pain is a priority for all patients, especially for critically ill children because of their vulnerability and limited understanding. The experience of pain is always subjective and depends on the age, the pain experience and the environment.In contrast to adults, it is often difficult to detect character of pain, pain intensity and pain localization in very young patients. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are performed in analgosedation for a given drug scheme by a pediatrician experienced in intensive care.In addition, a local anesthetic for an access system/lumbar punctures in the form of EMLA® patch is to be carried out. A rapid and effective treatment of pain and appropriate analgesia can prevent patients from being traumatized.For severe pain, malignancy- or chemotherapy-induced (eg. mucositis WHO grade 3 and 4) initial use of strong opiates is recommended instead of climbing the WHO ladder. For strong opiates, there is no maximum dose, as long as a dose increase leads to clinically observable increase in analgesia, without severe side effects. Patient-controlled analgesia with morphine as continuous subcutaneous or intravenous infusions and the possibility of a bolus injection is suited for children aged 6 years. A measurement of O2-saturation is essential during this infusion. Prophylactic approaches also must be used consistently in regard to the acute side effect of opiate treatment. Good experience, we have also made a non-drug therapy, e.g. personnel/physical affection, cuddling, massage, etc.The choice of analgesia depends on the nature and cause of pain. In neuropathic pain or phantom pain coanalgetics should be used to effectively treat pain in young patients. Different analgesic treatment approaches of the appropriate indications and adverse effects are presented. A

  12. Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy - Strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui Xue; Wong, Ho Lun; Xue, Hui Yi; Eoh, June Young; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2016-10-28

    Nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations has shown increasing significance in cancer therapy due to its promise in providing superior therapeutic benefits to the current drug combination therapy used in clinical practice. In this article, we will examine the rationale, principles, and advantages of applying nanocarriers to improve anticancer drug combination therapy, review the use of nanocarriers for delivery of a variety of combinations of different classes of anticancer agents including small molecule drugs and biologics, and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of the nanocarrier-based combination therapy. The goal of this review is to provide better understanding of this increasingly important new paradigm of cancer treatment and key considerations for rational design of nanomedicine of synergistic drug combinations for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter ( H .) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  14. Diabetes Insipidus: A Challenging Diagnosis with New Drug Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifan, Chadi; Nasr, Rabih; Mehta, Suchita; Sharma Acharya, Pranab; Perrera, Isera; Faddoul, Giovanni; Nalluri, Nikhil; Kesavan, Mayurakhan; Azzi, Yorg; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is either due to deficient secretion of arginine vasopressin (central) or to tubular unresponsiveness (nephrogenic). Drug induced DI is a well-known entity with an extensive list of medications. Polyuria is generally defined as urine output exceeding 3 liters per day in adults. It is crucial to identify the cause of diabetes insipidus and to implement therapy as early as possible to prevent the electrolyte disturbances and the associated mortality and morbidity. It is very rare to have an idiosyncratic effect after a short use of a medication, and physicians should be aware of such a complication to avoid volume depletion. The diagnosis of diabetes insipidus is very challenging because it relies on laboratory values, urine output, and the physical examination of the patient. A high clinical suspicion of diabetes insipidus should be enough to initiate treatment. The complications related to DI are mostly related to the electrolyte imbalance that can affect the normal physiology of different organ systems. PMID:24977135

  15. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Cost Control and Quality Improvement Requirements § 423.153 Drug utilization... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...

  16. Nano-engineered Drug Combinations for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    transport vehicles for effective delivery of two different cancer drugs. In particular, we aim to use two breast cancer drugs, which enhance each...shell structures,26, 27 and dendrimers .28, 29 To date, very few of these strategies have led to particles with distinct release profiles of multiple

  17. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  18. Engineering Microneedle Patches for Vaccination and Drug Delivery to Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-06-07

    Microneedle patches (MNPs) contain arrays of solid needles measuring hundreds of microns in length that deliver drugs and vaccines into skin in a painless, easy-to-use manner. Optimal MNP design balances multiple interdependent parameters that determine mechanical strength, skin-insertion reliability, drug delivery efficiency, painlessness, manufacturability, and other features of MNPs that affect their performance. MNPs can be made by adapting various microfabrication technologies for delivery of small-molecule drugs, biologics, and vaccines targeted to the skin, which can have pharmacokinetic and immunologic advantages. A small number of human clinical trials, as well as a large and growing market for MNP products for cosmetics, indicate that MNPs can be used safely, efficaciously, and with strong patient acceptance. More advanced clinical trials and commercial-scale manufacturing will facilitate development of MNPs to realize their potential to dramatically increase patient access to otherwise-injectable drugs and to improve drug performance via skin delivery.

  19. Drug therapy for people with mental disorders in the view of nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Bonfim de Alcântara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the perception of nursing professionals about drug therapy for people with mental disorders. Methods: An exploratory qualitative research was carried out in four Psychosocial Care Centers of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Data, collected from January to March 2015 using an individual semi-structured interview applied to 56 nursing professionals, were submitted to qualitative data analysis and interpretation as proposed by Creswell. Results: The data were organized into three thematic categories: drug therapy improves the life of the person with a mental disorder; negative and positive consequences related to drug therapy; and drug therapy as one of the resources needed to treat mental health. Conclusion: Nursing staff perceive the importance of medications as a resource to treat people with mental disorders as psychotropic drugs minimize he acute symptoms of disorders and improve living conditions when associated with other therapeutic resources.

  20. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers and polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery in tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Sumit

    Tissues and organs in vivo are structured in three dimensional (3-D) ordered assemblies to maintain their metabolic functions. In the case of an injury, certain tissues lack the regenerative abilities without an external supportive environment. In order to regenerate the natural in vivo environment post-injury, there is a need to design three-dimensional (3-D) tissue engineered constructs of appropriate dimensions along with strategies that can deliver growth factors or drugs at a controlled rate from such constructs. This thesis focuses on the applications of hydrogen bonded (H-bonded) nanoscale layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled multilayers for time controlled drug delivery, fabrication of polymeric nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers, and engineering 3-D cellular constructs. Axonal regeneration in the central nervous system after spinal cord injury is often disorganized and random. To support linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites, certain growth factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), needs to be delivered at a controlled rate from an array of uniaxial channels patterned in a scaffold. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that H-bonded LbL assembled degradable thin films prepared over agarose hydrogel, whereby the protein was loaded separately from the agarose fabrication, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Further, patterned agarose scaffolds implanted at the site of a spinal cord injury forms a reactive cell layer of leptomeningeal fibroblasts in and around the scaffold. This limits the ability of axons to reinnervate the spinal cord. To address this challenge, we demonstrate the time controlled release of an anti-mitotic agent from agarose hydrdgel to control the growth of the reactive cell layer of fibroblasts. Challenges in tissue engineering can also be addressed using gene therapy approaches. Certain growth factors in the body are known to inhibit

  2. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Neratinib Versus Lapatinib Plus Capecitabine For ErbB2 Positive Advanced Breast Cancer Active, not recruiting No Results Available YES neratinib -9...Drug: Neratinib |Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Capecitabine Efficacy and Safety of BMS-690514 in Combination With Letrozole to Treat Metastatic Breast Cancer

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia: successful antiepileptic drug combination therapy in three refractory cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisco L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lara Prisco1, Mario Ganau2, Federica Bigotto1, Francesca Zornada11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Cattinara, 2Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Antiepileptic drug combination therapy remains an empirical second-line treatment approach in trigeminal neuralgia, after treatment with one antiepileptic drug or other nonantiepileptic drugs have failed. The results in three patients followed in our clinic are not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions, but suggest the possibility of developing this type of therapeutic approach further.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, antiepileptic drugs, combination therapy

  4. Engineering approaches to transdermal drug delivery: a tribute to contributions of prof. Robert Langer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitragotri, S

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery continues to provide an advantageous route of drug administration over injections. While the number of drugs delivered by passive transdermal patches has increased over the years, no macromolecule is currently delivered by the transdermal route. Substantial research efforts have been dedicated by a large number of researchers representing varied disciplines including biology, chemistry, pharmaceutics and engineering to understand, model and overcome the skin's barrier properties. This article focuses on engineering contributions to the field of transdermal drug delivery. The article pays tribute to Prof. Robert Langer, who pioneered the engineering approach towards transdermal drug delivery. Over a period spanning nearly 25 years since his first publication in the field of transdermal drug delivery, Bob Langer has deeply impacted the field by quantitative analysis and innovative engineering. At the same time, he has inspired several generations of engineers by collaborations and mentorship. His scientific insights, innovative technologies, translational efforts and dedicated mentorship have transformed the field. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Light therapy: Methodological issues from an engineering perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; Aries; MD E.J.M. Wouters; Van Someren; Schoutens; Westerlaken; Aarts; Sinoo

    2011-01-01

    Light therapy is increasingly administered and studied as a non-pharmacologic treatment for a variety of health-related problems. Light therapy comes in a variety of ways, ranging from being exposed to daylight to being exposed to light from light boxes and ambient bright light. Light therapy is an

  6. Nature engineered diatom biosilica as drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthappa, U T; Brahmkhatri, Varsha; Sriram, G; Jung, Ho-Young; Yu, Jingxian; Kurkuri, Nikita; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M; Altalhi, Tariq; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Kurkuri, Mahaveer D

    2018-05-14

    Diatoms, unicellular photosynthetic algae covered with siliceous cell wall, are also called frustule. These are the most potential naturally available materials for the development of cost-effective drug delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility, high surface area, low cost and ease of surface modification. Mesoporous silica materials such as MCM-41 and SBA-15 have been extensively used in drug delivery area. Their synthesis is challenging, time consuming, requires toxic chemicals and are energy intensive, making the entire process expensive and non-viable. Therefore, it is necessary to explore alternative materials. Surprisingly, nature has provided some exciting materials called diatoms; biosilica is one such a material that can be potentially used as a drug delivery vehicle. The present review focuses on different types of diatom species used in drug delivery with respect to their structural properties, morphology, purification process and surface functionalization. In this review, recent advances along with their limitations as well as the future scope to develop them as potential drug delivery vehicles are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Key words: Aerobic exercise, drug therapy, blood pressure, randomised controlled trial. African Health Sciences 2013; (1): .... body fat and displayed it on the screen of the meter. ... inelastible tape measure (Butterfly, China). Blood pressure ...

  8. The application of machine learning techniques in the clinical drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Huan-Yu; Jin, Wan-Lin; Yan, Cheng-Kai; Yang, Huan

    2018-05-25

    The development of a novel drug is an extremely complicated process that includes the target identification, design and manufacture, and proper therapy of the novel drug, as well as drug dose selection, drug efficacy evaluation, and adverse drug reaction control. Due to the limited resources, high costs, long duration, and low hit-to-lead ratio in the development of pharmacogenetics and computer technology, machine learning techniques have assisted novel drug development and have gradually received more attention by researchers. According to current research, machine learning techniques are widely applied in the process of the discovery of new drugs and novel drug targets, the decision surrounding proper therapy and drug dose, and the prediction of drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. In this article, we discussed the history, workflow, and advantages and disadvantages of machine learning techniques in the processes mentioned above. Although the advantages of machine learning techniques are fairly obvious, the application of machine learning techniques is currently limited. With further research, the application of machine techniques in drug development could be much more widespread and could potentially be one of the major methods used in drug development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Two drugs are better than one. A short history of combined therapy of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Barbara; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Combined therapy of ovarian cancer has a long history. It has been applied for many years. The first drug which was commonly combined with other chemotherapeutics was cisplatin. It turned out to be effective given together with alkylating agents as well as with taxanes. Another drug which is often the basis of first-line therapy is doxorubicin. The use of traditional chemotherapy is often limited due to side effects. This is why new drugs, targeted specifically at cancer cells (e.g. monoclonal antibodies or epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors), offer a welcome addition when used in combination with conventional anticancer agents. Drugs applied in combination should be synergistic or at least additive. To evaluate the type of interaction between drugs in a plausible sequence, isobolographic analysis is used. This method allows one to assess whether the two agents could make an efficient combination, which might improve the therapy of ovarian cancer.

  10. Antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy: The technological and regulatory challenges of developing drug-biologic hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gregory S

    2015-09-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new class of therapeutic agents that combine the targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with small molecule drugs. The combination of a mAb targeting a cancer-specific antigen with a cytotoxin has tremendous promise as a new type of targeted cancer therapy. Two ADCs have been approved and many more are in clinical development, suggesting that this new class of drugs is coming to the forefront. Because of their unique nature as biologic-small drug hybrids, ADCs are challenging to develop, from both the scientific and regulatory perspectives. This review discusses both these aspects in current practice, and surveys the current state of the art of ADC drug development. Copyright © 2015 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epigenetic polypharmacology: from combination therapy to multitargeted drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lera, Angel R; Ganesan, A

    The modern drug discovery process has largely focused its attention in the so-called magic bullets, single chemical entities that exhibit high selectivity and potency for a particular target. This approach was based on the assumption that the deregulation of a protein was causally linked to a disease state, and the pharmacological intervention through inhibition of the deregulated target was able to restore normal cell function. However, the use of cocktails or multicomponent drugs to address several targets simultaneously is also popular to treat multifactorial diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. We review the state of the art with such combinations that have an epigenetic target as one of their mechanisms of action. Epigenetic drug discovery is a rapidly advancing field, and drugs targeting epigenetic enzymes are in the clinic for the treatment of hematological cancers. Approved and experimental epigenetic drugs are undergoing clinical trials in combination with other therapeutic agents via fused or linked pharmacophores in order to benefit from synergistic effects of polypharmacology. In addition, ligands are being discovered which, as single chemical entities, are able to modulate multiple epigenetic targets simultaneously (multitarget epigenetic drugs). These multiple ligands should in principle have a lower risk of drug-drug interactions and drug resistance compared to cocktails or multicomponent drugs. This new generation may rival the so-called magic bullets in the treatment of diseases that arise as a consequence of the deregulation of multiple signaling pathways provided the challenge of optimization of the activities shown by the pharmacophores with the different targets is addressed.

  12. Molecularly precise dendrimer-drug conjugates with tunable drug release for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Ma, Xinpeng; Murphy, Caitlin J; Jin, Erlei; Sun, Qihang; Shen, Youqing; Van Kirk, Edward A; Murdoch, William J

    2014-10-06

    The structural preciseness of dendrimers makes them perfect drug delivery carriers, particularly in the form of dendrimer-drug conjugates. Current dendrimer-drug conjugates are synthesized by anchoring drug and functional moieties onto the dendrimer peripheral surface. However, functional groups exhibiting the same reactivity make it impossible to precisely control the number and the position of the functional groups and drug molecules anchored to the dendrimer surface. This structural heterogeneity causes variable pharmacokinetics, preventing such conjugates to be translational. Furthermore, the highly hydrophobic drug molecules anchored on the dendrimer periphery can interact with blood components and alter the pharmacokinetic behavior. To address these problems, we herein report molecularly precise dendrimer-drug conjugates with drug moieties buried inside the dendrimers. Surprisingly, the drug release rates of these conjugates were tailorable by the dendrimer generation, surface chemistry, and acidity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  14. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Peptic Ulcers in Patients Receiving Antithrombotic/Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Komori, Keishi; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Munehiro; Nakamura, Norimoto; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kakigao, Kana; Ogino, Haruei; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kabemura, Teppei; Harada, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapies increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The features of hemorrhagic peptic ulcer disease in patients receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were investigated. Methods We investigated the medical records of 485 consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were diagnosed with hemorrhagic gastroduodenal ulcers. The patients treated with antithrombotic agents/NSAIDs were c...

  15. Special issue: engineering toxins for 21st-century therapies: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-12-01

    This special issue on 'Engineering toxins for 21st century therapies' provides a critical review of the current state of multifaceted aspects of toxin research by some of the leading researchers in the field. It also highlights the clinical potential and challenges for development of novel biologics based on engineered toxin derived products. © 2011 The Author Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  16. Stimuli-responsive hydrogels in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Nikhil; Bhardwaj, Ankur; Mehta, Shuchi; Mehta, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels are the three-dimensional network structures obtained from a class of synthetic or natural polymers which can absorb and retain a significant amount of water. Hydrogels are one of the most studied classes of polymer-based controlled drug release. These have attracted considerable attention in biochemical and biomedical fields because of their characteristics, such as swelling in aqueous medium, biocompatibility, pH and temperature sensitivity or sensitivity towards other stimuli, which can be utilized for their controlled zero-order release. The hydrogels are expected to explore new generation of self-regulated delivery system having a wide array of desirable properties. This review highlights the exciting opportunities and challenges in the area of hydrogels. Here, we review different literatures on stimuli-sensitive hydrogels, such as role of temperature, electric potential, pH and ionic strength to control the release of drug from hydrogels.

  17. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two…

  18. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for NonOpioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials...

  19. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, M.B.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Jorgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to…

  1. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  2. Unfavourable effect of prolonged treatment with antithyroid drugs on radioiodine therapy outcome in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Rajić, Milena; Vlajković, Marina; Ilić, Slobodan; Stević, Miloš; Sekulić, Vladan; Zečević, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) of Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is usually recommended after failure of primary therapy with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), which are commonly prescribed for up to 18-24 months. However, in our region, the prolonged ATDs treatment of the disease is very common. Thus, we assessed the efficacy of RIT after prolonged continual pretreatment with ATDs in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Therapy outcome using a single dose of radioiodine was evaluated after one year in 91 patients (f/m...

  3. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome secondary to hepatitis C antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Liana; Cotruta, Bogdan; Trifu, Viorel; Cotruta, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gheorghe, Cristian

    2008-09-01

    Pegylated interferon-alpha in combination with ribavirin currently represents the therapeutic standard for the hepatitis C virus infection. Interferon based therapy may be responsible for many cutaneous side effects. We report a case of drug-induced Sweet's syndrome secondary to hepatitis C antiviral therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Sweet's syndrome in association with pegylated interferon-alpha therapy.

  4. A review of over-the-counter drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmay, J B; Wertheimer, A I

    1979-01-01

    The authors review the extent of the use of nonprescription drugs as well as possible variables influencing such consumption. Various studies indicate that age, sex, personality characteristics, perceptions of health status, socioeconomic factors, parental example, and pharmacists all play parts in determining over-the-counter (OTC) drug utilization. Several sources express concern about the inaccessibility of accurate OTC drug information to the consumer. Indeed, even the FDA has occasional difficulty obtaining reliable facts on both the numbers and formulae of such products. Several studies indicate that consumers acquire information about their home remedies through advertising, friends and relatives, physicians, pharmacists, and product labels. By far the most influential of these is advertising, and much concern has been voiced over consumers' unquestioning faith in drug ads. Examples are cited of deceptive, inaccurate, and unfair advertising practices used by some OTC drug manufacturers. The pros and cons of the "drug-oriented society" theory are discussed, including an analysis of its underlying origins. Testing of the safety and efficacy of nonrescription remedies has proved to be controversial, especially when considering the ramifications of the placebo effect. Different surveys report widespread misuse of OTC's by consumers through overuse, taking several drugs concurrently, and using home remedies to treat potentially serious diseases.

  5. Light therapy: Methodological issues from an engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MD E.J.M. Wouters; AC Westerlaken; MBC Aries; AMC Schoutens; MM Sinoo; Joost van Hoof; MPJ Aarts

    2012-01-01

    Light therapy is increasingly administered and studied as a non-pharmacologic treatment for a variety of health-related problems, including treatment of people with dementia. Light therapy comes in a variety of ways, ranging from being exposed to daylight, to being exposed to light emitted by light

  6. Light therapy: Methodological issues from an engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Westerlaken; A.M.C. Schoutens; M.P.J. Aarts; M.B.C. Aries; M.M. Sinoo; J. van Hoof; E.J.M. Wouters

    2012-01-01

    Light therapy is increasingly administered and studied as a non-pharmacologic treatment for a variety of healthrelated problems, including treatment of people with dementia. Light therapy comes in a variety of ways, ranging from being exposed to daylight, to being exposed to light emitted by light

  7. Light therapy : methodological issues from an engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van J.; Westerlaken, A.C.; Aarts, M.P.J.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Schoutens, A.M.C.; Sinoo, M.M.; Aries, M.B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Light therapy is increasingly administered and studied as a non-pharmacologic treatment for a variety of healthrelated problems, including treatment of people with dementia. Light therapy comes in a variety of ways, ranging from being exposed to daylight, to being exposed to light emitted by light

  8. Engineering applications of nanotechnology from energy to drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Nor

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the use of nanotechnology in several fields of engineering. Among others, the reader will find valuable information as to how nanotechnology can aid in extending the life of component materials exposed to corrosive atmospheres, in thermal fluid energy conversion processes, anti-reflection coatings on photovoltaic cells to yield enhanced output from solar cells, in connection with friction and wear reduction in automobiles, and buoyancy suppression in free convective heat transfer. Moreover, this unique resource presents the latest research on nanoscale transport phenomena and concludes with a look at likely future trends.

  9. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adibe et al. Trop J Pharm Res, March 2017; 16(3): 697 .... suggestions to address medication problems, ..... Preventable drug-related hospital admissions. Ann. Pharmacother. 2002;. 36: .... geriatric hospitalized patients in yogyakarta hospitals,.

  10. Use of Gestalt Therapy Within a Drug Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideroff, Stephen I.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a Gestalt therapeutic approach that has shown promise within a drug treatment program. The major issues discussed include the acquisition of self-support, taking responsibility, dealing with anxiety, contact, and the expression of pent-up feelings. (Author)

  11. Regenerative therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finosh, G.T.; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of myocardium through regenerative therapy and tissue engineering is appearing as a prospective treatment modality for patients with end-stage heart failure. Focusing on this area, this review highlights the new developments and challenges in the regeneration of myocardial tissue. The role of various cell sources, calcium ion and cytokine on the functional performance of regenerative therapy is discussed. The evolution of tissue engineering and the role of tissue matrix/scaffold, cell adhesion and vascularisation on tissue engineering of cardiac tissue implant are also discussed. PMID:23507781

  12. Risk assessment principle for engineered nanotechnology in food and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myungsil; Lee, Eun Ji; Kweon, Se Young; Park, Mi Sun; Jeong, Ji Yoon; Um, Jun Ho; Kim, Sun Ah; Han, Bum Suk; Lee, Kwang Ho; Yoon, Hae Jung

    2012-06-01

    While the ability to develop nanomaterials and incorporate them into products is advancing rapidly worldwide, understanding of the potential health safety effects of nanomaterials has proceeded at a much slower pace. Since 2008, Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) started an investigation to prepare "Strategic Action Plan" to evaluate safety and nano risk management associated with foods, drugs, medical devices and cosmetics using nano-scale materials. Although there are some studies related to potential risk of nanomaterials, physical-chemical characterization of nanomaterials is not clear yet and these do not offer enough information due to their limitations. Their uncertainties make it impossible to determine whether nanomaterials are actually hazardous to human. According to the above mention, we have some problems to conduct the human exposure risk assessment currently. On the other hand, uncertainty about safety may lead to polarized public debate and to businesses unwillingness for further nanotechnology investigation. Therefore, the criteria and methods to assess possible adverse effects of nanomaterials have been vigorously taken into consideration by many international organizations: the World Health Organization, the Organization for Economic and Commercial Development and the European Commission. The object of this study was to develop risk assessment principles for safety management of future nanoproducts and also to identify areas of research to strengthen risk assessment for nanomaterials. The research roadmaps which were proposed in this study will be helpful to fill up the current gaps in knowledge relevant nano risk assessment.

  13. Site-specific antibody-drug conjugates: the nexus of bioorthogonal chemistry, protein engineering, and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Paresh; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-02-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the specificity of antibodies with the potency of small molecules to create targeted drugs. Despite the simplicity of this concept, generation of clinically successful ADCs has been very difficult. Over the past several decades, scientists have learned a great deal about the constraints on antibodies, linkers, and drugs as they relate to successful construction of ADCs. Once these components are in hand, most ADCs are prepared by nonspecific modification of antibody lysine or cysteine residues with drug-linker reagents, which results in heterogeneous product mixtures that cannot be further purified. With advances in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering, there is growing interest in producing ADCs by site-specific conjugation to the antibody, yielding more homogeneous products that have demonstrated benefits over their heterogeneous counterparts in vivo. Here, we chronicle the development of a multitude of site-specific conjugation strategies for assembly of ADCs and provide a comprehensive account of key advances and their roots in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering.

  14. Overview on zein protein: a promising pharmaceutical excipient in drug delivery systems and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Gihan

    2018-01-01

    Natural pharmaceutical excipients have been applied extensively in the past decades owing to their safety and biocompatibility. Zein, a natural protein of plant origin offers great benefit over other synthetic polymers used in controlled drug and biomedical delivery systems. It was used in a variety of medical fields including pharmaceutical and biomedical drug targeting, vaccine, tissue engineering, and gene delivery. Being biodegradable and biocompatible, the current review focuses on the history and the medical application of zein as an attractive still promising biopolymer. Areas covered: The current review gives a broadscope on zein as a still promising protein excipient in different fields. Zein- based drug and biomedical delivery systems are discussed with special focus on current and potential application in controlled drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. Expert opinion: Zein as a protein of natural origin can still be considered a promising polymer in the field of drug delivery systems as well as in tissue engineering. Although different researchers spotted light on zein application in different industrial fields extensively, the feasibility of its use in the field of drug delivery replenished by investigators in recent years has not yet been fully approached.

  15. Interventional procedures and future drug therapy for hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Melvin D.; Sobotka, Paul A.; Pathak, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension management poses a major challenge to clinicians globally once non-drug (lifestyle) measures have failed to control blood pressure (BP). Although drug treatment strategies to lower BP are well described, poor control rates of hypertension, even in the first world, suggest that more needs to be done to surmount the problem. A major issue is non-adherence to antihypertensive drugs, which is caused in part by drug intolerance due to side effects. More effective antihypertensive drugs are therefore required which have excellent tolerability and safety profiles in addition to being efficacious. For those patients who either do not tolerate or wish to take medication for hypertension or in whom BP control is not attained despite multiple antihypertensives, a novel class of interventional procedures to manage hypertension has emerged. While most of these target various aspects of the sympathetic nervous system regulation of BP, an additional procedure is now available, which addresses mechanical aspects of the circulation. Most of these new devices are supported by early and encouraging evidence for both safety and efficacy, although it is clear that more rigorous randomized controlled trial data will be essential before any of the technologies can be adopted as a standard of care. PMID:27406184

  16. Biomacromolecules as carriers in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujie; Sun, Tao; Jiang, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Natural biomacromolecules have attracted increased attention as carriers in biomedicine in recent years because of their inherent biochemical and biophysical properties including renewability, nontoxicity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, long blood circulation time and targeting ability. Recent advances in our understanding of the biological functions of natural-origin biomacromolecules and the progress in the study of biological drug carriers indicate that such carriers may have advantages over synthetic material-based carriers in terms of half-life, stability, safety and ease of manufacture. In this review, we give a brief introduction to the biochemical properties of the widely used biomacromolecule-based carriers such as albumin, lipoproteins and polysaccharides. Then examples from the clinic and in recent laboratory development are summarized. Finally the current challenges and future prospects of present biological carriers are discussed.

  17. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  18. Nano-engineered titanium for enhanced bone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Karan; Atkins, Gerald J.; Findlay, David M.; Losic, Dusan

    2013-09-01

    Current treatment of a number of orthopaedic conditions, for example fractures, bone infection, joint replacement and bone cancers, could be improved if mechanical support could be combined with drug delivery. A very challenging example is that of infection following joint replacement, which is very difficult to treat, can require multiple surgeries and compromises both the implant and the patient's wellbeing. An implant capable of providing appropriate biomechanics and releasing drugs/proteins locally might ensure improved healing of the traumatized bone. We propose fabrication of nanoengineered titanium bone implants using bioinert titanium wires in order to achieve this goal. Titanium in the form of flat foils and wires were modified by fabrication of titania nanotubes (TNTs), which are hollow self-ordered cylindrical tubes capable of accommodating substantial drug amounts and releasing them locally. To further control the release of drug to over a period of months, a thin layer of biodegradable polymer PLGA poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) was coated onto the drug loaded TNTs. This delayed release of drug and additionally the polymer enhanced bone cell adhesion and proliferation.

  19. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  1. The Impact of Breakthrough Therapy Designation on Development Strategies and Timelines for Nononcology Drugs and Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, A F; Murphy, W R

    2016-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA, 2012) introduced the Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD), a new tool to expedite development of medicines to treat serious or life-threatening diseases. The majority of BTDs have gone to oncology drugs, and a recent publication by Shea et al. 1 reviewed the impact of BTD on oncology drug development. This article reviews the impact of BTD on development strategies and timelines for nononcology drugs. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. The comprehension of drug therapy in elderly in a family health unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Martinghi Spinola Moretti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The complex therapeutic regimen and aging changes contribute to the difficulty of understanding the drug therapy and treatment adherence. Objective: To evaluate the comprehension of drug therapy for elderly identifying the limiting factors to its adherence to the treatment. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory and quantitative study using na evaluation questionnaire of the comprehension of the drug therapy, mini-mental state examination and the Lawton scale in patients from the Adult Program of a Family Health Unit, in nearby São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Data were analyzed by χ2 tests or Fisher’s exact test, of Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis. Results: The sample consisted of 50 elderly patients with diabetes and/or arterial hypertension with the average age of 68.8 years and low education. Only 30% of them knew the name of the medications that they make use of, 6% understood the letter of the prescription, 24% thought there is no need to take their medications when they feel good; and 20% have abandoned treatment sometime. The factors that influenced the comprehension of the drug therapy were marital status, family composition, cognitive status, number of pills/day and level of education. Conclusion: The lack of understanding by the elderly about their drug therapy may hinder to its adherence to the treatment, lead to poor control of symptoms, and interfere directly in their health and quality of life.

  3. A Drug Discovery Partnership for Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    antagonists) and then virtually screen the USDA Phytochemical, Chinese Herbal Medicine , and the FDA Marketed Drug Databases for new estrogens. Task 1...and antagonists that are in the registered pharmaceuticals and herbal medicine databases. The 29 analogs obtained have been characterized for...Marleesa Bastian, Technician at Xavier University (Sridhar lab and is now pursuing graduation at Meharry Medical College school of Medicine , Tennessee

  4. Patient compliance with drug therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Khan, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    To determine compliance and factors affecting compliance to antiresorptive drugs in osteoporosis, and to compare compliant and non compliant groups in a tertiary care setting. A total of 800 patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included in the study. The demographic and reproductive characteristics of all the patients were recorded. Type of antiresorptive drugs prescribed, degree of compliance, time and reasons for discontinuation were studied and analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 64 (+-9) years and their mean duration of follow-up 18 (+-5) months. The prevalence of risk factors for osteoporosis were evenly distributed among treatment groups; 73% patients had a co-morbidity besides osteoporosis while 27% were osteoporotic alone. One or more previous vertebral fractures due to osteoporosis was reported by 14.5% of patients, whereas 35.5% had at least one non-vertebral fracture in their medical history. Out of the total patients 21.5% discontinued the prescribed drug before attending the bone mass re-evaluations, more than half of these within first six months of starting the drugs. The medication that was most frequently discontinued within one year was calcium and vitamin-D (33.7%, p<0.01) while the least discontinued medication was Alendronate (5.9%, p < 0.01) which is taken once a week. In this study the most important determinant of compliance was the type of drug prescribed and its dose frequency, with a definite preference for Alendronate once a week. Treatment compliance was particularly poor for calcium and vitamin-D regimen, thereby emphasizing the need to find new ways of administering supplements, particularly for vitamin-D. (author)

  5. Modulating Cytotoxic Effector Functions by Fc Engineering to Improve Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Christian; Otte, Anna; Cappuzzello, Elisa; Klausz, Katja; Peipp, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    In the last two decades, monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the therapy of cancer patients. Although antibody therapy has continuously been improved, still a significant number of patients do not benefit from antibody therapy. Therefore, rational optimization of the antibody molecule by Fc engineering represents a major area of translational research to further improve this potent therapeutic option. Monoclonal antibodies are able to trigger a variety of effector mechanisms. Especially Fc-mediated effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement- dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) are considered important in antibody therapy of cancer. Novel mechanistic insights into the action of monoclonal antibodies allowed the development of various Fc engineering approaches to modulate antibodies' effector functions. Strategies in modifying the Fc glycosylation profile (Fc glyco-engineering) or approaches in engineering the protein backbone (Fc protein engineering) have been intensively evaluated. In the current review, Fc engineering strategies resulting in improved ADCC, ADCP and CDC activity are summarized and discussed.

  6. Drug therapy problems identification by clinical pharmacists in a private hospital in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoud, T; Waheedi, M; Lemay, J; Awad, A

    2018-05-01

    To report the types and frequency of drug therapy problems (DTPs) identified and the physician acceptance of the clinical pharmacist interventions in a private hospital in Kuwait. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 3500 patients admitted to the hospital between December 2010 and April 2013. A structured approach was used to identify DTPs and recommend interventions. Data were analyzed using MAXQDA version 11. A total of 670 DTPs were identified and recommendations were proposed to treating physicians for each DTP. Overdosage was the most frequently identified drug therapy problem (30.8%), followed by low dosage (17.6%), unnecessary drug therapy (17.3%), need for additional drug therapy (11.6%), and need for different drug product (11.6%). The drug classes most frequently involved were anti-infectives (36.9%), analgesics (25.2%), and gastrointestinal agents (15.5%). More than two-third of the interventions (67.5%) were accepted and implemented by physicians. The most frequently accepted interventions were related to nonadherence, adverse drug reaction, monitoring parameters, inappropriate dosage, and need for additional drug therapy. The current findings expand the existing body of data by reporting on pharmacist recommendations of identified DTPs and importantly, their high rate of acceptance and implementation by the treating physician. These results could serve as a springboard to support further development and implementation of clinical pharmacy services in other healthcare settings in Kuwait. Copyright © 2018 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanotechnology in drug delivery and tissue engineering: from discovery to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinjun; Votruba, Alexander R; Farokhzad, Omid C; Langer, Robert

    2010-09-08

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine, referred to as nanomedicine, is offering numerous exciting possibilities in healthcare. Herein, we discuss two important aspects of nanomedicine, drug delivery and tissue engineering, highlighting the advances we have recently experienced, the challenges we are currently facing, and what we are likely to witness in the near future.

  9. Medical applications of membranes: Drug delivery, artificial organs and tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Papenburg, B.J.; Girones nogue, Miriam; Saiful, S.; Bettahalli Narasimha, M.S.; Schmitmeier, Stephanie; Wessling, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    This paper covers the main medical applications of artificial membranes. Specific attention is given to drug delivery systems, artificial organs and tissue engineering which seem to dominate the interest of the membrane community this period. In all cases, the materials, methods and the current

  10. In vivo drug release behavior and osseointegration of a doxorubicin-loaded tissue-engineered scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ming; Chen, Muwan; Wang, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue-engineered scaffolds with therapeutic effects must meet the basic requirements as to support bone healing at the defect side and to release an effect drug within the therapeutic window. Here, a rapid prototyped PCL scaffold embedded with chitosan/nanoclay/β-tricalcium phosphate...

  11. Multi-Scale Validation of a Nanodiamond Drug Delivery System and Multi-Scale Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Michelle Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation has two primary concerns: (i) evaluating the uncertainty and prediction capabilities of a nanodiamond drug delivery model using Bayesian calibration and bias correction, and (ii) determining conceptual difficulties of multi-scale analysis from an engineering education perspective. A Bayesian uncertainty quantification scheme…

  12. Non-viral gene therapy for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Fiona; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of using gene therapy for bone regeneration have been extensively investigated. Improvements in the design of new transfection agents, combining vectors and delivery/release systems to diminish cytotoxicity and increase transfection efficiencies have led to several successful in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo strategies. These include growth factor or short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, or even enzyme replacement therapies, and have led to increased osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in vivo. These results provide optimism to consider use in humans with some of these gene-delivery strategies in the near future.

  13. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched...... the shortest seizures, etomidate and ketamine the longest. Etomidate and ketamine+propofol 1 : 1 seems to yield the seizures with best quality. Seizure quality is improved when induction of ECT is delayed until the effect of the anaesthetic has waned - possibly monitored with BIS values. Manual...

  14. Microsponges based novel drug delivery system for augmented arthritis therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Osmani, Riyaz Ali M.; Aloorkar, Nagesh H.; Ingale, Dipti J.; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K.; Hani, Umme; Bhosale, Rohit R.; Jayachandra Dev, Dandasi

    2015-01-01

    The motive behind present work was to formulate and evaluate gel containing microsponges of diclofenac diethylamine to provide prolonged release for proficient arthritis therapy. Quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method was implied using Eudragit RS-100 and microsponges with varied drug–polymer ratios were prepared. For the sake of optimization, diverse factors affecting microparticles physical properties were too investigated. Microsponges were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR, XRPD and parti...

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Handa, Hitesh; Mao, Guangzhao; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-02-01

    Drug resistance limits the success of many anticancer drugs. Reduced accumulation of the drug at its intracellular site of action because of overexpression of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major mechanism of drug resistance. In this study, we investigated whether photodynamic therapy (PDT) using methylene blue, also a P-gp inhibitor, can be used to enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells. Aerosol OT (AOT)-alginate nanoparticles were used as a carrier for the simultaneous cellular delivery of doxorubicin and methylene blue. Methylene blue was photoactivated using light of 665 nm wavelength. Induction of apoptosis and necrosis following treatment with combination chemotherapy and PDT was investigated in drug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Effect of encapsulation in nanoparticles on the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and methylene blue was investigated qualitatively using fluorescence microscopy and was quantitated using HPLC. Encapsulation in AOT-alginate nanoparticles significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of combination therapy in resistant tumor cells. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in a significant induction of both apoptosis and necrosis. Improvement in cytotoxicity could be correlated with enhanced intracellular and nuclear delivery of the two drugs. Further, nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production compared to single drug treatment. In conclusion, nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and PDT using doxorubicin and methylene blue was able to overcome resistance mechanisms and resulted in improved cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells.

  16. Non-viral gene therapy for bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.

    2013-01-01

    In bone tissue engineering bone morphogentic protein-2 (BMP-2) is one of the most commonly used growth factors. It induces stem cells to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage to form new bone. Clinically however, high dosages of protein are administered due to fast degradation, which is

  17. Trends in discovery of new drugs for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Giovanna; Pasca, Maria Rosalia

    2014-09-01

    After the introduction of isoniazid and rifampicin, the second one discovered in the Lepetit Research Laboratories (Milan, Italy), under the supervision of Professor Piero Sensi, tuberculosis (TB) was considered an illness of the past. Unfortunately, this infectious disease is still a global health fear, due to the multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and extensively circulating drug-resistant strains, as well as the unrecognized TB transmission, especially in regions with high HIV incidence. In the last few years, new antitubercular molecules appeared on the horizon both in preclinical and clinical stage of evaluation. In this review, we focus on a few of them and on their mechanism of action. Two new promising drug targets, DprE1 and MmpL3, are also discussed.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar; Singh, Satyawan

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  19. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field.

  20. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar, E-mail: swatantrakushwaha@yahoo.co.in [Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Singh, Satyawan [Saroj Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (India)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  1. Drug-releasing nano-engineered titanium implants: therapeutic efficacy in 3D cell culture model, controlled release and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, Karan [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kogawa, Masakazu; Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M. [Discipline of Orthopaedics and Trauma, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Atkins, Gerald J., E-mail: gerald.atkins@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Orthopaedics and Trauma, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Losic, Dusan, E-mail: dusan.losic@adelaide.edu.au [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing demand for new approaches for treating localized bone pathologies. Here we propose a new strategy for treatment of such conditions, via local delivery of hormones/drugs to the trauma site using drug releasing nano-engineered implants. The proposed implants were prepared in the form of small Ti wires/needles with a nano-engineered oxide layer composed of array of titania nanotubes (TNTs). TNTs implants were inserted into a 3D collagen gel matrix containing human osteoblast-like, and the results confirmed cell migration onto the implants and their attachment and spread. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, TNTs/Ti wires loaded with parathyroid hormone (PTH), an approved anabolic therapeutic for the treatment of severe bone fractures, were inserted into 3D gels containing osteoblast-like cells. Gene expression studies revealed a suppression of SOST (sclerostin) and an increase in RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) mRNA expression, confirming the release of PTH from TNTs at concentrations sufficient to alter cell function. The performance of the TNTs wire implants using an example of a drug needed at relatively higher concentrations, the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin, is also demonstrated. Finally, the mechanical stability of the prepared implants was tested by their insertion into bovine trabecular bone cores ex vivo followed by retrieval, which confirmed the robustness of the TNT structures. This study provides proof of principle for the suitability of the TNT/Ti wire implants for localized bone therapy, which can be customized to cater for specific therapeutic requirements. - Highlights: • Ti wire with titania nanotubes (TNTs) are proposed as ‘in-bone’ therapeutic implants. • 3D cell culture model is used to confirm therapeutic efficacy of drug releasing implants. Osteoblasts migrated and firmly attached to the TNTs and the micro-scale cracks. • Tailorable drug loading from few nanograms to several hundred

  2. Tubulin Inhibitor-Based Antibody-Drug Conjugates for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs are a class of highly potent biopharmaceutical drugs generated by conjugating cytotoxic drugs with specific monoclonal antibodies through appropriate linkers. Specific antibodies used to guide potent warheads to tumor tissues can effectively reduce undesired side effects of the cytotoxic drugs. An in-depth understanding of antibodies, linkers, conjugation strategies, cytotoxic drugs, and their molecular targets has led to the successful development of several approved ADCs. These ADCs are powerful therapeutics for cancer treatment, enabling wider therapeutic windows, improved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, and enhanced efficacy. Since tubulin inhibitors are one of the most successful cytotoxic drugs in the ADC armamentarium, this review focuses on the progress in tubulin inhibitor-based ADCs, as well as lessons learned from the unsuccessful ADCs containing tubulin inhibitors. This review should be helpful to facilitate future development of new generations of tubulin inhibitor-based ADCs for cancer therapy.

  3. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  4. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    ), Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), and Psychoeducational Therapy (PET)). RESULTS Our main objective was to evaluate the current evidence on the effect of CBT on abstinence and drug use reduction for young people in outpatient treatment for non-opioid drug use. Seven randomised trials, involving 953......, and PET ) with respect to reduction in young people’s drug use. The evidence drawn from this systematic review is based on seven included studies analysed in two separate analyses, depending on whether the intervention was CBT with an add-on component such as motivational interviewing (four studies......) or CBT without an add-on component (three studies). The seven studies are very different in terms of their findings regarding the effects of CBT interventions compared to other interventions (ACRA, CBOP (+ACC), DHPE, FFT, IT, MDFT, and PET ) on young people’s drug use. Therefore, the overall conclusion...

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a rapid prototyped tissue engineering scaffold with embedded multicomponent matrix for controlled drug release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Muwan; Le, Dang Q S; Hein, San

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering implants with sustained local drug delivery provide an opportunity for better postoperative care for bone tumor patients because these implants offer sustained drug release at the tumor site and reduce systemic side effects. A rapid prototyped macroporous polycaprolactone......, this scaffold can fulfill the requirements for both bone tissue engineering and local sustained release of an anticancer drug in vitro. These results suggest that the scaffold can be used clinically in reconstructive surgery after bone tumor resection. Moreover, by changing the composition and amount...... of individual components, the scaffold can find application in other tissue engineering areas that need local sustained release of drug....

  6. Continuous Drug Infusion for Diabetes Therapy: A Closed-Loop Control System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While a typical way for diabetes therapy is discrete insulin infusion based on long-time interval measurement, in this paper, we design a closed-loop control system for continuous drug infusion to improve the traditional discrete methods and make diabetes therapy automatic in practice. By exploring the accumulative function of drug to insulin, a continuous injection model is proposed. Based on this model, proportional-integral-derivative (PID and fuzzy logic controllers are designed to tackle a control problem of the resulting highly nonlinear plant. Even with serious disturbance of glucose, such as nutrition absorption at meal time, the proposed scheme can perform well in simulation experiments.

  7. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  8. NIR responsive liposomal system for rapid release of drugs in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen MM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Mao Chen,1 Yuan-Yuan Liu,1 Guang-Hao Su,2 Fei-Fei Song,1 Yan Liu,3 Qi-Qing Zhang1,4 1Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, 2Institute of Pediatric Research, Children’s Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 3State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, 4Key Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To design a rapid release liposomal system for cancer therapy, a NIR responsive bubble-generating thermosensitive liposome (BTSL system combined with photothermal agent (Cypate, doxorubicin (DOX, and NH4HCO3 was developed. Cypate/DOX-BTSL exhibited a good aqueous stability, photostability, and photothermal effect. In vitro release suggested that the amounts of DOX released from BTSL were obviously higher than that of (NH42SO4 liposomes at 42°C. After NIR irradiation, the hyperthermic temperature induced by Cypate led to the decomposition of NH4HCO3 and the generation of a large number of CO2 bubbles, triggering a rapid release of drugs. Confocal laser scanning microscope and acridine orange staining indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL upon irradiation could facilitate to disrupt the lysosomal membranes and realize endolysosomal escape into cytosol, improving the intracellular uptake of DOX clearly. MTT and trypan blue staining implied that the cell damage of Cypate/DOX-BTSL with NIR irradiation was more severe than that in the groups without irradiation. In vivo results indicated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL with irradiation could dramatically increase the accumulation of DOX in tumor, inhibit tumor growth, and reduce systemic side effects of DOX. These data demonstrated that Cypate/DOX-BTSL has the potential to be used as a NIR responsive liposomal system for a rapid

  9. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanis...

  11. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells--metastases suppressor factors as change agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50-60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles.

  12. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  13. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  14. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  15. Antithyroid Drug Therapy for Graves' Disease and Implications for Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism worldwide. Current therapeutic options for GD include antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, and thyroidectomy. ATD treatment is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians due to some advantages including normalizing thyroid function in a short time, hardly causing hypothyroidism, and ameliorating immune disorder while avoiding radiation exposure and invasive procedures. However, the relatively high recurrence rate is a major concern for ATD treatment, which is associated with multiple influencing factors like clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and genetic and environmental factors. Of these influencing factors, some are modifiable but some are nonmodifiable. The recurrence risk can be reduced by adjusting the modifiable factors as much as possible. The titration regimen for 12–18 months is the optimal strategy of ATD. Levothyroxine administration after successful ATD treatment was not recommended. The addition of immunosuppressive drugs might be helpful to decrease the recurrence rate of GD patients after ATD withdrawal, whereas further studies are needed to address the safety and efficacy. This paper reviewed the current knowledge of ATD treatment and mainly focused on influencing factors for recurrence in GD patients with ATD treatment. PMID:28529524

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Chen, Di; Patil, Yogesh; Ma, Linan; Dou, Q Ping; Shekhar, Malathy P V; Panyam, Jayanth

    2010-01-25

    Tumor drug resistance significantly limits the success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Tumor cells utilize multiple mechanisms to prevent the accumulation of anticancer drugs at their intracellular site of action. In this study, we investigated the anticancer efficacy of doxorubicin in combination with photodynamic therapy using methylene blue in a drug-resistant mouse tumor model. Surfactant-polymer hybrid nanoparticles formulated using an anionic surfactant, Aerosol-OT (AOT), and a naturally occurring polysaccharide polymer, sodium alginate, were used for synchronized delivery of the two drugs. Balb/c mice bearing syngeneic JC tumors (mammary adenocarcinoma) were used as a drug-resistant tumor model. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved animal survival. Nanoparticle-mediated combination treatment resulted in enhanced tumor accumulation of both doxorubicin and methylene blue, significant inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, and increased induction of apoptosis. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy using doxorubicin and methylene blue has significant therapeutic potential against drug-resistant tumors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal engineering of lactose using electrospray technology: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharvil; Mahadik, Abhijeet; Nalawade, Pradeep; More, Priyesh

    2017-12-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) consisting of a powder mixture containing coarse carrier particles (generally lactose) and micronized drug particles are used for lung drug delivery. The effective drug delivery to the lungs depends on size and shape of carrier particles. Thus, various methods have been proposed for engineering lactose particles to enhance drug delivery to lungs. The objective of current work was to assess suitability of electrospray technology toward crystal engineering of lactose. Further, utility of the prepared lactose particles as a carrier in DPI was evaluated. Saturated lactose solutions were electrosprayed to obtain electrosprayed lactose (EL) particles. The polymorphic form of EL was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, morphological, surface textural, and flow properties of EL were determined using scanning electron microscopy and Carr's index, respectively. The aerosolization properties of EL were determined using twin-stage impinger and compared with commercial lactose particles [Respitose ® (SV003, Goch, Germany)] used in DPI formulations. EL was found to contain both isomers (α and β) of lactose having flow properties comparable to Respitose ® (SV003). In addition, the aerosolization properties of EL were found to be significantly improved when compared to Respitose ® (SV003) which could be attributed to morphological (high elongation ratio) and surface characteristic (smooth surface) alterations induced by electrospray technology. Electrospray technology can serve as an alternative technique for continuous manufacturing of engineered lactose particles which can be used as a carrier in DPI formulations.

  18. Bisphosphonate Treatment in Osteoporosis: Optimal Duration of Therapy and the Incorporation of a Drug Holiday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Jordan C; Gianakos, Arianna; Lane, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely used treatment for osteoporosis. They accumulate in the bone for years, and therefore, their inhibitory effects on osteoclasts may persist after drug discontinuation. The ideal duration of therapy remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to review the literature to determine the (1) indications for drug holiday, (2) the duration of drug holiday, (3) the evaluation during drug holiday, and (4) the proper treatment and maintenance after drug holiday. A review of two electronic databases (PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE) was conducted using the term "(Drug holiday)," in January 29, 2015. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) clinical trials and case control, (2) human studies, (3) published in a peer-review journal, and (4) written in English. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (1) case reports, (2) case series, and (3) in vitro studies. The literature supports a therapeutic pause after 3-5 years of bisphosphonate treatment in patients with minor bone deficiencies and no recent fragility fracture (low risk) and in patients with moderate bone deficiencies and/or recent fragility fracture (moderate risk). In these patients, a bone health reevaluation is recommended every 1-3 years. Patients with high fracture risk should be maintained on bisphosphonate therapy without drug holiday. The duration and length of drug holiday should be individualized for each patient. Evaluation should be based on serial bone mass measurements, bone turnover rates, and fracture history evaluation. If after drug therapy, assessments show an increased risk of fracture, the patient may benefit from initiating another treatment. Raloxifene, teriparatide, or denosumab are available options.

  19. Indefinite antithyroid drug therapy in toxic Graves′ disease: What are the cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Rajput

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing treatment modalities for Graves′ disease includes antithyroid drugs (ATDs, radioactive iodine, and surgery. There has been a lack of general agreement as to which therapy is the best as none is ideal since all effectively restore euthyroidism, but with some limitations. Previously, therapies were selected with the goal of achieving euthyroidism. Instead, hypothyroidism is now the goal of treatment, to ensure that hyperthyroidism does not recur. Current evidences suggest that high relapse rate and not so rare fatal side effects seen with ATD therapy compel one to consider other definite modes of treatment like radiotherapy and surgery for toxic Graves′ disease after discussing this with the patient.

  20. Indefinite antithyroid drug therapy in toxic Graves’ disease: What are the cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Rajesh; Goel, Vasudha

    2013-01-01

    Existing treatment modalities for Graves’ disease includes antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine, and surgery. There has been a lack of general agreement as to which therapy is the best as none is ideal since all effectively restore euthyroidism, but with some limitations. Previously, therapies were selected with the goal of achieving euthyroidism. Instead, hypothyroidism is now the goal of treatment, to ensure that hyperthyroidism does not recur. Current evidences suggest that high relapse rate and not so rare fatal side effects seen with ATD therapy compel one to consider other definite modes of treatment like radiotherapy and surgery for toxic Graves’ disease after discussing this with the patient. PMID:24251229

  1. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  2. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  3. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors' perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the "integration" of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms of

  4. Opiate v CNS depressant therapy in neonatal drug abstinence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandall, S R; Doberczak, T M; Mauer, K R; Strashun, R H; Korts, D C

    1983-04-01

    Paregoric and phenobarbital, administered randomly in 153 passively addicted neonates, initially appeared to control neonatal abstinence signs equally well. However, seven of the 62 phenobarbital-treated newborns had abstinence-associated seizures within the first month of life, while none of 49 paregoric-treated neonates had seizures. Forty-two neonates initially requiring no specific pharmacotherapy for abstinence signs were born to mothers taking less methadone hydrochloride just before delivery. Five of those 42 neonates, however, had seizures within the first 14 days of life. Seizure occurrence could not be predicted from analysis of early abstinence patterns. We consider paregoric to be the treatment of choice for the neonatal abstinence syndrome. Phenobarbital use should be monitored with serum drug levels and modification of recommended dosage regimens considered.

  5. Gastric emptying rate in the elderly: implications for drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.A.; Triggs, E.J.; Cheung, M.; Broe, G.A.; Creasey, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the aging process on gastric emptying was studied in 11 elderly subjects (mean age, 77) and in 7 young healthy volunteers (mean age, 26). Gastric emptying rates were assessed by a modified sequential scinti-scanning technique after administration of the nonabsorbable chelated radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-DTPA. The rate of emptying, expressed as half-time (T 1/2e) in minutes, was significantly longer (p less than 0.001) in the elderly subjects (mean apparent T 1/2e . 123.23 min) compared to the young healthy volunteers (mean apparent T 1/2e . 49.69 min). Clinical implications of these findings are discussed, particularly with respect to the rate and extent of drug absorption in elderly persons

  6. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe Mudzviti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2% of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%, Bidens pilosa (66.0%, Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%, Moringa oleifera (44.1%, Lippia javanica (36.3%, and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%. Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR=0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828 and Peltoforum africanum (OR=0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839 reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles.

  7. DRUG THERAPY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN: SURVEY IN MASHHAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Karimi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For future health planning of our country, the type and amount of drugs used for treatment of chronic diseases should be known. Therefore, in the present study the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad was studied. Methods. To study the different types of drugs in the treatment regimen of asthmatic children in the city of Mashhad, we evaluated the treatment regimen of 366 primary school children with asthma disease. Starting, maximum and duration of action of three different bronchodilators (salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup were compared. Findings. The results of the first part of this study showed that only 31.6 percent of asthmatic children had history of treatment and only 10.6 percent had current medication. In addition, most of the treated children (38.8 percent had only bronchodilator (salbutamol syrup in their treatment regimen. The effect of salbutamol inhaler on lung function tests starts in 5 min, salbutamol syrup in 15 min and theophylline syrup at 30 min after administration. The maximum response to salbutamol inhaler, salbutamol syrup, and theophylline syrup occurred 15 min, 4 hr and 3 hr after administration, respectively. The reduction of response to salbutamol inhaler occurs after 3 hr, but there was no any reduction in response to salbutamol and theophylline syrup during study period. Conclusion. The prevalence of asthma among children in the city of Mashhad is relatively high, but most of asthmatic children are not treated. Although the oral bronchodilator in mild asthma is effective, salbutamol inhaler is needed for emergency use.

  8. Functional Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Nonopioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of functional family therapy (FFT) on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Data and Analysis: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized...... and nonrandomized trials. Results: The search yielded two studies that met inclusion criteria. Only one study provided numerical results on the effect of FFT on drug use reduction. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to allow any conclusion to be drawn on the effect of FFT for young people in treatment...

  9. Brief strategic family therapy for young people in treatment for drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis...... and interpretation. Results: The results are mixed: BSFT does not seem to have better or worse effects on drug use frequency and family functioning than other treatments but has positive effects on treatment retention compared to control conditions. Longer retention in treatment has been identified as a consistent...

  10. Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayem, Yasin I; Altabtabaei, Abdulaziz S; Mohamed, Mohamed W; Arrfedi, Mansour M; Aljawder, Hasan S; Aldebous, Fahad A; James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2016-01-01

    This study used role-play demonstrations to train medical students to communicate drug therapy and evaluated the perceptions on this instructional approach. The second-year medical students who attended a prescription writing session (n = 133), participated in this study. Prescription communication was introduced by using role-play demonstrations. Participant's perceptions were explored by a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussion. The academic achievement of attendees and nonattendees was compared with an objective structured performance evaluation (OSPE) station that tested students' competence in this skill. Most attendees responded to the questionnaire (81.2%). Almost all respondents expressed their desire to have similar demonstrations in other units. A large proportion of participants reported that role-play demonstrations helped them develop their communication skills, in general, confidence to communicate drug-related information in a prescription, and the ability to explain the aim of drug therapy to patients. Most trainees thought also that they developed skills to communicate instructions on drug use including drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, adverse drug reactions, and warnings. During the focus group interviews, students thought that role-play was useful but would be more beneficial if conducted frequently in small group as part of the curriculum implementation. The majority of students also reported improved competence in writing a complete prescription. Analysis of attendees and nonattendees grades in the OSPE showed that the former scored higher than the latter group (P = 0.016). Role-play demonstrations were well accepted by medical students and led to the development of their competence in communicating drug therapy to patients.

  11. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nano-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase Therapeutic Efficacy of Anticancer Drug Through True Active Tumor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Panyam, Jayanth; Prabha, Swayam

    2018-06-01

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery has the potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and mitigate non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs. However, current drug delivery approaches rely on inefficient passive accumulation of the drug carrier in the tumor. We have developed a unique, truly active tumor-targeting strategy that relies on engineering mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Our studies using the A549 orthotopic lung tumor model show that nano-engineered MSCs carrying the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) home to tumors and create cellular drug depots that release the drug payload over several days. Despite significantly lower doses of PTX, nano-engineered MSCs resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and superior survival. Anticancer efficacy of nano-engineered MSCs was confirmed in immunocompetent C57BL/6 albino female mice bearing orthotopic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LL/2-luc) tumors. Furthermore, at doses that resulted in equivalent therapeutic efficacy, nano-engineered MSCs had no effect on white blood cell count, whereas PTX solution and PTX nanoparticle treatments caused leukopenia. Biodistribution studies showed that nano-engineered MSCs resulted in greater than 9-fold higher AUC lung of PTX (1.5 μg.day/g) than PTX solution and nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.1 μg.day/g tissue, respectively) in the target lung tumors. Furthermore, the lung-to-liver and the lung-to-spleen ratios of PTX were several folds higher for nano-engineered MSCs relative to those for PTX solution and nanoparticle groups, suggesting that nano-engineered MSCs demonstrate significantly less off-target deposition. In summary, our results demonstrate that nano-engineered MSCs can serve as an efficient carrier for tumor-specific drug delivery and significantly improved anti-cancer efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(6); 1196-206. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  14. Treatment of Hepatitis C in Patients Undergoing Immunosuppressive Drug Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kohtaro Ooka; Joseph K.Lim

    2016-01-01

    With 185 million people chronically infected globally,hepatitis C is a leading bloodborne infection.All-oral regimens of direct acting agents have superior efficacy compared to the historical interferon-based regimens and are significantly more tolerable.However,trials of both types of regimens have often excluded patients on immunosuppressive medications for reasons other than organ transplantation.Yet,these patients-most often suffering from malignancy or autoimmune diseases-could stand to benefit from these treatments.In this study,we systematically review the literature on the treatment of hepatitis C in these neglected populations.Research on patients with organ transplants is more robust and this literature is reviewed here non-systematically.Our systematic review produced 2273 unique works,of which 56 met our inclusion criteria and were used in our review.The quality of data was low;only 3 of the 56 studies were randomized controlled trials.Sustained virologic response was reported sporadically.Interferon-containing regimens achieved this end-point at rates comparable to that in immunocompetent individuals.Severe adverse effects and death were rare.Data on all-oral regimens were sparse,but in the most robust study,rates of sustained virologic response were again comparable to immunocompetent individuals (40/41).Efficacy and safety of interferoncontaining regimens and all-oral regimens were similar to rates in immunocompetent individuals;however,there were few interventional trials.The large number of case reports and case series makes conclusions vulnerable to publication bias.While firm conclusions are challenging,given the dearth of high-quality studies,our results demonstrate that antiviral therapy can be safe and effective.The advent of all-oral regimens offers patients and clinicians greatly increased chances of cure and fewer side effects.Preliminary data reveal that these regimens may confer such benefits in immunosuppressed individuals as well

  15. Liposomes as a drug delivery system in photodynamic therapy for colon cancer treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maduray, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a drug termed a photosensitizer (PS), light (laser) of an appropriate wavelength and molecular oxygen (tissue) to elicit cell death of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the enhancement of PDT...

  16. Effective experimental tumor therapy with targeted polymer drug delivery systems based on HPMA copolymers.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šírová, Milada; Horková, Veronika; Sivák, Ladislav; Etrych, Tomáš; Říhová, Blanka; Studenovský, Martin

    SI (2016), s. 24-24 ISSN 0014-2980. [3rd Meeting of Middle – European Societies for Immunology and Allergology. 01.12.2016-03.12.2016, Budapest ] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12742S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Tumor therapy * polymer drug * HPMA copolymers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Pharmacy Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Drug Therapy Services in Nonmetropolitan Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Abhijit S.; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.; Bonnarens, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Higher prevalence of chronic diseases and reduced access to other health professionals in rural areas suggest that rural Medicare enrollees will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services (DTS). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe non-metropolitan community pharmacy sites in Wisconsin, the provision of DTS at…

  18. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  19. A review of drug therapy for sporadic fatal insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaee Damavandi, Pardis; Dove, Martin T; Pickersgill, Richard W

    2017-09-03

    Sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI) is a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease characterised by gradual to perpetual insomnia, followed by dysautonomia, coma and death. 1 The cause of sFI was recently mapped to a mutation in a protein, the prion, found in the human brain. It is the unfolding of the prion that leads to the generation of toxic oligomers that destroy brain tissue and function. Recent studies have confirmed that a methionine mutation at codon 129 of the human Prion is characteristic of sFI. Current treatment slows down the progression of the disease, but no cure has been found, yet. We used Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics simulation methods, to study the toxic Fatal-Insomnia-prion conformations at local unfolding. The idea was to determine these sites and to stabilise these regions against unfolding and miss-folding, using a small ligand, based on a phenothiazine "moiety". As a result we here discuss current fatal insomnia therapy and present seven novel possible compounds for in vitro and in vivo screening.

  20. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  1. Application of the Pareto principle to identify and address drug-therapy safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; Dormann, Harald; Pfistermeister, Barbara; Sonst, Anja; Patapovas, Andrius; Vogler, Renate; Hartmann, Nina; Plank-Kiegele, Bettina; Kirchner, Melanie; Bürkle, Thomas; Maas, Renke

    2014-06-01

    Adverse drug events (ADE) and medication errors (ME) are common causes of morbidity in patients presenting at emergency departments (ED). Recognition of ADE as being drug related and prevention of ME are key to enhancing pharmacotherapy safety in ED. We assessed the applicability of the Pareto principle (~80 % of effects result from 20 % of causes) to address locally relevant problems of drug therapy. In 752 cases consecutively admitted to the nontraumatic ED of a major regional hospital, ADE, ME, contributing drugs, preventability, and detection rates of ADE by ED staff were investigated. Symptoms, errors, and drugs were sorted by frequency in order to apply the Pareto principle. In total, 242 ADE were observed, and 148 (61.2 %) were assessed as preventable. ADE contributed to 110 inpatient hospitalizations. The ten most frequent symptoms were causally involved in 88 (80.0 %) inpatient hospitalizations. Only 45 (18.6 %) ADE were recognized as drug-related problems until discharge from the ED. A limited set of 33 drugs accounted for 184 (76.0 %) ADE; ME contributed to 57 ADE. Frequency-based listing of ADE, ME, and drugs involved allowed identification of the most relevant problems and development of easily to implement safety measures, such as wall and pocket charts. The Pareto principle provides a method for identifying the locally most relevant ADE, ME, and involved drugs. This permits subsequent development of interventions to increase patient safety in the ED admission process that best suit local needs.

  2. [Molecular fundamentals of drug interactions in the therapy of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulska, Katarzyna; Stanisz, Beata; Regulski, Miłosz; Gieremek, Paulina

    2014-03-04

    Rapid advances in the field of chemotherapy have resulted in the introduction of numerous antineoplastic drugs into clinical practice, which increased the efficiency of patient management. Also the prevalent use of combination treatment based on drug action synergy contributed to the improved clinical effect associated with cytotoxic drug administration. It seems, however, obvious that the multidirectional pharmacotherapy in oncology requires a thorough knowledge of drugs' pharmaceutical behavior in order to maximize their collective action and prevent the occurrence of unintended drug interactions that could potentially impair treatment effectiveness. In fact, drug interactions constitute a serious problem for current oncology primarily resulting from a narrow therapeutic index specific for the majority of anticancer drugs. This, in turn, indicates that even slight deviations of their pharmacokinetics could cause significant clinical consequences, manifested by alteration of the toxicological profile or reduction of therapeutic efficiency. Hence, the investigation of molecular aspects underlying the mechanisms of various drug interactions seems to be essential for proper and safe patient management. The present article is devoted to the extensive subject of drug interactions occurring in the therapy of colorectal cancer. It presents the available literature data on both positive and negative effects of interactions and it discusses their mechanisms complying with their classification into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic ones.

  3. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  4. Global marketing of cholesterol-lowering drugs as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimimian, Jonathan U; Gilmore, James M; Singletary, Tony J

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing services (PMS) are a key component of pharmaceutical companies' marketing strategies in that they create links between the pharmaceutical company and the physician. They are is also a link between physician and patients locally and globally. PMS discussed in this paper provide various services from tangible to intangible products in order to increase the physicians and pharmacists prescribing activities of their treatment modalities. Given the high cost of recruiting, training, and supporting PMS global marketing efforts, it is important for PMS channels to understand the significance of pharmaceutical multinational companies to ascribe to prescription drug services provided in Thailand. This created the unique marketing environment for the pharmaceutical companies. This study examines whether there is a gap in the existing cholesterol-lowering medication prescribed by physicians in Thailand and the newly introduced brand to the U.S. market. The degree of the new product adoption is analyzed through physician prescription frequency and records. Results of the study indicate there is significant improvement in the health conditions of the users of the new cholesterol medication among Thailand patients. Physicians in Thailand were, however, faced with competing brands in the market due to aggressiveness of advertising and promotion by multinational pharmaceutical marketing and manufacturers Associations. Perceived value and benefit to users were significant outcome of the study. More diagnostic and prescriptive research is recommended to cover Southeast Asia and other parts of the developing countries.

  5. Celiac Disease and Drug-Based Therapies: Inquiry into Patients Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Ferretti, Francesca; Norsa, Lorenzo; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Conte, Dario; Elli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Medical research is looking for alternative drug-based options to the gluten-free diet (GFD) for celiac disease. We aimed at evaluating the need for alternative therapies perceived by celiac patients. During the 2013 meeting of the Lombardy section of the Italian Celiac Patients Association, adult subjects were invited to fill in a questionnaire investigating their clinical profile in relation to compliance to the diet, quality of life (QOL) as well as their opinion on alternative therapies. Three hundred and seventy two patients (76 m, mean age 41.7 ± 13.9 years) completed the questionnaire. Patients reported a significant improvement in health status (HS) and QOL after the diet was started (p < 0.001). The GFD was accepted by 88% patients, but the need for alternative therapies was reported by 65%. Subjects expressing the need for a drug-based therapy showed a lower increase in QOL (p = 0.003) and HS (p = 0.005) on GFD. The preferred option for an alternative therapy was the use of enzymes (145 subjects), followed by a vaccine (111 subjects). The GFD is favorably accepted by most celiac patients. Nevertheless, a proportion of patients pronounce themselves in favor of the development of alternative drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. CAN MELATONIN BE EFFECTIVELY USED TO DIMINISH SIDE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AND ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Aleksandrovich Bekker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study and summarize the existing evidence base for the use of melatonin as a mean to counteract or diminish the side effects of various psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, and to provide the reader with relevant conclusions. Methodology. The authors have searched for the scientific literature regarding the use of melatonin as a mean to counteract or diminish the side effects of various psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, using the PubMed and Google Scholar as a search tool. Then the authors thoroughly reviewed the data they found. The resulting review is presented in this article. Results. The data we have obtained from this review of the literature indicate that melatonin can be effectively used both in monotherapy and in combination with other therapeutic means in order to reduce several different side effects of psychotropic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy. Melatonin also deserves further study in this regard. The evidence base for its use in this manner is very variable in quality for different side effects. For now, the greatest evidence base exists regarding the potential effectiveness of melatonin in the prevention and treatment of drug-induced insomnia, memory and cognitive impairment, akathisia, tardive dyskinesias, and metabolic syndrome. Practical implications. The results we have obtained can be widely applied in psychiatry, neurology and addiction medicine, as well as in all those areas of general medicine, which make use of psychotropic drugs.

  7. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  8. Profiling persistent tubercule bacilli from patient sputa during therapy predicts early drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyborne, Isobella; McHugh, Timothy D; Kuittinen, Iitu; Cichonska, Anna; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Ronacher, Katharina; van Helden, Paul D; Gillespie, Stephen H; Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro; Walzl, Gerhard; Rousu, Juho; Butcher, Philip D; Waddell, Simon J

    2016-04-07

    New treatment options are needed to maintain and improve therapy for tuberculosis, which caused the death of 1.5 million people in 2013 despite potential for an 86 % treatment success rate. A greater understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) bacilli that persist through drug therapy will aid drug development programs. Predictive biomarkers for treatment efficacy are also a research priority. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling was used to map the mRNA signatures of M.tb from the sputa of 15 patients before and 3, 7 and 14 days after the start of standard regimen drug treatment. The mRNA profiles of bacilli through the first 2 weeks of therapy reflected drug activity at 3 days with transcriptional signatures at days 7 and 14 consistent with reduced M.tb metabolic activity similar to the profile of pre-chemotherapy bacilli. These results suggest that a pre-existing drug-tolerant M.tb population dominates sputum before and after early drug treatment, and that the mRNA signature at day 3 marks the killing of a drug-sensitive sub-population of bacilli. Modelling patient indices of disease severity with bacterial gene expression patterns demonstrated that both microbiological and clinical parameters were reflected in the divergent M.tb responses and provided evidence that factors such as bacterial load and disease pathology influence the host-pathogen interplay and the phenotypic state of bacilli. Transcriptional signatures were also defined that predicted measures of early treatment success (rate of decline in bacterial load over 3 days, TB test positivity at 2 months, and bacterial load at 2 months). This study defines the transcriptional signature of M.tb bacilli that have been expectorated in sputum after two weeks of drug therapy, characterizing the phenotypic state of bacilli that persist through treatment. We demonstrate that variability in clinical manifestations of disease are detectable in bacterial sputa signatures, and that the changing M.tb m

  9. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Vera M.; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Martinson, Neil; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In

  10. Stem Cells for Cardiac Regeneration by Cell Therapy and Myocardial Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zeng, Faquan; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    Congestive heart failure, which often occurs progressively following a myocardial infarction, is characterized by impaired myocardial perfusion, ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction. Novel treatments are required to reverse these effects - especially in older patients whose endogenous regenerative responses to currently available therapies are limited by age. This review explores the current state of research for two related approaches to cardiac regeneration: cell therapy and tissue engineering. First, to evaluate cell therapy, we review the effectiveness of various cell types for their ability to limit ventricular dilatation and promote functional recovery following implantation into a damaged heart. Next, to assess tissue engineering, we discuss the characteristics of several biomaterials for their potential to physically support the infarcted myocardium and promote implanted cell survival following cardiac injury. Finally, looking ahead, we present recent findings suggesting that hybrid constructs combining a biomaterial with stem and supporting cells may be the most effective approaches to cardiac regeneration.

  11. Analysis of combination drug therapy to develop regimens with shortened duration of treatment for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L Drusano

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, particularly with the advent of multi-drug resistance. Shortening therapy duration for Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major goal, requiring generation of optimal kill rate and resistance-suppression. Combination therapy is required to attain the goal of shorter therapy.Our objective was to identify a method for identifying optimal combination chemotherapy. We developed a mathematical model for attaining this end. This is accomplished by identifying drug effect interaction (synergy, additivity, antagonism for susceptible organisms and subpopulations resistant to each drug in the combination.We studied the combination of linezolid plus rifampin in our hollow fiber infection model. We generated a fully parametric drug effect interaction mathematical model. The results were subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to extend the findings to a population of patients by accounting for between-patient variability in drug pharmacokinetics.All monotherapy allowed emergence of resistance over the first two weeks of the experiment. In combination, the interaction was additive for each population (susceptible and resistant. For a 600 mg/600 mg daily regimen of linezolid plus rifampin, we demonstrated that >50% of simulated subjects had eradicated the susceptible population by day 27 with the remaining organisms resistant to one or the other drug. Only 4% of patients had complete organism eradication by experiment end.These data strongly suggest that in order to achieve the goal of shortening therapy, the original regimen may need to be changed at one month to a regimen of two completely new agents with resistance mechanisms independent of the initial regimen. This hypothesis which arose from the analysis is immediately testable in a clinical trial.

  12. Enhancing the Pediatric Drug Development Framework to Deliver Better Pediatric Therapies Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Health care professionals involved in the clinical management of children have long appreciated the limited number of therapies suitably evaluated for their optimal use in the pediatric population. In the past century, advances in regulatory policy significantly evolved adult drug evaluation. The scarcity of available patient populations, practical complexities of drug development research, and minimal financial returns have hampered pharmaceutical investment in the study of therapies for children. More recently, pediatric policy and legislation in the United States and Europe have instituted a system of obligations and incentives to stimulate investment in pediatric drug development. These initiatives, in conjunction with a more sophisticated process of drug discovery and development, have led to significant advancements in the labeling of drugs for pediatric use. Facilitated by the emergence of new targets, precision medicine, and innovations in regulatory science, there is now a subtle shift in focus toward drug development research for children rather than simply in children. Although there has been an increase in pediatric studies of investigational agents and labeling of pediatric information for use, there have been unintended consequences of existing policies. As a result, limited progress has been made in certain therapeutic areas and for off-patent therapies. Future policy reform to enhance the availability and accessibility of pediatric medicines should not only reflect an understanding not only of the successes of existing policy and legislative initiatives but also constructively address failures and unintended consequences. Taken together, policy reform, global cooperation, and innovation in regulatory science will more ably deliver better pediatric therapies tomorrow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug persistence and need for dose intensification to adalimumab therapy; the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Lorant; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Rutka, Mariann; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Klaudia; Lovasz, Barbara D; Golovics, Petra A; Gecse, Krisztina B; Szalay, Balazs; Molnar, Tamas; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-08-08

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aid therapeutic decision making in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who lose response to anti-TNF therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predictive factors of loss of response (LOR) to adalimumab using TDM in IBD patients. One hundred twelve IBD patients (with 214 TDM measurements, CD/UC 84/28, male/female 50/62, mean age CD/UC: 36/35 years) were enrolled in this consecutive cohort from two referral centres in Hungary. Demographic data were comprehensively collected and harmonized monitoring strategy was applied. Previous and current therapy, laboratory data and clinical activity were recorded at the time of TDM. Patients were evaluated either at the time of suspected LOR or during follow-up. TDM measurements were determined by commercial ELISA (LISA TRACKER, Theradiag, France). Among 112 IBD patients, LOR/drug persistence was 25.9%/74.1%. The cumulative ADA positivity (>10 ng/mL) and low TL (<5.0 μg/mL) was 12.1% and 17.8% after 1 year and 17.3% and 29.5% after 2 years of adalimumab therapy. Dose intensification was needed in 29.5% of the patients. Female gender and ADA positivity were associated with LOR (female gender: p < 0.001, OR:7.8 CI 95%: 2.5-24.3, ADA positivity: p = 0.007 OR:3.6 CI 95%: 1.4-9.5). ADA development, low TL and need for dose intensification were frequent during adalimumab therapy and support the selective use of TDM in IBD patients treated with adalimumab. ADA positivity and gender were predictors of LOR.

  14. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  15. G2 checkpoint abrogator abates the antagonistic interaction between antimicrotubule drugs and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Meihua; Zhang Hongfang; Di Xiaoyun; Chang Jinjia; Shen Youqing; Fan Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously demonstrated that radiation may arrest tumor cells at G2 phase, which in turn prevents the cytotoxicity of antimicrotubule drugs and results in antagonistic interaction between these two modalities. Herein we tested whether G2 abrogators would attenuate the above antagonistic interaction and improve the therapeutic efficacy of combination therapy between radiation and antimicrotubule drugs. Materials and methods: Breast cancer BCap37 and epidermoid carcinoma KB cell lines were administered with radiation, UCN-01 (a model drug of G2 abrogator), paclitaxel or vincristine, alone or in combinations. The antitumor activities of single and combined treatments were analyzed by a series of cytotoxic, apoptotic, cell cycle, morphological and biochemical assays. Results: UCN-01 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation, antimitotic drugs, and their combined treatments in vitro. Further investigations demonstrated that UCN-01 attenuated radiation-induced G2 arrest, and subsequently repressed the inhibitory effect of radiation on drug-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions: This is the first report demonstrating that G2 checkpoint abrogation represses the inhibitory effect of radiation on antimicrotubule drugs, which may be implicated in cancer combination therapy. Considering that G2 abrogators are under extensive evaluation for cancer treatment, our findings provide valuable information for this class of promising compounds.

  16. From Composition to Cure: A Systems Engineering Approach to Anticancer Drug Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2017-06-06

    The molecular complexity and heterogeneity of cancer has led to a persistent, and as yet unsolved, challenge to develop cures for this disease. The pharmaceutical industry focuses the bulk of its efforts on the development of new drugs, but an alternative approach is to improve the delivery of existing drugs with drug carriers that can manipulate when, where, and how a drug exerts its therapeutic effect. For the treatment of solid tumors, systemically delivered drug carriers face significant challenges that are imposed by the pathophysiological barriers that lie between their site of administration and their site of therapeutic action in the tumor. Furthermore, drug carriers face additional challenges in their translation from preclinical validation to clinical approval and adoption. Addressing this diverse network of challenges requires a systems engineering approach for the rational design of optimized carriers that have a realistic prospect for translation from the laboratory to the patient. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Molecular fundamentals of drug interactions in the therapy of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in the field of chemotherapy have resulted in the introduction of numerous antineoplastic drugs into clinical practice, which increased the efficiency of patient management. Also the prevalent use of combination treatment based on drug action synergy contributed to the improved clinical effect associated with cytotoxic drug administration. It seems, however, obvious that the multidirectional pharmacotherapy in oncology requires a thorough knowledge of drugs’ pharmaceutical behavior in order to maximize their collective action and prevent the occurrence of unintended drug interactions that could potentially impair treatment effectiveness. In fact, drug interactions constitute a serious problem for current oncology primarily resulting from a narrow therapeutic index specific for the majority of anticancer drugs. This, in turn, indicates that even slight deviations of their pharmacokinetics could cause significant clinical consequences, manifested by alteration of the toxicological profile or reduction of therapeutic efficiency. Hence, the investigation of molecular aspects underlying the mechanisms of various drug interactions seems to be essential for proper and safe patient management. The present article is devoted to the extensive subject of drug interactions occurring in the therapy of colorectal cancer. It presents the available literature data on both positive and negative effects of interactions and it discusses their mechanisms complying with their classification into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic ones.

  19. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain; Hatim, Ahmad; Rashid, Rusdi; Ardakan, Abolfazl; Esmaeili Motlaq, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety) emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy.

  20. [The influence of drug liberation from drug forms on local therapy of infected bone cavities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, W; Wehr, M

    1984-09-01

    With regard to an optimum local pharmaco-therapy in infected bone cavities, in vitro examinations by means of a flow model based on the half-change method had been performed to liberate Gentamycin from globular embeddings in polymethylmethacrylate. The Gentamycin had been determined in a micro-biological manner. The release behaviour of the polymere carrier could be controlled by adding Polyethylenglycol 400 as softener or butane dioldimethacrylate as wettener. Adding 20 vol.-% of Polyethylenglycol 400, the Gentamycin release could be increased to the 8-fold, whereas the addition of 5 vol.-% of butane dioldimethacrylate resulted in a decrease amounting to 7/8 exit value.

  1. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Melanoma Antitumoral Therapy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, Roberta Balansin; Oyafuso, Márcia Helena; Fujimura, Andressa Terumi; Gonçalez, Maíra Lima; do Prado, Alice Haddad; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma (MEL) is a less common type of skin cancer, but it is more aggressive with a high mortality rate. The World Cancer Research Fund International (GLOBOCAN 2012) estimates that there were 230,000 new cases of MEL in the world in 2012. Conventional MEL treatment includes surgery and chemotherapy, but many of the chemotherapeutic agents used present undesirable properties. Drug delivery systems are an alternative strategy by which to carry antineoplastic agents. Encapsulated drugs are advantageous due to such properties as high stability, better bioavailability, controlled drug release, a long blood circulation time, selective organ or tissue distribution, a lower total required dose, and minimal toxic side effects. This review of scientific research supports applying a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for MEL therapy.

  2. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine: adjunctive therapy with antithyroid drugs reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkeniers, B.; Vanhaelst, L.; Cytryn, R.; Jonckheer, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the value of antithyroid drugs as an adjunct to radioactive iodine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism the incidence of relapse or hypothyroidism after a mean follow-up of 51/2 years (range 2-7 years) was reviewed retrospectively for 206 patients, some treated with and others without antithyroid drugs after radioiodine therapy. Allocation to treatment group had been random, and both groups were similar in all respects except for the adjunctive treatment with antithyroid drugs. All doses of 131 I had been calculated by one physician. Compared with those who received 131 I alone, those starting on antithyroid drugs within 8 days after 131 I had a lower incidence of hypothyroidism but a higher incidence of early post-treatment recurrence or persistence of hyperthyroidism, and considerably lower incidence of remission. (author)

  3. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. - Highlights: • Herein, we have synthesized boron-modified diblock copolymer. • Bpin-PLA-PEOz, which will be served as new boron containing vehicle for transporting the boron drug. • This boron containing Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle was low toxicity can be applied to drug delivery

  4. Treatment with antithyroid drugs or iodine following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeto, Glaucia; Leal, B.M.B.; Souza, L.S.; Griva, B.L.; Moriguchi, S.M.; Moreira, C.C.; Lemos, A.C.; Kiy, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy in Graves' disease is gradual and the patients continue to be hyperthyroid for much time after this therapy. In a retrospective study, we compared the evolution of 196 patients in this situation treated with some therapeutic regimens. They received propylthiouracil or methimazole (ATD), one of them and potassium iodide (KI), KI only, or no drugs after 131 I therapy. ATD was started usually one day and KI two months after the radioiodine. The groups had similar age, pretreatment serum T 4 concentrations and 131 I treatment dose. Cure of the hyperthyroidism occurred in 83,9%, 75,5%, 75,0% and 70,6% in no-drugs, KI, ATD and KI-ATD groups, respectively. Hyperthyroidism was longer in KI and KI-ATD groups. Definitive hypothyroidism occurred in 39,2%, 47,2%, 52,9% and 66,1% in KI-ATD, KI, ATD and no-drugs groups, respectively. This condition appeared more quickly in no-drugs and ATD groups. Conclusion: We conclude that KI and ATD groups had similar evolutions as to cure of hyperthyroidism and occurrence of hypothyroidism. (author)

  5. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m"2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m"2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  6. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Stevens, Wendy S; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Hamers, Raph L

    2016-11-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load monitoring, feasible and affordable technologies to detect drug-resistant HIV could help maximise the durability and rational use of available drug regimens. Potential low-cost technologies include in-house Sanger and next-generation sequencing in centralised laboratories, and point mutation assays and genotype-free systems that predict response to antiretroviral therapy at point-of-care. Strengthening of centralised high-throughput laboratories, including efficient systems for sample referral and results delivery, will increase economies-of-scale while reducing costs. Access barriers can be mitigated by standardisation of in-house assays into commercial kits, use of polyvalent instruments, and adopting price-reducing strategies. A stepwise rollout approach should improve feasibility, prioritising WHO-recommended population-based surveillance and management of complex patient categories, such as patients failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. Implementation research, adaptations of existing WHO guidance, and political commitment, will be key to support the appropriate investments and policy changes. In this Personal View, we discuss the potential role of HIV drug resistance testing for population-based surveillance and individual patient management in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the strengths and challenges of promising low-cost technologies and how they can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 77 FR 75177 - Impact of Approved Drug Labeling on Chronic Opioid Therapy; Public Hearing; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1172] Impact of Approved Drug Labeling on Chronic Opioid Therapy; Public Hearing; Request for Comments AGENCY... impact the entire class of opioid drugs or a large subcategory thereof (e.g., ER/LA opioids), such as the...

  8. Regional Lymphotropic Therapy in Combination with Low Level Laser Therapy for Treating Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Dogorova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the growing incidence of Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB in newly identified patients, novel multimodality treatment methods are needed, aimed at reducing the time to sputum conversion and cavity healing, which would be applicable in MDR cases. Our experimental treatment consisted of the following: 1 chemotherapy based on the drug sensitivity profile, 2 local laser irradiation therapy for 25 days, and lymphotropic administration of isoniazid (to subcutaneous tissue in alternating locations: underarm area; fifth intercostal space along the sterna border; subclavian area where the first rib meets the sternum in a daily dose of 10mg/kg 5 times a week. This treatment was significantly more effective in newly detected destructive MDR-TB versus the standard Category IV regimen for MDR-TB in terms of reduced time for sputum culture conversion and cavity healing, estimated to be 6 months after initiation of treatment.

  9. IONP-doped nanoparticles for highly effective NIR-controlled drug release and combination tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xudong Fu,1 Xinjun Wang,1 Shaolong Zhou,1 Yanyan Zhang2 1The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 2School of Basic Medical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Despite advances in controlled drug delivery, drug delivery systems (DDSs with controlled activated drug release and high spatial and temporal resolution are still required. Theranostic nanomedicine is capable of diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring the delivery and distribution of drug molecules and has received growing interest. In this study, a near-infrared light-controlled “off–on” DDS with magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic targeting properties was developed using a hybrid nanoplatform (carbon nanotubes [CNTs]-iron oxide nanoparticle. Doxorubicin (DOX and distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG were adsorbed onto CNTs-iron oxide nanoparticle, and then to avoid the unexpected drug release during circulation, 1-myristyl alcohol was used to encapsulate the CNTs–drug complex. Herein, multifunctional DOX-loaded nanoparticles (NPs with “off–on” state were developed. DOX-NPs showed an obvious “off–on” effect (temperature increase, drug release controlled by near-infrared light in vitro and in vivo. In the in vivo and in vitro studies, DOX-NPs exhibited excellent magnetic resonance imaging ability, magnetic targeting property, high biosafety, and high antitumor combined therapeutic efficacy (hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy. These results highlight the great potential of DOX-NPs in the treatment of cancer. Keywords: controlled drug release, magnetic targeting, MRI, combination therapy

  10. Mono- and combination drug therapies in hospitalized patients with bipolar depression. Data from the European drug surveillance program AMSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeberle Anne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the pharmacological treatment of bipolar depression several guidelines exist. It is largely unknown, to what extent the prescriptions in daily clinical routine correspond to these evidence based recommendations and which combinations of psychotropic drugs are frequently used. Methods The prescriptions of psychotropic drugs were investigated of all in-patients with bipolar depression (n = 2246; time period 1994–2009 from hospitals participating in the drug surveillance program AMSP. For the drug use in 2010, 221 cases were analysed additionally. Results From 1994 to 2009, 85% of all patients received more than one class of psychotropic substances: 74% received antidepressants in combination therapy, 55% antipsychotics, 48% anticonvulsants and 33% lithium. When given in combination, lithium is the most often prescribed substance for bipolar depression (33%, followed by valproic acid (23%, mirtazapine and venlafaxine (16% each, quetiapine (15%, lamotrigine (14% and olanzapine (13%. Both, lithium and valproic acid are often combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, but also with mirtazapine und venlafaxine. Combinations of more than one antidepressant occur quite often, whereby combinations with bupropion, paroxetine, fluoxetine or fluvoxamine are very rare. In 2010, quetiapine (alone and combined was the most frequently prescribed drug (39%; aripiprazole was administered in 10%. Conclusion Combinations of antidepressants (SSRI, mirtazapine, venlafaxine with mood stabilizers (lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine and / or atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, olanzapine are common. Of most of those combinations the efficacy has not been studied. The use of aripiprazole and the concomitant use of two or three antidepressants contrast the guidelines.

  11. Direct anti-atherosclerotic therapy; development of natural anti-atherosclerotic drugs preventing cellular cholesterol retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhov, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    The results of numerous clinical trials with statins and other drugs have demonstrated the principal possibility of the prevention and regression of atherosclerosis by pharmacotherapy. This review describes the use of cultured human arterial cells for the mass screening of anti-atherosclerotic substances, the investigation of the mechanisms responsible for their atherosclerosis-related effects, and the optimization of anti-atherosclerotic and anti-atherogenic drug and dietary therapies. Natural products can be considered promising drugs for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. Our basic studies have shown that cellular lipidosis is the principal event in the genesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Using cellular models and natural products, we have developed an approach to prevent lipid accumulation in arterial cells. Based on our knowledge of atherosclerosis, we developed drugs that possess direct anti-atherosclerotic activity. Two-year treatment with allicor (garlic powder) has a direct anti-atherosclerotic effect on carotid atherosclerosis in asymptomatic men. Inflaminat (calendula, elder, and violet), which possesses anti-cytokine activity, has been shown to cause the regression of carotid atherosclerosis following the treatment of asymptomatic men for one year. The phytoestrogen-rich drug karinat (garlic powder, extract of grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cones, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid) prevents the development of carotid atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Thus, our basic findings were successfully translated into clinical practice. Because of this translation, a novel approach to antiatherosclerotic therapy was developed. Our clinical trial confirmed the efficacy of both the novel approach and the novel drugs.

  12. Colchicine in therapy. State of the art and new perspectives for an old drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, J P

    1988-01-01

    Colchicine is the most specific treatment in acute gouty attacks. In several European countries, oral colchicine is still used for routine treatment of acute gout. Its selectivity is used as a diagnostic tool. It is also active in the treatment of acute crises of chondrocalcinosis and more occasionally of other arthritic crises (e.g. sarcoidosis). Colchicine appears to be the necessary adjuvant prophylactic drug when starting a hypouricemic treatment with uricosuric or uricolytic drugs for avoiding acute gouty crisis due to sudden mobilisation of the uric acid pool. Besides gout, colchicine is the drug of choice for treating familial mediterranean fever. It appears to be helpful in the treatment of Behçet's disease. It seems also useful for treating fibrosing conditions such as liver cirrhosis and scleroderma. As an adjuvant therapy, it helps treating dermatological disorders which are associated with leucocyte migration as an essential pathogenic factor (e.g. psoriasis, dermatitis herpetiformis, necrotising vasculitis ...). It has been advocated as an adjuvant therapy in malignant diseases as a support in radiotherapy and as an useful drug in various other diseases where it has been tried occasionally (e.g. Paget's disease of the bone, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, disc syndrome). This very old drug remains a modern therapeutic agent.

  13. Rational use and interpretation of urine drug testing in chronic opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M; Salazar, Elaine; Bertholf, Roger L

    2007-01-01

    Urine drug testing (UDT) has become an essential feature of pain management, as physicians seek to verify adherence to prescribed opioid regimens and to detect the use of illicit or unauthorized licit drugs. Results of urine drug tests have important consequences in regard to therapeutic decisions and the trust between physician and patient. However, reliance on UDT to confirm adherence can be problematic if the results are not interpreted correctly, and evidence suggests that many physicians lack an adequate understanding of the complexities of UDT and the factors that can affect test results. These factors include metabolic conversion between drugs, genetic variations in drug metabolism, the sensitivity and specificity of the analytical method for a particular drug or metabolite, and the effects of intentional and unintentional interferants. In this review, we focus on the technical features and limitations of analytical methods used for detecting drugs or their metabolites in urine, the statistical constructs that are pertinent to ordering UDT and interpreting test results, and the application of these concepts to the clinical monitoring of patients maintained on chronic opioid therapy.

  14. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  15. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yong-Yong; Li, Lan; Dong, Hai-Qing; Cai, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Tian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ∼ 100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery. - Highlights: ► A new nuclear targeted drug delivery system based on micelles is developed. ► This micellar system features a core-shell structure with the size peaked at 100 nm. ► PV7, a short peptide sequence, is adopted as a nuclear targeting ligand. ► PV7 functionalized drug loaded micelles are more potent in killing tumor cells

  16. Nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble drugs using a novel spray-drying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafroth, Nina; Arpagaus, Cordin; Jadhav, Umesh Y; Makne, Sushil; Douroumis, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    In the current study nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble drugs was conducted using a novel piezoelectric spray-drying approach. Cyclosporin A (CyA) and dexamethasone (DEX) were encapsulated in biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) grades of different molecular weights. Spray-drying studies carried out with the Nano Spray Dryer B-90 employed with piezoelectric driven actuator. The processing parameters including inlet temperature, spray mesh diameter, sample flow rate, spray rate, applied pressure and sample concentration were examined in order to optimize the particle size and the obtained yield. The process parameters and the solute concentration showed a profound effect on the particle engineering and the obtained product yield. The produced powder presented consistent and reproducible spherical particles with narrow particle size distribution. Cyclosporin was found to be molecularly dispersed while dexamethasone was in crystalline state within the PLGA nanoparticles. Further evaluation revealed excellent drug loading, encapsulation efficiency and production yield. In vitro studies demonstrated sustained release patterns for the active substances. This novel spray-drying process proved to be efficient for nano and microparticle engineering of water insoluble active substances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sachiko Kaihara; Numata, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin), protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin). The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed. PMID:23344060

  18. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Numata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin, protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin. The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed.

  19. Click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels: emerging platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Chen, Jing; Deng, Chao; Suuronen, Erik J; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have emerged as versatile and viable platforms for sustained protein release, targeted drug delivery, and tissue engineering due to excellent biocompatibility, a microporous structure with tunable porosity and pore size, and dimensions spanning from human organs, cells to viruses. In the past decade, remarkable advances in hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have been achieved with click chemistry. It is a most promising strategy to prepare gels with varying dimensions owing to its high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions. In particular, the recent development of copper-free click chemistry such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, radical mediated thiol-ene chemistry, Diels-Alder reaction, tetrazole-alkene photo-click chemistry, and oxime reaction renders it possible to form hydrogels, microgels and nanogels without the use of potentially toxic catalysts or immunogenic enzymes that are commonly required. Notably, unlike other chemical approaches, click chemistry owing to its unique bioorthogonal feature does not interfere with encapsulated bioactives such as living cells, proteins and drugs and furthermore allows versatile preparation of micropatterned biomimetic hydrogels, functional microgels and nanogels. In this review, recent exciting developments in click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels, as well as their biomedical applications such as controlled protein and drug release, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapies for inborn errors of metabolism: what has the orphan drug act delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talele, Sonali S; Xu, Kui; Pariser, Anne R; Braun, M Miles; Farag-El-Massah, Sheiren; Phillips, M Ian; Thompson, Barry H; Coté, Timothy R

    2010-07-01

    The 1983 US Orphan Drug Act established a process through which promising therapies are designated as orphan products and, later, with satisfactory safety and efficacy data, receive marketing approval and fiscal incentives. We examined accomplishments in drug development for inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs). Food and Drug Administration data were used to identify orphan product designations and approvals for IEMs, and the trends for the past 26 years were summarized. Individual clinical development times (CDTs) from filing investigational new drug application to marketing approval were determined. We examined 1956 orphan product designations from 1983 through 2008 and found 93 (4.8%) for IEMs. Of those, 24 (25.8%) received marketing approval. This proportion of approval was significantly (P = .036) higher than that for non-IEM orphan products (17%). Among the IEM products, disorders of complex molecules received the most designations and approvals (61 and 11, respectively). Among the subgroups, lysosomal storage diseases received the most designations and approvals (43 and 9, respectively), whereas mitochondrial diseases (other than fatty acid oxidation disorders) received 7 designations with no approvals. We then examined the CDTs for the approved IEM products and found a median of 6.4 years (range: 2.6-25.1 years). Biological products had significantly shorter CDTs than drugs (mean: 4.6 vs 11.0 years; P = .003). For 26 years, the Orphan Drug Act has generated new therapies for IEMs. Why some IEMs have motivated successful drug development and others have not remains enigmatic; yet the needs of IEM patients without treatment are a certainty.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antithyroid drug therapy, 131I therapy and subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Fuzuki; Watanabe, Sadahiro; Hayashi, Katsumi; Kita, Tamotsu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy vs. radioiodine therapy (RIT) vs. subtotal thyroidectomy (STT) by calculating expected lifelong cost and utility based on Graves' disease patients' responses to questionnaires using a decision-tree sensitivity analysis and relevant variables. The decision-tree sensitivity analysis to determine expected lifelong cost and utility in Graves' disease patients was designed on the basis of the 4 competing strategies consisting of: (1) ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, (2) ATD therapy plus STT strategy, (3) low-fixed-dose (185 MBq) RIT alone strategy, and (4) high-fixed-dose (370 MBq) RIT alone strategy. One-way sensitivity analysis was designed in the ATD therapy plus RIT strategy, for replacement with RIT in place of ATD, ranging from a 1% incidence of ATD side effects to 30%. The low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy was least costly, and the high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy most costly. The lifelong utility of high-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy with a 5% rate of discounting was highest (lifelong utility for 30 years: 15.2/patient), and the utility of the ATD plus RIT strategy with 1% side effects of the ATD was lowest (14.1/patient). The cost-effectiveness ratio was lowest (yen 5 008/utility) in a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy. In conclusion, a low-fixed-dose RIT alone strategy is preferred treatments in view of cost-effectiveness ratio, and RIT should be used more widely in Japan. (author)

  2. APPLICABILITY OF THE NON STEROID ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS IN FEVER THERAPY OF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Mubarakshina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are widely applied in the pediatric practices for the fever therapy among children. While choosing the medications from this group to prescribe them to the children, it is essential to get guided towards the highly efficient medications with the least risk of the side effects. Only Paracetamol and ibuprofen are fully compliant with this requirement. They are officially recommended by who as the anti febrile medications for use in pediatrics. In the given article, the author reviews the advantages of ibuprofen over to Paracetamol based on the data from the foreign randomized research. She pays certain attention to the safety issues during the ibuprofen based treatment and to the opportunities of the combined Paracetamol and ibuprofen based therapy.Key words: fever, treatment, non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, children.

  3. [Treatment of typical trigeminus neuralgias. Overview of the current state of drug and surgical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E; Leopold, H C; Paulus, W M

    1984-10-11

    Carbamazepine continues to be the most useful drug in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Diphenylhydantoin may be given in addition to or instead of Carbamazepine. Refractory cases may benefit from combination with Baclofen or Chlorphenesin. In cases of persistent pain the concomitant use of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is recommended. If pain continues in spite of multiple medical therapies or if serious side effects develop, then surgical procedures such as percutaneous controlled thermocoagulation or microvascular decompression are indicated. Percutaneous thermocoagulation is associated with the lowest mortality and morbidity rate and can easily be repeated. Microvascular decompression should especially be offered to young patients, who want to avoid any sensory disturbance of the face, and recommended for other patients for whom all other forms of therapy including percutaneous thermocoagulation have failed.

  4. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  5. 帕金森病的药物治疗%Drug therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨任民

    2011-01-01

    帕金森病(PD)的多种治疗药物是针对运动症状的治疗,而PD非运动症状可降低患者生活质量,甚至可加重PD患者的运动症状和功能残疾,其治疗也不容忽视.本文综述PD运动症状的药物治疗原则,以及各类药物的临床使用及其疗效评价,同时汇总多种非运动症状的药物治疗研究.%Several drugs have been used to treat the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Non-motor symptoms may reduce quality of life, cause more motor symptoms and functional disability in PD patients. The therapy for non-motor symptoms should not be ignored. This review describes the principle and application of drug therapy for motor symptoms of PD, and summarizes drug therapy for a variety of non-motor symptoms.

  6. Individualization of anticancer therapy; molecular targets of novel drugs in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of cellular signal transduction, caused by gene mutations, has been recognized as a basic factor of cancer initiation, promotion and progression. Thus, the ability to control the activity of overstimulated signal molecules by the use of appropriate inhibitors became the idea of targeted cancer therapy, which has provided an effective tool to normalize the molecular disorders in malignant cells and to treat certain types of cancer. The molecularly targeted drugs are divided into two major pharmaceutical classes: monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule kinase inhibitors. This review presents a summary of their characteristics, analyzing their chemical structures, specified molecular targets, mechanisms of action and indications for use. Also the molecules subjected to preclinical trials or phase I, II and III clinical trials evaluating their efficiency and safety are presented. Moreover, the article discusses further perspectives for development of targeted therapies focusing on three major directions: systematic searching and discovery of new targets that are oncogenic drivers, improving the pharmacological properties of currently known drugs, and developing strategies to overcome drug resistance. Finally, the role of proper pharmacodiagnostics as a key to rational anticancer therapy has been emphasized since the verification of reliable predictive biomarkers is a basis of individualized medicine in oncology. 

  7. Promise and deceit: pharmakos, drug replacement therapy, and the perils of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Todd

    2014-06-01

    The problem of lying as a feature of medication compliance has been well documented in anthropological and clinical literatures. Yet the role of the lie-its destabilizing effects on the continuity of drug treatment and therapy, as a technology of drug misuse, or as a way to understand the neuro-chemical processes of treatment (pharmacotherapy "tricking" or lying to the brain)-has been less considered, particularly in the context of opioid replacement therapy. The following paper is set against the backdrop of a three-year study of adolescents receiving a relatively new drug (buprenorphine) for the treatment of opiate dependency inside and outside of highly monitored treatment environments in the United States. Lies give order not only to the experience of addiction but also to the experience of therapy as well. In order to better understand this ordering of experience, the paper puts the widely discussed conceptual duality of the pharmakon (healing and poison) in conversation with a perilously overlooked subject in the critical study of pharmacotherapy, namely the pharmakos or the personification of sacrifice. The paper demonstrates how the patient-subject comes to represent therapeutic promise by allowing for the possibility of (and often performing) deceit.

  8. The early career researcher's toolkit:translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Wilson, Samantha L.; Patel, Asha K.; Barnes, Amanda L.; Adams, Christopher F.; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in...

  9. Human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and tissue engineering strategies for disease modeling and drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alec S T; Macadangdang, Jesse; Leung, Winnie; Laflamme, Michael A; Kim, Deok-Ho

    Improved methodologies for modeling cardiac disease phenotypes and accurately screening the efficacy and toxicity of potential therapeutic compounds are actively being sought to advance drug development and improve disease modeling capabilities. To that end, much recent effort has been devoted to the development of novel engineered biomimetic cardiac tissue platforms that accurately recapitulate the structure and function of the human myocardium. Within the field of cardiac engineering, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are an exciting tool that offer the potential to advance the current state of the art, as they are derived from somatic cells, enabling the development of personalized medical strategies and patient specific disease models. Here we review different aspects of iPSC-based cardiac engineering technologies. We highlight methods for producing iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) and discuss their application to compound efficacy/toxicity screening and in vitro modeling of prevalent cardiac diseases. Special attention is paid to the application of micro- and nano-engineering techniques for the development of novel iPSC-CM based platforms and their potential to advance current preclinical screening modalities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Biological therapies (immunomodulatory drugs), worsening of psoriasis and rebound effect: new evidence of similitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2016-11-01

    Employing the secondary action or adaptative reaction of the organism as therapeutic response, homeopathy uses the treatment by similitude (similia similibus curentur) administering to sick individuals the medicines that caused similar symptoms in healthy individuals. Such homeostatic or paradoxical reaction of the organism is scientifically explained through the rebound effect of drugs, which cause worsening of symptoms after withdrawal of several palliative treatments. Despite promoting an improvement in psoriasis at the beginning of the treatment, modern biological therapies provoke worsening of the psoriasis (rebound psoriasis) after discontinuation of drugs. Exploratory qualitative review of the literature on the occurrence of the rebound effect with the use of immunomodulatory drugs [T-cell modulating agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors drugs] in the treatment of psoriasis. Several researches indicate the rebound effect as the mechanism of worsening of psoriasis with the use of efalizumab causing the suspension of its marketing authorization in 2009, in view of some severe cases. Other studies also have demonstrated the occurrence of rebound psoriasis with the use of alefacept, etanercept and infliximab. As well as studied in other classes of drugs, the rebound effect of biologic agents supports the principle of similitude (primary action of the drugs followed by secondary action and opposite of the organism). Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving the efficacy and safety of engineered T cell therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huan; Liu, Lin; Wang, Zhehai

    2013-01-28

    Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is a powerful immunotherapeutics approach against metastatic melanoma. The success of TIL therapy has led to novel strategies for redirecting normal T cells to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) by genetically engineering tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) genes. In this manner, large numbers of antigen-specific T cells can be rapidly generated compared with the longer term expansion of TILs. Great efforts have been made to improve these approaches. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that genetically engineered T cells can mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the development of TCR and CAR gene-engineered T cells and the safety concerns surrounding the use of these T cells in patients. We highlight the importance of judicious selection of TAAs for modified T cell therapy and propose solutions for potential "on-target, off-organ" toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transdermal hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: A review of metabolic effects and drug delivery technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W Kopper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nathan W Kopper, Jennifer Gudeman, Daniel J ThompsonKV Pharmaceutical, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS associated with menopause can cause significant discomfort and decrease the quality of life for women in the peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages of life. Hormone therapy (HT is the mainstay of treatment for menopausal symptoms and is currently the only therapy proven effective for VMS. Numerous HT options are available to treat VMS, including estrogen-only and estrogen-progestogen combination products to meet the needs of both hysterectomized and nonhysterectomized women. In addition to selecting an appropriate estrogen or estrogen-progestogen combination, consideration should be given to the route of administration to best suit the needs of the patient. Delivery systems for hormone therapy include oral tablets, transdermal patches, transdermal topical (nonpatch products, and intravaginal preparations. Oral is currently the most commonly utilized route of administration in the United States. However, evidence suggests that oral delivery may lead to some undesirable physiologic effects caused by significant gut and hepatic metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery may mitigate some of these effects by avoiding gut and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Advantages of transdermal delivery include the ability to administer unmetabolized estradiol directly to the blood stream, administration of lower doses compared to oral products, and minimal stimulation of hepatic protein production. Several estradiol transdermal delivery technologies are available, including various types of patches, topical gels, and a transdermal spray.Keywords: estradiol, hormone therapy, menopause, transdermal drug delivery, vasomotor symptoms

  13. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yun; Chen Zhilong; Yang Xiaoxia; Huang Peng; Zhou Xinping; Du Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 μM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  14. A controlled evaluation of family behavior therapy in concurrent child neglect and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Azrin, Nathan H; Bradshaw, Kelsey; Van Hasselt, Vincent B; Cross, Chad L; Urgelles, Jessica; Romero, Valerie; Hill, Heather H; Allen, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 50% of child protective service (CPS) referrals abuse drugs; yet, existing treatment studies in this population have been limited to case examinations. Therefore, a family-based behavioral therapy was evaluated in mothers referred from CPS for child neglect and drug abuse utilizing a controlled experimental design. Seventy-two mothers evidencing drug abuse or dependence and child neglect were randomly assigned to family behavior therapy (FBT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 10 months postrandomization. As hypothesized, intent-to-treat repeated measures analyses revealed mothers referred for child neglect not due to their children being exposed to illicit drugs demonstrated better outcomes in child maltreatment potential from baseline to 6- and 10-month postrandomization assessments when assigned to FBT, as compared with TAU mothers and FBT mothers who were referred due to child drug exposure. Similar results occurred for hard drug use from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. However, TAU mothers referred due to child drug exposure were also found to decrease their hard drug use more than TAU mothers of non-drug-exposed children and FBT mothers of drug-exposed children at 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Although effect sizes for mothers assigned to FBT were slightly larger for marijuana use than TAU (medium vs. large), these differences were not statistically significant. Specific to secondary outcomes, mothers in FBT, relative to TAU, increased time employed from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Mothers in FBT, compared to TAU, also decreased HIV risk from baseline to 6 months postrandomization. There were no differences in outcome between FBT and TAU for number of days children were in CPS custody and alcohol intoxication, although FBT mothers demonstrated marginal decreases (p = .058) in incarceration from baseline to 6 months postrandomization relative to TAU mothers

  15. Crystals of Serum Albumin for Use in Genetic Engineering and Rational Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Serum albumin crystal forms have been produced which exhibit superior x-ray diffraction quality. The crystals are produced from both recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, canine, and baboon serum albumin and allow the performance of drug-binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies. The crystals are grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol or ammonium sulphate within prescribed limits during growth times from one to several weeks and include the following space groups: P2(sub 1), C2, P1.

  16. Antibody-drug conjugates: Promising and efficient tools for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hadi; Valedkarimi, Zahra; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar

    2018-09-01

    Over the recent decades, the use of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) has led to a paradigm shift in cancer chemotherapy. Antibody-based treatment of various human tumors has presented dramatic efficacy and is now one of the most promising strategies used for targeted therapy of patients with a variety of malignancies, including hematological cancers and solid tumors. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are able to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells, which express specific antigens on their surface, and has been suggested as a novel category of agents for use in the development of anticancer targeted therapies. In contrast to conventional treatments that cause damage to healthy tissues, ADCs use mAbs to specifically attach to antigens on the surface of target cells and deliver their cytotoxic payloads. The therapeutic success of future ADCs depends on closely choosing the target antigen, increasing the potency of the cytotoxic cargo, improving the properties of the linker, and reducing drug resistance. If appropriate solutions are presented to address these issues, ADCs will play a more important role in the development of targeted therapeutics against cancer in the next years. We review the design of ADCs, and focus on how ADCs can be exploited to overcome multiple drug resistance (MDR). © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  18. Moving forward in uveitis therapy: preclinical to phase II clinical trial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Méndez, Raquel; Yilmaz, Taygan; Cordero-Coma, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Several advances have been made in the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of patients with immune-mediated uveitis over the last few decades, which have to lead to an improvement in the visual prognosis of patients. However, the use of available therapies, including steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, is still associated with limited efficacy and potentially serious side effects. Consequently, efforts have been made to develop novel therapeutic alternatives including new molecules and innovative therapeutic approaches. Herein, the authors provide an updated review of those drugs in the initial phases of evaluation for the treatment of immune-mediated uveitides as well as the latest evidence from basic research. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to immune-mediated uveitis has led to the identification of new therapeutic targets and thus to the development of more specific drugs. In addition, considering that the eye is a semi-enclosed chamber and that local therapy has the benefit of sparing the rest of the body from potentially toxic exposure, several attempts of establishing direct ophthalmologic avenues for delivery of the established and emerging drugs have also been made. All these advances have been an unquestionable step forward in the challenging management of uveitis patients.

  19. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  20. Flow cytometric determination of osmotic behaviour of animal erythrocytes toward their engineering for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivana T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the methods based on the osmotic properties of the cells are the most widely used for loading of drugs in human and animal erythrocytes, data related to the osmotic properties of erythrocytes derived from animal blood are scarce. This work was performed with an aim to investigate the possibility of use the flow cytometry as a tool for determination the osmotic behaviour of porcine and bovine erythrocytes, and thus facilitate the engineering of erythrocytes from animal blood to be drug carriers. The method of flow cytometry successfully provided the information about bovine and porcine erythrocyte osmotic fragility, and made the initial steps in assessment of erythrocyte shape in a large number of erythrocytes. Although this method is not able to confirm the swelling of pig erythrocytes, it indicated to the differences in pig erythrocytes that had basic hematological parameters inside and outside the reference values. In order to apply/use the porcine and bovine erythrocytes as drug carriers, the method of flow cytometry, confirming the presence of osmotically different fractions of red blood cells, indicated that various amounts of the encapsulated drug in porcine and bovine erythrocytes can be expected.

  1. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  2. Human engineered heart tissue as a model system for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Alexandra; Vollert, Ingra; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Drug development is time- and cost-intensive and, despite extensive efforts, still hampered by the limited value of current preclinical test systems to predict side effects, including proarrhythmic and cardiotoxic effects in clinical practice. Part of the problem may be related to species-dependent differences in cardiomyocyte biology. Therefore, the event of readily available human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) has raised hopes that this human test bed could improve preclinical safety pharmacology as well as drug discovery approaches. However, hiPSC-CM are immature and exhibit peculiarities in terms of ion channel function, gene expression, structural organization and functional responses to drugs that limit their present usefulness. Current efforts are thus directed towards improving hiPSC-CM maturity and high-content readouts. Culturing hiPSC-CM as 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) improves CM maturity and anisotropy and, in a 24-well format using silicone racks, enables automated, multiplexed high content readout of contractile function. This review summarizes the principal technology and focuses on advantages and disadvantages of this technology and its potential for preclinical drug screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

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    Philipp Koehler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells.

  4. Rational drug therapy education in clinical phase carried out by task-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, S. Sırrı; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Özlem, Mıdık

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Irrational drug use results in drug interactions, treatment noncompliance, and drug resistance. Rational pharmacotherapy education is being implemented in many faculties of medicine. Our aim is to introduce rational pharmacotherapy education by clinicians and to evaluate task-based rational drug therapy education in the clinical context. Methods: The Kirkpatrick's evaluation model was used for the evaluation of the program. The participants evaluated the program in terms of constituents of the program, utilization, and contribution to learning. Voluntary participants responded to the evaluation forms after the educational program. Data are evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative tools. SPSS (version 21) used for quantitative data for determining mean and standard deviation values. Descriptive qualitative analysis approach is used for the analysis of open-ended questions. Results: It was revealed that the program and its components have been favorable. A total 95.9% of the students consider the education to be beneficial. Simulated patients practice and personal drug choice/problem-based learning sessions were appreciated by the students in particular. 93.9% of the students stated that all students of medicine should undergo this educational program. Among the five presentations contained in the program, “The Principles of Prescribing” received the highest points (9 ± 1.00) from participating students in general evaluation of the educational program. Conclusion: This study was carried out to improve task-based rational drug therapy education. According to feedback from the students concerning content, method, resource, assessment, and program design; some important changes, especially in number of facilitators and indications, are made in rational pharmacotherapy education in clinical task-based learning program. PMID:28458432

  5. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  6. Nanotechnology meets 3D in vitro models: tissue engineered tumors and cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, E L; Porto, L M; Rambo, C R

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology are providing to medicine a new dimension. Multifunctional nanomaterials with diagnostics and treatment modalities integrated in one nanoparticle or in cooperative nanosystems are promoting new insights to cancer treatment and diagnosis. The recent convergence between tissue engineering and cancer is gradually moving towards the development of 3D disease models that more closely resemble in vivo characteristics of tumors. However, the current nanomaterials based therapies are accomplished mainly in 2D cell cultures or in complex in vivo models. The development of new platforms to evaluate nano-based therapies in parallel with possible toxic effects will allow the design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications prior to in vivo studies. Therefore, this review focuses on how 3D in vitro models can be applied to study tumor biology, nanotoxicology and to evaluate nanomaterial based therapies. © 2013.

  7. Modeling antibiotic treatment in hospitals: A systematic approach shows benefits of combination therapy over cycling, mixing, and mono-drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepekule, Burcu; Uecker, Hildegard; Derungs, Isabel; Frenoy, Antoine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Multiple treatment strategies are available for empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitals, but neither clinical studies nor theoretical investigations have yielded a clear picture when which strategy is optimal and why. Extending earlier work of others and us, we present a mathematical model capturing treatment strategies using two drugs, i.e the multi-drug therapies referred to as cycling, mixing, and combination therapy, as well as monotherapy with either drug. We randomly sample a large parameter space to determine the conditions determining success or failure of these strategies. We find that combination therapy tends to outperform the other treatment strategies. By using linear discriminant analysis and particle swarm optimization, we find that the most important parameters determining success or failure of combination therapy relative to the other treatment strategies are the de novo rate of emergence of double resistance in patients infected with sensitive bacteria and the fitness costs associated with double resistance. The rate at which double resistance is imported into the hospital via patients admitted from the outside community has little influence, as all treatment strategies are affected equally. The parameter sets for which combination therapy fails tend to fall into areas with low biological plausibility as they are characterised by very high rates of de novo emergence of resistance to both drugs compared to a single drug, and the cost of double resistance is considerably smaller than the sum of the costs of single resistance.

  8. A dual-targeting strategy for enhanced drug delivery and synergistic therapy based on thermosensitive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; You, Chaoqun; Gao, Zhiguo; Wu, Hongshuai; Sun, Baiwang; Zhu, Xiaoli; Chen, Renjie

    2018-08-01

    The functionalized nanoparticles have been widely studied and reported as carriers of drug transport recently. Furthermore, many groups have focused more on developing novel and efficient treatment methods, such as photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy, since both therapies have shown inspiring potential in the application of antitumor. The mentioned treatments exhibited the superiority of cooperative manner and showed the ability to compensate for the adverse effects caused by conventional monotherapy in proposed strategies. In view of the above descriptions, we formulated a thermosensitive drug delivery system, which achieved the enhanced delivery of cisplatin and two photosensitizers (ICG and Ce6) by dual-targeting traction. Drawing on the thin film hydration method, cisplatin and photosensitizers were encapsulated inside nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the targeting peptide cRGD and targeting molecule folate can be modified on the surface of nanoparticles to realize the active identification of tumor cells. The measurements of dynamic light scattering showed that the prepared nanoparticles had an ideal dispersibility and uniform particle size of 102.6 nm. On the basis of the results observed from confocal laser scanning microscope, the modified nanoparticles were more efficient endocytosed by MCF-7 cells as a contrast to SGC-7901 cells. Photothermal conversion-triggered drug release and photo-therapies produced a significant apoptosis rate of 85.9% on MCF-7 cells. The distinguished results made it believed that the formulated delivery system had conducted great efforts and innovations for the realization of concise collaboration and provided a promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Antithyroid drug regimens before and after 131I-therapy for hyperthyroidism: evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnhout, G S; Franken, A A M

    2008-06-01

    In view of the new national guideline on thyroid dysfunction, the evidence base for current practice as well as the new guideline is assessed with regard to the use of antithyroid drugs (ATDs) before and after radioiodine (131I) therapy. In December 2006, we surveyed 16 hospitals by telephone about different aspects of their antithyroid drug regimen: all eight academic centres and eight nonacademic teaching hospitals. The literature was searched for an evidence-based answer to each question in the inquiry. 13 of 16 hospitals (81%) use antithyroid drugs for pretreatment before 131I. ATDs are discontinued on average four days before 131I or diagnostic scan. However, 27% stop only three days beforehand, which may diminish the effect of 131I. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is also withdrawn four days before 131I, although the literature shows that PTU diminishes the effect of 131I even if it is stopped 15 days beforehand. Resumption of ATDs after 131I to prevent thyrotoxicosis is common practice (81%). One hospital (6%) never restarts ATDs, two (13%) only by indication. Adjunctive treatment consists of combination therapy in 93%, is usually resumed within two days after 131I therapy, and then continued for two to six months. Routine adjunctive treatment is not evidence-based and may be limited to a high-risk subset, especially elderly patients (>70 years) and patients with cardiac comorbidity. Resumption of ATDs within five to seven days after 131I may diminish the effect of 131I. Antithyroid drug regimens in the Netherlands are heterogeneous. The evidence base of current practice and the new guideline are discussed.

  10. Core-shell designed scaffolds for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-07-01

    Scaffolds that secure and deliver therapeutic ingredients like signaling molecules and stem cells hold great promise for drug delivery and tissue engineering. Employing a core-shell design for scaffolds provides a promising solution. Some unique methods, such as co-concentric nozzle extrusion, microfluidics generation, and chemical confinement reactions, have been successful in producing core-shelled nano/microfibers and nano/microspheres. Signaling molecules and drugs, spatially allocated to the core and/or shell part, can be delivered in a controllable and sequential manner for optimal therapeutic effects. Stem cells can be loaded within the core part on-demand, safely protected from the environments, which ultimately affords ex vivo culture and in vivo tissue engineering. The encapsulated cells experience three-dimensional tissue-mimic microenvironments in which therapeutic molecules are secreted to the surrounding tissues through the semi-permeable shell. Tuning the material properties of the core and shell, changing the geometrical parameters, and shaping them into proper forms significantly influence the release behaviors of biomolecules and the fate of the cells. This topical issue highlights the immense usefulness of core-shell designs for the therapeutic actions of scaffolds in the delivery of signaling molecules and stem cells for tissue regeneration and disease treatment. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Population-based differences in treatment outcome following anticancer drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Brigette By; Hui, Edwin P; Mok, Tony Sk

    2010-01-01

    Population-based differences in toxicity and clinical outcome following treatment with anticancer drugs have an important effect on oncology practice and drug development. These differences arise from complex interactions between biological and environmental factors, which include genetic diversity affecting drug metabolism and the expression of drug targets, variations in tumour biology and host physiology, socioeconomic disparities, and regional preferences in treatment standards. Some well-known examples include the high prevalence of activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in pulmonary adenocarcinoma among northeast (China, Japan, Korea) and parts of southeast Asia (excluding India) non-smokers, which predict sensitivity to EGFR kinase inhibitors, and the sharp contrast between Japan and the west in the management and survival outcome of gastric cancer. This review is a critical overview of population-based differences in the four most prevalent cancers in the world: lung, breast, colorectal, and stomach cancer. Particular attention is given to the clinical relevance of such knowledge in terms of the individualisation of drug therapy and in the design of clinical trials. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. New drugs or alternative therapy to blurring the symptoms of fibromyalgia-a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marlange A; Guimarães, Adriana G; Araújo, Adriano A S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Quintans, Jullyana S S

    2017-10-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a musculoskeletal condition characterized by chronic widespread pain, tenderness and often accompanied by other comorbid conditions such as depression, anxiety, chronic fatigue, among others. Now, we aimed to survey the recent patents describing new drugs or alternative therapy for FM. Areas covered: This review covers the therapeutic patents published between 2010 and 2017 from specialized search databases (WIPO, DERWENT, INPI, ESPANET and USPTO) that report the discovery of new drugs or pharmacologic alternative for the treatment of FM. Expert opinion: New therapeutic substances have been proposed in the last seven years. At least as it has been found in our survey, most are still in the pre-clinical phase of the study, and its clinical applicability is unclear. However, other therapeutic approaches were found in patents such as well-established drugs in the market in combination or drug repositioning that combines the 'new analgesic' effects with the old side effects. Hence, it is a safe approach for pharmaceutical market, but poorer to patients who need a radical innovation. So, there is the emerging need for further studies on the safety and efficacy of such therapeutic measures and the search for improvement of side effects, as well as the development of new drugs that are unorthodox for different FM symptoms.

  13. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cai; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM) algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE) approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60). The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC) patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  14. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Huang

    Full Text Available Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60. The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  15. Potential of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yihua; Tsang, Kent K S; Zhang Han

    2006-01-01

    The insufficiency of self-repair and regeneration of the central nervous system (CNS) leads to difficulty of rehabilitation of the injured brain. In the past few decades, the significant progress in cell therapy and tissue engineering has contributed to the functional recovery of the CNS to a great extent. The present review focuses on the potential role of stem cell based therapy and tissue engineering in the regeneration of the CNS. (topical review)

  16. Novel concept of the smart NIR-light-controlled drug release of black phosphorus nanostructure for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Meng; Wang, Dou; Liang, Weiyuan; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Xing; Sang, David Kipkemoi; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Zhongjun; Dong, Biqin; Xing, Feng; Fan, Dianyuan; Bao, Shiyun; Zhang, Han; Cao, Yihai

    2018-01-16

    A biodegradable drug delivery system (DDS) is one the most promising therapeutic strategies for cancer therapy. Here, we propose a unique concept of light activation of black phosphorus (BP) at hydrogel nanostructures for cancer therapy. A photosensitizer converts light into heat that softens and melts drug-loaded hydrogel-based nanostructures. Drug release rates can be accurately controlled by light intensity, exposure duration, BP concentration, and hydrogel composition. Owing to sufficiently deep penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light through tissues, our BP-based system shows high therapeutic efficacy for treatment of s.c. cancers. Importantly, our drug delivery system is completely harmless and degradable in vivo. Together, our work proposes a unique concept for precision cancer therapy by external light excitation to release cancer drugs. If these findings are successfully translated into the clinic, millions of patients with cancer will benefit from our work.

  17. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  18. Role of antithyroid drug treatment prior to radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Senthilnathan, M.S.; Malhotra, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radio Iodine (RI) therapy is preceded by anti thyroid drug treatment in most centres. There is a general notion that this is a pre-requisite for RI therapy. There have been some sporadic reports in the past emphasizing that euthyroid state is not necessary in all cases before RI. However, no prospective randomized study has been reported in recent literature. The aim of this prospective study was to find out whether prior treatment with anti thyroid drugs showed any advantage in comparison to direct application of radio iodine in hyperthyroid patients. Seventy-two clinically and bio chemically proven cases of hyperthyroidism were randomized into two groups , each with 36 patients. They were matched by age, sex and size of goiter. After establishment of the diagnosis the patients were either subjected to anti thyroid drug treatment (Group A) or given calculated dose of radio iodine (Group B). After being euthyroid for at least 4 weeks the Group A patients were asked to stop the drugs (Neomercazole) for 3-5 days and radio iodine was administered. Patients in both groups were prescribed beta blockers for 4-6 weeks. Average radio iodine dose in both groups was 5 ± 0.92 mCi. All patients were evaluated both clinically and bio chemically 3, 6, 12 months after the radio iodine application. The duration to achieve euthyroid state, patient tolerance and side effects if any were meticulously recorded. In the pre treated group 72.1, 83.4 and 97.2% of the patients attained euthyroid state at 3, 6, 12 months respectively. Five patients needed a second dose after 3 months. No side effect or complications were observed. In group B 77.7, 88.8 and 94.4% of patients achieved euthyroid status at 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. There was no side effects or complications noted. However, 16.7 and 22.2% of the patients in group A and 27.7 and 36.1% of the group B became hypothyroid at 6 and 12 months respectively. They were treated with Thyroxine supplementation. Overall

  19. Mechanisms of termination and prevention of atrial fibrillation by drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, AJ; Smith, GL; Rankin, AC

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disorder of the rhythm of electrical activation of the cardiac atria. It is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, has multiple aetiologies, and increases the risk of death from stroke. Pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of treatment for AF, but currently available anti-arrhythmic drugs have limited efficacy and safety. An improved understanding of how anti-arrhythmic drugs affect the electrophysiological mechanisms of AF initiation and maintenance, in the setting of the different cardiac diseases that predispose to AF, is therefore required. A variety of animal models of AF has been developed, to represent and control the pathophysiological causes and risk factors of AF, and to permit the measurement of detailed and invasive parameters relating to the associated electrophysiological mechanisms of AF. The purpose of this review is to examine, consolidate and compare available relevant data on in-vivo electrophysiological mechanisms of AF suppression by currently approved and investigational anti-arrhythmic drugs in such models. These include the Vaughan Williams class I-IV drugs, namely Na+ channel blockers, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, action potential prolonging drugs, and Ca2+ channel blockers; the “upstream therapies”, e.g., angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and fish oils; and a variety of investigational drugs such as “atrial-selective” multiple ion channel blockers, gap junction-enhancers, and intracellular Ca2+-handling modulators. It is hoped that this will help to clarify the main electrophysiological mechanisms of action of different and related drug types in different disease settings, and the likely clinical significance and potential future exploitation of such mechanisms. PMID:21334377

  20. Changes of serum cytokines levels after drug therapy in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jianping; Li Suping; Xiong Gang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of the cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the neuroimmune modulation of epilepsy through measurement of the changes of the serum levels of the these cytokines after drug therapy in epileptic patients. Methods: Serum IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α levels were measured with RIA in 43 patients with epilepsy both before and after drug therapy for 3-6 months as well as 32 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum levels of these cytokines in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (p<0.001). After treatment, 18 of the 43 patients were regarded as treatment very successful, with attack numbers decreased more than 75%. Some of this group of patient had their serum cytokines levels significantly dropped down, but the mean level for the group as a whole did not change much. In the rest 25 patients with less successful result, changes were not significant with the levels increased in a few cases. Among the cytokines, levels of IL-2 were significantly positively correlated to those of IL-6 and TNF-α (r=0.47, p<0.01, r=0.55, p<0.01). Conclusion: Increased levels of the cytokines in the epileptic patients suggest an activated immune state. However, the changes of levels after therapy are not predictable and do not necessarily drop down significantly even with very successful treatment

  1. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Astrocyte Senescence and Metabolic Changes in Response to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART survival rates among patients infected by HIV have increased. However, even though survival has increased HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND still persist, suggesting that HAART-drugs may play a role in the neurocognitive impairment observed in HIV-infected patients. Given previous data demonstrating that astrocyte senescence plays a role in neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we examined the role of HAART on markers of senescence in primary cultures of human astrocytes (HAs. Our results indicate HAART treatment induces cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment is also associated with the induction of reactive oxygen species and upregulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These changes in mitochondria correlate with increased glycolysis in HAART drug treated astrocytes. Taken together these results indicate that HAART drugs induce the senescence program in HAs, which is associated with oxidative and metabolic changes that could play a role in the development of HAND.

  3. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  4. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vguarino@unina.it; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, Department of Chemical Sciences & Materials Technology, National Research Council of Italy, V.le Kennedy 54, Naples (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial’s manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell–biomaterial and cell– cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues.

  5. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial’s manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell–biomaterial and cell– cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues

  6. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial's manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell-biomaterial and cell- cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues.

  7. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kroesen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In the present Systematic Review, we investigate whether NSAIDs display any effects as therapy of TB and discuss possible mechanisms of action of NSAIDs as adjunctive therapy of TB. Ten studies, seven preclinical studies in mice and three clinical trials, were included and systematically reviewed. Our results point toward a beneficial effect of NSAIDs as adjunct to current TB therapy regimens, mediated by decreased lung pathology balancing host-immune reaction. The determination of the best timing for their administration in order to obtain the potential beneficial effects needs further investigation. Even if the preclinical evidence requires clinical evaluation, NSAIDs might represent a potential safe, simple, and cheap improvement in therapy of TB.

  8. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Shu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Yu-Jen [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of

  9. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of m

  10. Effects of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) on Nonopioid Drug Abuse: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence of the effects of multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) on drug use reduction in young people for the treatment of nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials. Meta-analytic methods were used to…

  11. The mastermind approach to CNS drug therapy: translational prediction of human brain distribution, target site kinetics, and therapeutic effects

    OpenAIRE

    de Lange, Elizabeth CM

    2013-01-01

    Despite enormous advances in CNS research, CNS disorders remain the world?s leading cause of disability. This accounts for more hospitalizations and prolonged care than almost all other diseases combined, and indicates a high unmet need for good CNS drugs and drug therapies. Following dosing, not only the chemical properties of the drug and blood?brain barrier (BBB) transport, but also many other processes will ultimately determine brain target site kinetics and consequently the CNS effects. ...

  12. Biophotonic techniques for manipulation and characterization of drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, E; Makropoulou, M; Mourelatou, E A; Demetzos, C

    2012-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are usually involved in two opposite procedures related to cancer: initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer, as well as in all non-surgical therapeutic approaches for cancer, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. This review is concentrated in new therapeutic strategies that take advantage of increased ROS in cancer cells to enhance therapeutic activity and selectivity. Novel biophotonic techniques for manipulation and characterization of drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy are discussed, including optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. This review highlights how these techniques are playing a critical role in recent and future cancer fighting applications. We can conclude that Biophotonics and nanomedicine are the future for cancer biology and disease management, possessing unique potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, dosimetry and personalized treatment of biomedical applications targeting cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Three-drug chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, Y.; Steyaert, J.; Francis, C.; Bosly, A.; Prignot, J.

    1983-01-01

    In 43 cases of small cell carcinoma of the lung, a combined treatment has been initiated with three drugs (cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 and vincristine sulphate 1 or 2 mg total dosis), split-course-radiation therapy on the primary tumour (3500 rads) and prophylactic irradiation of the brain (2000 rads). The median survival of the 34 cases evaluable at day 50 attains 253 days. A more favourable evolution is observed for patients with a good response after therapy (median survival: 315 days) and for cases with limited disease (321 days) than for non-responders (median survival: 157 days) and for cases with extensive disease (median survival: 214 days). In spite of tumour site irradiation, prophylactic irradiation of CNS and chemotherapy, there were six local relapses, two CNS extensions and six metastatic relapses and only two autopsied cases without macroscopic evidence of relapse. (author)

  14. Is administered radioiodine activity appropriate? The effects of pre- treatment antithyroid drugs on the therapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.; Udugama, C.; Perera, K.; Herath, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although radioiodine (RAI) therapy has been used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, there are both wide variations in current practice and deficiencies in outcome. There is concern as to decide the optimum activity to achieve better therapeutic outcome and uncertainty over the effects of pretreatment antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the post therapy outcome. Use of ATD (carbimazole) to control the severity of the disease prior to RAI therapy is a common accepted practice. The Royal college of Physicians (RCP) guideline on radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis has recommended activity of 400mBq for Graves' disease (GD) and 15mCi for toxic multi nodular disease (TMND) to achieve euthyroidism with an incidence of hypothyroidism around 15-20% at 2 years. However, in the clinical setting, many patients have become hypothyroid very early than the expected time period. This study was carried out to see the fixed dose RAI therapy outcome of both GD and TMND. Another objective is to assess the effects of pre therapy ATD on the RAI therapy for both GD and TMND at 1 year. Post RAI therapy outcome was analyzed in thyrotoxic patients who received RAI at our institute from 2001-2005. Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made on the basis of biochemical thyroid function tests and thyroid uptake scans. Both GD and TMND patients were selected. Patients who were treated with ATD were advised to stop drugs for at least 4 weeks before administration of RAI therapeutic dose. GD patients received 400mBq and TMND received 550mBq of RAI irrespective of the size of the thyroid gland. Both GD and TMND were further categorized into two groups on the basis of whether they have given ATD prior to RAI therapy. Patients with solitary toxic nodular disease were excluded from the study. Post therapy thyroid functions (free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were done at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months intervals. Therapy outcome over time was defined on the basis of thyroid function and

  15. Patient compliance with drug therapy in schizophrenia. Economic and clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, E; Bingefors, K

    2000-08-01

    The effectiveness of drug treatment in clinical practice is considerably lower than the efficacy shown in controlled studies. The lower effectiveness in practice presumably leads to lower cost effectiveness of drug treatment in real-life situations compared with that demonstrated by studies based on results from controlled trials. Improved cost effectiveness in routine clinical practice would be a significant advantage in the treatment of schizophrenia, one of the most costly diseases in society. The aetiology of schizophrenia is unknown, and there is no cure. The main aims of therapy with antipsychotic medication include the effective relief of symptoms without the introduction of adverse effects or serious adverse events, improved quality of life, cost effectiveness and a positive long term outcome. The older classical antipsychotic drugs do not always meet these requirements because of their well-known limitations, such as a lack of response in a subgroup of individuals with schizophrenia and intolerable adverse effects. There has long been a need for new antipsychotics that can ameliorate more symptoms and have no or few adverse effects. Some of the recently introduced antipsychotics have been shown to be more effective in certain clinical situations and to have a more favourable adverse effect profile than the classical antipsychotics. A major factor contributing to the lower effectiveness of drug treatment is noncompliance, which may be very high in schizophrenia. There are several factors influencing compliance, including drug type and formulation, patient, disease status, physician, health care system, community care and family. There have been very few studies of compliance improvement strategies in schizophrenia or, indeed, in medicine in general. Current methods are relatively complex and there are differing opinions on their effectiveness. There are several ways to increase compliance in schizophrenia--the evidence is strongest for psychoeducative

  16. Drug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Hom

    Full Text Available To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa.Cross-sectional cohort study.Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥ 18y/o initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007-May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium. Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed.1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42-150/µl. 267 subjects (26% reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20% were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18% subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.4. Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9-30.5 compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1-8.9 among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4-9.5 had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance.The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence.

  17. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...... who were under follow-up on ART at 1 July 2008 was therefore developed by imputing data on patients with no prior resistance test results, based on the probability of detecting resistance in tested patients with similar profiles....

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a rapid prototyped tissue engineering scaffold with embedded multicomponent matrix for controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muwan; Le, Dang QS; Hein, San; Li, Pengcheng; Nygaard, Jens V; Kassem, Moustapha; Kjems, Jørgen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Bünger, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering implants with sustained local drug delivery provide an opportunity for better postoperative care for bone tumor patients because these implants offer sustained drug release at the tumor site and reduce systemic side effects. A rapid prototyped macroporous polycaprolactone scaffold was embedded with a porous matrix composed of chitosan, nanoclay, and β-tricalcium phosphate by freeze-drying. This composite scaffold was evaluated on its ability to deliver an anthracycline antibiotic and to promote formation of mineralized matrix in vitro. Scanning electronic microscopy, confocal imaging, and DNA quantification confirmed that immortalized human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT) cultured in the scaffold showed high cell viability and growth, and good cell infiltration to the pores of the scaffold. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin staining showed that the scaffold was osteoinductive. The drug-release kinetics was investigated by loading doxorubicin into the scaffold. The scaffolds comprising nanoclay released up to 45% of the drug for up to 2 months, while the scaffold without nanoclay released 95% of the drug within 4 days. Therefore, this scaffold can fulfill the requirements for both bone tissue engineering and local sustained release of an anticancer drug in vitro. These results suggest that the scaffold can be used clinically in reconstructive surgery after bone tumor resection. Moreover, by changing the composition and amount of individual components, the scaffold can find application in other tissue engineering areas that need local sustained release of drug. PMID:22904634

  19. 131I therapy for 345 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism: Without antithyroid drug pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jialiu; Fang, Yi; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Youren; Long, Yahong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and long-term results of 131I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment. From January 2002 to December 2012, 408 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism were treated with 131I alone. Among them, 345 were followed up for 1 to 10 years for physical examination, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound. Complete Blood Count (CBC) liver function, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) thyroid imaging were performed as indicated. The 345 patients had concomitant conditions including thyrotoxic heart disease, severe liver dysfunction, enlarged thyroid weighing 80 to 400 g, severe cytopenia, and vasculitis. One to two weeks prior to 131I therapy, all patients were given low-iodine diet. The dose of 131I therapy was 2.59 to 6.66 MBq (70 to180 µCi) per gram of thyroid with an average of 3.83 ± 0.6 MBq (103.6 ± 16.4 µCi); and the total 131I activity administrated for the individuals was 111 to 3507.6 MBq (3.0 to 94.8 mCi, mean 444 ± 336.7 MBq (12.0 ± 9.1 mCi)). Out of the 408 patients, 283 were cured, 15 with complete remission, and 47 with incomplete remission. No treatment failure or significant clinical worsening was noted in these patients. Our data indicated that 131I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment is safe and effective. PMID:26341470

  20. 131I therapy for 345 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism: Without antithyroid drug pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Xing, Jialiu; Fang, Yi; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Youren; Long, Yahong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and long-term results of (131)I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment. From January 2002 to December 2012, 408 patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism were treated with (131)I alone. Among them, 345 were followed up for 1 to 10 years for physical examination, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound. Complete Blood Count (CBC) liver function, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) thyroid imaging were performed as indicated. The 345 patients had concomitant conditions including thyrotoxic heart disease, severe liver dysfunction, enlarged thyroid weighing 80 to 400 g, severe cytopenia, and vasculitis. One to two weeks prior to (131)I therapy, all patients were given low-iodine diet. The dose of (131)I therapy was 2.59 to 6.66 MBq (70 to180 µCi) per gram of thyroid with an average of 3.83 ± 0.6 MBq (103.6 ± 16.4 µCi); and the total (131)I activity administrated for the individuals was 111 to 3507.6 MBq (3.0 to 94.8 mCi, mean 444 ± 336.7 MBq (12.0 ± 9.1 mCi)). Out of the 408 patients, 283 were cured, 15 with complete remission, and 47 with incomplete remission. No treatment failure or significant clinical worsening was noted in these patients. Our data indicated that (131)I therapy alone for patients with refractory severe hyperthyroidism without antithyroid drug pretreatment is safe and effective. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  1. Regenerative therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure: new developments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finosh, G T; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of myocardium through regenerative therapy and tissue engineering is appearing as a prospective treatment modality for patients with end-stage heart failure. Focusing on this area, this review highlights the new developments and challenges in the regeneration of myocardial tissue. The role of various cell sources, calcium ion and cytokine on the functional performance of regenerative therapy is discussed. The evolution of tissue engineering and the role of tissue matrix/scaffold, cell adhesion and vascularisation on tissue engineering of cardiac tissue implant are also discussed.

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticle Facilitated Drug Delivery for Cancer Therapy with Targeted and Image-Guided Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Yuancheng; Orza, Anamaria; Lu, Qiong; Guo, Peng; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2016-06-14

    With rapid advances in nanomedicine, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have emerged as a promising theranostic tool in biomedical applications, including diagnostic imaging, drug delivery and novel therapeutics. Significant preclinical and clinical research has explored their functionalization, targeted delivery, controllable drug release and image-guided capabilities. To further develop MNPs for theranostic applications and clinical translation in the future, we attempt to provide an overview of the recent advances in the development and application of MNPs for drug delivery, specifically focusing on the topics concerning the importance of biomarker targeting for personalized therapy and the unique magnetic and contrast-enhancing properties of theranostic MNPs that enable image-guided delivery. The common strategies and considerations to produce theranostic MNPs and incorporate payload drugs into MNP carriers are described. The notable examples are presented to demonstrate the advantages of MNPs in specific targeting and delivering under image guidance. Furthermore, current understanding of delivery mechanisms and challenges to achieve efficient therapeutic efficacy or diagnostic capability using MNP-based nanomedicine are discussed.

  3. Effects of concurrent drug therapy on technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, G.H.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Peek, C.; Barker, K.K.; Ice, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Drug interactions with /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate resulting in altered biodistribution were studied using chart review and animal tests. Charts of nine patients who had abnormal gallbladder uptake of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate during a two-year period were reviewed to obtain data such as concurrent drug therapy, primary diagnosis, and laboratory values. Adult New Zealand white rabbits were then used for testing the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate when administered concurrently with possibly interacting drugs identified in the chart review--penicillamine, penicillin G potassium, penicillin V potassium, acetaminophen, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Chart review revealed no conclusive patterns of altered biodistribution associated with other factors. The data did suggest the possibility that the five drugs listed above might cause increased hepatobiliary clearance of the radiopharmaceutical. Animal tests showed that i.v. penicillamine caused substantial distribution of radioactivity into the gallbladder and small bowel. Minimally increased gallbladder radioactivity occurred when oral acetaminophen and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were administered concurrently. Oral and i.v. penicillins did not increase gallbladder activity. Penicillamine may cause substantial alteration of the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate

  4. DRUG THERAPY IN THE PROGRESSED CML PATIENT WITH MULTI-TKI FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim C. Haznedaroglu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline pharmacotherapy of the ‘third-line management of CML’ (progressive disease course after sequential TKI drugs. Current management of CML with multi-TKI failure is reviewed. TKI (bosutinib, ponatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and non-TKI (omacetaxine mepussecinate, IFN or PEG-IFN drugs are available. The literature search was made in PubMed with particular focus on the clinical trials, recommendations, guidelines and expert opinions, as well as international recommendations. Progressing CML disease with multi-TKI failure should be treated with alloSCT based on the availability of the donor and EBMT transplant risk scores. The TKI and non-TKI drugs shall be used to get best promising (hematological, cytogenetic, molecular response. During the CP-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, 2nd generation TKIs (nilotinib or dasatinib are used if they remained. Bosutinib and ponatinib (3rd generation TKIs can be administered in triple-TKI failed (imatinib and nilotinib and dasatinib patients. The presence of T315I mutation at any phase requires ponatinib or omacetaxine mepussecinate therapy before allografting. During the AP/BC-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, the most powerful TKI available (ponatinib or dasatinib if remained together with chemotherapy should be given before alloSCT. Monitoring of CML disease and drug off-target risks (particularly vascular thrombotic events are vital.

  5. The early career researcher's toolkit: translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Qasim A; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I; Wilson, Samantha L; Patel, Asha K; Barnes, Amanda L; Adams, Christopher F; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine translation, we discuss common pitfalls associated with translational research, providing practical solutions and important considerations which will aid process and product development. Suggestions range from effective project management, consideration of key manufacturing, clinical and regulatory matters and means of exploiting research for successful commercialization.

  6. Tissue engineering and cell-based therapy toward integrated strategy with artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojo, Satoshi; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    Research in order that artificial organs can supplement or completely replace the functions of impaired or damaged tissues and internal organs has been underway for many years. The recent clinical development of implantable left ventricular assist devices has revolutionized the treatment of patients with heart failure. The emerging field of regenerative medicine, which uses human cells and tissues to regenerate internal organs, is now advancing from basic and clinical research to clinical application. In this review, we focus on the novel biomaterials, i.e., fusion protein, and approaches such as three-dimensional and whole-organ tissue engineering. We also compare induced pluripotent stem cells, directly reprogrammed cardiomyocytes, and somatic stem cells for cell source of future cell-based therapy. Integrated strategy of artificial organ and tissue engineering/regenerative medicine should give rise to a new era of medical treatment to organ failure.

  7. Microencapsulation of Lefty-secreting engineered cells for pulmonary fibrosis therapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongge; Qiao, Shupei; Wang, Zeli; Geng, Shuai; Zhao, Yufang; Hou, Xiaolu; Tian, Weiming; Chen, Xiongbiao; Yao, Lifen

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease that causes unremitting deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, thus resulting in distortion of the pulmonary architecture and impaired gas exchange. Associated with high morbidity and mortality, IPF is generally refractory to current pharmacological therapies. Lefty A, a potent inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β signaling, has been shown to have promising antifibrotic ability in vitro for the treatment of renal fibrosis and other potential organ fibroses. Here, we determined whether Lefty A can attenuate bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo based on a novel therapeutic strategy where human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells are genetically engineered with the Lefty A-associated GFP gene. The engineered HEK293 cells were encapsulated in alginate microcapsules and then subcutaneously implanted in ICR mice that had 1 wk earlier been intratracheally administered BLM to induce pulmonary fibrosis. The severity of fibrosis in lung tissue was assessed using pathological morphology and collagen expression to examine the effect of Lefty A released from the microencapsulated cells. The engineered HEK293 cells with Lefty A significantly reduced the expression of connective tissue growth factor and collagen type I mRNA, lessened the morphological fibrotic effects induced by BLM, and increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9. This illustrates that engineered HEK293 cells with Lefty A can attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in vivo, thus providing a novel method to treat human pulmonary fibrotic disease and other organ fibroses. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Engineering of gadofluoroprobes: Broad-spectrum applications from cancer diagnosis to therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Ranu A., E-mail: ranu.dutta16@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); NanoeRA medicare Private Limited, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sharma, Prashant K. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India); Tiwari, Vandana [Department of Pathology, KGMU, Lucknow (India); Tiwari, Vivek; Patel, Anant B. [Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad (India); Pandey, Ravindra [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Michigan 49931-1295 (United States); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); NanoeRA medicare Private Limited, Uttar Pradesh (India); Bundelkhand University, Jhansi (India)

    2014-01-13

    The engineering of the Gadolinium based nanostructures have been demonstrated in this paper. Nanostructures of α-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} exhibit a unique transition between ferromagnetic state and paramagnetic state of the system. It was demonstrated that their properties could be tuned for a wide range of applications ranging from hyperthermia to Magnetic Resonance Imaging, owing to their magnetic moments and large relaxivities. Metallic Gd nanoparticles obtained by reduction method were employed for cancer imaging in mice. The Gd nanoparticles were coated with Curcumin and their biomedical implications in the field of simultaneous diagnosis and therapy of cancer and related diseases has been discussed.

  9. Engineering of gadofluoroprobes: Broad-spectrum applications from cancer diagnosis to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Ranu A.; Sharma, Prashant K.; Tiwari, Vandana; Tiwari, Vivek; Patel, Anant B.; Pandey, Ravindra; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2014-01-01

    The engineering of the Gadolinium based nanostructures have been demonstrated in this paper. Nanostructures of α-Gd 2 S 3 exhibit a unique transition between ferromagnetic state and paramagnetic state of the system. It was demonstrated that their properties could be tuned for a wide range of applications ranging from hyperthermia to Magnetic Resonance Imaging, owing to their magnetic moments and large relaxivities. Metallic Gd nanoparticles obtained by reduction method were employed for cancer imaging in mice. The Gd nanoparticles were coated with Curcumin and their biomedical implications in the field of simultaneous diagnosis and therapy of cancer and related diseases has been discussed

  10. Preclinical Models in Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T-Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Elizabeth Louise; Wang, Pin

    2018-05-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has enormous potential in inducing long-term remission in cancer patients, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells have been largely successful in treating hematological malignancies in the clinic. CAR-T therapy has not been as effective in treating solid tumors, in part due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Additionally, CAR-T therapy can cause dangerous side effects, including off-tumor toxicity, cytokine release syndrome, and neurotoxicity. Animal models of CAR-T therapy often fail to predict such adverse events and frequently overestimate the efficacy of the treatment. Nearly all preclinical CAR-T studies have been performed in mice, including syngeneic, xenograft, transgenic, and humanized mouse models. Recently, a few studies have used primate models to mimic clinical side effects better. To date, no single model perfectly recapitulates the human immune system and tumor microenvironment, and some models have revealed CAR-T limitations that were contradicted or missed entirely in other models. Careful model selection based on the primary goals of the study is a crucial step in evaluating CAR-T treatment. Advancements are being made in preclinical models, with the ultimate objective of providing safer, more effective CAR-T therapy to patients.

  11. Strategy for the Prediction of Steady-State Exposure of Digoxin to Determine Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Digoxin With Other Drugs in Digitalization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-20

    Digoxin, a narrow therapeutic index drug, is widely used in congestive heart failure. However, the digitalization therapy involves dose titration and can exhibit drug-drug interaction. Ctrough versus area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in a dosing interval of 24 hours (AUC0-24h) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h for digoxin were established by linear regression. The predictions of digoxin AUC0-24h values were performed using published Ctrough or Cmax with appropriate regression lines. The fold difference, defined as the quotient of the observed/predicted AUC0-24h values, was evaluated. The mean square error and root mean square error, correlation coefficient (r), and goodness of the fold prediction were used to evaluate the models. Both Ctrough versus AUC0-24h (r = 0.9215) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h models for digoxin (r = 0.7781) showed strong correlations. Approximately 93.8% of the predicted digoxin AUC0-24h values were within 0.76-fold to 1.25-fold difference for Ctrough model. In sharp contrast, the Cmax model showed larger variability with only 51.6% of AUC0-24h predictions within 0.76-1.25-fold difference. The r value for observed versus predicted AUC0-24h for Ctrough (r = 0.9551; n = 177; P < 0.001) was superior to the Cmax (r = 0.6134; n = 275; P < 0.001) model. The mean square error and root mean square error (%) for the Ctrough model were 11.95% and 16.2% as compared to 67.17% and 42.3% obtained for the Cmax model. Simple linear regression models for Ctrough/Cmax versus AUC0-24h were derived for digoxin. On the basis of statistical evaluation, Ctrough was superior to Cmax model for the prediction of digoxin AUC0-24h and can be potentially used in a prospective setting for predicting drug-drug interaction or lack of it.

  12. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZY

    2015-03-01

    inhibitors on clopidogrel (omeprazole, esomeprazole versus pantoprazole, rabeprazole, the effects of rifampicin on clopidogrel versus ticagrelor and prasugrel, and the effects of calcium channel blockers on clopidogrel (amlodipine versus P-glycoprotein-inhibiting calcium channel blockers. The mechanism of the DDIs with clopidogrel involves modulating CYP enzymes (eg, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4, paraoxonase-1, hepatic carboxylesterase 1, P-glycoprotein, and organic anion transporter family member 1B1.Conclusion: Effective and safe clopidogrel combination therapy can be achieved by increasing the awareness of potential changes in efficacy and toxicity, rationally selecting alternatives, tailoring drug therapy based on genotype, checking the appropriateness of physician orders, and performing therapeutic monitoring. Keywords: clopidogrel, drug–drug interactions, drug metabolism, drug transporter, genotype, pharmacokinetics, polypharmacy, pharmacogenetics, P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, risk management 

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a rapid prototyped tissue engineering scaffold with embedded multicomponent matrix for controlled drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Muwan Chen,1,2 Dang QS Le,1,2 San Hein,2 Pengcheng Li,1 Jens V Nygaard,2 Moustapha Kassem,3 Jørgen Kjems,2 Flemming Besenbacher,2 Cody Bünger11Orthopaedic Research Lab, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark; 2Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; 3Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, DenmarkAbstract: Bone tissue engineering implants with sustained local drug delivery provide an opportunity for better postoperative care for bone tumor patients because these implants offer sustained drug release at the tumor site and reduce systemic side effects. A rapid prototyped macroporous polycaprolactone scaffold was embedded with a porous matrix composed of chitosan, nanoclay, and β-tricalcium phosphate by freeze-drying. This composite scaffold was evaluated on its ability to deliver an anthracycline antibiotic and to promote formation of mineralized matrix in vitro. Scanning electronic microscopy, confocal imaging, and DNA quantification confirmed that immortalized human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT cultured in the scaffold showed high cell viability and growth, and good cell infiltration to the pores of the scaffold. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin staining showed that the scaffold was osteoinductive. The drug-release kinetics was investigated by loading doxorubicin into the scaffold. The scaffolds comprising nanoclay released up to 45% of the drug for up to 2 months, while the scaffold without nanoclay released 95% of the drug within 4 days. Therefore, this scaffold can fulfill the requirements for both bone tissue engineering and local sustained release of an anticancer drug in vitro. These results suggest that the scaffold can be used clinically in reconstructive surgery after bone tumor resection. Moreover, by changing the composition and amount of individual components, the scaffold can find application in other

  14. Current drug therapies for rosacea: a chronic vascular and inflammatory skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Huang, William W; Huynh, Tu T

    2014-06-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder that presents with abnormal vascular and inflammatory conditions. Clinical manifestations include flushing, facial erythema, inflammatory papules and pustules, telangiectasias, edema, and watery or irritated eyes. To discuss the evolving pathophysiology of rosacea, factors involved in promoting the chronic vascular and inflammatory abnormalities seen in rosacea, and the available drug therapies for the condition. Chronic inflammation and vascular changes are believed to be underlying factors in the pathophysiology of rosacea. Aberrant cathelicidin expression, elevated kallikrein 5 (KLK5) proteolytic activity, and altered toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) expression have been reported in rosacea skin leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Until recently, drug therapies only targeted the inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules) and transient erythema associated with these inflammatory lesions of rosacea. Brimonidine tartrate gel 0.5% was recently approved for the treatment of persistent (nontransient) facial erythema of rosacea, acting primarily on the cutaneous vascular component of the disease. Rosacea is a chronic vascular and inflammatory skin disease. Understanding the role of factors that trigger the onset of rosacea symptoms and exacerbate the condition is crucial in treating this skin disease.

  15. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  16. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  17. 3D Photo-Fabrication for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rúben F. Pereira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most promising strategies in tissue engineering involve the integration of a triad of biomaterials, living cells, and biologically active molecules to engineer synthetic environments that closely mimic the healing milieu present in human tissues, and that stimulate tissue repair and regeneration. To be clinically effective, these environments must replicate, as closely as possible, the main characteristics of the native extracellular matrix (ECM on a cellular and subcellular scale. Photo-fabrication techniques have already been used to generate 3D environments with precise architectures and heterogeneous composition, through a multi-layer procedure involving the selective photocrosslinking reaction of a light-sensitive prepolymer. Cells and therapeutic molecules can be included in the initial hydrogel precursor solution, and processed into 3D constructs. Recently, photo-fabrication has also been explored to dynamically modulate hydrogel features in real time, providing enhanced control of cell fate and delivery of bioactive compounds. This paper focuses on the use of 3D photo-fabrication techniques to produce advanced constructs for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. State-of-the-art photo-fabrication techniques are described, with emphasis on the operating principles and biofabrication strategies to create spatially controlled patterns of cells and bioactive factors. Considering its fast processing, spatiotemporal control, high resolution, and accuracy, photo-fabrication is assuming a critical role in the design of sophisticated 3D constructs. This technology is capable of providing appropriate environments for tissue regeneration, and regulating the spatiotemporal delivery of therapeutics.

  18. Utility of Glioblastoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenografts in Drug Discovery and Personalized Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Patrizii

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial effort and resources dedicated to drug discovery and development, new anticancer agents often fail in clinical trials. Among many reasons, the lack of reliable predictive preclinical cancer models is a fundamental one. For decades, immortalized cancer cell cultures have been used to lay the groundwork for cancer biology and the quest for therapeutic responses. However, cell lines do not usually recapitulate cancer heterogeneity or reveal therapeutic resistance cues. With the rapidly evolving exploration of cancer “omics,” the scientific community is increasingly investigating whether the employment of short-term patient-derived tumor cell cultures (two- and three-dimensional and/or patient-derived xenograft models might provide a more representative delineation of the cancer core and its therapeutic response. Patient-derived cancer models allow the integration of genomic with drug sensitivity data on a personalized basis and currently represent the ultimate approach for preclinical drug development and biomarker discovery. The proper use of these patient-derived cancer models might soon influence clinical outcomes and allow the implementation of tailored personalized therapy. When assessing drug efficacy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, currently, the most reliable models are generated through direct injection of patient-derived cells or more frequently the isolation of glioblastoma cells endowed with stem-like features and orthotopically injecting these cells into the cerebrum of immunodeficient mice. Herein, we present the key strengths, weaknesses, and potential applications of cell- and animal-based models of GBM, highlighting our experience with the glioblastoma stem-like patient cell-derived xenograft model and its utility in drug discovery.

  19. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: The importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, Ben Avi; Raveh, Lily

    2008-01-01

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission

  20. Biochemistry and biomedicine of quantum dots: from biodetection to bioimaging, drug discovery, diagnostics, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Li, Pingfan; Li, Lin; Yang, Mei

    2018-07-01

    According to recent research, nanotechnology based on quantum dots (QDs) has been widely applied in the field of bioimaging, drug delivery, and drug analysis. Therefore, it has become one of the major forces driving basic and applied research. The application of nanotechnology in bioimaging has been of concern. Through in vitro labeling, it was found that luminescent QDs possess many properties such as narrow emission, broad UV excitation, bright fluorescence, and high photostability. The QDs also show great potential in whole-body imaging. The QDs can be combined with biomolecules, and hence, they can be used for targeted drug delivery and diagnosis. The characteristics of QDs make them useful for application in pharmacy and pharmacology. This review focuses on various applications of QDs, especially in imaging, drug delivery, pharmaceutical analysis, photothermal therapy, biochips, and targeted surgery. Finally, conclusions are made by providing some critical challenges and a perspective of how this field can be expected to develop in the future. Quantum dots (QDs) is an emerging field of interdisciplinary subject that involves physics, chemistry, materialogy, biology, medicine, and so on. In addition, nanotechnology based on QDs has been applied in depth in biochemistry and biomedicine. Some forward-looking fields emphatically reflected in some extremely vital areas that possess inspiring potential applicable prospects, such as immunoassay, DNA analysis, biological monitoring, drug discovery, in vitro labelling, in vivo imaging, and tumor target are closely connected to human life and health and has been the top and forefront in science and technology to date. Furthermore, this review has not only involved the traditional biochemical detection but also particularly emphasized its potential applications in life science and biomedicine. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo enhancement of anticancer therapy using bare or chemotherapeutic drug-bearing nanodiamond particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Yingqi Li,1,2 Yaoli Tong,1 Ruixia Cao,1 Zhimei Tian,2 Binsheng Yang,2 Pin Yang2 1Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 2Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, People's Republic of China Background: This study investigated the use of nanodiamond particles (NDs as a promising material for drug delivery in vivo and in vitro. Methods: HepG2 cells (a human hepatic carcinoma cell line were used to determine the characteristics of a nanodiamond-doxorubicin complex (ND-DOX when taken up by cells in vitro using laser scanning confocal microscopy and dialysis experiments. We also compared the survival rate and histopathology of tumor-bearing mice after treatment with NDs or ND-DOX in vivo. Results: In vitro investigation showed that ND-DOX has slow and sustained drug release characteristics compared with free doxorubicin. In vivo, the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice treated with ND-DOX was four times greater than that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. Interestingly, the survival rate in mice treated with NDs alone was close to that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. This indicates that treatment with ND-DOX can prolong the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice significantly compared with conventional doxorubicin and that NDs can have this effect as well. Histopathological analysis showed that neither the NDs nor ND-DOX were toxic to the kidney, liver, or spleen in contrast with the well-known toxic effects of free doxorubicin on the kidney and liver. Further, both the bare NDs and ND-DOX could suppress tumor growth effectively. Conclusion: NDs can potentially prolong survival, and ND-DOX may act as a nanodrug with promising chemotherapeutic efficacy and safety.  Keywords: nanodiamond, drug delivery, sustained release, survival rate, cancer, treatment

  2. Targeted therapy and personalized medicine in hepatocellular carcinoma: drug resistance, mechanisms, and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galun D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Danijel Galun,1,2 Tatjana Srdic-Rajic,3 Aleksandar Bogdanovic,1 Zlatibor Loncar,2,4 Marinko Zuvela1,2 1Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, University Clinic for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, 2Medical School, University of Belgrade, 3Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia/Unit for Experimental Oncology, 4Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is characterized by a growing number of new cases diagnosed each year that is nearly equal to the number of deaths from this cancer. In a majority of the cases, HCC is associated with the underlying chronic liver disease, and it is diagnosed in advanced stage of disease when curative treatment options are not applicable. Sorafenib is a treatment of choice for patients with performance status 1 or 2 and/or macrovascular invasion or extrahepatic spread, and regorafenib is the only systemic treatment found to provide survival benefit in HCC patients progressing on sorafenib treatment. Other drugs tested in different trials failed to demonstrate any benefit. Disappointing results of numerous trials testing the efficacy of various drugs indicate that HCC has low sensitivity to chemotherapy that is in great part caused by multidrug resistance. Immunotherapy for HCC is a new challenging treatment option and involves immune checkpoint inhibitors/antibody-based therapy and peptide-based vaccines. Another challenging approach is microRNA-based therapy that involves two strategies. The first aims to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs by using miRNA antagonists and the second strategy is miRNA replacement, which involves the reintroduction of a tumor-suppressor miRNA mimetic to restore a loss of function. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, drug resistance, multimodal treatment, chemotherapy 

  3. Hypericin-bearing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery in photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, Harald; Subatzus, Daniel; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Poettler, Marina; Stiegelschmitt, Alfons; Schuster, Matthias; Maake, Caroline; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Combining the concept of magnetic drug targeting and photodynamic therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. A high selectivity as well as significant fewer side effects can be achieved by this method, since the therapeutic treatment only takes place in the area where accumulation of the particles by an external electromagnet and radiation by a laser system overlap. In this article, a novel hypericin-bearing drug delivery system has been developed by synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with a hypericin-linked functionalized dextran coating. For that, sterically stabilized dextran-coated SPIONs were produced by coprecipitation and crosslinking with epichlorohydrin to enhance stability. Carboxymethylation of the dextran shell provided a functionalized platform for linking hypericin via glutaraldehyde. Particle sizes obtained by dynamic light scattering were in a range of 55-85 nm, whereas investigation of single magnetite or maghemite particle diameter was performed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and resulted in approximately 4.5-5.0 nm. Surface chemistry of those particles was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ζ potential measurements, indicating successful functionalization and dispersal stabilization due to a mixture of steric and electrostatic repulsion. Flow cytometry revealed no toxicity of pure nanoparticles as well as hypericin without exposure to light on Jurkat T-cells, whereas the combination of hypericin, alone or loaded on particles, with light-induced cell death in a concentration and exposure time-dependent manner due to the generation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the combination of SPIONs' targeting abilities with hypericin's phototoxic properties represents a promising approach for merging magnetic drug targeting with photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer.

  4. DNA origami as an in vivo drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Qiao; Li, Na; Dai, Luru; Liu, Qing; Song, Linlin; Wang, Jinye; Li, Yaqian; Tian, Jie; Ding, Baoquan; Du, Yang

    2014-07-22

    Many chemotherapeutics used for cancer treatments encounter issues during delivery to tumors in vivo and may have high levels of systemic toxicity due to their nonspecific distribution. Various materials have been explored to fabricate nanoparticles as drug carriers to improve delivery efficiency. However, most of these materials suffer from multiple drawbacks, such as limited biocompatibility and inability to engineer spatially addressable surfaces that can be utilized for multifunctional activity. Here, we demonstrate that DNA origami possessed enhanced tumor passive targeting and long-lasting properties at the tumor region. Particularly, the triangle-shaped DNA origami exhibits optimal tumor passive targeting accumulation. The delivery of the known anticancer drug doxorubicin into tumors by self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures was performed, and this approach showed prominent therapeutic efficacy in vivo. The DNA origami carriers were prepared through the self-assembly of M13mp18 phage DNA and hundreds of complementary DNA helper strands; the doxorubicin was subsequently noncovalently intercalated into these nanostructures. After conducting fluorescence imaging and safety evaluation, the doxorubicin-containing DNA origami exhibited remarkable antitumor efficacy without observable systemic toxicity in nude mice bearing orthotopic breast tumors labeled with green fluorescent protein. Our results demonstrated the potential of DNA origami nanostructures as innovative platforms for the efficient and safe drug delivery of cancer therapeutics in vivo.

  5. National indicators for quality of drug therapy in older persons: the Swedish experience from the first 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastbom, Johan; Johnell, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Inappropriate drug use is an important health problem in elderly persons. Beginning with the Beers' criteria in the early 1990s, explicit criteria have been extensively used to measure and improve quality of drug use in older people. This article describes the Swedish indicators for quality of drug therapy in the elderly, introduced in 2004 and updated in 2010. These indicators were designed to be applied to people aged 75 years and over, regardless of residence and other characteristics. The indicators are divided into drug specific, covering choice, indication and dosage of drugs, polypharmacy, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), drug use in decreased renal function and in some symptoms; and diagnosis specific, covering the rational, irrational and hazardous drug use in common disorders in elderly people. During the 10 years since introduction, the Swedish indicators have several applications. They form the basis for recommendations for drug therapy in older people, are implemented in prescribing supports and drug utilisation reviews, are used in national benchmarking of the quality of Swedish healthcare and have contributed to initiatives from pensioner organisations. The indicators have also been used in several pharmacoepidemiological studies. Since 2005, there have been signs of improvement of the quality of drug prescribing to elderly persons in Sweden. For example, the prescribing of drugs that should be avoided in older persons decreased by 36 % between 2006 and 2012 in persons aged 80 years and older. Similarly, drug combinations that may cause DDIs decreased by 26 % and antipsychotics by 41 %. The indicators have likely contributed to this.

  6. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  7. Gene therapy for spinomuscular atrophy: a biomedical advance, a missed opportunity for more equitable drug pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, T

    2017-09-01

    An experimental approach for gene therapy of spinomuscular atrophy has been reported to prevent development of the neuromuscular features of this lethal and previously untreatable disorder. The approach involves treatment of patients suffering from SMN1-associated infantile form of the disease with a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that corrects aberrant splicing of the nearly identical SMN2 gene to allow the generation of functional SMN protein, thereby mitigating the development of the disease. This technique represents the first apparently effective therapy for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and an important documentation for ASO technology for therapy of neurodegenerative disease. These results with one form of SMA are likely to be relevant for similar applications to other SMA types and are likely to inspire application to a number of other intractable neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and possibly even the extremely common Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and others. Nevertheless, the scientific and medical importance of this advance is marred by a pricing policy by the corporate sponsors that may complicate accessibility of the drug for some desperate patients.

  8. [Adherence with proton pump inhibitor therapy, by continuously taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimanov, S I; Makarenko, E V; Dikareva, E A

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the impact of adherence with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy on the incidence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy (NSAID gastropathy) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PPI pharmacotherapy adherence was estimated using the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) in 92 patients with RA, including 32 patients did not take a PPI and 60 used a PPI. The groups were matched for age, disease duration, and used NSAIDs. All those asked underwent video esophagogastroduodenoscopy. According to the data of MAQ survey, low, moderate, and high adherence subgroups could be identified among the patients treated with a PPI. NSAID gastropathy was detected in 43.8% of the patients taking no PPI, in 50% of those with low PPI treatment adherence, in 12.5% with moderate adherence, and in 4.5% with high adherence. In the patients with low adherence to PPI therapy, NSAID gastropathy was recorded 11 times more frequently than in those with high adherence (c2 = 7.77; p = 0.005). This condition occurred in 28.6% of the patients taking NSAID without preventively using a PPI in the absence of risk factors for NSAID gastropathy. Only 36.7% patients who had been recommended to use a PPI for the prevention of NSAID gastropathy strictly observed their doctor's directions. Low PPI pharmacotherapy adherence may serve as an additional risk factor for NSAID gastropathy in patients in whom preventive antisecretory therapy used in combination with NSAID is indicated.

  9. NIR photoregulated chemo- and photodynamic cancer therapy based on conjugated polyelectrolyte-drug conjugate encapsulated upconversion nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Min, Yuanzeng; Hu, Qinglian; Xing, Bengang; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The design of nanoplatforms with target recognition and near-infrared (NIR) laser photoregulated chemo- and photodynamic therapy is highly desirable but remains challenging. In this work, we have developed such a system by taking advantage of a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)-drug conjugate and upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). The poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted CPE not only serves as a polymer matrix for UCNP encapsulation, but also as a fluorescent imaging agent, a photosensitizer as well as a carrier for chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) through a UV-cleavable ortho-nitrobenzyl (NB) linker. Upon 980 nm laser irradiation, the UCNPs emit UV and visible light. The up-converted UV light is utilized for controlled drug release through the photocleavage of the ortho-nitrobenzyl linker, while the up-converted visible light is used to initiate the polymer photosensitizer to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) for photodynamic therapy. The NIR photo-regulated UCNP@CPE-DOX showed high efficiency of ROS generation and controlled drug release in cancer cells upon single laser irradiation. In addition, the combination therapy showed enhanced inhibition of U87-MG cell growth as compared to sole treatments. As two light sources with different wavelengths are always needed for traditional photodynamic therapy and photoregulated drug release, the adoption of UCNPs as an NIR light switch is highly beneficial to combined chemo- and photodynamic therapy with enhanced therapeutic effects.

  10. How much elderly people of Isfahan are adherent to their drug therapy regimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Parvaneh; Jafari, Tayebe Arab; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The need for a correct follow-up for medical advices of health givers is the cornerstone for avoiding drug-related complications in especial period of elderly people life. There isn't any data about drug therapy regimens adherence of elderly people of Isfahan. In this study, we aimed to cover this deficit. In this cross-sectional study which was carried out in Isfahan (Iran) in 2013 senior citizens (aged 65 or more) who were taking at least one medication and had no record of residency in nursing homes were included. We used Morisky medication adherence scale (after validation and reliability assessment for using this questionnaire in Persian language) to evaluate the level of adherence in the study population. A total of 200 elderly participants were fully studied ( n = 200, 61% females), and 52% of them had poor medication adherence. 77.5% of participants were suffered from at least four medical illnesses, and 18.5% of them were taking more than eight medications per day. We have not found any significant statistical relationship between vision or hearing loss disorders and the medication adherence of the participants). There was a significant positive relationship between the level of education and medication adherence ( P = 0.001), ( χ 2 = 0.29). Low Medication adherence is a common and important drug issue in the elderly in Isfahan. This issue can lead to medical complications and huge cost if it is not addressed appropriately.

  11. HIV drug resistance following a decade of the free antiretroviral therapy programme in India: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karade, Santosh; Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Sen, Sourav; Joshi, Rajneesh K; Kulkarni, Smita S; Shankar, Subramanian; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review was to assess the burden of HIV drug resistance mutations (DRM) in Indian adults exposed to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) as per national guidelines. An advanced search of the published literature on HIV drug resistance in India was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases. Data pertaining to age, sex, CD4 count, viral load, and prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM were extracted from each publication. Year-wise Indian HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos HIV database and mutation analyses were performed. A time trend analysis of the proportion of sequences showing NRTI resistance mutations among individuals exposed to first-line ART was conducted. Overall, 23 studies (1046 unique RT sequences) were identified indicating a prevalence of drug resistance to NRTI and NNRTI. The proportion of RT sequences with any DRM, any NRTI DRM, and any NNRTI DRM was 78.39%, 68.83%, and 73.13%, respectively. The temporal trend analysis of individual DRM from sequences retrieved during 2004-2014 indicated a rising trend in K65R mutations (p=0.013). Although the overall burden of resistance against first-line ART agents remained steady over the study decade, periodic monitoring is essential. There is the need to develop an HIV-1 subtype C-specific resistance database in India. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effects of maternal hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drug therapy on thyroid function of newborn infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-lan; Bai, Yao; Xun, Yun-hua; Dai, Wei-xin; Guo, Zhi-sheng

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the incidence of abnormal thyroid function of newborns and maternal hyperthyroidism with antithyroid drug therapy. The clinical data of 35 neonates born to mothers with hyperthyroidism from 1983 to 2003 in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. According to the maternal thyroid function and the antithyroid drugs taken during pregnancy, subjects were divided into different groups. The proportion of abnormal thyroid function in newborn was 48.6% (17/35). The prevalences of primary hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, hypothyroxinemia, and central hypothyroidism were 29.4%, 29.4%, 35.3%, and 5.9%, respectively. The incidence of abnormal thyroid function of neonates whose mothers did not take the antithyroid drugs (ATDs) until the third trimester of pregnancy was significantly higher than those without and with ATDs during the first or second trimester (P hyperthyroid mothers did not take ATDs until the third trimester of pregnancy may be increased. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of hyperthyroidism in pregnant women are essential for the prevention of neonatal thyroid functional abnormality.

  13. Cost-effectiveness-analysis: radioiodine or antithyroid drugs as first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Dederichs, B.; Schicha, H.; Hunsche, E.; Lauterbach, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: As first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease antithyroid drugs are favoured in Europe, while radioiodine therapy is favoured in the USA. Radioiodine therapy has become more economic in Germany since the new recommendations by the Federal German Radiation Protection Committee (SSK) for patient discharge guidelines. Method: Sensitivity analyses took into account the long-term relapse rate of conservative or radioiodine therapy, use of diagnostic tests, level of health insurance, drops in productivity and a discount factor. Costing models included the costs of follow-up care over 30 years. The costs of the hospitalisation for radioiodine therapy were calculated for 300 patients, discharged with 250 MBq I-131 residual activity. Result: Antithyroid drugs were considered cost-effective when they achieved relapse rate of 50% or less, a cut in the number of tests needed and reduced working hours. Failure to meet any one of these conditions makes primary radioiodine therapy more cost-effective in 1593 of 1944 calculated costing models. Repeated conservative therapies will increase clearly the overall costs. Conclusion: Radioiodine is a cost-effective, first-line therapy in patients with a special risk of relapse after primary conservative therapy (goitre, younger patient, persistent elevated TSH-receptor-antibodies or Tc-uptake). (orig.) [de

  14. Can Bone Tissue Engineering Contribute to Therapy Concepts after Resection of Musculoskeletal Sarcoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Michael Holzapfel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resection of musculoskeletal sarcoma can result in large bone defects where regeneration is needed in a quantity far beyond the normal potential of self-healing. In many cases, these defects exhibit a limited intrinsic regenerative potential due to an adjuvant therapeutic regimen, seroma, or infection. Therefore, reconstruction of these defects is still one of the most demanding procedures in orthopaedic surgery. The constraints of common treatment strategies have triggered a need for new therapeutic concepts to design and engineer unparalleled structural and functioning bone grafts. To satisfy the need for long-term repair and good clinical outcome, a paradigm shift is needed from methods to replace tissues with inert medical devices to more biological approaches that focus on the repair and reconstruction of tissue structure and function. It is within this context that the field of bone tissue engineering can offer solutions to be implemented into surgical therapy concepts after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcoma. In this paper we will discuss the implementation of tissue engineering concepts into the clinical field of orthopaedic oncology.

  15. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-04-17

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  16. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  17. Tuberculosis therapeutics: Engineering of nanomedicinal systems for local delivery of targeted drug cocktails

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M.

    In this thesis, a multifunctional nanocarrier drug delivery system was investigated and optimized to improve tuberculosis therapy by promoting the intracellular delivery of high payloads of antibiotics. To meet the needs of a patient population which continues to grow by close to 10 million people a year, innovative therapeutics must be formulated by robust and scalable processes. We use Flash NanoPrecipitation for the continuous precipitation of nanocarriers by block copolymer directed assembly, which enables the development of nanocarriers with tunable properties. Stable nanocarriers of Rifampicin and a hydrophobic Rifampicin prodrug have efficacy against tuberculosis in vitro that is equivalent to the soluble Rifampicin. To overcome poor in vivo efficacy of the recently discovered antitubercular drug SQ641, we co-encapsulate SQ641 and Cyclosporine A in a stable aqueous nanocarrier suspension, which enables drug administration and also enhances intracellular accumulation and antitubercular efficacy relative to SQ641 in solution. Since the mannose receptor is involved in the phagocytosis of tuberculosis bacilli, we modify the surface of nanocarriers with mannoside residues to target specific intracellular accumulation in macrophages. The surface density of mannoside terminated polyethylene glycol chains was controlled between 0 and 75% and in vitro cellular association reveals a 9% surface density is optimal for internalization mediated by the mannose receptor. We explore the preparation of large, porous aerosol carrier particles of with tunable deposition characteristics by spray freeze drying with ultrasonic atomization for direct dosing to the lungs. Nanocarriers are loaded at 3 - 50 wt% in mannitol particles with constant size, limited nanocarrier aggregation, and 63% dose delivered to the lungs, as determined by in vitro cascade impaction. There has been a lag in the development of new technologies to facilitate development and commercialization of

  18. The holistic 3M modality of drug delivery nanosystems for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Luo, Cong; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of human death worldwide. There are many challenges in the treatment of cancer and the rapidly developing area of nanotechnology has shown great potential to open a new era in cancer therapy. This article, rather than being exhaustive, focuses on the striking progress in the drug delivery nanosystems (DDNS) for cancer therapy and selects typical examples to point out the emerging mode of action of DDNS from our perspective. Among the outstanding advances in DDNS for cancer therapy is the development of ``multicomponent delivery systems'', ``multifunctional nanocarriers'' and ``multistage delivery systems''. However, these represent only one aspect of DDNS research. In addition, nature is the best teacher and natural evolution pressure has meant that virions conform to the ``multitarget, multistage and multicomponent'' (3M) mode of action. Amazingly, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), used for over 4000 years in China, also displays the same mode of action. Integrating the previous notable progress in nanoparticle technology, learned from the building mode of natural virions and the action concept of TCM, we propose an integrity-based 3M mode DDNS for cancer therapy: multitarget, multistage and multicomponent, which are not fragmented parts but an interconnected integrity. Based on the physiological multitarget and the pharmacokinetic multistage, multicomponent DDNS are rationally designed, where different components with individual specific functions act in a synergistic manner against each target at each disposition stage to maximize the targeted delivery effectiveness. In this article, we introduce each component of 3M DDNS in detail and describe some typical cases to realize the tumor-homing purposes.

  19. Fidelity Failures in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse: A Clinical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensohn-Chialvo, Florencia; Rohrbaugh, Michael J; Hasler, Brant P

    2018-04-30

    As evidence-based family treatments for adolescent substance use and conduct problems gain traction, cutting edge research moves beyond randomized efficacy trials to address questions such as how these treatments work and how best to disseminate them to community settings. A key factor in effective dissemination is treatment fidelity, which refers to implementing an intervention in a manner consistent with an established manual. While most fidelity research is quantitative, this study offers a qualitative clinical analysis of fidelity failures in a large, multisite effectiveness trial of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) for adolescent drug abuse, where BSFT developers trained community therapists to administer this intervention in their own agencies. Using case notes and video recordings of therapy sessions, an independent expert panel first rated 103 cases on quantitative fidelity scales grounded in the BSFT manual and the broader structural-strategic framework that informs BSFT intervention. Because fidelity was generally low, the panel reviewed all cases qualitatively to identify emergent types or categories of fidelity failure. Ten categories of failures emerged, characterized by therapist omissions (e.g., failure to engage key family members, failure to think in threes) and commissions (e.g., off-model, nonsystemic formulations/interventions). Of these, "failure to think in threes" appeared basic and particularly problematic, reflecting the central place of this idea in structural theory and therapy. Although subject to possible bias, our observations highlight likely stumbling blocks in exporting a complex family treatment like BSFT to community settings. These findings also underscore the importance of treatment fidelity in family therapy research. © 2018 Family Process Institute.

  20. Smart multifunctional drug delivery towards anticancer therapy harmonized in mesoporous nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seonmi; Singh, Rajendra K.; Khanal, Dipesh; Patel, Kapil D.; Lee, Eun-Jung; Leong, Kam W.; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine seeks to apply nanoscale materials for the therapy and diagnosis of diseased and damaged tissues. Recent advances in nanotechnology have made a major contribution to the development of multifunctional nanomaterials, which represents a paradigm shift from single purpose to multipurpose materials. Multifunctional nanomaterials have been proposed to enable simultaneous target imaging and on-demand delivery of therapeutic agents only to the specific site. Most advanced systems are also responsive to internal or external stimuli. This approach is particularly important for highly potent drugs (e.g. chemotherapeutics), which should be delivered in a discreet manner and interact with cells/tissues only locally. Both advances in imaging and precisely controlled and localized delivery are critically important in cancer treatment, and the use of such systems - theranostics - holds great promise to minimise side effects and boost therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment. Among others, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) are considered one of the most promising nanomaterials for drug delivery. Due to their unique intrinsic features, including tunable porosity and size, large surface area, structural diversity, easily modifiable chemistry and suitability for functionalization, and biocompatibility, MSNPs have been extensively utilized as multifunctional nanocarrier systems. The combination or hybridization with biomolecules, drugs, and other nanoparticles potentiated the ability of MSNPs towards multifunctionality, and even smart actions stimulated by specified signals, including pH, optical signal, redox reaction, electricity and magnetism. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art of multifunctional, smart drug delivery systems centered on advanced MSNPs, with special emphasis on cancer related applications.

  1. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltan AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aline Raquel Voltan,1 Guillermo Quindós,2 Kaila P Medina Alarcón,3 Ana Marisa Fusco-Almeida,3 Maria José Soares Mendes-Giannini,3 Marlus Chorilli1 1Department of Drugs and Medicines, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Immunology, Microbiology, and Parasitology Department, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Analysis, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. Keywords: fungal diseases, antifungal agents, amphotericin B, azoles

  2. The sources and popularity of online drug information: an analysis of top search engine results and web page views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael R; Mintzes, Barbara; Morgan, Steven G

    2011-03-01

    The Internet has become a popular source of health information. However, there is little information on what drug information and which Web sites are being searched. To investigate the sources of online information about prescription drugs by assessing the most common Web sites returned in online drug searches and to assess the comparative popularity of Web pages for particular drugs. This was a cross-sectional study of search results for the most commonly dispensed drugs in the US (n=278 active ingredients) on 4 popular search engines: Bing, Google (both US and Canada), and Yahoo. We determined the number of times a Web site appeared as the first result. A linked retrospective analysis counted Wikipedia page hits for each of these drugs in 2008 and 2009. About three quarters of the first result on Google USA for both brand and generic names linked to the National Library of Medicine. In contrast, Wikipedia was the first result for approximately 80% of generic name searches on the other 3 sites. On these other sites, over two thirds of brand name searches led to industry-sponsored sites. The Wikipedia pages with the highest number of hits were mainly for opiates, benzodiazepines, antibiotics, and antidepressants. Wikipedia and the National Library of Medicine rank highly in online drug searches. Further, our results suggest that patients most often seek information on drugs with the potential for dependence, for stigmatized conditions, that have received media attention, and for episodic treatments. Quality improvement efforts should focus on these drugs.

  3. Tissue-engineered human bioartificial muscles expressing a foreign recombinant protein for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Forman, D. E.; Hennessey, J.; Sullivan, K.; Zielinski, B. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Murine skeletal muscle cells transduced with foreign genes and tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) are capable of long-term delivery of soluble growth factors when implanted into syngeneic mice (Vandenburgh et al., 1996b). With the goal of developing a therapeutic cell-based protein delivery system for humans, similar genetic tissue-engineering techniques were designed for human skeletal muscle stem cells. Stem cell myoblasts were isolated, cloned, and expanded in vitro from biopsied healthy adult (mean age, 42 +/- 2 years), and elderly congestive heart failure patient (mean age, 76 +/- 1 years) skeletal muscle. Total cell yield varied widely between biopsies (50 to 672 per 100 mg of tissue, N = 10), but was not significantly different between the two patient groups. Percent myoblasts per biopsy (73 +/- 6%), number of myoblast doublings prior to senescence in vitro (37 +/- 2), and myoblast doubling time (27 +/- 1 hr) were also not significantly different between the two patient groups. Fusion kinetics of the myoblasts were similar for the two groups after 20-22 doublings (74 +/- 2% myoblast fusion) when the biopsy samples had been expanded to 1 to 2 billion muscle cells, a number acceptable for human gene therapy use. The myoblasts from the two groups could be equally transduced ex vivo with replication-deficient retroviral expression vectors to secrete 0.5 to 2 microg of a foreign protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH)/10(6) cells/day, and tissue engineered into human BAMs containing parallel arrays of differentiated, postmitotic myofibers. This work suggests that autologous human skeletal myoblasts from a potential patient population can be isolated, genetically modified to secrete foreign proteins, and tissue engineered into implantable living protein secretory devices for therapeutic use.

  4. Metal complexes in cancer therapy – an update from drug design perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndagi U

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umar Ndagi, Ndumiso Mhlongo, Mahmoud E Soliman Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, South Africa Abstract: In the past, metal-based compounds were widely used in the treatment of disease conditions, but the lack of clear distinction between the therapeutic and toxic doses was a major challenge. With the discovery of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in 1960, a milestone in the history of metal-based compounds used in the treatment of cancers was witnessed. This forms the foundation for the modern era of the metal-based anticancer drugs. Platinum drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are the mainstay of the metal-based compounds in the treatment of cancer, but the delay in the therapeutic accomplishment of other metal-based compounds hampered the progress of research in this field. Recently, however, there has been an upsurge of activities relying on the structural information, aimed at improving and developing other forms of metal-based compounds and nonclassical platinum complexes whose mechanism of action is distinct from known drugs such as cisplatin. In line with this, many more metal-based compounds have been synthesized by redesigning the existing chemical structure through ligand substitution or building the entire new compound with enhanced safety and cytotoxic profile. However, because of increased emphasis on the clinical relevance of metal-based complexes, a few of these drugs are currently on clinical trial and many more are awaiting ethical approval to join the trial. In this review, we seek to give an overview of previous reviews on the cytotoxic effect of metal-based complexes while focusing more on newly designed metal-based complexes and their cytotoxic effect on the cancer cell lines, as well as on new approach to metal-based drug design and molecular target in cancer therapy. We are optimistic that the concept of selective

  5. [Stabilizing the social and health status of drug dependent patients with methadone. Long-term maintainance therapy--Vienna results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loimer, N; Werner, E; Hollerer, E; Pfersmann, V; Schmid-Siegel, B; Presslich, O

    1991-01-01

    On September 25th, 1987 methadone was legalized in Austria for therapeutic use in drug addiction treatment in case of: 1. Long-term drug addiction with intravenous application of the drug, and several unsuccessful withdrawal therapies and/or 2. opiate addiction through intravenous application of the drug along with an existing HIV-1 infection. Since than, 291 patients were treated with methadone at the drug-dependency outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Vienna. In 1990, 96 patients treated for more than one year were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The image in which crime, prostitution, poverty, ill health all merge was broken by this decriminalization. Methadone treatment offers a first step toward social rehabilitation for drug addicts who have been living as criminals on the fringe of society.

  6. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-01-18

    A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts. The CAP self-assembled into fiber-like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug-loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP-NPs) upon FAP-α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers-like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug-loaded CAP-NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Something new every day: defining innovation and innovativeness in drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2008-01-01

    The word "innovation" comes from the Latin noun innovatio, derived from the verb innovare, to introduce [something] new. It can refer either to the act of introducing something new or to the thing itself that is introduced. In terms of commerce, it is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "the action of introducing a new product into the market; a product newly brought on to the market," a definition that illustrates both aspects of the word's meaning. "Innovativeness" is the property of being an innovation. Here I identify several different types of innovativeness in drug therapy, including structural, pharmacological or pharmacodynamic, pharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic innovativeness, and I stress the over-riding importance of clinical innovativeness, which should result in a better benefit to harm balance at an affordable cost.

  8. Combination Cancer Therapy Can Confer Benefit via Patient-to-Patient Variability without Drug Additivity or Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Sorger, Peter K

    2017-12-14

    Combination cancer therapies aim to improve the probability and magnitude of therapeutic responses and reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in an individual patient. However, drugs are tested in clinical trials on genetically diverse patient populations. We show here that patient-to-patient variability and independent drug action are sufficient to explain the superiority of many FDA-approved drug combinations in the absence of drug synergy or additivity. This is also true for combinations tested in patient-derived tumor xenografts. In a combination exhibiting independent drug action, each patient benefits solely from the drug to which his or her tumor is most sensitive, with no added benefit from other drugs. Even when drug combinations exhibit additivity or synergy in pre-clinical models, patient-to-patient variability and low cross-resistance make independent action the dominant mechanism in clinical populations. This insight represents a different way to interpret trial data and a different way to design combination therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub-Saharan Af...... mutations among failing patients justify increased vigilance by improving the availability and systematic use of VL testing to monitor ART response, and underlines the need for rapid, inexpensive tests to identify the most common drug resistance mutations....

  10. Clinical outcomes and immune benefits of anti-epileptic drug therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krentz Hartmut B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are frequently prescribed to persons with HIV/AIDS receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART although the extent of AED use and their interactions with cART are uncertain. Herein, AED usage, associated toxicities and immune consequences were investigated. Methods HIV replication was analysed in proliferating human T cells during AED exposure. Patients receiving AEDs in a geographically-based HIV care program were assessed using clinical and laboratory variables in addition to assessing AED indication, type, and cumulative exposures. Results Valproate suppressed proliferation in vitro of both HIV-infected and uninfected T cells (p 0.05 but AED exposures did not affect HIV production in vitro. Among 1345 HIV/AIDS persons in active care between 2001 and 2007, 169 individuals were exposed to AEDs for the following indications: peripheral neuropathy/neuropathic pain (60%, seizure/epilepsy (24%, mood disorder (13% and movement disorder (2%. The most frequently prescribed AEDs were calcium channel blockers (gabapentin/pregabalin, followed by sodium channel blockers (phenytoin, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. In a nested cohort of 55 AED-treated patients receiving cART and aviremic, chronic exposure to sodium and calcium channel blocking AEDs was associated with increased CD4+ T cell levels (p 0.05 with no change in CD8+ T cell levels over 12 months from the beginning of AED therapy. Conclusions AEDs were prescribed for multiple indications without major adverse effects in this population but immune status in patients receiving sodium or calcium channel blocking drugs was improved.

  11. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on PEGylated conjugated polyelectrolyte and drug molecules for image-guided drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-10

    A drug delivery system based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) has been developed to serve as a polymeric photosensitizer and drug carrier for combined photodynamic and chemotherapy. The amphiphilic brush copolymer can self-assemble into micellar nanopaticles (NPs) in aqueous media with hydrophobic conjugated polyelectrolyte backbone as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The NPs have an average diameter of about 100 nm, with the absorption and emission maxima at 502 and 598 nm, respectively, making them suitable for bioimaging applications. Moreover, the CPE itself can serve as a photosensitizer, which makes the NPs not only a carrier for drug but also a photosensitizing unit for photodynamic therapy, resulting in the combination of chemo- and photodynamic therapy for cancer. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy to U87-MG cells is 12.7 μg mL(-1), which is much lower than that for the solely photodynamic therapy (25.5 μg mL(-1)) or chemotherapy (132.8 μg mL(-1)). To improve the tumor specificity of the system, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) tripeptide as the receptor to integrin αvβ3 overexpressed cancer cells was further incorporated to the surface of the NPs. The delivery system based on PEGylated CPE is easy to fabricate, which integrates the merits of targeted cancer cell image, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy, making it promising for cancer treatment.

  12. Development of facile drug delivery platform of ranibizumab fabricated PLGA-PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles for age-related macular degeneration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Peng, Xifeng; Cai, Yulian; Cong, Wendong

    2018-06-01

    The present anti-angiogenic therapies for neovascular age-related macular degeneration require effective drug delivery systems for transfer drug molecules. Ranibizumab is an active humanized monoclonal antibody that counteracts active forms of vascular endothelial growth factor A in the neovascular age-related macular degeneration therapy. The development of ranibizumab-related therapies, we have designed the effective drug career with engineered magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 ) as a facile platform of ranibizumab delivery for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Ranibizumab conjugated iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 )/PEGylated poly lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA) was successfully designed and the synthesized materials are analyzed different analytical techniques. The microscopic techniques (Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) & Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)) are clearly displayed that spherical nanoparticles into the PEG-PLGA matrix and presence of elements and chemical interactions confirmed by the results of energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier trans-form infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods. The in vitro anti-angiogenic evaluation of Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterial efficiently inhibits the tube formation in the Matrigel-based assay method by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Ranibizumab treated Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterials not disturbed cell proliferation and the results could not display the any significant differences in human endothelial cells. The present investigated results describe that Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterials can be highly favorable and novel formulation for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Knowledge Level of Hypertension Patients for Drug Therapy in the Primary Health Care of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananditia R. Pramestutie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a persistent blood pressure in which systolic pressure ≥140 mmHg and diastolic pressure ≥90 mmHg. The knowledge that should be owned by patients with hypertension is the meaning, causes, symptoms and treatment of hypertension. This knowledge is important to support the success of hypertension therapy. The aim of this research was to determine the knowledge level of hypertension patients about their drug therapy in the primary health care of Malang. This research used observational study methods. The selection of the patients and the primary health care was done using non-random sampling technique (purposive sampling. The subject who meet the inclusion criteria were involved. The result of this study revealed that the patients with hypertension who have a sufficient level of knowledge were 69 respondents (72,63%. Patients who have a good criteria were 26 respondents (27,3763%. There is no patient with low level of knowledge in this research. The conclusion from this study is most patients with hypertension in Primary Health Care Malang have enough knowledge about their treatment.

  14. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  15. Comparative evaluation of antioxidant drug influence on a radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Siprov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is a comparative analysis of the effect of melatonin (Melaxen and 3-hydroxypyridine (Mexidol on antitumor and antimetastatic influence of chemoradiotherapy and oxidative status at mice with Lewis lung carcinoma. Material — Experiments have been organized on 95 mice of C57Bl/6 line and of 20–22 g in weight. Cyclophosphan has been abdominally administered two times in a dosage of 60 mg/kg within the interval of 120 hours — 20-30 min before radiotherapy. It has been located on the area of initial tumor in a dosage of 2 g at the same time as cyclophosphan injection. Melaxen and Mexidol have been intramuscularly injecting in the dosage of 45 and 50 mg/ kg for 14 days. Antitumor and antimetastatic effect of the applied therapy and changes in the oxidative status of the animals have been estimated. Results — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease antitumour and antimetastatic effects of radiotherapy and prevent the activation of free radical processes at animals with tumors. Mexidol was more effective than Melaxen in correction of superoxide dismutase activity in liver. The drugs under the study do not decrease radiotherapy-induced lipid peroxidation in the initial tumor. Conclusion — Melaxen and Mexidol do not decrease the radio therapy efficiency and oxidative status at mice with tumor (on the background of antitumor treatment.

  16. Treatment of Cushing's disease with adrenal blocking drugs and megavoltage therapy to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.; Evered, D.C.; Hunter, P.; Benaim, M.; Cook, D.; Hall, R.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen patients with Cushing's disease were seen over a 40-month period and considered for treatment by pituitary irradiation and adrenal blocking drugs. Fourteen patients entered the study and each received megavoltage therapy to give a mean dose of 4600 rad to the pituitary over 31 days. Each patient was treated for one (two patients) or two (12 patients) years with one or both of the adrenocortical enzyme inhibitors, metyrapone or aminoglutethimide to suppress cortisol secretion. Doses were adjusted to maintain urinary free cortisol secretion below 300 nmol/24 h. One patient failed to complete the trial. Normal urinary free cortisol excretion and plasma cortisol concentration were maintained after treatment in eight of the remaining 13 patients after therapy. Only one patient required cortisol replacement and normal menstrual function was restored in five of the six women. The remaining five patients relapsed and four were subsequently treated by total adrenalectomy. It was noted that the patients who responded to treatment were substantially younger than the therapeutic failures. It is suggested that this treatment is most useful in the management of younger patients. (author)

  17. [Evaluation and classification of drug therapy for breast cancer with bone-only metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X Y; Song, S T

    2017-03-23

    Skeleton is one of the most common metastatic organs for breast cancer, which has a better prognosis than visceral metastases. Bone-only metastasis was defined"non-measurable" in the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria, and was excluded by clinical trials. However, patients with bone-only metastasis are also in need of effective treatment to prolong survival. Endocrine therapy is the most important treatment for bone metastatic patients. Tumor response of bone metastases can be determined objectively by bone-window CT. Effective treatment should be continued if the symptoms are relieved or osteogenesis is observed. Osteoblastic change in bone-window CT is a sign of improvement after treatment. Endocrine therapy is proper for ER-positive patients. The patients with initial osteoblastic metastasis should not be treated with salvage chemotherapy or anti-HER2 treatment, only if osteolytic metastasis or visceral metastasis is observed. Bishosphonates are just auxiliary drugs in bone metastasis, which should not be abused.

  18. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p [de

  19. Combining drug and music therapy in patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Manfredi, Valentina; Schifano, Letizia; Paterlini, Chiara; Parente, Annalisa; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2018-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can impair language, but active music therapy (AMT) and memantine (M) can improve communication. This study aimed to clarify whether adding AMT to M may improve language in comparison with drugs alone in patients with moderate AD on stable therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI). Forty-five AD patients treated with stable dose of AchEI were randomized to receive AMT plus M 20 mg/day or M 20 mg/day for 24 weeks. The Severe Impairment Battery-Language (SIB-l), SIB, Mini Mental State Examination, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Lubben Social Network Scale, Activities of Daily Living, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scores at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks assessed language (primary variable) and overall cognitive, psycho-behavior, social, and functional aspects (secondary variables). The SIB-l showed a stabilization of the baseline condition in both groups, in the absence of between-group differences. The NPI depression and appetite scores significantly improved in the M-AMT group. Moreover, significantly less patients in the M-AMT group than those in the M group showed worsening of the NPI total score. Daily activities, social relationships, and overall cognitive performance did not deteriorate. In patients with moderate AD, AMT added to pharmacotherapy has no further benefits for language in comparison with pharmacotherapy alone. However, this integrated treatment can improve the psycho-behavioral profile.

  20. Increasing Access to Subsidized Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy through Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabra Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, many people seek malaria treatment from retail drug sellers. The National Malaria Control Program identified the accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO program as a private sector mechanism to supplement the distribution of subsidized artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs from public facilities and increase access to the first-line antimalarial in rural and underserved areas. The ADDO program strengthens private sector pharmaceutical services by improving regulatory and supervisory support, dispenser training, and record keeping practices. Methods The government's pilot program made subsidized ACTs available through ADDOs in 10 districts in the Morogoro and Ruvuma regions, covering about 2.9 million people. The program established a supply of subsidized ACTs, created a price system with a cost recovery plan, developed a plan to distribute the subsidized products to the ADDOs, trained dispensers, and strengthened the adverse drug reactions reporting system. As part of the evaluation, 448 ADDO dispensers brought their records to central locations for analysis, representing nearly 70% of ADDOs operating in the two regions. ADDO drug register data were available from July 2007-June 2008 for Morogoro and from July 2007-September 2008 for Ruvuma. This intervention was implemented from 2007-2008. Results During the pilot, over 300,000 people received treatment for malaria at the 448 ADDOs. The percentage of ADDOs that dispensed at least one course of ACT rose from 26.2% during July-September 2007 to 72.6% during April-June 2008. The number of malaria patients treated with ACTs gradually increased after the start of the pilot, while the use of non-ACT antimalarials declined; ACTs went from 3% of all antimalarials sold in July 2007 to 26% in June 2008. District-specific data showed substantial variation among the districts in ACT uptake through ADDOs, ranging from ACTs representing 10% of all antimalarial sales

  1. The Hippo Pathway as Drug Targets in Cancer Therapy and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shunta; Bao, Yijun; Hata, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) co-operate with numerous transcription factors to regulate gene transcriptions. YAP1 and TAZ are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressive Hippo pathway. In human cancers, the Hippo pathway is frequently deregulated and YAP1 and TAZ escape the inhibition by the Hippo pathway. The upregulation of YAP1 and TAZ induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increases drug resistance in cancer cells. TAZ is implicated in cancer stemness. In consequence cancers with hyperactive YAP1 and TAZ are associated with poor clinical prognosis. Inhibitors of YAP1 and TAZ are reasoned to be beneficial in cancer therapy. On the other hand, since YAP1 and TAZ play important roles in the regulation of various tissue stem cells and in tissue repair, activators of YAP1 and TAZ are useful in the regenerative medicine. We discuss the potential application of inhibitors and activators of YAP1 and TAZ in human diseases and review the progress of drug screenings to search for them. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Pathogenesis of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Gastropathy: Clues to Preventative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim MA Bastaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulceration and bleeding are major impediments to the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The development of effective therapies for prevention of these adverse effects requires better understanding of their pathogenesis. Several features of NSAIDs contribute to the development of damage in the stomach, including the topical irritant effects of these drugs on the epithelium, impairment of the barrier properties of the mucosa, suppression of gastric prostaglandin synthesis, reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow and interference with the repair of superficial injury. The presence of acid in the lumen of the stomach also contributes to the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced ulcers and bleeding in a number of ways. Acid impairs the restitution process, interferes with hemostasis and can inactivate several growth factors that are important in mucosal integrity and repair. Profound suppression of gastric acid secretion has been shown to be effective in preventing NSAID-induced ulceration. There is a strong possibility that new NSAIDs entering the market will have greatly reduced toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. The influence of antithyroid drugs on the results of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuevich, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the given research was the estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) of nonimmune hyperthyroidism in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of thyroid FA were included in research and received treatment with radioactive iodine. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 persons initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made, as a rule, 2 day prior to RIT, and the second included 50 persons not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multimorbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a doze of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as antithyroid drugs. In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyrosis or hypothyroidism) was achieved in 48 (96%) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94%) patients who were not accepting last. The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on efficiency of RIT of thyroid FA is made. It is revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36%), than in patients of the second group (20%). (authors)

  4. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Bio-inspired engineering of cell- and virus-like nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Alessandro; Molinaro, Roberto; Sushnitha, Manuela; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Arrighetti, Noemi; Corbo, Claudia; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-12-01

    The engineering of future generations of nanodelivery systems aims at the creation of multifunctional vectors endowed with improved circulation, enhanced targeting and responsiveness to the biological environment. Moving past purely bio-inert systems, researchers have begun to create nanoparticles capable of proactively interacting with the biology of the body. Nature offers a wide-range of sources of inspiration for the synthesis of more effective drug delivery platforms. Because the nano-bio-interface is the key driver of nanoparticle behavior and function, the modification of nanoparticles' surfaces allows the transfer of biological properties to synthetic carriers by imparting them with a biological identity. Modulation of these surface characteristics governs nanoparticle interactions with the biological barriers they encounter. Building off these observations, we provide here an overview of virus- and cell-derived biomimetic delivery systems that combine the intrinsic hallmarks of biological membranes with the delivery capabilities of synthetic carriers. We describe the features and properties of biomimetic delivery systems, recapitulating the distinctive traits and functions of viruses, exosomes, platelets, red and white blood cells. By mimicking these biological entities, we will learn how to more efficiently interact with the human body and refine our ability to negotiate with the biological barriers that impair the therapeutic efficacy of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes.

  7. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micro-pores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards.

  8. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micropores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards. PMID:27324800

  9. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, P K; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S K; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as 'Yakshma'. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as 'Rajayakshma'. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB.

  10. High effectiveness of self-help programs after drug addiction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Øistein

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The self-help groups Alcoholics Anonymous (AA and Narcotics Anonymous (NA are very well established. AA and NA employ a 12-step program and are found in most large cities around the world. Although many have argued that these organizations are valuable, substantial scepticism remains as to whether they are actually effective. Few treatment facilities give clear recommendations to facilitate participation, and the use of these groups has been disputed. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the use of self-help groups after addiction treatment is associated with higher rates of abstinence. Methods One hundred and fourteen patients, 59 with alcohol dependency and 55 with multiple drug dependency, who started in self-help groups after addiction treatment, were examined two years later using a questionnaire. Return rate was 66%. Six (5% of the patients were dead. Results Intention-to-treat-analysis showed that 38% still participated in self-help programs two years after treatment. Among the regular participants, 81% had been abstinent over the previous 6 months, compared with only 26% of the non-participants. Logistic regression analysis showed OR = 12.6, 95% CI (4.1–38.3, p Conclusion The study has several methodological problems; in particular, correlation does not necessarily indicate causality. These problems are discussed and we conclude that the probability of a positive effect is sufficient to recommend participation in self-help groups as a supplement to drug addiction treatment. Previous publication This article is based on a study originally published in Norwegian: Kristensen O, Vederhus JK: Self-help programs in drug addiction therapy. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2005, 125:2798–2801.

  11. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate 125 I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for ∼4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  12. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; Demarzo, Angelo M; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A; Dionne, Craig A; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S Brøgger; Isaacs, John T

    2012-06-27

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer.

  13. Adolescent and parent alliances with therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy with drug-using Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S; Mayorga, Carla C; Mitrani, Victoria B; Szapocznik, José; Turner, Charles W; Alexander, James F

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief strategic family therapy for the treatment of adolescent drug use. Videotapes of first sessions were rated to identify parent and adolescent alliances with the therapist. Results demonstrated that Completer cases had significantly higher levels of alliance across all family members than Dropout cases, and Dropout cases had significantly higher unbalanced alliances than Completer cases. Clinical implications are discussed.

  14. RNA Disruption and Drug Response in Breast Cancer Primary Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Kenneth; Pritzker, Laura; Generali, Daniele; Bottini, Alberto; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo; Trudeau, Maureen

    2015-05-01

    As there is now evidence that switching clinical nonresponders early in primary systemic therapy to alternate treatment regimens can enhance survival in some breast cancer patients, the need for a robust intermediate endpoint that can guide treatment response across all tumor subtypes is urgent. Recently, chemotherapy drugs have been shown to induce a decrease in RNA quality in tumor cells from breast cancer biopsies in some patients at midtherapy, and that this has been associated with subsequent achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). The decrease in RNA quality has been shown to be associated with RNA disruption; aberrant RNA bands visualized by RNA electrophoresis have been associated with subsequent tumor cell death. The objectives of these studies are to show that a new assay based on induction of RNA disruption in tumor cells by chemotherapy can stratify at midtherapy, pCR responders from non-pCR responders irrespective of clinical response and to present early evidence that clinically useful RNA disruption can be detected as early as 14 days after initiation of treatment. RNA disruption in tumor cells was quantified by analysis of the RNA electrophoresis banding pattern and expressed as an RNA disruption index (RDI). To develop the RNA disruption assay (RDA), RDI was correlated with clinical outcome (pCR) from the NCIC-CTG MA.22 breast cancer clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066443). RDA Zones were established by stratifying patients using RDI values into Zone 1, Zone 2, and Zone 3. Zone 3 included seven out of eight pCR responders, whereas Zone 1 contained no pCR responders. An intermediate zone (Zone 2) was established which contained one pCR. Subsequently, to determine early drug response, RNA disruption was examined by RDI after 14 days exposure to trastuzumab, zoledronic acid, or letrozole + cyclophosphamide ± sorafenib therapy. In MA.22, RDA stratified 23 of 85 patients in Zone 1 as pCR nonresponders, 24 patients in Zone 2, an

  15. Progression of hydroxychloroquine toxic effects after drug therapy cessation: new evidence from multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mititelu, Mihai; Wong, Brandon J; Brenner, Marie; Bryar, Paul J; Jampol, Lee M; Fawzi, Amani A

    2013-09-01

    Given the infrequent occurrence of hydroxychloroquine toxic effects, few data are available about the presenting features and long-term follow-up of patients with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy, making it difficult to surmise the clinical course of patients after cessation of drug treatment. To report functional and structural findings of hydroxychloroquine retinal toxic effects after drug therapy discontinuation. A retrospective medical record review was performed to identify patients taking hydroxychloroquine who were screened for toxic effects from January 1, 2009, through August 31, 2012, in the eye centers of Northwestern University and the University of Southern California. Northwestern University Sorrel Rosin Eye Center, Chicago, Illinois, and the Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Seven consecutive patients diagnosed as having hydroxychloroquine retinal toxic effects. Retinal toxic effects. Seven patients (1 man and 6 women) with a mean age of 55.9 years (age range, 25-74 years) developed retinal toxic effects after using hydroxychloroquine for a mean of 10.4 years (range, 3-19 years). Fundus examination revealed macular pigmentary changes in all 7 patients, corresponding to abnormal fundus autofluorescence (FAF). On spectral domain optical coherence tomography, there was outer retinal foveal resistance (preservation of the external limiting membrane and the photoreceptor layer) in 6 patients. After drug therapy discontinuation, 5 patients experienced outer retinal regeneration (3 subfoveally and 2 parafoveally), with associated functional visual improvement on static perimetry in 2 patients. Over time, FAF remained stable in 3 patients, whereas the remaining patients had a pattern of hypoautofluorescence that replaced areas of initial hyperautofluorescence (2 patients) and enlargement of the total area of abnormal FAF (2 patients). Preservation of the external limiting membrane carries a positive prognostic value in

  16. Impact of use of alcohol and illicit drugs by AIDS patients on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Celia; Dourado, Maria De Lourdes; Santos, Marcio P; Brites, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Use of alcohol and illicit drugs is a common finding among HIV-infected individuals, but there are many open questions about its impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy and virological outcomes. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact of the use of alcohol and illicit drugs on the adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among patients starting ART in Salvador, Brazil. We followed up 144 AIDS patients initiating ART for a 6-month period. At baseline, they were interviewed about demographics, behavior, and use of illicit drugs and alcohol. All of them had HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cells count measured before starting therapy. After 60 days of treatment they were asked to answer a new questionnaire on adherence to ART. All patients were monitored during the following months, and new CD4(+) cell count/HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load determinations were performed after 6 months of therapy. Optimal adherence to therapy was defined by self-reported questionnaire, by 95% use of prescribed drug doses, and by using plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load as a biological marker. A total of 61 (42.4%) patients reported alcohol use, 7 (4.9%) used illicit drugs, and 17 (11.8%) used both alcohol and illicit drugs. Being in a steady relationship was protective to nonadherence (95% CI: 0.18-0.84). Missing more than two medical visits was also associated with a 68% higher likelihood of nonadherence (95% CI: 0.10-1.02). After logistic regression we detected a higher risk of nonadherence for patients declaring use of alcohol plus illicit drugs (odds ratio=6.0; 95% CI: 1.78-20.28) or high-intensity use of alcohol (odds ratio=3.29; 95% CI: 1.83-5.92). AIDS patients using alcohol and/or illicit drugs are socially vulnerable, and need specific and flexible programs, combining mental health care, harm reduction strategies, and assisted drug therapy to maximize the chances of successful use of ART.

  17. Tissue-Engineered Skin Substitute Enhances Wound Healing after Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busra, Mohd Fauzi bin Mh; Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; bin Ismail, Fuad; bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2016-03-01

    When given in conjunction with surgery for treating cancer, radiation therapy may result in impaired wound healing, which, in turn, could cause skin ulcers. In this study, bilayer and monolayer autologous skin substitutes were used to treat an irradiated wound. A single dose of 30 Gy of linear electron beam radiation was applied to the hind limb of nude mice before creating the skin lesion (area of 78.6 mm). Monolayer tissue-engineered skin substitutes (MTESSs) were prepared by entrapping cultured keratinocytes in fibrin matrix, and bilayer tissue-engineered skin substitutes (BTESSs) were prepared by entrapping keratinocytes and fibroblasts in separate layers. Bilayer tissue-engineered skin substitute and MTESS were implanted to the wound area. Gross appearance and wound area were analyzed to evaluate wound healing efficiency. Skin regeneration and morphological appearance were observed via histological and electron microscopy. Protein expressions of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skin regeneration were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Macroscopic observation revealed that at day 13, treatments with BTESS completely healed the irradiated wound, whereas wound sizes of 1.1 ± 0.05 and 6.8 ± 0.14 mm were measured in the MTESS-treated and untreated control groups, respectively. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) analysis showed formation of compact and organized epidermal and dermal layers in the BTESS-treated group, as compared with MTESS-treated and untreated control groups. Ultrastructural analysis indicates maturation of skin in BTESS-treated wound evidenced by formation of intermediate filament bundles in the dermal layer and low intercellular space in the epidermal layer. Expressions of TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and VEGF were also higher in BTESS-treated wounds, compared with MTESS-treated wounds. These results indicate that BTESS is the preferred treatment for

  18. Antidepressant Drug Treatment in Association with Multiple Sclerosis Disease-Modifying Therapy: Using Explorys in the MS Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Matthew M; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Explorys Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) database contains de-identified clinical data for 50 million patients. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), specifically interferon beta (IFNβ) treatments, may potentiate depression. Conflicting data have emerged, and a large-scale claims-based study by Patten et al. did not support such an association. This study compares the results of Patten et al. with those using the EPM database. Methods: "Power searches" were built to test the relationship between antidepressant drug use and DMT in the MS population. Searches were built to produce a cohort of individuals diagnosed as having MS in the past 3 years taking a specific DMT who were then given any antidepressant drug. The antidepressant drug therapy prevalence was tested in the MS population on the following DMTs: IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, combined IFNβ, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and dimethyl fumarate. Results: In patients with MS, the rate of antidepressant drug use in those receiving DMTs was 40.60% to 44.57%. The rate of antidepressant drug use for combined IFNβ DMTs was 41.61% (males: 31.25%-39.62%; females: 43.10%-47.33%). Antidepressant drug use peaked in the group aged 45 to 54 years for five of six DMTs. Conclusions: We found no association between IFNβ treatment and antidepressant drug use in the MS population compared with other DMTs. The EPM database has been validated against the Patten et al. data for future use in the MS population.

  19. FDM 3D printing of modified drug-delivery systems using hot melt extrusion: a new approach for individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Filho, Marcilio; Araújo, Maísa Rp; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-11-01

    The production process of 3D-printed drugs offers unique advantages such as the possibility of individualizing the drug therapy and easily associating different drugs and release technologies in the same pharmaceutical unit. Fused deposition modeling, a 3D printing technique, seems especially interesting for pharmaceutical applications, due to its low cost, precise and reproducible control of the printed structures, and versatility for industrial and laboratory scale. This technique combined with another technology already adapted for the pharmaceutical industry, the hot melt extrusion, is able to incorporate various mechanisms of modified drug release. This special report aims to bring together data of the experimental progress achieved using the fused deposition modeling 3D printing combined with hot melt extrusion technique and its potential in drug delivery. [Formula: see text].

  20. Engineering of lipid prodrug-based, hyaluronic acid-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers platform for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combination gastric cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Ying Qu,1,* Min Zhou,1,* Ying-wei Chen,2 Mei-mei Chen,3 Feng Shen,1 Lei-Ming Xu11Digestive Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Digestive Department, Xinhua Hospital, School of medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The first-line chemotherapy treatment protocol for gastric cancer is combination chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and cisplatin (CDDP. The aim of this study was to engineer prodrug-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC platform for codelivery of 5-FU and CDDP to enhance therapy and decrease toxicity.Methods: First, 5-FU-stearic acid lipid conjugate was synthesized by two steps. Second, 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP were loaded in NLC. Finally, hyaluronic acid (HA was coated onto NLC surface. Average size, zeta potential, and drug loading capacity of NLC were evaluated. Human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 (BGC823 cells was used for the testing of in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity of NLC was evaluated in mice bearing BGC823 cells model.Results: HA-coated 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP-loaded NLC (HA-FU/C-NLC showed a synergistic effect in combination therapy and displayed the greatest antitumor activity than all of the free drugs or uncoated NLC in vitro and in vivo.Conclusion: This work reveals that HA-coated NLC could be used as a novel carrier to codeliver 5-FU and CDDP for gastric cancer therapy. HA-FU/C-NLC could be a promising targeted and combinational therapy in nanomedicine.Keywords: gastric cancer, nanostructured lipid carriers, hyaluronic acid, combination chemotherapy, lipid prodrug

  1. Science, law, and politics in the Food and Drug Administration's genetically engineered foods policy: FDA's 1992 policy statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, David L

    2005-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) 1992 policy statement was developed in the context of critical gaps in scientific knowledge concerning the compositional effects of genetic transformation and severe limitations in methods for safety testing. FDA acknowledged that pleiotropy and insertional mutagenesis may cause unintended changes, but it was unknown whether this happens to a greater extent in genetic engineering compared with traditional breeding. Moreover, the agency was not able to identify methods by which producers could screen for unintended allergens and toxicants. Despite these uncertainties, FDA granted genetically engineered foods the presumption of GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and recommended that producers use voluntary consultations before marketing them.

  2. Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies. A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 602.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

    The annotated bibliography on Hyperactivity--Drug Therapy/Food Additives/Allergies contains approximately 65 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents or journal articles published from 1968 to 1975 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources…

  3. HSA/PSS coated gold nanorods as thermo-triggered drug delivery vehicles for combined cancer photothermal therapy and chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ting-Yu; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Wang, Chung-Hao; Lee, Shin-Yu; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2018-02-01

    Drug delivery systems combined multimodal therapy strategies are very promising in cancer theranostic applications. In this work, a new drug-delivery vehicles based on human serum albumin (HSA)-coated gold nanorods (GNR/PSS/HSA NPs) was developed. The success of coating was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, it is demonstrated that doxorubicin (DOX) is successfully loaded among multilayered gold nanorods by the electrostatic and hydrophobic force, and DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs were highly biocompatible and stable in various physiological solutions. The NPs possess strong absorbance in nearinfrared (NIR) region, and high photothermal conversion efficiency for outstanding photothermal therapy applications. A bimodal drug release triggered by proteinase or NIR irradiation has been revealed, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect in tumor sites because of the preferential drug accumulation and triggered release. Importantly, the in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs, which combined photothermal and chemotherapy for cancer therapy, revealing a remarkably superior synergistic anticancer effect over either monotherapy. All these results suggested a considerable potential of DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs nano-platform for antitumor therapy.

  4. A 37-year-old woman presenting with impaired visual function during antituberculosis drug therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanniyi Abdulkabir A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Combination antituberculosis drug therapy remains the mainstay of treating tuberculosis. Unfortunately, antituberculosis drugs produce side effects including (toxic impaired visual function, which may be irreversible. We report a case of antituberculosis-drug-induced impaired visual function that was reversed following early detection and attention. Case presentation A 37-year-old Yoruba woman, weighing 48 kg, presented to our facility with impaired visual functions and mild sensory polyneuropathy in about the fourth month of antituberculosis treatment. Her therapy comprised ethambutol 825 mg, isoniazid 225 mg, rifampicin 450 mg, and pyrazinamide 1200 mg. Her visual acuity was 6/60 in her right eye and 1/60 in her left eye. She had sluggish pupils, red-green dyschromatopsia, hyperemic optic discs and central visual field defects. Her intraocular pressure was 14 mmHg. Her liver and kidney functions were essentially normal. Screening for human immunodeficiency virus was not reactive. Her impaired visual function improved following prompt diagnosis and attention, including the discontinuation of medication. Conclusions The ethambutol and isoniazid in antituberculosis medication are notorious for causing impaired visual function. The diagnosis of ocular toxicity from antituberculosis drugs should never be delayed, and should be possible with the patient's history and simple but basic eye examinations and tests. Tight weight-based antituberculosis therapy, routine peri-therapy visual function monitoring towards early detection of impaired function, and prompt attention will reduce avoidable ocular morbidity.

  5. Effect of acupuncture combined with drug therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in convalescence of cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jie Dai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of acupuncture combined with drug therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in convalescence of cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 118 patients in convalescence of cerebral infarction who were treated in the affiliated hospital of our school between August 2014 and December 2016 were divided into control group (n=59 and observation group (n=59 according to the random number table method. Control group received routine drug therapy, and the observation group received acupuncture combined with drug therapy. The differences in serum levels of neurotrophic factors, nerve injury factors and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: The differences in serum levels of neurotrophic factors, nerve injury factors and oxidative stress indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, serum neurotrophic factors IGF-1, BDNF and NGF levels of observation group were higher than those of control group; nerve injury factors S-100β, NSE, GFAP and UCH-L1 levels were lower than those of control group; oxidative stress indexes MDA, AOPPs and LHP levels were lower than those of control group while SOD and GSH-Px levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Acupuncture combined with drug therapy can effectively optimize the nerve function, reduce the nerve injury and suppress the systemic oxidative stress response of patients in convalescence of cerebral infarction.

  6. Modified n-HA/PA66 scaffolds with chitosan coating for bone tissue engineering: cell stimulation and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qin; Li, Junfeng; Niu, Lulu; Zuo, Yi; Li, Jidong; Li, Yubao

    2017-09-01

    The dipping-drying procedure and cross-linking method were used to make drug-loaded chitosan (CS) coating on nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 (nHA/PA66) composite porous scaffold, endowing the scaffold controlled drug release functionality. The prefabricated scaffold was immersed into an aqueous drug/CS solution in a vacuum condition and then crosslinked by vanillin. The structure, porosity, composition, compressive strength, swelling ratio, drug release and cytocompatibility of the pristine and coating scaffolds were investigated. After coating, the scaffold porosity and pore interconnection were slightly decreased. Cytocompatibility performance was observed through an in vitro experiment based on cell attachment and the MTT assay by MG63 cells which revealed positive cell viability and increasing proliferation over the 11-day period in vitro. The drug could effectively release from the coated scaffold in a controlled fashion and the release rate was sustained for a long period and highly dependent on coating swelling, suggesting the possibility of a controlled drug release. Our results demonstrate that the scaffold with drug-loaded crosslinked CS coating can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to be a promising high performance biomaterial in bone tissue engineering.

  7. The Efficacy of Dog Assisted Therapy in Detained Drug Users: A Pilot Study in an Italian Attenuated Custody Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contalbrigo, Laura; De Santis, Marta; Toson, Marica; Montanaro, Maria; Farina, Luca; Costa, Aldo; Nava, Felice Alfonso

    2017-06-24

    Drug addiction is a major care and safety challenge in prison context. Nowadays, rehabilitation and specific therapeutic programs are suggested to improve health and well-being of inmates during their detention time and to reduce substance abuse relapse after release from prison. Among these programs, several studies reported the benefits for inmates coming from animal assisted interventions. In this pilot controlled study, we investigated the efficacy of a dog assisted therapy program addressed to 22 drug addicted male inmates housed in an attenuated custody institute in Italy. The study lasted six months, the treated group (12 inmates) was involved once a week for one hour in 20 dog assisted therapy sessions, whereas the control group (10 inmates) followed the standard rehabilitation program. One week before the beginning and one week after the end of the sessions, all inmates involved were submitted to symptom checklist-90-revised and Kennedy axis V. Inmates involved in the dog assisted therapy sessions significantly improved their social skills, reducing craving, anxiety and depression symptoms compared to the control group. Despite the limitation due to the small number of inmates enrolled and to the absence of follow up, we found these results encouraging to the use of dog assisted therapy as co-therapy in drug addicted inmates rehabilitation programs, and we claim the need of more extensive study on this subject.

  8. Association of opioid agonist therapy with lower incidence of hepatitis C virus infection in young adult injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I; Evans, Jennifer L; Lum, Paula J; Hahn, Judith A; Page, Kimberly

    2014-12-01

    Injection drug use is the primary mode of transmission for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Prior studies suggest opioid agonist therapy may reduce the incidence of HCV infection among injection drug users; however, little is known about the effects of this therapy in younger users. To evaluate whether opioid agonist therapy was associated with a lower incidence of HCV infection in a cohort of young adult injection drug users. Observational cohort study conducted from January 3, 2000, through August 21, 2013, with quarterly interviews and blood sampling. We recruited young adult (younger than 30 years) injection drug users who were negative for anti-HCV antibody and/or HCV RNA. Substance use treatment within the past 3 months, including non-opioid agonist forms of treatment, opioid agonist (methadone hydrochloride or buprenorphine hydrochloride) detoxification or maintenance therapy, or no treatment. Incident HCV infection documented with a new positive result for HCV RNA and/or HCV antibodies. Cumulative incidence rates (95% CI) of HCV infection were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit adjusting for age, sex, race, years of injection drug use, homelessness, and incarceration. Baseline characteristics of the sample (n = 552) included median age of 23 (interquartile range, 20-26) years; 31.9% female; 73.1% white; 39.7% who did not graduate from high school; and 69.2% who were homeless. During the observation period of 680 person-years, 171 incident cases of HCV infection occurred (incidence rate, 25.1 [95% CI, 21.6-29.2] per 100 person-years). The rate ratio was significantly lower for participants who reported recent maintenance opioid agonist therapy (0.31 [95% CI, 0.14-0.65]; P = .001) but not for those who reported recent non-opioid agonist forms of treatment (0.63 [95% CI, 0.37-1.08]; P = .09) or opioid agonist detoxification (1.45 [95% CI, 0.80-2.69]; P = .23). After adjustment for

  9. Functionally engineered nanosized particles in pharmaceutics: improved oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Tetsuya; Tagami, Tatsuaki

    2013-01-01

    The development of drug nanoparticles has attracted substantial attention because of their potential to improve the dissolution rate and oral availability of poorly water-soluble drugs. This review summarizes the recent articles that discussed nanoparticle-based oral drug delivery systems. The preparation methods were categorized as top-down and bottom-up methods, which are common methods for preparing drug nanoparticles. In addition, methods of handling drug nanoparticles (e.g., one-step preparation of nanocomposites which are microparticles containing drug nanoparticles) were introduced for the effective preservation of drug nanoparticles. The carrier-based preparation of drug nanoparticles was also introduced as a potentially promising oral drug delivery system.

  10. Modeling the effects of space structure and combination therapies on phenotypic heterogeneity and drug resistance in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorz, Alexander; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Perthame, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological evidence supports the idea that the emergence of phenotypic heterogeneity and resistance to cytotoxic drugs can be considered as a process of selection in tumor cell populations. In this framework, can we explain intra-tumor heterogeneity in terms of selection driven by the local cell environment? Can we overcome the emergence of resistance and favor the eradication of cancer cells by using combination therapies? Bearing these questions in mind, we develop a model describing cell dynamics inside a tumor spheroid under the effects of cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs. Cancer cells are assumed to be structured as a population by two real variables standing for space position and the expression level of a phenotype of resistance to cytotoxic drugs. The model takes explicitly into account the dynamics of resources and anticancer drugs as well as their interactions with the cell population under treatment. We analyze the effects of space structure and combination therapies on phenotypic heterogeneity and chemotherapeutic resistance. Furthermore, we study the efficacy of combined therapy protocols based on constant infusion and bang-bang delivery of cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs.

  11. Engineering Macaca fascicularis cytochrome P450 2C20 to reduce animal testing for new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Francesco; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-12-01

    In order to develop in vitro methods as an alternative to P450 animal testing in the drug discovery process, two main requisites are necessary: 1) gathering of data on animal homologues of the human P450 enzymes, currently very limited, and 2) bypassing the requirement for both the P450 reductase and the expensive cofactor NADPH. In this work, P450 2C20 from Macaca fascicularis, homologue of the human P450 2C8 has been taken as a model system to develop such an alternative in vitro method by two different approaches. In the first approach called "molecular Lego", a soluble self-sufficient chimera was generated by fusing the P450 2C20 domain with the reductase domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium (P450 2C20/BMR). In the second approach, the need for the redox partner and also NADPH were both obviated by the direct immobilization of the P450 2C20 on glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Both systems were then compared to those obtained from the reconstituted P450 2C20 monooxygenase in presence of the human P450 reductase and NADPH using paclitaxel and amodiaquine, two typical drug substrates of the human P450 2C8. The K(M) values calculated for the 2C20 and 2C20/BMR in solution and for 2C20 immobilized on electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were 1.9 ± 0.2, 5.9 ± 2.3, 3.0 ± 0.5 μM for paclitaxel and 1.2 ± 0.2, 1.6±0.2 and 1.4 ± 0.2 μM for amodiaquine, respectively. The data obtained not only show that the engineering of M. fascicularis did not affect its catalytic properties but also are consistent with K(M) values measured for the microsomal human P450 2C8 and therefore show the feasibility of developing alternative in vitro animal tests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. HSA-based multi-target combination therapy: regulating drugs' release from HSA and overcoming single drug resistance in a breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Zhang, Zhenlei; Li, Dongyang; Zhao, Lei; Cai, Meiling; Sun, Zhewen; Li, Yongping; Zhang, Yao; Khan, Hamid; Sun, Hongbing; Wang, Tao; Liang, Hong; Yang, Feng

    2018-11-01

    Multi-drug delivery systems, which may be promising solution to overcome obstacles, have limited the clinical success of multi-drug combination therapies to treat cancer. To this end, we used three different anticancer agents, Cu(BpT)Br, NAMI-A, and doxorubicin (DOX), to build human serum albumin (HSA)-based multi-drug delivery systems in a breast cancer model to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of overcoming single drug (DOX) resistance to cancer cells in vivo, and to regulate the drugs' release from HSA. The HSA complex structure revealed that NAMI-A and Cu(BpT)Br bind to the IB and IIA sub-domain of HSA by N-donor residue replacing a leaving group and coordinating to their metal centers, respectively. The MALDI-TOF mass spectra demonstrated that one DOX molecule is conjugated with lysine of HSA by a pH-sensitive linker. Furthermore, the release behavior of three agents form HSA can be regulated at different pH levels. Importantly, in vivo results revealed that the HSA-NAMI-A-Cu(BpT)Br-DOX complex not only increases the targeting ability compared with a combination of the three agents (the NAMI-A/Cu(BpT)Br/DOX mixture), but it also overcomes DOX resistance to drug-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

  13. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  14. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering - cells, biological...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  15. Drug May Help Prevent Resistance to Toxin-Based Leukemia Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding the drug 5-AZA to moxetumomab pasudotox, a toxin-based cancer drug, may improve its efficacy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). As this Cancer Currents blog post explains, in mice, both drugs were more effective than moxetumomab alone.

  16. Tratamento medicamentoso da osteoartrose do joelho Drug therapy in knee osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Uchôa de Rezende

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento clínico da osteoartrite/artrose (OA está sempre indicado e baseia-se no autocuidado feito pelo paciente e orientado pelo médico. O uso de medicamentos é complementar às medidas de emagrecimento, ganho de força, de propriocepção, de flexibilidade e de amplitude de movimento. Entre os medicamentos disponíveis para o tratamento da OA há os que são essencialmente analgésicos e que não interferem no curso da doença; bem como os anti-inflamatórios, controversos por seus efeitos colaterais e pelo seu papel na OA, porém, com propriedades analgésicas e anti-inflamatórias indiscutíveis; e, por fim, as drogas modificadoras de estrutura, que retardam a evolução da OA. As medicações ainda podem ser de uso tópico, intra-articular, oral e injetável (sistêmico. As várias apresentações de ácido hialurônico (AH mostram o poder analgésico da droga e há indícios de poder modificador de estrutura da cartilagem pela medicação. Há nível de evidência IA, para diacereína e para a glucosamina, de que retardam a evolução da OA. Mais tecnologia para diagnóstico e controle de tratamento da OA, bem como mais estudos multicêntricos são necessários para consolidar o poder do tratamento medicamentoso de outras drogas.Clinical treatment for osteoarthritis (OA is very important and is based on patient's self care and guided by the physician. Drug therapy is additional to losing weight, improving muscular strength, proprioception, flexibility and range of motion. Between the available drugs for osteoarthritis' treatment, some are basically analgesics and do not interfere on disease's progression; some are anti-inflammatory with good analgesic power but with side effects that compromise their prolonged usage; and the structure modifying drugs that slow down the progression of OA. The medications are presented in topic, oral, intra-muscular, intra-venous and intra-articular forms. The hyaluronic acid has various

  17. PHARMACOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH COMORBID CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Zyryanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform pharmacoeconomic analysis of CHF therapy with supramolecular sacubitril/valsartan complex compared to routine therapy in patients with diabetes type 2 and ACE inhibitor intolerance within context of Russian healthcare system.Material and methods. A Markov model based on Russian Standards of treatment and clinical practice results was built. Cost-effectiveness analysis was done by comparing two patient groups of 1000 people each. Budget impact analysis required 27,451 simulated patients. Randomized controlled clinical trials results of sacubitril/valsartan vs. routine practice were used as source of efficacy and safety data. Time horizon was set at 3 years. Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY were used as effectiveness. Single-factor sensitivity analysis (SA was used to ensure the results are robust to changes in market situation.Results. Cost-effectiveness ratio for sacubitril/valsartan is 301,145.7 rub. per QALY while cost-effectiveness ratio for routine practice is 510,621 rub. Budget impact analysis results indicate that during three years, in case of sacubitril/valsartan usage budgetary burden can be reduced by more than 220,000 rubles per patient and leads to savings of more than six billion rubles in terms of the whole population. Sensitivity analysis has confirmed the robustness of results.Conclusion. These results indicate benefits of sacubitril/valsartan using for CHF patients with type 2 diabetes and ACE inhibitor intolerance and justify inclusion of this drug into reimbursement lists that allow to reduce risk of hospitalization, lethal outcomes and budget of healthcare system.

  18. Definitive radiation therapy - alone or combined with drug treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsarov, D.; Mihajlova, I.; Georgiev, D; Lyubomirov, V.; Gesheva, N.; Balabanova, A.; Klenova, A.; Pyrvanova, V.; Atanasov, T.

    2017-01-01

    Goal: To assess the effectiveness of three treatment methods in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck-ultimate radiotherapy (RT) up to 60 Gy, definitive radiation therapy simultaneously with chemotherapy (RT-CT) up to 60 Gy and definitive RT-CT greater than 60 Gy. Material and method: 154 patients with locally advanced head and neck carcinomas, at clinical stage T3-T4 N + M0 are included in the analysis for the period 2009-2016. Radical RT is carried out with a daily dose of 2-2.33 Gy on MV therapy equipment. There were treated as follows: in Group I - 37 patients with RT up to 60 Gy, in Group II - 58 patients with RT-CT up to 60 Gy and simultaneous radiosensitizing CT, weekly Cisplatin 50 mg i.v. or Cetuximab regimen, and Group III - 59 patients with RT-CT and a total dose over 60 Gy. The early dermatological and mucosal toxicity is assessed by the CTCAE v.3 scale. Results: RT in all patients was conducted without interruption. The mean total survival rate in the three groups with RT up to 60 Gy / RT-CT to 60 Gy / RT-CT over 60 Gy is 11 months, 21 months and 27 months respectively, with a statistically significant difference between I and III groups in favor of the latter (p = 0.049). The use of RT-CT with a dose increase above 60 Gy shows an advantage of III g over Group II, which is an extension of the mean overall survival by 61 months (p = 0.21). II-III degree toxicity was observed in II and III - dermatitis and mucositis - at the simultaneous RT-CT (Grade 3> 16%). Conclusions: The application of doses greater than 60 Gy with concurrent radiosensitizing drug treatment in advanced head and neck carcinoma is an effective method for more pronounced but reversible dermatological and mucosal toxicity. [bg

  19. New Drug Candidate Targeting the 4A1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor for Medullary Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC is a relatively rare thyroid cancer responsible for a substantial fraction of thyroid cancer mortality. More effective therapeutic drugs with low toxicity for MTC are urgently needed. Orphan nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1 plays a pivotal role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of tumor cells. Based on the NR4A1 protein structure, 2-imino-6-methoxy-2H-chromene-3-carbothioamide (IMCA was identified from the Specs compounds database using the protein structure-guided virtual screening approach. Computationally-based molecular modeling studies suggested that IMCA has a high affinity for the ligand binding pocket of NR4A1. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] and apoptosis assays demonstrated that IMCA resulted in significant thyroid cancer cell death. Immunofluorescence assays showed that IMCA induced NR4A1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in thyroid cancer cell lines, which may be involved in the cell apoptotic process. In this study, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the IMCA-induced upregulation of sestrin1 and sestrin2 was dose-dependent in thyroid cancer cell lines. Western blot showed that IMCA increased phosphorylation of adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K, which is the key enzyme in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The experimental results suggest that IMCA is a drug candidate for MTC therapy and may work by increasing the nuclear export of NR4A1 to the cytoplasm and the tumor protein 53 (p53-sestrins-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

  20. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  1. Application of drug delivery system to boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagië, Hironobu; Ogata, Aya; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Takamoto, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons ((10)B + (1)n --> (7)Li + (4)He (alpha) + 2.31 MeV (93.7 %)/2.79 MeV (6.3 %)). The resulting lithium ions and alphaparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give a high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5 - 9 mum) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma. Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-dodecaborate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH: BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ((10)BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. These low molecule compounds are easily cleared from cancer cells and blood, so high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues and cancer cells are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage to adjacent healthy cells. In order to achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, a drug delivery system (DDS) is an attractive intelligent technology for targeting and controlled release of drugs. We performed literature searches related to boron delivery systems in vitro and in vivo. We describe several DDS technologies for boron delivery to cancer tissues and cancer cells from the past to current status. We are convinced that it will be possible to use liposomes, monoclonal antibodies and WOW emulsions as boron delivery systems for BNCT clinically in accordance with the preparation of good commercial product (GCP) grade materials.

  2. Application of drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy. Basic research toward clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10 B and thermal neutrons ( 10 B+ 1 n → 7 Li+ 4 He (α) +2.31 MeV (93.7%)/2.79 MeV (6.3%)). The resulting lithium ions and αparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5-9 μm) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma etc, recently. Sodium borocaptate (Na 2 10 B 12 H 11 SH; BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ( 10 BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. To achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, drug delivery system (DDS) becomes an attractive intelligent technology as targeting and controlled release of drugs. We have firstly reported that 10 B atoms delivered by immunoliposomes are cytotoxic to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) after thermal neutron irradiation in vitro. The intra-tumoural injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10 B atoms in tumour cells, causing suppression of tumour growth in vivo following thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared polyethylene-glycol binding liposomes (PEG-liposomes) as an effective 10 B carrier to obviate phagocytosis by reticuloendotherial systems. We had prepared 10 BSH entrapped Water-in-Oil-in-Water (WOW) emulsion. The 10 B concentration in VX-2 tumour after intra-arterial injection of 10 BSH entrapped WOW emulsion was superior to the groups of 10 BSH entrapped conventional Lipiodol mix emulsion. 10 Boron entrapped WOW emulsion is one of the most useful for intra-arterial boron delivery carrier on BNCT to hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  3. New Drug Candidate Targeting the 4A1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor for Medullary Thyroid Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Qun; Li, Qinpei; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Jun; Teng, Tieshan; Chen, Mingliang; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2018-03-02

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a relatively rare thyroid cancer responsible for a substantial fraction of thyroid cancer mortality. More effective therapeutic drugs with low toxicity for MTC are urgently needed. Orphan nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1) plays a pivotal role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of tumor cells. Based on the NR4A1 protein structure, 2-imino-6-methoxy-2H-chromene-3-carbothioamide (IMCA) was identified from the Specs compounds database using the protein structure-guided virtual screening approach. Computationally-based molecular modeling studies suggested that IMCA has a high affinity for the ligand binding pocket of NR4A1. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] and apoptosis assays demonstrated that IMCA resulted in significant thyroid cancer cell death. Immunofluorescence assays showed that IMCA induced NR4A1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in thyroid cancer cell lines, which may be involved in the cell apoptotic process. In this study, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the IMCA-induced upregulation of sestrin1 and sestrin2 was dose-dependent in thyroid cancer cell lines. Western blot showed that IMCA increased phosphorylation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), which is the key enzyme in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The experimental results suggest that IMCA is a drug candidate for MTC therapy and may work by increasing the nuclear export of NR4A1 to the cytoplasm and the tumor protein 53 (p53)-sestrins-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

  4. Cochleo-vestibular clinical findings among drug resistant Tuberculosis Patients on therapy-a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramma Lebogang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background To investigate the Cochleo-vestibular clinical and audiometric findings in Multi and Extreme Drug Resistance(MDR and XDR tuberculosis(TB patients on treatment and make recommendations. Methods A cross-sectional study of adult MDR and XDR-TB patients was conducted in a general hospital in Cape-Town-South-Africa. Ethical approval was secured and all consenting patients administered with pretested and validated questionnaire under the guidance of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health(ICF Checklist-version-2.1a. Audiometric evaluation included: Otoscopy, Diagnostic Audiometry and Tympanometry. The data analyses were done with SPSS version 16, Chi-square and StatCalc-7. Results Fifty-three adults, ages 18-60 (mean-33 years comprising 26 males and 27 females participated in the study. Hospital stay duration varied from 1-18 months (mean-6 months and all were on anti-Koch's second line drugs (regimen 2. MDR TB group were 45(85% and XDR 8(15%. Vertigo was the most common vestibular symptoms, 24(45% whereas, tinnitus 23(42% and hearing loss 13(25% were most frequent auditory complaints. Bilateral sensorineural hearing losses of varying degrees were confirmed in 23(47%. There was no association between gender and age with hearing loss [χ2 (P = 0.16, ά = 0.05 and (p = 0.13, ά = 0.05]. Furthermore, MDR and XTR TB groups [20/42 Vs 3/8; Z = 0.46 and P = 0.64], showed no difference in pattern of the hearing losses. Conclusions A multi-disciplinary close surveillance of MDR and XDR TB patients on therapy is imperative. Finally, researches into therapeutic trials on antidotes and potent safer substitutes for aminoglycosides in the management are recommended.

  5. Drug Concentration Thresholds Predictive of Therapy Failure and Death in Children With Tuberculosis: Bread Crumb Trails in Random Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Ramachandran, Geetha; Hemanth Kumar, A K; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Nuermberger, Eric; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-11-01

     The role of drug concentrations in clinical outcomes in children with tuberculosis is unclear. Target concentrations for dose optimization are unknown.  Plasma drug concentrations measured in Indian children with tuberculosis were modeled using compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses. The children were followed until end of therapy to ascertain therapy failure or death. An ensemble of artificial intelligence algorithms, including random forests, was used to identify predictors of clinical outcome from among 30 clinical, laboratory, and pharmacokinetic variables.  Among the 143 children with known outcomes, there was high between-child variability of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide concentrations: 110 (77%) completed therapy, 24 (17%) failed therapy, and 9 (6%) died. The main predictors of therapy failure or death were a pyrazinamide peak concentration <38.10 mg/L and rifampin peak concentration <3.01 mg/L. The relative risk of these poor outcomes below these peak concentration thresholds was 3.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28-5.83). Isoniazid had concentration-dependent antagonism with rifampin and pyrazinamide, with an adjusted odds ratio for therapy failure of 3.00 (95% CI, 2.08-4.33) in antagonism concentration range. In regard to death alone as an outcome, the same drug concentrations, plus z scores (indicators of malnutrition), and age <3 years, were highly ranked predictors. In children <3 years old, isoniazid 0- to 24-hour area under the concentration-time curve <11.95 mg/L × hour and/or rifampin peak <3.10 mg/L were the best predictors of therapy failure, with relative risk of 3.43 (95% CI, .99-11.82).  We have identified new antibiotic target concentrations, which are potential biomarkers associated with treatment failure and death in children with tuberculosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Recent progress in the synthesis of poly(organo)phosphazenes and their applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, R. U.; Wang, L.; Yu, H.; Zain-ul-Abdin; Akram, M.; Wu, J.; Haroon, M.; Ullah, R. S.; Deng, Zh; Xia, X.

    2018-02-01

    It is a highly desirable goal of researchers to develop effective biomaterials with minimum recovery time and affordable treatment expense for tissue engineering and drug delivery. In this scenario, numerous synthetic and natural polymers have been used. Among those synthetic polymers, polyorganophosphazenes (POPs) have got much attention as highly promising candidates for applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Polyorganophosphazenes are hybrid polymers containing inorganic backbone consisting of alternating nitrogen and phosphorus atoms with two organic side groups. POPs possess a wide range of unique properties, i.e., synthetic flexibility, biocompatibility, osteocompatibility, osteoinductivity, sustainability and degradability into harmless end products with predictable degradation rate and adjustable mechanical strength. Moreover, their tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic and stimuli responsive properties add extra points to their use in biomedical applications. In addition, their various polymeric forms, i.e., microspheres, nano/microfibres, micelles, membranes, polymersomes, hydrogels and nano-conjugate linear polymers provide different carriers to efficiently deliver various hydrophilic/hydrophobic therapeutic agents both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the most recent progress that has been made in the synthesis and applications of POPs in tissue engineering and their different polymeric forms used for drug delivery. Moreover, we have also summarized the effect of different side groups on the overall efficiency of POPs. The bibliography includes 239 references.

  7. Biocompatible nanocomposite scaffolds based on copolymer-grafted chitosan for bone tissue engineering with drug delivery capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber-Samandari, Samaneh; Saber-Samandari, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Significant efforts have been made to develop a suitable biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. In this work, a chitosan-graft-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffold was synthesized through a novel multi-step route. The prepared scaffolds were characterized for crystallinity, morphology, elemental analysis, chemical bonds, and pores size in their structure. The mechanical properties (i.e. compressive strength and elastic modulus) of the scaffolds were examined. Further, the biocompatibility of scaffolds was determined by MTT assays on HUGU cells. The result of cell culture experiments demonstrated that the prepared scaffolds have good cytocompatibility without any cytotoxicity, and with the incorporation of hydroxyapatite in their structure improves cell viability and proliferation. Finally, celecoxib as a model drug was efficiently loaded into the prepared scaffolds because of the large specific surface area. The in vitro release of the drug displayed a biphasic pattern with a low initial burst and a sustained release of up to 14 days. Furthermore, different release kinetic models were employed for the description of the release process. The results suggested that the prepared cytocompatible and non-toxic nanocomposite scaffolds might be efficient implants and drug carriers in bone-tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A series of biocompatible scaffolds were synthesized through a novel multi-step route. • The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were found close to those of trabecular bone. • The prepared scaffolds were able to load celecoxib efficiently as a model drug. • The celecoxib release was mainly controlled by a Fickian diffusion process. • The scaffold can be efficient as an implant for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  8. Biocompatible nanocomposite scaffolds based on copolymer-grafted chitosan for bone tissue engineering with drug delivery capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber-Samandari, Samaneh, E-mail: samaneh.saber@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Eastern Mediterranean University, Gazimagusa, TRNC via Mersin 10 (Turkey); Saber-Samandari, Saeed, E-mail: saeedss@aut.ac.ir [New Technologies Research Center, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    Significant efforts have been made to develop a suitable biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. In this work, a chitosan-graft-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffold was synthesized through a novel multi-step route. The prepared scaffolds were characterized for crystallinity, morphology, elemental analysis, chemical bonds, and pores size in their structure. The mechanical properties (i.e. compressive strength and elastic modulus) of the scaffolds were examined. Further, the biocompatibility of scaffolds was determined by MTT assays on HUGU cells. The result of cell culture experiments demonstrated that the prepared scaffolds have good cytocompatibility without any cytotoxicity, and with the incorporation of hydroxyapatite in their structure improves cell viability and proliferation. Finally, celecoxib as a model drug was efficiently loaded into the prepared scaffolds because of the large specific surface area. The in vitro release of the drug displayed a biphasic pattern with a low initial burst and a sustained release of up to 14 days. Furthermore, different release kinetic models were employed for the description of the release process. The results suggested that the prepared cytocompatible and non-toxic nanocomposite scaffolds might be efficient implants and drug carriers in bone-tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A series of biocompatible scaffolds were synthesized through a novel multi-step route. • The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were found close to those of trabecular bone. • The prepared scaffolds were able to load celecoxib efficiently as a model drug. • The celecoxib release was mainly controlled by a Fickian diffusion process. • The scaffold can be efficient as an implant for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  9. Drug utilization and therapy provision patterns by prescriber types among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sooyoung Shin College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology (RIPST, Ajou University, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Republic of Korea Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE poses a growing challenge for healthcare systems, affecting an increasing number of people in Korea. This study aimed to investigate the prescribing patterns of SLE therapies and to compare common drug regimens prescribed by provider types.Methods: Sampled national health insurance claims data in 2015 were used to select eligible SLE patients. Frequency analyses were carried out regarding patient characteristics related to relevant SLE prescriptions. Patient-days were calculated per substance and per drug class and then categorized by provider types. Differences in drug utilization trends among the main types of providers were examined with the chi-square test.Results: A total of 2,074 patients with SLE were selected for study inclusion. Systemic corticosteroid therapy was provided for up to 67.9% of patients, frequently in conjunction with other SLE therapies. About 33.2% and 18.7% of steroid users were treated for more than 150 days and 300 days during the study period, respectively. The provider group that most frequently prescribed systemic corticosteroids was dermatologists. Hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial considered pivotal to SLE management, was prescribed for only 32.4% of patients, predominantly by rheumatologists. Antimalarial therapy was associated with the longest therapy duration (257.7±120.1 days, followed by immunosuppressant therapy (187.0±153.0 days. Prescription rates of antimalarials and immunosuppressants were substantially lower in primary care doctor group and particularly in dermatologist group, compared to rheumatologist group (P-value associated with prescription patterns by provider types was <0.001 for both drug classes.Conclusion: The drug utilization patterns among the main provider groups commonly

  10. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part III. Biocatalysis, metabolic engineering and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology has been defined as the use and application of biotechnology for the sustainable processing and production of chemicals, materials and fuels. It makes use of biocatalysts such as microbial communities, whole-cell microorganisms or purified enzymes. In the review these processes are described. Drug design is an iterative process which begins when a chemist identifies a compound that displays an interesting biological profile and ends when both the activity profile and the chemical synthesis of the new chemical entity are optimized. Traditional approaches to drug discovery rely on a stepwise synthesis and screening program for large numbers of compounds to optimize activity profiles. Over the past ten to twenty years, scientists have used computer models of new chemical entities to help define activity profiles, geometries and relativities. This article introduces inter alia the concepts of molecular modelling and contains references for further reading.

  11. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Tramontano, Giuseppina; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2017-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab) as well as interleukin (IL)-12/23 (ustekinumab) and IL-17 (secukinumab) inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient's preferences (e.g., administration route), and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed.

  12. Physical therapy with drug treatment in Bell palsy: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Margarida; Marques, Elisa E; Duarte, José A; Santos, Paula C

    2015-04-01

    The physical therapy (PT) associated with standard drug treatment (SDT) in Bell palsy has never been investigated. Randomized controlled trials or quasirandomized controlled trials have compared facial PT (except treatments such as acupuncture and osteopathic) combined with SDT against a control group with SDT alone. Participants included those older than 15 yrs with a clinical diagnosis of Bell palsy, and the primary outcome measure was motor function recovery by the House-Brackmann scale. The methodologic quality of each study was also independently assessed by two reviewers using the PEDro scale. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. Three trials indicate that PT in association with SDT supports higher motor function recovery than SDT alone between 15 days and 1 yr of follow-up. On the other hand, one trial showed that electrical stimulation added to conventional PT with SDT did not influence treatment outcomes. The present review suggests that the current practice of Bell palsy treatment by PT associated with SDT seems to have a positive effect on grade and time recovery compared with SDT alone. However, there is very little quality evidence from randomized controlled trials, and such evidence is insufficient to decide whether combined treatment is beneficial in the management of Bell palsy.

  13. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Glasgow Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 131 I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before 131 I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic 131 I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of 131 I, biological half life of 131 I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics. (orig.)

  14. Combination of endovascular graft exclusion and drug therapy in AAA with hypertension or hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dile; Qu, Bihui; He, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of combination of endovascular graft exclusion and drugs for hypertension/hyperglycemia for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We analyzed 156 patients with AAA. Eighty-four patients were hypertensive and 72 were hyperglycemic. After endovascular graft exclusion, hypertensive patients were divided into four groups and treated with cyclopenthiazide, reserpine, propranolol, and placebo respectively. Hyperglycemic patients were divided into three groups and treated with metformin, insulin, and placebo respectively. Body temperature and peripheral blood leukocytes were measured at day 1, 2, 7, and 14 after endovascular graft exclusion. Size of AAAs, blood pressure, and blood sugar were measured again after 1 year. In hypertensive patients, the size of AAAs reduced after endovascular graft exclusion, while the combined treatments with cyclopenthiazide, reserpine, or propranolol helped to reduce blood pressure (blood pressure decrease AAA size decreased in the control group (PAAAs reduced after endovascular graft exclusion. Combined treatment with Metformin and Insulin reduced blood sugar (control, blood sugar >7.8 mmol/L (22/24), AAA size (P7.8 mmol/L (14/24), AAA size (P7.8 mmol/L (11/24), AAA size (PAAA therapy.

  15. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  16. Can bone loss be reversed by antithyroid drug therapy in premenopausal women with Graves' disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belsing Tina Z

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Hyperthyroidism can lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk particularly in postmenopausal women, but the mechanism behind is still unclear. Objective Prospective examination of the influence of thyroid hormones and/or thyroid autoantibodies on BMD in premenopause. Design We have examined 32 premenopausal women with untreated active Graves' disease from time of diagnosis, during 18 months of antithyroid drug therapy (ATD and additionally 18 months after discontinuing ATD. Variables of thyroid metabolism, calcium homeostasis and body composition were measured every 3 months. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured at baseline, 18 ± 3 and 36 ± 3 months. Data were compared to base line, a sex- and age matched control group and a group of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis treated with non-suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Results The study showed significantly (p Conclusion The results indicated a clinically relevant impact of thyroid function on bone modulation also in premenopausal women with Graves' disease, and further indicated the possibility for a direct action of TRAb on bones.

  17. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Hilditch, T.E.; Robertson, J.; Alexander, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine (/sup 131/I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive /sup 131/I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before /sup 131/I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic /sup 131/I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of /sup 131/I, biological half life of /sup 131/I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics.

  18. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Improvement of Coping Strategies and Addiction Symptoms in Drug-Dependent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BrockieMilan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in improving coping strategies and symptoms of drug addiction patients. Method: In a quasi-experimental study, the number of 90drug-dependent patients referring to clinics to stop taking drugs existing in the city of Urmia were divided into two experimental (n=45 groups and control (n=45 using random sampling. The experimental group received 12 sessions of cognitive-behavioral treatment in Carroll style while the control group received only methadone and the physical pills. All the participants completed coping strategies questionnaire at the beginning, during (after three months, and three months after treatment (follow-up. As well, they were assessed for the rate of improvement in symptoms of addiction and process of addiction treatment using by Madzly’s addiction profile questionnaire. Findings: The results proved the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy and its survival. Conclusion: Cognitive behavioral therapy is very influential in the boost of coping strategies and the improvement of mental and physical health in drug-dependent patients.

  19. Sequence-engineered mRNA Without Chemical Nucleoside Modifications Enables an Effective Protein Therapy in Large Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thess, Andreas; Grund, Stefanie; Mui, Barbara L; Hope, Michael J; Baumhof, Patrick; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Schlake, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Being a transient carrier of genetic information, mRNA could be a versatile, flexible, and safe means for protein therapies. While recent findings highlight the enormous therapeutic potential of mRNA, evidence that mRNA-based protein therapies are feasible beyond small animals such as mice is still lacking. Previous studies imply that mRNA therapeutics require chemical nucleoside modifications to obtain sufficient protein expression and avoid activation of the innate immune system. Here we show that chemically unmodified mRNA can achieve those goals as well by applying sequence-engineered molecules. Using erythropoietin (EPO) driven production of red blood cells as the biological model, engineered Epo mRNA elicited meaningful physiological responses from mice to nonhuman primates. Even in pigs of about 20 kg in weight, a single adequate dose of engineered mRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) induced high systemic Epo levels and strong physiological effects. Our results demonstrate that sequence-engineered mRNA has the potential to revolutionize human protein therapies. PMID:26050989

  20. Chinese herbal therapy and Western drug use, belief and adherence for hypertension management in the rural areas of Heilongjiang province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM including Chinese herbal therapy has been widely practiced in China. However, little is known about Chinese herbal therapy use for hypertension management, which is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in China. Thus we described Chinese herbal therapy and western drug users, beliefs, hypertension knowledge, and Chinese herbal and western drug adherence and determinants of Chinese herbal therapy use among patients with hypertension in rural areas of Heilongjiang Province, China.This face-to-face cross sectional survey included 665 hypertensive respondents aged 30 years or older in rural areas of Heilongjiang Province, China. Of 665 respondents, 39.7% were male, 27.4% were aged 65 years or older. At the survey, 14.0% reported using Chinese herbal therapy and 71.3% reported using western drug for hypertension management. A majority of patients had low level of treatment adherence (80.6% for the Chinese herbal therapy users and 81.2% for the western drug users. When respondents felt that their blood pressure was under control, 72.0% of the Chinese herbal therapy users and 69.2% of the western drug users sometimes stopped taking their