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Sample records for engine cryogenic turbopump

  1. Regeneratively-Cooled, Turbopump-Fed, Small-Scale Cryogenic Rocket Engines, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To-date, the realization of small-scale, high-performance liquid bipropellant rocket engines has largely been limited by the inability to operate at high chamber...

  2. Introduction to cryogenic engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Vandoni, Giovanna; Niinikoski, Tapio O

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning.

  3. Floating Seal For Turbopumps, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic engines for in-space propulsion require innovative technologies to provide long-life, lightweight, and reliable turbopump designs. One area open for...

  4. Analysis of Acoustic Cavitation Surge in a Rocket Engine Turbopump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Nanri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a liquid rocket engine, cavitation in an inducer of a turbopump sometimes causes instability phenomena when the inducer is operated at low inlet pressure. Cavitation surge (auto-oscillation, one such instability phenomenon, has been discussed mainly based on an inertia model assuming incompressible flow. When this model is used, the frequency of the cavitation surge decreases continuously as the inlet pressure of the turbopump decreases. However, we obtained an interesting experimental result in which the frequency of cavitation surge varied discontinuously. Therefore, we employed one-dimensional analysis based on an acoustic model in which the fluid is assumed to be compressible. The analytical result qualitatively corresponded with the experimental result.

  5. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and

  6. Nonlinear rotordynamics analysis. [Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Sherif T.

    1991-01-01

    Effective analysis tools were developed for predicting the nonlinear rotordynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps under steady and transient operating conditions. Using these methods, preliminary parametric studies were conducted on both generic and actual HPOTP (high pressure oxygen turbopump) models. In particular, a novel modified harmonic balance/alternating Fourier transform (HB/AFT) method was developed and used to conduct a preliminary study of the effects of fluid, bearing and seal forces on the unbalanced response of a multi-disk rotor in the presence of bearing clearances. The method makes it possible to determine periodic, sub-, super-synchronous and chaotic responses of a rotor system. The method also yields information about the stability of the obtained response, thus allowing bifurcation analyses. This provides a more effective capability for predicting the response under transient conditions by searching in proximity of resonance peaks. Preliminary results were also obtained for the nonlinear transient response of an actual HPOTP model using an efficient, newly developed numerical method based on convolution integration. Currently, the HB/AFT is being extended for determining the aperiodic response of nonlinear systems. Initial results show the method to be promising.

  7. Critical Performance of Turbopump Mechanical Elements for Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Masataka; Sudou, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Fumiya; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Makoto

    It is generally acknowledged that bearings and axial seals have a tendency to go wrong compared with other rocket engine elements. And when those components have malfunction, missions scarcely succeed. However, fundamental performance (maximum rotational speed, minimum flow rate, power loss, durability, etc.) of those components has not been grasped yet. Purpose of this study is to grasp a critical performance of mechanical seal and hybrid ball bearing of turbopump. In this result, it was found that bearing outer race temperature and bearing coolant outlet temperature changed along saturation line of liquid hydrogen when flow rate was decreased under critical pressure. And normal operation of bearing was possible under conditions of more than 70,000 rpm of rotational speed and more than 0.2 liter/s of coolant flow rate. Though friction coefficient of seal surface increased several times of original value after testing, the seal showed a good performance same as before.

  8. Rotordynamic Characteristics of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Rotational stability of turbopump components in the space shuttle main engine was studied via analysis of component and structural dynamic models. Subsynchronous vibration caused unacceptable migration of the rotor/housing unit with unequal load sharing of the synchronous bearings that resulted in the failure of the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump. Linear analysis shows that a shrouded inducer eliminates the second critical speed and the stability problem, a stiffened rotor improves the rotordynamic characteristics of the turbopump, and installing damper boost/impeller seals reduces bearing loads. Nonlinear analysis shows that by increasing the "dead band' clearances, a marked reduction in peak bearing loads occurs.

  9. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    A bulk-flow analysis and computer program for prediction of the static load performance and dynamic force coefficients of angled injection, orifice-compensated hydrostatic/hydrodynamic thrust bearings have been completed. The product of the research is an efficient computational tool for the design of high-speed thrust bearings for cryogenic fluid turbopumps. The study addresses the needs of a growing technology that requires of reliable fluid film bearings to provide the maximum operating life with optimum controllable rotordynamic characteristics at the lowest cost. The motion of a cryogenic fluid on the thin film lands of a thrust bearing is governed by a set of bulk-flow mass and momentum conservation and energy transport equations. Mass flow conservation and a simple model for momentum transport within the hydrostatic bearing recesses are also accounted for. The bulk-flow model includes flow turbulence with fluid inertia advection, Coriolis and centrifugal acceleration effects on the bearing recesses and film lands. The cryogenic fluid properties are obtained from realistic thermophysical equations of state. Turbulent bulk-flow shear parameters are based on Hirs' model with Moody's friction factor equations allowing a simple simulation for machined bearing surface roughness. A perturbation analysis leads to zeroth-order nonlinear equations governing the fluid flow for the thrust bearing operating at a static equilibrium position, and first-order linear equations describing the perturbed fluid flow for small amplitude shaft motions in the axial direction. Numerical solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations renders the bearing flow rate, thrust load, drag torque and power dissipation. Solution to the first-order equations determines the axial stiffness, damping and inertia force coefficients. The computational method uses well established algorithms and generic subprograms available from prior developments. The Fortran9O computer program hydrothrust runs

  10. Radiation pyrometer for gas turbine blades. [in LOX turbopump engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohy, D. A.; Compton, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    A turbine blade temperature measuring system for liquid oxygen turbopumps is reported. The system includes a three mode, two-input optical signal processor, interconnecting cable, and four sensor heads. Two of the heads are aperture type, while the other two are lens type. This system is applicable to a temperature range of 1400 to 2200 F.

  11. Cryogenic engineering fifty years of progress

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Engineering: Fifty Years of Progress is a benchmark reference work which chronicles the major developments in the field. Starting with an historical background dating to the 1850s, this book reviews the development of data resources now available for cryogenic fields and properties of materials. The advances in cryogenic fundamentals are covered by reviews of cryogenic principles, cryogenic insulation, low-loss storage systems, modern liquefaction processes, helium cryogenics and low-temperature thermometry. Several well-established applications resulting from cryogenic advances include aerospace cryocoolers and refrigerators, use of LTS and HTS systems in electrical applications, and recent changes in cryopreservation. Extensive references are provided for the readers interested in the details of these cryogenic engineering advances.

  12. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  13. The Pressure Field Measurement for Researching Inducer Flow of Booster Rocket Engine Turbopump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Dorosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing a feed system for modern main rocket engine development, designers have to pay special attention to energy efficiency of units and their reliability. One of the most important conditions of reliability is to provide non-cavitation operation of the main turbo-pump, which is impossible without using the booster turbo-pumps, considering the current levels of pressure in the combustion chamber. Thanks to high suction properties and processability, axial inducers with screw geometry became the most widely used in booster turbo-pumps. At the same time, the flow in the inducers of progressive geometry has complex spatial nature that makes their designing and detailed flow studying to be a difficult task.Based on the need of detailed understanding the flow structure in inducer channels a number of investigation methods are considered, including: analytical calculation, visual research methods, direct flow measurement, and numerical simulation. Analysis of the characteristics of each method shows the need to combine several methods to achieve the best results. Using a numerical simulation becomes the most effective strategy to obtain a wide range of data and confirm their authenticity by experimental measurements at characteristic points. The features of such kind of measurements in the inducer flow and measuring device requirements are considered.Based on this, an original design experimental booster turbo-pump, equipped with a pressure measuring system behind the inducer and automatic unloader device simulator is developed. Using these systems a radial pressure diagram of inducer flow as well as axial the force acting on the inducer can be experimentally obtained. It is shown that the offered measuring system satisfies those requirements and provides data at the various operation modes of the booster turbopump unit. A developed test program allows us to obtain required data: the pressure values in the flow behind inducer and axial force

  14. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  15. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, huge detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world’s largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. Monday 5.12.2005 Introduction: From History to Modern Refrigeration Cycles (Goran Perinic) Tuesday 6.12.2005 Refrigerants, Standard Cryostats, Cryogenic Des...

  16. Academic Training: Introduction to cryogenic Engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Introduction to cryogenic Engineering by G. Perinic - CERN-AT Cryogenic engineering is one of the key technologies at CERN. It is widely used in research and has many applications in industry and last but not least in medicine. In research cryogenic engineering and its applications are omnipresent from the smallest laboratories to fusion reactors, hughe detectors and accelerators. With the termination of the LHC, CERN will in fact become the world's largest cryogenic installation. This series of talks intends to introduce the non-cryogenist to the basic principles and challenges of cryogenic engineering and its applications. The course will also provide a basis for practical application as well as for further learning. From history to modern refrigeration cycles (1/5) Refrigerants, standard cryostats, cryogenic design (2/5) Heat transfer and insulation (3/5) Safety in cryoge...

  17. Vibration characteristics of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, D. W.; Moyer, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of various rotordynamic problems which have been encountered and eliminated in developing the current flight engines, and continuing subsynchronous problems which are being encountered in developing a 109% power level engine. The basic model for the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) of the SSME including the structural dynamic model for the rotor and housing and component models for the liquid and gas seals, turbine-clearance excitation forces, and impeller-diffuser forces are discussed. Results from a linear model are used to examine the synchronous response and stability characteristics of the HPOTP, examining bearing load and stability problems associated with the second critical speed. Various seal modifications are examined and shown to have favorable consequences with respect to bearing reactions and stability.

  18. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  19. Technical presentation: BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Laignel - FI Department

    2006-01-01

    13 - 14 June 2006 TECHNICAL PRESENTATION BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited 09:00 - 18:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. Presentation on BGM: 11:00 - 12:00, 60-2-016, Main Building. BGM Cryogenic Engineering Limited manufactures assemblies, sub-assemblies and machined components for the cryogenic technology sector. The primary markets served include superconducting magnets used in the healthcare sector (eg MRI body scanners), spectroscopy and NMR equipment for numerous R & D and technology applications, high vacuum applications and particle physics research. BGM has specialist assembly capability including stainless steel and aluminium welding, vacuum testing, electromechanical assembly and metal finishing. BGM offers a ‘one stop shop'facility to satisfy any customer requirement. Through our design partner we can offer a full design and modelling service, including 3D modelling and production of 2D drawings on your own borders. We can conduct heat load and force calculations and advise on the best...

  20. Cryogenic rocket engine development at Delft aerospace rocket engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J; Hermsen, R.; Huijsman, R; Akkermans, C.; Denies, L.; Barreiro, F.; Schutte, A.; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current developments regarding cryogenic rocket engine technology at Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE). DARE is a student society based at Delft University of Technology with the goal of being the first student group in the world to launch a rocket into space. After

  1. The Space Shuttle Main Engine High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump rotordynamic instability problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) HPFTP (High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump) has been subject to a rotordynamic instability problem, characterized by large and damaging subsynchronous whirling motion. The original design of the HPFTP (from a rotordynamic viewpoint) and the evolution of the HPFTP subsynchronous whirl problem are reviewed. The models and analysis which have been developed and utilized to explain the HPFTP instability and improve its stability performance are also reviewed. Elements of the rotordynamic model which are discussed in detail include the following: (a) hydrodynamic forces due to seals, (b) internal rotor damping, (c) bearing and casing support stiffness asymmetry, and (d) casing dynamics. The stability and synchronous response characteristics of the following two design alternatives are compared: (a) a 'stiff' symmetric bearing support design and (b) a damped asymmetric stiffness design. With appropriate interstage seal designs, both designs are shown, in theory to provide substantially improved stability and synchronous response characteristics in comparison to the original design. The asymmetric design is shown to have better stability and synchronous response characteristics than the stiffly supported design.

  2. Progress report - Advanced cryogenic OTV engine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenman, L.

    1985-01-01

    New technologies for space-based, reusable, throttleable, cryogenic orbit transfer propulsion are being evaluated. A variable-thrust (200 to 3000 lbF), 2000 psi chamber pressure, LO2/LH2 engine has been selected to demonstrate the 20-hour, 500-restart life goal, and a specific impulse in excess of 480 lbF-sec/lbM. The results of recent vehicle-engine integration analyses and the progress in design, fabrication, and testing are provided. Emphasis is placed on the following technology areas being investigated in support of the advanced engine design: LOX hydrostatic bearings; burn-resistant materials for high-pressure GOX turbines and valves; high surface-low flux annular combustion chambers for the dual propellant expander cycle; improved cooling approaches for high-pressure combustion chambers, new concepts in integrated controls; and engine health diagnostics.

  3. Development of Cryogenic Engine for GSLV MkIII: Technological Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, RS; Jayan, N.; Bijukumar, KS; Jayaprakash, J.; Narayanan, V.; Ayyappan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic engine capable of delivering 200 kN thrust is being developed for the first time in the country by ISRO for powering the upper stage of GSLV Mk-III, the next generation launch vehicle of ISRO capable of launching four tonne class satellites to Geo-synchronous Transfer Orbit(GTO). Development of this engine started a decade ago when various sub-systems development and testing were taken up. Starting with injector element development, the design, realization and testing of the major sub-systems viz the gas generator, turbopumps, start-up system and thrust chamber have been successfully done in a phased manner before conducting a series of developmental tests in the integrated engine mode. Apart from the major sub-systems, many critical components like the igniter, control components etc were independently developed and qualified. During the development program many challenges were faced in almost all areas of propulsion engineering. Systems engineering of the engine was another key challenge in the realization. This paper gives an outlook on various technological challenges faced in the key areas related to the engine development, insight to the solutions and measures taken to overcome the challenges.

  4. Vibration characteristics of the HPOTP (High-Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, D. W.; Moyer, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to rotor dynamic problems that have been encountered and eliminated in the course of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) development, as well as continuing, subsynchronous problems which are being encountered in the development of a 109-percent power level engine. The basic model for the SSME's High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) encompasses a structural dynamic model for the rotor and housing, and component models for the liquid and gas seals, turbine clearance excitation forces, and impeller diffuser forces. Linear model results are used to examine the synchronous response and stability characteristics of the HPOTP, with attention to bearing load and stability problems associated with the second critical speed. Differences between linear and nonlinear model results are discussed and explained in terms of simple models. Simulation results indicate that while synchronous bearing loads can be reduced, subsynchronous motion is not eliminated by seal modifications.

  5. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering: Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (CEC) 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 joint Cryogenic Engineering and International Cryogenic Materials Conferences were held from June 28 through July 2 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa in Tucson, Arizona. As at past conferences, the international scope of these meetings was strongly maintained with 26 countries being represented by 561 attendees who gathered to enjoy the joint technical programs, industrial exhibits, special events, and natural beauty of the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The program for the joint conferences included a total of 363 presentations in the plenary, oral, and poster sessions. Four plenary talks gave in-depth discussions of the readiness of bulk superconductors for applications, the role of cryogenics in the development of the hydrogen bomb and vice versa, superconducting turboelectric aircraft propulsion and UPS's uses and plans for LNG fuel. Contributed papers covered a wide range of topics including large-scale and small-scale cryogenics, advances in superconductors and their applications. In total, 234 papers were submitted for publication of which 224 are published in these proceedings. The CEC/ICMC Cryo Industrial Expo displayed the products and services of 38 industrial exhibitors and provided a congenial venue for a reception and refreshments throughout the week as well as the conference poster sessions. Spectacular panoramic views of Saguaro National Park, the Sonoran Desert and the night time lights of Tucson set the stage for a memorable week in the American Southwest. Conference participants enjoyed scenic hikes and bike rides, exploring Old Town Tucson, hot and spicy southwestern cuisine, a nighttime lightning display and a hailstorm. Conference Chairs for 2015 were Peter Kittel, Consultant, for CEC and Michael Sumption from The Ohio State University, Materials Science Department for ICMC. Program Chairs were Jonathan Demko from the LeTourneau University for CEC and Timothy Haugan from AFRL/RQQM for ICMC, assisted by the CEC Program Vice Chair

  6. Contributions to the 12th. International Cryogenic Engineering Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The report consists of two papers read at the 12 th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference Held in Southampton from 12 to 15 July 1988. The first deals with the design of a conductor for NET machine; the second one gives the description of the liquid Nitrogen cooling system of the FTU tokamak

  7. Proceedings of the 26th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference - International Cryogenic Material Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Sharma, R. G.; Kar, S.

    2017-02-01

    International Conference ICEC 26 - ICMC 2016 was organized at New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016. Previous conference ICEC25-ICMC 2014 was held at the University of Twente, The Netherlands in July 2014. Next Conference ICEC 27- ICMC 2018 will be held at Oxford, UK during September 3-7, 2018 1. Introduction This is a biennial international conference on cryogenic engineering and cryogenics materials organized by the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee and the International Cryogenic Material Committee. For some years, the host country has been alternating between Europe and Asia. The present conference was held at the Manekshaw Convention Centre, New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016 and hosted jointly by the Indian Cryogenics Council (ICC) and the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Put all together as many as 547 persons participated in the conference. Out of these 218 were foreign delegates coming from 25 countries and the rest from India. 2. Inaugural Session & Course Lectures The pre conference short course lectures on “Cryocoolers” and “Superconducting Materials for Power Applications” were organized on 7th March. Cryocooler course was given jointly by Dr. Chao Wang from M/s. Cryomech, USA and Prof. Milind Atrey from IIT Bombay, India. The Course on Superconducting Materials was given by Prof. Venkat Selvamanickam from the University of Houston, USA. The conference was inaugurated in the morning of March 8th in a typical Indian tradition and in the presence of the Chief Guest, Dr. R Chidambaram (Principle Scientific Adviser to Govt. of India), Guest of Honour, Prof. H Devaraj (Vice Chairman University Grant Commission), Prof Marcel ter Brake ( Chair, ICEC Board), Prof. Wilfried Goldacker (Chair, ICMC board), Dr. D Kanjilal (Director IUAC), Dr R K Bhandari, (President, Indian Cryogenic Council ). Dr. T S Datta, Chair Local Organizing Committee coordinated the proceedings of the inaugural function. 3. Technical

  8. Regeneratively-Cooled, Turbopump-Fed, LOX/Methane Lunar Ascent Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To-date, the realization of small-scale, high-performance liquid bipropellant rocket engines for lunar and other planetary ascent vehicles has largely been limited...

  9. Experimental measurements of the Space Shuttle main engine fuel and oxygen turbopump vibration characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, E. J.; Flack, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The vibration characteristics of the SSME (Space Shuttle main engine) are dealt with. The Space Shuttle engine consists of a main rocket nozzle and attached to it are high pressure fuel and oxygen pumps. Various vibration problems have been encountered with both the hydrogen and oxygen pumps. The vibration spectrum of the hydrogen and oxygen pumps has been analyzed by various techniques using synchronous tracking filters and FFT analyzers. The experimental data has been correlated to theoretical predictions of resonance frequencies.

  10. Advanced Simulation Capability for Turbopump Cavitation Dynamics Guided by Experimental Validation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerical cavitation modeling capability is critical in the design of liquid rocket engine turbopumps, feed lines, injector manifolds and engine test facilities....

  11. The Concept Design of a Split Flow Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Advanced Expander Engine Cycle Schematic ................................................... 20 Figure 10 Component View of ALH Turbopump...21 Table 12 ALH Turbopump Performance Parameters ....................................................... 21 Table 13...Units C Absolute velocity ft/s ALH Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Al Aluminum AR Aspect Ratio AxLngth Axial Length inches Beta2b Blade exit angle

  12. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  13. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  14. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering - Materials: Proceedings of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference (ICMC) 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 joint Cryogenic Engineering and International Cryogenic Materials Conferences were held from June 28 through July 2 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa in Tucson, Arizona. As at past conferences, the international scope of these meetings was strongly maintained with 26 countries being represented by 561 attendees who gathered to enjoy the joint technical programs, industrial exhibits, special events, and natural beauty of the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The program for the joint conferences included a total of 363 presentations in the plenary, oral, and poster sessions. Four plenary talks gave in-depth discussions of the readiness of bulk superconductors for applications, the role of cryogenics in the development of the hydrogen bomb and vice versa, superconducting turboelectric aircraft propulsion and UPS's uses and plans for LNG fuel. Contributed papers covered a wide range of topics including large-scale and small-scale cryogenics, advances in superconductors and their applications. In total, 234 papers were submitted for publication of which 224 are published in these proceedings. The CEC/ICMC Cryo Industrial Expo displayed the products and services of 38 industrial exhibitors and provided a congenial venue for a reception and refreshments throughout the week as well as the conference poster sessions. Spectacular panoramic views of Saguaro National Park, the Sonoran Desert and the night time lights of Tucson set the stage for a memorable week in the American Southwest. Conference participants enjoyed scenic hikes and bike rides, exploring Old Town Tucson, hot and spicy southwestern cuisine, a nighttime lightning display and a hailstorm. Conference Chairs for 2015 were Peter Kittel, Consultant, for CEC and Michael Sumption from The Ohio State University, Materials Science Department for ICMC. Program Chairs were Jonathan Demko from the LeTourneau University for CEC and Timothy Haugan from AFRL/RQQM for ICMC, assisted by the CEC Program Vice Chair

  15. Members of the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee visit the CMS experiment at Point 5 during the Nineteenth International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC 19) in Grenoble, France (22-26 July 2002).

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Members of the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee visit the CMS experiment at Point 5 during the Nineteenth International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC 19) in Grenoble, France (22-26 July 2002).

  16. Light-Weight Injector Technology for Cryogenic Mars Ascent Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trihn, Huu Phuoc; Cramer, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Preliminary mission studies for human exploration of Mars have been performed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These studies indicate that for chemical rockets only a cryogenic propulsion system would provide high enough performance to be considered for a Mars ascent vehicle. Although the mission is possible with Earth-supplied propellants for this vehicle, utilization of in-situ propellants is highly attractive. This option would significantly reduce the overall mass of launch vehicles. Consequently, the cost of the mission would be greatly reduced because the number and size of the Earth launch vehicle(s) needed for the mission decrease. NASA/Johnson Space Center has initiated several concept studies of in-situ propellant production plants. Liquid oxygen (LOX) is the primary candidate for an in-situ oxidizer. In-situ fuel candidates include methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), and methanol (CH3OH). MSFC initiated a technology development program for a cryogenic propulsion system for the Mars human exploration mission in 1998. One part of this technology program is the effort described here: an evaluation of propellant injection concepts for a LOX/liquid methane Mars Ascent Engine (MAE) with an emphasis on light-weight, high efficiency, reliability, and thermal compatibility. In addition to the main objective, hot-fire tests of the subject injectors will be used to test other key technologies including light-weight combustion chamber materials and advanced ignition concepts. This state-of-the-art technology will then be applied to the development of a cryogenic propulsion system that will meet the requirements of the planned Mars sample return (MSR) mission. The current baseline propulsion system for the MSR mission uses a storable propellant combination [monomethyl hydrazine/mixed oxides of nitrogen-25. However, a mission option that incorporates in-situ propellant production and utilization for the ascent stage is being carefully considered as a subscale

  17. Turbopump Design for Deep Throttling Capability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A rocket engine turbopump design using a partial emission pump combined with a zero net positive suction pressure inducer design is proposed to achieve a robust,...

  18. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  19. Cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V.

    1997-01-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  20. Correction of Dynamic Characteristics of SAR Cryogenic GTE on Consumption of Gasified Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukin, V. A.; Gimadiev, A. G.; Gangisetty, G.

    2018-01-01

    When the gas turbine engines (GTE) NK-88 were developed for liquid hydrogen and NK-89 for liquefied natural gas, performance of the systems with a turbo-pump unitary was improved and its proved without direct regulation of the flow of a cryogenic fuel, which was supplied by a centrifugal pump of the turbo-pump unit (TPU) Command from the “kerosene” system. Such type of the automatic control system (SAR) has the property of partial “neutralization” of the delay caused by gasification of the fuel. This does not require any measurements in the cryogenic medium, and the failure of the centrifugal cryogenic pump does not lead to engine failure. On the other hand, the system without direct regulation of the flow of cryogenic fuel has complex internal dynamic connections, their properties are determined by the characteristics of the incoming units and assemblies, and it is difficult to maintain accurate the maximum boundary level and minimum fuel consumption due to the influence of a booster pressure change. Direct regulation of the consumption of cryogenic fuel (prior to its gasification) is the preferred solution, since for using traditional liquid and gaseous fuels this is the main and proven method. The scheme of correction of dynamic characteristics of a single-loop SAR GTE for the consumption of a liquefied cryogenic fuel with a flow rate correction in its gasified state, which ensures the dynamic properties of the system is not worse than for NK-88 and NK-89 engines.

  1. Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Inducer Dynamic Environment Characterization through Water Model and Hot-Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Patrick; Patton, Marc; Schwartz, Alan; Stanton, David

    2006-01-01

    The Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (LPOTP) inducer on the Block II configuration Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) experienced blade leading edge ripples during hot firing. This undesirable condition led to a minor redesign of the inducer blades. This resulted in the need to evaluate the performance and the dynamic environment of the redesign, relative to the current configuration, as part of the design acceptance process. Sub-scale water model tests of the two inducer configurations were performed, with emphasis on the dynamic environment due to cavitation induced vibrations. Water model tests were performed over a wide range of inlet flow coefficient and pressure conditions, representative of the scaled operating envelope of the Block II SSME, both in flight and in ground hot-fire tests, including all power levels. The water test hardware, facility set-up, type and placement of instrumentation, the scope of the test program, specific test objectives, data evaluation process and water test results that characterize and compare the two SSME LPOTP inducers are discussed. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the two water models were compared to hot fire data from specially instrumented ground tests. In general, good agreement between the water model and hot fire data was found, which confirms the value of water model testing for dynamic characterization of rocket engine turbomachinery.

  2. Investigation on Composite Throat Insert For Cryogenic Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyappan, G.; Tiwari, S. B.; Praveen, RS; Mohankumar, L.; Jathaveda, M.; Ganesh, P.

    2017-02-01

    Injector element testing is an important step in the development and qualification of the cryogenic rocket engines. For the purpose of characterising the injectors, sub scale chambers are used. In order to assess the performance of the injectors, different configurations of the injectors are tested using a combustion chamber and a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pressure distribution along the wall of the chamber and throat insert is obtained from the CFD analysis and temperature distribution is obtained from thermal analysis. Thermo-structural analysis is carried out for the sub-scale model of throat inert using temperature dependent material properties. For the experiments a sub-scale model of the thrust chamber is realised. Injector element tests are carried out for the studies. The objective of the present study is to investigate the behaviour of different throat inserts, mainly graphite, 2-D Carbon-Carbon(2D C-C), 4-D Carbon-Carbon (4D C-C) and Silica Phenolic (SP), under pressure and thermal load for repeated operation of the engine. Analytical results are compared with the test results. The paper gives the results of theoretical studies and experiments conducted with all the four type of throat material. It is concluded that 2D C-C is superior in terms of throat erosion being the least under specified combustion environment.

  3. Applying Additive Manufacturing to a New Liquid Oxygen Turbopump Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, T. Derek

    2016-01-01

    A liquid oxygen turbopump has been designed at Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the in-house, Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine (AMDE) project. Additive manufacturing, specifically direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) of Inconel 718, is used for 77% of the parts by mass. These parts include the impeller, turbine components, and housings. This paper discusses the impacts of the DMLS fabrication technique on the design of the turbopump and lessons learned during DMLS hardware fabrication and material testing.

  4. Turbopump options for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissell, W.R.; Gunn, S.V.

    1992-07-01

    Several turbopump options for delivering liquid nitrogen to nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engines were evaluated and compared. Axial and centrifugal flow pumps were optimized, with and without boost pumps, utilizing current design criteria within the latest turbopump technology limits. Two possible NTR design points were used, a modest pump pressure rise of 1,743 psia and a relatively higher pump pressure rise of 4,480 psia. Both engines utilized the expander cycle to maximize engine performance for the long duration mission. Pump suction performance was evaluated. Turbopumps with conventional cavitating inducers were compared with zero NPSH (saturated liquid in the tanks) pumps over a range of tank saturation pressures, with and without boost pumps. Results indicate that zero NSPH pumps at high tank vapor pressures, 60 psia, are very similar to those with the finite NPSHs. At low vapor pressures efficiencies fall and turbine pressure ratios increase leading to decreased engine chamber pressures and or increased pump pressure discharges and attendant high-pressure component weights. It may be concluded that zero tank NSPH capabilities can be obtained with little penalty to the engine systems but boost pumps are needed if tank vapor pressure drops below 30 psia. Axial pumps have slight advantages in weight and chamber pressure capability while centrifugal pumps have a greater operating range. 10 refs

  5. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  6. Temperature Sensing Solution for Cryogenic Space Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic systems, heavily used in rocket ground testing, space station operations, shuttle launch systems, etc, require a large number of temperature sensors for...

  7. The pros and cons of cryogenic accelerators: An engineering point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, W.

    1991-01-01

    The design of cryogenic linacs is a challenging engineering task; however, significant improvements in accelerator performance are possible. Resistive power losses may be reduced by a factor of four or greater. Greater flexibility is possible in thermal management as a result of substantial increases in thermal conductivity for certain materials. Radio frequency structures may by an order of magnitude more stable in terms of frequency shifts due to thermal transients resulting form very small coefficients of thermal expansion at cryogenic temperatures. Significant engineering problems must be addressed, such as the design of effective rf contacts that will not be affected by thermal cycling and the design of cryogenic mechanisms and dynamic components, such as frequency tuners, that operate reliably at cryogenic operating temperatures. The areas of high-power sparking and multipactoring have not yet been experimentally addressed. Both Los Alamos, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, and Boeing Corporation have built or are building and testing cryogenic accelerator structures. This paper reviews the advances made in cryogenic technology applied to radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and drift tube linac (DTL) structures and will discuss the advantages and engineering challenges that these linacs present

  8. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a. variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions, This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solution with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. And the literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  9. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  10. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  11. Helium cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  12. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  13. The J-2X Fuel Turbopump - Design, Development, and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, James G.; Hawkins, Lakiesha V.; Shinguchi, Brian H.; Marsh, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR), a NASA subcontractor, is executing the design, development, test, and evaluation (DDT&E) of a liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen two hundred ninety four thousand pound thrust rocket engine initially intended for the Upper Stage (US) and Earth Departure Stage (EDS) of the Constellation Program Ares-I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). A key element of the design approach was to base the new J-2X engine on the heritage J-2S engine with the intent of uprating the engine and incorporating SSME and RS-68 lessons learned. The J-2S engine was a design upgrade of the flight proven J-2 configuration used to put American astronauts on the moon. The J-2S Fuel Turbopump (FTP) was the first Rocketdyne-designed liquid hydrogen centrifugal pump and provided many of the early lessons learned for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopumps. This paper will discuss the design trades and analyses performed for the current J-2X FTP to increase turbine life; increase structural margins, facilitate component fabrication; expedite turbopump assembly; and increase rotordynamic stability margins. Risk mitigation tests including inducer water tests, whirligig turbine blade tests, turbine air rig tests, and workhorse gas generator tests characterized operating environments, drove design modifications, or identified performance impact. Engineering design, fabrication, analysis, and assembly activities support FTP readiness for the first J-2X engine test scheduled for July 2011.

  14. Study and Development of Face-Contact, Bellows Mechanical Seal for Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump

    OpenAIRE

    NOSAKA, Masataka; SUZUKI, Mineo; MIYAKAWA, Yukio; KAMIJO, Kenjiro; KIKUCHI, Masataka; MORI, Masahiro; 野坂, 正隆; 鈴木, 峰男; 宮川, 行雄; 上絛, 謙二郎; 菊池, 正孝; 森, 雅裕

    1981-01-01

    The development of a 10-ton thrust liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen (LOX and LH2) rocket engine is under way at the National Space Development Agency. In advance of the development of a liquid hydrogen turbopump, the National Aerospace Laboratory carried out study and development of a face-contact, bellows mechanical seal for a liquid hydrogen turbopump in co-operation with the National Space Development Agency. The present report describes the fundamental experiments of the mechanical seal ...

  15. Low-speed inducers for cryogenic upper-stage engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, W. R.; Jenkins, D. S.; King, J. A.; Jackson, E. D.

    1975-01-01

    Two-phase, low-speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers driven by electric motors and applicable to the tug engine were designed and constructed. The oxygen inducer was tested in liquid and two-phase oxygen. Its head and flow performance were approximately as designed, and it was able to accelerate to full speed in 3 seconds and produce its design flow and head. The analysis of the two-phase data indicated that the inducer was able to pump with vapor volume fractions in excess of 60 percent. The pump met all of its requirements (duration of runs and number of starts) to demonstrate its mechanical integrity.

  16. Small Scale Turbopump Manufacturing Technology and Material Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Erika; Morgan, Kristin; Wells, Doug; Zimmerman, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As part of an internal research and development project, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a high specific impulse 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine testbed with the capability to throttle 10:1. A Fuel Turbopump (FTP) with the ability to operate across a speed range of 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm was developed and analyzed. This small size and flight-like Fuel Turbopump has completed the design and analysis phase and is currently in the manufacturing phase. This paper highlights the manufacturing and processes efforts to fabricate an approximately 20-lb turbopump with small flow passages, intricately bladed components and approximately 3-in diameter impellers. As a result of the small scale and tight tolerances of the hardware on this turbopump, several unique manufacturing and material challenges were encountered. Some of the technologies highlighted in this paper include the use of powder metallurgy technology to manufacture small impellers, electron beam welding of a turbine blisk shroud, and casting challenges. The use of risk reduction efforts such as non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation (NDE), fractography, material testing, and component spin testing are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Design and development of a direct injection system for cryogenic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutumba, Angela; Cheeseman, Kevin; Clarke, Henry; Wen, Dongsheng

    2018-04-01

    The cryogenic engine has received increasing attention due to its promising potential as a zero-emission engine. In this study, a new robust liquid nitrogen injection system was commissioned and set up to perform high-pressure injections into an open vessel. The system is used for quasi-steady flow tests used for the characterisation of the direct injection process for cryogenic engines. An electro-hydraulic valve actuator provides intricate control of the valve lift, with a minimum cycle time of 3 ms and a frequency of up to 20 Hz. With additional sub-cooling, liquid phase injections from 14 to 94 bar were achieved. Results showed an increase in the injected mass with the increase in pressure, and decrease in temperature. The injected mass was also observed to increases linearly with the valve lift. Better control of the injection process, minimises the number of variables, providing more comparable and repeatable sets of data. Implications of the results on the engine performance were also discussed.

  18. Engineering Analysis Studies for Preliminary Design of Lightweight Cryogenic Hydrogen Tanks in UAV Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Palko, Joseph L.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Mital, Subodh K.; Smith, Lizalyn M.; Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Hunter, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A series of engineering analysis studies were conducted to investigate the potential application of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy composites and polymer cross-linked silica aerogels in cryogenic hydrogen storage tank designs. This assessment focused on the application of these materials in spherical tank designs for unmanned aeronautic vehicles with mission durations of 14 days. Two cryogenic hydrogen tank design concepts were considered: a vacuum-jacketed design and a sandwiched construction with an aerogel insulating core. Analyses included thermal and structural analyses of the tank designs as well as an analysis of hydrogen diffusion to specify the material permeability requirements. The analyses also provided material property targets for the continued development of cross-linked aerogels and nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy composites for cryogenic storage tank applications. The results reveal that a sandwiched construction with an aerogel core is not a viable design solution for a 14-day mission. A vacuum-jacketed design approach was shown to be far superior to an aerogel. Aerogel insulation may be feasible for shorter duration missions. The results also reveal that the application of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy should be limited to the construction of outer tanks in a vacuum-jacketed design, since a graphite/epoxy inner tank does not provide a significant weight savings over aluminum and since the ability of nanoclay-enhanced graphite/epoxy to limit hydrogen permeation is still in question.

  19. Novelty detection methods for online health monitoring and post data analysis of turbopumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hu; Niaoqing, Hu; Xinpeng, Zhang; Fengshou, Gu; Ming, Gao

    2013-01-01

    As novelty detection works when only normal data are available, it is of considerable promise for health monitoring in cases lacking fault samples and prior knowledge. We present two novelty detection methods for health monitoring of turbopumps in large-scale liquid propellant rocket engines. The first method is the adaptive Gaussian threshold model. This method is designed to monitor the vibration of the turbopumps online because it has minimal computational complexity and is easy for implementation in real time. The second method is the one-class support vector machine (OCSVM) which is developed for post analysis of historical vibration signals. Via post analysis the method not only confirms the online monitoring results but also provides diagnostic results so that faults from sensors are separated from those actually from the turbopumps. Both of these two methods are validated to be efficient for health monitoring of the turbopumps.

  20. An overview of the turbopump development programme in the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s aerospace systems research group

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smyth, J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Development Programme in the University of KwaZulu-Natal?s Aerospace Systems Research Group Jonathan Smyth, Luke Philogene, Jeffery Bindon, Michael Brooks and Graham Smith School of Mechanical Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041, South... turbopump design capability would be vital to any future South African commercial launch initiative. In this context, the University of KwaZulu-Natal?s Aerospace Systems Research Group, located in the School of Engineering, has initiated a turbopump...

  1. Application of the Stirling engine driven with cryogenic exergy of LNG (liquefied natural gas) for the production of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczygieł, Ireneusz; Stanek, Wojciech; Szargut, Jan

    2016-01-01

    LNG (liquefied natural gas) delivered by means of sea-ships is pressurized and then regasified before its introduction to the system of pipelines. The utilization of cryogenic exergy of LNG for electricity production without combustion of any its portion is analyzed. For the conversion of LNG cryogenic exergy into electricity, the Stirling engine is proposed to be applied. The theoretical thermodynamic model of Stirling engine has been applied. This model is used to investigate the influence of pinch temperature in heat exchangers, engine compression ratio and dead volumes ratios on the thermodynamic parameters of the Stirling engine. The results of simulation represent the input data for investigations of thermodynamic performance of the proposed system. In order to evaluate the thermodynamic performance of the proposed process, an exergy analysis has been applied. The exergy efficiency and influence of design and operational parameters on exergy losses are determined for each of the proposed system configurations. The obtained results represent the background for advanced exergy-based analyses, including thermo-ecological cost. - Highlights: • Application of Stirling engine in LNG regasification. • Thermodynamic model of Stirling engine for cryogenic exergy recovery is applied. • Sensitivity analysis of operational parameters on system behaviour is applied. • Exergy analysis is conducted.

  2. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  3. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  4. Cryogenic Propulsion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants can enhance NASA missions. This project will establish that modern cryogenic storage technologies will allow the use of cryogenic propulsion...

  5. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  6. Cryogenics theory, processes and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Allyson E

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150 -C, -238 -F or 123 K) and the behaviour of materials at those temperatures. This book presents current research from across the globe in the study of cryogenics, including the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of light weight alloys; the application of Fiber Bragg grating sensors at cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic grinding; liquid oxygen magnetohydrodynamics; and, genetic engineering techniques used to improve tolerance to cryopreservation.

  7. Turbulence Modelling and Cavitation Dynamics in Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mani, K.V.; Cervone, A.; Hickey, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic system approach for the modeling of fluid flow in microchannels to be used in thrust control applications. A micro-resistojet fabricated using MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technology has been selected for the analysis. The device operates by vaporizing a liquid

  8. Carbon-carbon turbopump concept for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, David M.

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is placing high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio in the development of a practical high-performance nuclear rocket. The turbopump design is driven by these goals. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is from rapid heating of the propellant from 180 R to thousands of degrees in the particle bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. A high-performance approach is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. Carbon-carbon components are used throughout the TPA hot section to obtain the high-temperature capability. Several carbon-carbon components are in development including structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines and many other turbomachinery applications.

  9. A fully coupled variable properties thermohydraulic model for a cryogenic hydrostatic journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Hendricks, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The goal set forth here is to continue the work started by Braun et al. (1984-1985) and present an integrated analysis of the behavior of the two row, 20 staggered pockets, hydrostatic cryogenic bearing used by the turbopumps of the Space Shuttle main engine. The variable properties Reynolds equation is fully coupled with the two-dimensional fluid film energy equation. The three-dimensional equations of the shaft and bushing model the boundary conditions of the fluid film energy equation. The effects of shaft eccentricity, angular velocity, and inertia pressure drops at pocket edge are incorporated in the model. Their effects on the bearing fluid properties, load carrying capacity, mass flow, pressure, velocity, and temperature form the ultimate object of this paper.

  10. Experimental study on friction and wear behaviour of amorphous carbon coatings for mechanical seals in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlei; Jia, Qian; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shaopeng

    2012-10-01

    The service life and the reliability of contact mechanical seal are directly affected by the wear of seal pairs (rotor vs. stator), especially under the cryogenic environment in liquid rocket engine turbopumps. Because of the lower friction and wear rate, amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings are the promising protective coatings of the seal pairs for contact mechanical seal. In this paper, a-C coatings were deposited on 9Cr18 by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. The tribological performances of the specimen were tested under three sealed fluid conditions (air, water and liquid nitrogen). The results show that the coatings could endure the cryogenic temperature while the friction coefficients decrease with the increased contact load. Under the same contact condition, the friction coefficient of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen is higher than that in water and that they are in air. The friction coefficients of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen range from 0.10 to 0.15. In the cryogenic environment, the coatings remain their low specific wear rates (0.9 × 10-6 to 1.8 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1). The results provide an important reference for designing a water lubricated bearing or a contact mechanical seal under the cryogenic environment that is both reliable and has longevity.

  11. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  12. Deep Throttle Turbopump Technology Design Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinzburg, Adiel; Williams, Morgan; Ferguson, Tom; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to increase the throttling range of turbopumps from 30 to 120% of the design value, while maintaining high performance levels. Details are given on wide flow range issues, H-Q characteristics, stall characteristics, energy levels, pressure fluctuations at impeller exit, WFR impeller characteristics, commercial diffuser pumps, slotted or tandem vanes, leading edge characteristics, leading edge models, throat models, diffusion passage models, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodologies, and CFD flow cases.

  13. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  14. Modeling and analysis of chill and fill processes for the cryogenic storage and transfer engineering development unit tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Cartagena, W.; Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    NASA's future missions may require long-term storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU), a NASA in-house effort supported by both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Glenn Research Center, is a cryogenic fluid management (CFM) test article that primarily serves as a manufacturing pathfinder and a risk reduction task for a future CFM payload. The EDU test article comprises a flight-like tank, internal components, insulation, and attachment struts. The EDU is designed to perform integrated passive thermal control performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a test-like vacuum environment. A series of tests, with LH2 as a testing fluid, was conducted at Test Stand 300 at MSFC during the summer of 2014. The objective of this effort was to develop a thermal/fluid model for evaluating the thermodynamic behavior of the EDU tank during the chill and fill processes. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, an MSFC in-house general-purpose computer program for flow network analysis, was utilized to model and simulate the chill and fill portion of the testing. The model contained the LH2 supply source, feed system, EDU tank, and vent system. The test setup, modeling description, and comparison of model predictions with the test data are presented.

  15. Design, implementation, and testing of a cryogenic loading capability on an engineering neutron diffractometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, T R; Krishnan, V B; Clausen, B; Sisneros, T; Livescu, V; Brown, D W; Bourke, M A M; Vaidyanathan, R

    2010-06-01

    A novel capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during loading at cryogenic temperatures on the spectrometer for materials research at temperature and stress at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This capability allowed for the application of dynamic compressive forces of up to 250 kN on standard samples controlled at temperatures between 300 and 90 K. The approach comprised of cooling thermally isolated compression platens that in turn conductively cooled the sample in an aluminum vacuum chamber which was nominally transparent to the incident and diffracted neutrons. The cooling/heat rate and final temperature were controlled by regulating the flow of liquid nitrogen in channels inside the platens that were connected through bellows to the mechanical actuator of the load frame and by heaters placed on the platens. Various performance parameters of this system are reported here. The system was used to investigate deformation in Ni-Ti-Fe shape memory alloys at cryogenic temperatures and preliminary results are presented.

  16. Polymers at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Shao-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Kalia and Fu's novel monograph covers cryogenic treatment, properties and applications of cryo-treated polymer materials. Written by numerous international experts, the twelve chapters in this book offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the latest findings and developments, as well as an outlook on the field. Cryogenic technology has seen remarkable progress in the past few years and especially cryogenic properties of polymers are attracting attention through new breakthroughs in space, superconducting, magnetic and electronic techniques. This book is a valuable resource for researchers, educators, engineers and graduate students in the field and at technical institutions.

  17. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  18. Cavitation instabilities and rotordynamic effects in turbopumps and hydroturbines turbopump and inducer cavitation, experiments and design

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a detailed approach to the physics, fluid dynamics, modeling, experimentation and numerical simulation of cavitation phenomena, with special emphasis on cavitation-induced instabilities and their implications on the design and operation of high performance turbopumps and hydraulic turbines. The first part covers the fundamentals (nucleation, dynamics, thermodynamic effects, erosion) and forms of cavitation (attached cavitation, cloud cavitation, supercavitation, vortex cavitation) relevant to hydraulic turbomachinery, illustrates modern experimental techniques for the characterization, visualization and analysis of cavitating flows, and introduces the main aspects of the hydrodynamic design and performance of axial inducers, centrifugal turbopumps and hydo-turbines. The second part focuses on the theoretical modeling, experimental analysis, and practical control of cavitation-induced fluid-dynamic and rotordynamic instabilities of hydraulic turbomachinery, with special emphasis on cavitating...

  19. The Development of Titanium Alloys for Application in the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halchak, John A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Zimmerman, Frank R.

    2010-01-01

    The high-strength-to-weight ratio of titanium alloys, particularly at cryogenic temperatures, make them attractive for application in rocket engines - offering the potential of superior performance while minimizing component weight. This was particularly attractive for rotating components, such as pump impellers, where titanium alloys presented the potential to achieve a major advance in rotational tip speed, with a reduction in stages and resultant saving in pump weight and complexity. The investigation into titanium alloys for application in cryogenic turbopumps began in the early 1960's. However, it was found that the reactivity of titanium limited applications and produced unique processing challenges. Specialized chemical compositions and processing techniques had to be developed. A substantial amount of material properties testing and trials in experimental turbopumps occurred, ultimately leading to application in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. One particular alloy stood out for use at liquid hydrogen temperatures, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI. This alloy was employed for several critical components. This presentation deals with the development effort, the challenges that were encountered and operational experiences with Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI in the SSME.

  20. Advances in Cryogenic Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, R. F.

    During the past 50 years, the use of digital computers has significantly influenced the design and analysis of cryogenic systems. At the time when the first Cryogenic Engineering Conference was held, thermodynamic data were presented in graphical or tabular form (the "steam table" format), whereas thermodynamic data for cryogenic system design is computer generated today. The thermal analysis of cryogenic systems in the 1950s involved analytical solutions, graphical solutions, and relatively simple finite-difference approaches. These approaches have been supplanted by finite-element numerical programs which readily solve complicated thermal problems that could not be solved easily using the methods of the 1950s. In distillation column design, the use of the McCabe-Thiele graphical method for determination of the number of theoretical plates has been replaced by numerical methods that allow consideration of several different components in the feed and product streams.

  1. High-temperature turbopump assembly for space nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a practical, high-performance nuclear rocket by the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program places high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio. The operating parameters arising from these goals drive the propellant-pump design. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is effected by rapid heating of the propellant from 100 K to thousands of degrees in the particle-bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. One approach to achieve high performance is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. The high-temperature capability is obtained by using carbon-carbon throughout the TPA hot section. Carbon-carbon components in development include structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines plus a wide variety of other turbomachinery applications.

  2. Cryogenic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourches, N.; Abbon, P.; Delagnes, E.; Le Meur, L.P.

    1995-04-01

    This study presents the cryogenic electronics, which is used in high energy physics with appropriate device. It discuss their ability to hardening against ionization radiation and neutrons. Some partial results on the operation of microelectronics devices at cryogenic temperature are given. (TEC). 33 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  4. Throttling Characteristics of the RL10 Derivative Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine -- Demo 1.6 and 1.7 Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Matthew K.; Hulka, James; Adamski, Walt; Brown, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) is a deep throttling cryogenic Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) technology development demonstrator based on the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) RL10 engine. Previous testing on this engine occurred during 2006 as Demo 1.0, then Demo 1.5 in 2007, Demo 1.6 in 2008 and finally Demo 1.7 in 2010. A review of Demo 1.0, 1.5, and preliminary results of 1.6 were reported in previous JANNAF papers. Demo 1.6 was tested at the PWR E-6 test facility in November 2008. The primary goal of this series was to mitigate low frequency combustion instability observed at low power levels. To mitigate the chug, the Demo 1.6 injector was modified from the previous configurations to include an approximately 0.050 inch thick teflon-type spray-on insulation to reduce heat transfer to the LOX manifold, which was believed to be a significant contributor to the low power instability. In addition, gaseous helium injection into the LOX manifold was used as a means to stabilize the system. Also explored in this test series was mitigation for a low power 1 Hz fuel system oscillation caused by sub-critical hydrogen boiling in the chamber cooling jacket. Reduced area gas venturis were utilized to avoid the 1 Hz fuel-size oscillation by keeping the cooling jacket supercritical down to lower engine power levels. Demo 1.7 began testing in March 2010. Its primary objectives were to demonstrate closed loop control capability on mixture ratio and chamber pressure, start to lower power levels and increased throttling ramp rates. Secondary test objectives that are discussed include multiple engine starts, higher mixture ratio excursions and additional time at low power level. While the complete test series and data reduction is not yet complete for Demo 1.7, an overview and up-to-date status is provided.

  5. RHIC cryogenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iarocci, M.A. E-mail: iarocci@bnl.gov; Brown, D.; Sondericker, J.; Wu, K.C.; Benson, J.; Farah, Y.; Lac, C.; Morgillo, A.; Nicoletti, A.; Quimby, E.; Rank, J.; Rehak, M.; Werner, A

    2003-03-01

    An integrated helium cryogenic system was designed with the specific performance goal of cooling and refrigerating the cryogenic magnets to below their nominal operating temperature. These magnets make up the steering and focusing elements for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In addition to meeting the accelerator demands, reliability, flexibility, safety, and ease of operation were key considerations during the design phase of the project. The refrigerator, with a capacity of 25 kW at about 4 K, was originally designed to match the load for the Colliding Beam Accelerator Project. The existing refrigerator, along with its complimentary warm compressor system was reconfigured slightly to meet the cooling process cycle design for RHIC. The original VAX based process control system was also adapted for RHIC, and later expanded upon to integrate a new programmable logic controller based ring resident control system, hence forming a common system to monitor and control all cryogenic components.

  6. Cryogenics; Criogenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C.; Jimenez D, J.; Cejudo A, J.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Cryogenics is one of these technologies which contributes to scientific research that supports to the industry in the following benefits: 1. Storage ability and a great quantity of dense gases with cryogenic liquid which is found at high pressure. 2. Production ability at low cost with high purity gases through distillation or condensation. 3. Ability to use low temperatures in the refrigerating materials or alteration of the physical properties. This technology is used for reprocessing of those short and long half life radioactive wastes which always have been required that to be separated with classical methods. In this text we report the radioactive wastes separation by more sophisticated methods but more quickly and reliable. (Author)

  7. Computing Thermal Effects of Cavitation in Cryogenic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Dash, Sanford M.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements a numerical model of thermal effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The model and program were developed for use in designing and predicting the performances of turbopumps for cryogenic fluids. Prior numerical models used for this purpose do not account for either the variability of properties of cryogenic fluids or the thermal effects (especially, evaporative cooling) involved in cavitation. It is important to account for both because in a cryogenic fluid, the thermal effects of cavitation are substantial, and the cavitation characteristics are altered by coupling between the variable fluid properties and the phase changes involved in cavitation. The present model accounts for both thermal effects and variability of properties by incorporating a generalized representation of the properties of cryogenic fluids into a generalized compressible-fluid formulation for a cavitating pump. The model has been extensively validated for liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Using the available data on the properties of these fluids, the model has been shown to predict accurate temperature-depression values.

  8. Operation of a cryogenic rocket engine an outline with down-to-earth and up-to-space remarks

    CERN Document Server

    Kitsche, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the operational aspects of the rocket engine on a test facility. It will be useful to engineers and scientists who are in touch with the test facility. To aerospace students it shall provide an insight of the job on the test facility. And to interest readers it shall provide an impression of this thrilling area of aerospace.

  9. Cryogenic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, G

    2000-01-01

    Some of the most significant developments in cryogenic photodetectors are presented. In particular, the main characteristics of microbolometers involving Transition Edge- and NTD-sensors and offering resolutions of a few eV in the keV range, superconducting tunnel junction detectors with resolutions of the order of 10 eV or offering position sensitivity, and infrared bolometers with recent developments towards matrix detectors are discussed. Some of the recent achievements using large mass bolometers for gamma and neutron discriminating detectors, and future prospects of single photon detection in the far infrared using Single Electron Transistor devices are also presented.

  10. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  11. Predicted performance of an integrated modular engine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Michael; Felder, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Space vehicle propulsion systems are traditionally comprised of a cluster of discrete engines, each with its own set of turbopumps, valves, and a thrust chamber. The Integrated Modular Engine (IME) concept proposes a vehicle propulsion system comprised of multiple turbopumps, valves, and thrust chambers which are all interconnected. The IME concept has potential advantages in fault-tolerance, weight, and operational efficiency compared with the traditional clustered engine configuration. The purpose of this study is to examine the steady-state performance of an IME system with various components removed to simulate fault conditions. An IME configuration for a hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle propulsion system with four sets of turbopumps and eight thrust chambers has been modeled using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) program. The nominal steady-state performance is simulated, as well as turbopump thrust chamber and duct failures. The impact of component failures on system performance is discussed in the context of the system's fault tolerant capabilities.

  12. Fuel/Oxidizer Injector Modeling in Sub- and Super-Critical Regimes for Deep Throttling Cryogenic Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate CFD modeling of fuel/oxidizer injection and combustion is needed to design and analyze liquid rocket engines. Currently, however, there is no mature...

  13. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  14. The J-2X Fuel Turbopump - Turbine Nozzle Low Cycle Fatigue Acceptance Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lakiesha V.; Duke, Gregory C.; Newman, Wesley R.; Reynolds, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The J-2X Fuel Turbopump (FTP) turbine, which drives the pump that feeds hydrogen to the J-2X engine for main combustion, is based on the J-2S design developed in the early 1970 s. Updated materials and manufacturing processes have been incorporated to meet current requirements. This paper addresses an analytical concern that the J-2X Fuel Turbine Nozzle Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) analysis did not meet safety factor requirements per program structural assessment criteria. High strains in the nozzle airfoil during engine transients were predicted to be caused by thermally induced stresses between the vane hub, vane shroud, and airfoil. The heritage J-2 nozzle was of a similar design and experienced cracks in the same area where analysis predicted cracks in the J-2X design. Redesign options that did not significantly impact the overall turbine configuration were unsuccessful. An approach using component tests and displacement controlled fracture mechanics analysis to evaluate LCF crack initiation and growth rate was developed. The results of this testing and analysis were used to define the level of inspection on development engine test units. The programmatic impact of developing crack initiation/growth rate/arrest data was significant for the J-2X program. Final Design Certification Review acceptance logic will ultimately be developed utilizing this test and analytical data.

  15. Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Disk for Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Mike; Genge, Gary; Kiser, Doug

    2000-01-01

    NASA has recently completed testing of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC), integrally bladed disk (blisk) for rocket engine turbopumps. The turbopump's main function is to bring propellants from the tank to the combustion chamber at optimal pressures, temperatures, and flow rates. Advantages realized by using CMC blisks are increases in safety by increasing temperature margins and decreasing costs by increasing turbopump performance. A multidisciplinary team, involving materials, design, structural analysis, nondestructive inspection government, academia, and industry experts, was formed to accomplish the 4.5 year effort. This article will review some of the background and accomplishments of the CMC Blisk Program relative to the benefits of this technology.

  16. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Novel Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System for Turbopumps, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AI Signal Research, Inc. proposes to develop a Non-Intrusive Vibration Measurement System (NI-VMS) for turbopumps which will provide effective on-board/off-board...

  18. The design of a kerosene turbopump for a South African commercial launch vehicle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snedden, Glen C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available hypothetical commercial launch vehicle capable of inserting 50-500kg payloads into 500km sun synchronous orbit. A preliminary design is presented with the focus on the turbopump impeller geometry and its predicted performance....

  19. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  20. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan - Final.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  1. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  2. Cryogen Safety Course 8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cryogenics (from the Greek word κρvoζ, meaning frost or icy cold) is the study of the behavior of matter at very cold temperatures. The purpose of this course is to provide trainees with an introduction to cryogen use, the hazards and potential accidents related to cryogen systems, cryogen safety components, and the requirements that govern the design and use of cryogen systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The knowledge you gain will help you keep your workplace safe for yourself and your coworkers.

  3. Booster cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, D.W.; Weitkamp, W.G.; Will, D.I.

    1984-01-01

    During this past year the authors have ordered a helium refrigerator, developed cryostat specifications and come to understand better some of the potential problems to avoid in helium distribution systems. The helium refrigerator consists of a Koch Process Systems 2800HR with three type RS screw compressors. The 2800HR has two dry expansion engines, each with two 3'' diameter pistons, and one wet expansion engine with a single 2'' diameter piston. It has guaranteed capacities at 4.5 0 K of 440 W without liquid nitrogen precool and of 510 W with liquid nitrogen precool which compare favorably with the estimated need of 300 W. At present the authors have nearly completed material, technique and performance specifications for their cryostats, pending a decision on bayonet design, and the authors are beginning preliminary specifications for their liquid helium distribution manifold and transfer siphons

  4. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, D. [Fermilab; Adamowski, M. [Fermilab; Bremer, J. [CERN; Delaney, M. [Fermilab; Diaz, A. [CERN; Doubnik, R. [Fermilab; Haaf, K. [Fermilab; Hentschel, S. [Fermilab; Norris, B. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the models of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  5. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Bremer, J; Delany, M; Diaz, A; Doubnik, R; Haaf, K; Henstchel, S; Norris, B; Voirin, E

    2017-01-01

    The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

  6. Cryogenic turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    Understanding turbulence is vital in astrophysics, geophysics and many engineering applications, with thermal convection playing a central role. I shall describe progress that has recently been made in understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon by making controlled experiments using low-temperature helium, and a brief account of the frontier topic of superfluid turbulence will also be given. CERN might be able to play a unique role in experiments to probe these two problems.

  7. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  8. Cryogenic and Vacuum Compatible Metrology Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR project for NASA, Flexure Engineering of Greenbelt, MD will leverage the work we did in our current SBIR project entitled: Cryogenic Optical...

  9. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  10. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  11. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  12. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  13. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  14. Uprated OMS engine for upper stage propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, William C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a pre-development component demonstration program on the use of a gas generator-driven turbopump that increases the Space Shuttle's Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) operating pressure are given. Tests and analysis confirm the the capability of the concept to meet or exceed performance and life requirements. Storable propellant upper stage concepts are also discussed.

  15. Overview of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility cryogenic system

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, David; Bremer, Johan; Delaney, Michael; Aurelien, Diaz; Doubnik, Roza; Haaf, Kevin; Hentschel, Steve; Norris, Barry; Voirin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration is developing a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located one mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, detectors will be located inside four cryostats filled with a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, at the level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) is developing the conventional facilities and cryogenics infrastructure supporting this experiment. The cryogenics system is composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity, and Internal cryogenics. It will be engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution highlights the main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. It presents its performance, functional requirements and modes of operations. It also details the status of the design, ...

  16. Terry Turbopump Expanded Operating Band Full-Scale Component and Basic Science Detailed Test Plan-Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.; Osborn, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Severe Accident Analysis Dept.

    2017-08-01

    This document details the milestone approach to define the true operating limitations (margins) of the Terry turbopump systems used in the nuclear industry for Milestone 3 (full-scale component experiments) and Milestone 4 (Terry turbopump basic science experiments) efforts. The overall multinational-sponsored program creates the technical basis to: (1) reduce and defer additional utility costs, (2) simplify plant operations, and (3) provide a better understanding of the true margin which could reduce overall risk of operations.

  17. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  18. Experimental Determination of the Dynamic Hydraulic Transfer Function for the J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump. Part One; Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Tom; Patel, Sandeep; Lee, Erik; Karon, Dave

    2011-01-01

    An advanced methodology for extracting the hydraulic dynamic pump transfer matrix (Yp) for a cavitating liquid rocket engine turbopump inducer+impeller has been developed. The transfer function is required for integrated vehicle pogo stability analysis as well as optimization of local inducer pumping stability. Laboratory pulsed subscale waterflow test of the J-2X oxygen turbo pump is introduced and our new extraction method applied to the data collected. From accurate measures of pump inlet and discharge perturbational mass flows and pressures, and one-dimensional flow models that represents complete waterflow loop physics, we are able to derive Yp and hence extract the characteristic pump parameters: compliance, pump gain, impedance, mass flow gain. Detailed modeling is necessary to accurately translate instrument plane measurements to the pump inlet and discharge and extract Yp. We present the MSFC Dynamic Lump Parameter Fluid Model Framework and describe critical dynamic component details. We report on fit minimization techniques, cost (fitness) function derivation, and resulting model fits to our experimental data are presented. Comparisons are made to alternate techniques for spatially translating measurement stations to actual pump inlet and discharge.

  19. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  20. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  1. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Thermodynamic Effect of Cavitation in Cryogenic Inducer Using Singularity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor production in cavitation extracts the latent heat of evaporation from the surrounding liquid, which decreases the local temperature, and hence the local vapor pressure in the vicinity of cavity. This is called thermodynamic/thermal effect of cavitation and leads to the good suction performance of cryogenic turbopumps. We have already established the simple analysis of partially cavitating flow with the thermodynamic effect, where the latent heat extraction and the heat transfer between the cavity and the ambient fluid are taken into account. In the present study, we carry out the analysis for cavitating inducer and compare it with the experimental data available from literatures using Freon R-114 and liquid nitrogen. It is found that the present analysis can simulate fairly well the thermodynamic effect of cavitation and some modification of the analysis considering the real fluid properties, that is, saturation characteristic, is favorable for more qualitative agreement.

  3. Novel Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System for Turbopumps Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ASRI proposes to develop an advanced and commercially viable Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System (NI-VMS) which can provide effective on-line/off-line engine...

  4. Adsorption in cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravex, A.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main fields for application of physical adsorption in cryogenics: cryopumping and refrigeration. Cryopumping has known many developments but is now almost industrial. Basic principles, applications and realizations are presented, for instance, in nuclear fusion and particle physics. For refrigeration developments and realizations are rare but present potential space applications [fr

  5. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  6. The European Graduate Course in Cryogenics hosted at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Tavian

    2010-01-01

    The “liquid helium” week of the European Graduate Course in Cryogenics was held at CERN from 30 August to 3 September 2010. This course scheduled annually since 2008 is a common teaching project of the Universities of Technology of Dresden, Wroclaw and Trondheim. It is focused on liquid natural gas, hydrogen and helium cryogenics. Attending students were carefully selected, and will take an examination giving ECTS credits for their academic curriculum.   This year, as Wroclaw University of Technology was already heavily involved in organising the International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC), it requested that the “liquid helium” week to be exceptionally held at CERN. While this is certainly a good choice from the point of view of large cryogenic helium systems, with the large cryoplants cooling the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments, CERN has only acted as host laboratory organizing the course classes and visits, and the teaching and i...

  7. Use of PROFIBUS for cryogenic instrumentation at XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, T.; Bolte, J.; Bozhko, Y.; Clausen, M.; Escherich, K.; Korth, O.; Penning, J.; Rickens, H.; Schnautz, T.; Schoeneburg, B.; Zhirnov, A.

    2017-12-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) is a research facility and since December 2016 under commissioning at DESY in Hamburg. The XFEL superconducting accelerator is 1.5 km long and contains 96 superconducting accelerator modules. The control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the XFEL cryogenic system consisting of the XFEL refrigerator, cryogenic distribution systems and the XFEL accelerator. The PROFIBUS fieldbus technology is the key technology of the cryogenic instrumentation and the link to the control system. More than 650 PROFIBUS nodes are implemented in the different parts of the XFEL cryogenic facilities. The presentation will give an overview of PROFIBUS installation in these facilities regarding engineering, possibilities of diagnostics, commissioning and the first operating experience.

  8. Cryogenic Vacuum Insulation for Vessels and Piping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, A.; Fesmire, J.; Johnson, W.; Minnick, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, with proper materials selection and execution, can offer the highest levels of thermal performance. Three areas of consideration are vital to achieve the optimum result: materials, representative test conditions, and engineering approach for the particular application. Deficiency in one of these three areas can prevent optimum performance and lead to severe inefficiency. Materials of interest include micro-fiberglass, multilayer insulation, and composite arrangements. Cylindrical liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry methods were used. The need for standard thermal conductivity data is addressed through baseline testing. Engineering analysis and design factors such as layer thickness, density, and practicality are also considered.

  9. Operation of the main feedwater system turbopump following plant trip with total failure of the auxiliary feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas Alvaro, A.M. de; Rosa Martinez, B. de la; Alcaide, F.; Toledano Camara, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Auxiliary Feedwater System (AF) is a safeguard system which has been designed to supply feedwater to the steam generators, cool the primary system and remove decay heat from the reactor when the main feedwater pumps fail due to loss of power or any other reason. Thus, when plant trip occurs, the AF system pumps start up automatically, allowing removal of decay heat from the reactor. However, even though this system (2 motor-driven pumps and 1 turbopump) is highly reliable, injection of water to the steam generators must be ensured when it fails completely. To do this, if plant trip has not been caused by loss of off site power or failure of the Main Feedwater System (FW) turbopumps, one of these turbopumps can be used to achieve removal of decay heat. Since a large amount of steam is consumed by these turbopumps, an analysis has been performed to determine whether one of these pumps can be used and what actions are necessary to inject water into the steam generators. Results show that, for the case in question, a FW turbopump can be used to remove decay heat from the reactor. (author)

  10. CRYOGENIC PROCESSES IN LOESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Konishchev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to the analysis of the genetic nature of the mineral substance of loessial rocks. At the present time, the prevailing view on this issue is the eolian accumulation of loess, while the influence of other factors of formation has not been practically taken into account. However, loess accumulation can be explained by other mechanisms, e.g., active processes of cryogenic weathering under a very harsh climate. The latter concept is based on the results of analysis of wedge-shaped structures in loess thickness, as well as numerous data of spore-pollen, microfaunistic, and other types of analysis. Further developing concepts of loess formation, the authors made an attempt to assess the degree of influence of cryogenic processes on the composition and structure of loess. The proposed method is based on a differentiated analysis of the distribution of the main rock-forming minerals (quartz and feldspars along the granulometric spectrum. Two criteria are proposed − the coefficient of cryogenic contrast and the heavy fraction coefficient (i.e., the coefficient of distribution of heavy minerals − which allow determining the degree of participation of cryogenic processes, as well as aeolian and aqueous sedimentation, in the formation of loessial rocks. This method was used to study two sections of loessial thickness − in the south of the Russian Plain and within the Loess Plateau of China. The results of the study revealed the role of cryogenic factors in the formation of the composition of the loess horizons of soil-loess sequences of different territories. Particularly clearly the effect of cryogenesis was manifested in the loess section in the south of the Russian Plain. In the section of the Loess Plateau, only the youngest deposits of the last formation stage are affected by cryogenesis. It follows that not only within the long-term periglacial permafrost zone, but also under the conditions of seasonal freezing

  11. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament

  12. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  13. Proceedings of cryogenic optical systems and instruments IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melugin, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of Cryogenic Optical systems and Instruments IV. Topics covered include: Cryogenic System Design and Optical Technology; Cryogenic Instruments, Sensors, and Detectors; Space Cryogenic Dewars and Coolers; and Cryogenic Mechanisms, Testing, and Structures

  14. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of cryogens in spacecraft propellant...

  15. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  16. Interaction of Acoustic Waves with a Cryogenic Nitrogen Jet at Sub- and Supercritical Pressures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chehroudi, B

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the nature of the interaction between acoustic waves and liquid fuel jets in rocket engines, cryogenic liquid nitrogen is injected into a room temperature high-pressure chamber...

  17. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  18. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  19. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  20. Development of turbopump cavitation performance test facility and the test of inducer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Dong Kee; Kim, Chun Tak; Yoon, Min Soo; Cha, Bong Jun; Kim, Jin Han; Yang, Soo Seok

    2001-01-01

    A performance test facility for turbopump inducer cavitation was developed and the inducer cavitation performance tests were performed. Major components of the performance test facility are driving unit, test section, piping, water tank, and data acquisition and control system. The maximum of testing capability of this facility are as follows: flow rate - 30kg/s; pressure - 13 bar, rotational speed - 10,000rpm. This cavitation test facility is characterized by the booster pump installed at the outlet of the pump that extends the flow rate range, and by the pressure control system that makes the line pressure down to vapor pressure. The vacuum pump is used for removing the dissolved air in the water as well as the line pressure. Performance tests were carried out and preliminary data of test model inducer were obtained. The cavitation performance test and cavitation bubble flow visualization were also made. This facility is originally designed for turbopump inducer performance test and cavitation test. However it can be applied to the pump impeller performance test in the future with little modification

  1. Cryogenics maintenance strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzat, Fabiola

    2012-09-01

    ALMA is an interferometer composed of 66 independent systems, with specific maintenance requirements for each subsystem. To optimize the observation time and reduce downtime maintenance, requirements are very demanding. One subsystem with high maintenance efforts is cryogenics and vacuum. To organize the maintenance, the Cryogenic and Vacuum department is using and implementing different tools. These are monitoring and problem reporting systems and CMMS. This leads to different maintenance approaches: Preventive Maintenance, Corrective Maintenance and Condition Based Maintenance. In order to coordinate activities with other departments the preventive maintenance schedule is kept as flexible as systems allow. To cope with unavoidable failures, the team has to be prepared to work under any condition with the spares on time. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) will help to manage inventory control for reliable spare part handling, the correct record of work orders and traceability of maintenance activities. For an optimized approach the department is currently evaluating where preventive or condition based maintenance applies to comply with the individual system demand. Considering the change from maintenance contracts to in-house maintenance will help to minimize costs and increase availability of parts. Due to increased number of system and tasks the cryo team needs to grow. Training of all staff members is mandatory, in depth knowledge must be built up by doing complex maintenance activities in the Cryo group, use of advanced computerized metrology systems.

  2. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    for applications at sub-ambient to cryogenic temperatures. A growing need for energy efficiency and cryogenic applications is creating a worldwide demand for improved thermal insulation systems for low temperatures. The need for thermal characterization of these systems and materials raises a corresponding need for insulation test standards and thermal data targeted for cryogenic-vacuum applications. Such standards have a strong correlation to energy, transportation, and environment and the advancement of new materials technologies in these areas. In conjunction with this project, two new standards on cryogenic insulation were recently published by ASTM International: C1774 and C740. Following the requirements of NPR 7120.10, Technical Standards for NASA Programs and Projects, the appropriate information in this report can be provided to the NASA Chief Engineer as input for NASA's annual report to NIST, as required by OMB Circular No. A-119, describing NASA's use of voluntary consensus standards and participation in the development of voluntary consensus standards and bodies.

  3. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  4. Performance evaluation of various cryogenic energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Rodrigo F.; Pedro, Hugo T.C.; Koury, Ricardo N.N.; Machado, Luiz; Coimbra, Carlos F.M.; Porto, Matheus P.

    2015-01-01

    This work compares various CES (cryogenic energy storage) systems as possible candidates to store energy from renewable sources. Mitigating solar and wind power variability and its direct effect on local grid stability are already a substantial technological bottleneck for increasing market penetration of these technologies. In this context, CES systems represent low-cost solutions for variability that can be used to set critical power ramp rates. We investigate the different thermodynamic and engineering constraints that affect the design of CES systems, presenting theoretical simulations, indicating that optimization is also needed to improve the cryogenic plant performance. - Highlights: • We assessed the performance of cryogenic energy storage systems. • We re-evaluated the Linde–Hampson cycle proposed by Chen. • We proposed the Claude and Collins cycles as alternatives for the Linde–Hampson cycle. • We concluded that Claude cycle is the best alternative for the simulated conditions.

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  6. Design of an Oxygen Turbopump for a Dual Expander Cycle Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    circuit. 6 The hydrogen must be heated to temperatures near the design limit for alloys currently used in the chamber liner. Other limits of this...tests (450/800oF) Invar -36 5444 Ignition in all tests (675/340oF) Hastelloy-X 7160 Ignition in all tests (725/750oF) 2.2.2 of the e Bearings

  7. Microminiature linear split Stirling cryogenic cooler for portable infrared imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Vilenchik, H.; Riabzev, S.; Pundak, N.

    2007-04-01

    Novel tactics employed in carrying out military and antiterrorist operations call for the development of a new generation of warfare, among which sophisticated portable infrared (IR) imagers for surveillance, reconnaissance, targeting and navigation play an important role. The superior performance of such imagers relies on novel optronic technologies and maintaining the infrared focal plane arrays at cryogenic temperatures using closed cycle refrigerators. Traditionally, rotary driven Stirling cryogenic engines are used for this purpose. As compared to their military off-theshelf linear rivals, they are lighter, more compact and normally consume less electrical power. Latest technological advances in industrial development of high-temperature (100K) infrared detectors initialized R&D activity towards developing microminiature cryogenic coolers, both of rotary and linear types. On this occasion, split linearly driven cryogenic coolers appear to be more suitable for the above applications. Their known advantages include flexibility in the system design, inherently longer life time, low vibration export and superior aural stealth. Moreover, recent progress in designing highly efficient "moving magnet" resonant linear drives and driving electronics enable further essential reduction of the cooler size, weight and power consumption. The authors report on the development and project status of a novel Ricor model K527 microminiature split Stirling linear cryogenic cooler designed especially for the portable infrared imagers.

  8. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  9. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  10. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Flight Demonstration development has been canceled in favor of a ground test bed development for of passive/active cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and...

  11. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  12. Overview of the Liquid Argon Cryogenics for the Short Baseline Neutrino Program (SBN) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Barry [Fermilab; Bremer, Johan [CERN; Chalifour, Michel [Fermilab; Delaney, Mike [Fermilab; Dinnon, Mike [Fermilab; Doubnik, Roza [Fermilab; Geynisman, Michael [Fermilab; Hentschel, Steve [Fermilab; Kim, Min Jeong [Fermilab; Stefanik, Andy [Fermilab; Tillman, Justin [Fermilab; Zuckerbrot, Mike [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    The Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program will involve three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. The Program will be composed of an existing and operational detector known as Micro Boone (170 ton LAr mass) plus two new experiments known as the SBN Near Detector (SBND, ~ 260 ton) and the SBN Far Detector (SBN-FD, ~ 600 tons). Fermilab is now building two new facilities to house the experiments and incorporate all cryogenic and process systems to operate these detectors beginning in the 2018-2019 time frame. The SBN cryogenics are a collaborative effort between Fermilab and CERN. The SBN cryogenic systems for both detectors are composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure (or LN2), Proximity (or LAr), and internal cryogenics. For each detector the External/Infrastructure cryogenics includes the equipment used to store and the cryogenic fluids needed for the operation of the Proximity cryogenics, including the LN2 and LAr storage facilities. The Proximity cryogenics consists of all the systems that take the cryogenic fluids from the external/infrastructure cryogenics and deliver them to the internal at the required pressure, temperature, purity and mass flow rate. It includes the condensers, the LAr and GAr purification systems, the LN2 and LAr phase separators, and the interconnecting piping. The Internal cryogenics is comprised of all the cryogenic equipment located within the cryostats themselves, including the GAr and LAr distribution piping and the piping required to cool down the cryostats and the detectors. These cryogenic systems will be engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and

  13. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  14. 900-L liquid xenon cryogenic system operation for the MEG experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Hisamatsu, Y; Iawamoto, W; Mori, T; Nishiguchi, H; Otani, W; Sawada, R; Uchiyama, Y; Nishitani, T

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the MEG (muon rare decay) experiment has started operation at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Zurich. The main part of the MEG detector is the 900-L liquid xenon calorimeter for gamma ray detection, equipped with 850 photo multipliers directly immersed in liquid xenon. A 200 W pulse tube cryocooler enabled LN2-free operation of this calorimeter. A liquid purification system; using a liquid pump and a zero boil-off 1000-L cryogenic buffer dewar is also included in the system. The first entire engineering run was carried out in November-December 2007 and satisfactory cryogenic performances were confirmed.

  15. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-01-01

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm 2 Co 17 or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  16. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989

  17. Additive Manufacturing for Affordable Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brian; Robertson, Elizabeth; Osborne, Robin; Calvert, Marty

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) technology has the potential to drastically reduce costs and lead times associated with the development of complex liquid rocket engine systems. NASA is using 3D printing to manufacture rocket engine components including augmented spark igniters, injectors, turbopumps, and valves. NASA is advancing the process to certify these components for flight. Success Story: MSFC has been developing rocket 3D-printing technology using the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process. Over the last several years, NASA has built and tested several injectors and combustion chambers. Recently, MSFC has 3D printed an augmented spark igniter for potential use the RS-25 engines that will be used on the Space Launch System. The new design is expected to reduce the cost of the igniter by a factor of four. MSFC has also 3D printed and tested a liquid hydrogen turbopump for potential use on an Upper Stage Engine. Additive manufacturing of the turbopump resulted in a 45% part count reduction. To understanding how the 3D printed parts perform and to certify them for flight, MSFC built a breadboard liquid rocket engine using additive manufactured components including injectors, turbomachinery, and valves. The liquid rocket engine was tested seven times in 2016 using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In addition to exposing the hardware to harsh environments, engineers learned to design for the new manufacturing technique, taking advantage of its capabilities and gaining awareness of its limitations. Benefit: The 3D-printing technology promises reduced cost and schedule for rocket engines. Cost is a function of complexity, and the most complicated features provide the largest opportunities for cost reductions. This is especially true where brazes or welds can be eliminated. The drastic reduction in part count achievable with 3D printing creates a waterfall effect that reduces the number of processes and drawings, decreases the amount of touch

  18. The performance of a piezoelectric-sensor-based SHM system under a combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Beard, Shawn J.; Kumar, Amrita; Sullivan, Kevin; Aguilar, Robert; Merchant, Munir; Taniguchi, Mike

    2008-10-01

    A series of tests have been conducted to determine the survivability and functionality of a piezoelectric-sensor-based active structural health monitoring (SHM) SMART Tape system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature and vibration loads. The performance of different piezoelectric sensors and a low temperature adhesive under cryogenic temperature was first investigated. The active SHM system for liquid rocket engines was exposed to flight vibration and shock environments on a simulated large booster LOX-H2 engine propellant duct conditioned to cryogenic temperatures to evaluate the physical robustness of the built-in sensor network as well as operational survivability and functionality. Test results demonstrated that the developed SMART Tape system can withstand operational levels of vibration and shock energy on a representative rocket engine duct assembly, and is functional under the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment.

  19. To Ensure the Integrity of the Cryogenic Propellant Depot Tank Within the Expected Radiation and Space Debris Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HyPerComp Engineering, Inc. (HEI) proposes to develop well characterized, structurally reliable filament wound composite pressure vessels for use in both cryogenic...

  20. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Several significant superconducting beam line magnet systems are being constructed in the U. S. These will demonstrate the practicability of superconductors in beam lines. It is now time to consider some of the more subtle engineering problems associated with these magnets in order to assure a ''next generation'' of highly usable magnets. This paper presents some engineering approaches to better magnets for the future. (U.S.)

  1. Cryogenics bringing the temperature down, underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first 600m of the LHC cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which will feed the accelerator's superconducting magnets, has passed initial validating tests of its mechanical design at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Cryogenic thermal conductivity measurements on candidate materials for space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James; Canavan, Edgar; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-12-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. It is common for NASA engineers to propose new candidate materials which have not been totally characterized at cryogenic temperatures. In many cases a material's cryogenic thermal conductivity must be known before selecting it for a specific space-flight application. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to measure the longitudinal thermal conductivity of materials at temperatures between 4 and 300 K, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for ten engineered materials, including alloys, polymers, composites, and a ceramic.

  3. Silicon Germanium Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, J. C.; Montazeri, S.; Chang, Su-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Silicon germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors have emerged in the last decade as an excellent option for use in cryogenic low noise amplifiers. This paper begins with a review of the critical developments that have led to today’s cryogenic low noise amplifiers. Next, recent work focused on minimizing the power consumption of SiGe cryogenic amplifiers is presented. Finally, open issues related to the cryogenic noise properties of SiGe HBTs are discussed.

  4. High speed cryogenic monodisperse targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukharov, A.; Vishnevkii, E.

    2017-11-01

    The basic possibility of creation of high speed cryogenic monodisperse targets is shown. According to calculations at input of thin liquid cryogenic jets with a velocity of bigger 100 m/s in vacuum the jets don’t manage to freeze at distance to 1 mm and can be broken into monodisperse drops. Drops due to evaporation are cooled and become granules. High speed cryogenic monodisperse targets have the following advantages: direct input in vacuum (there is no need for a chamber of a triple point chamber and sluices), it is possible to use the equipment of a cluster target, it is possible to receive targets with a diameter of D 100m/s), exact synchronization of the target hitting moment in a beam with the moment of sensors turning on.

  5. Cryogenic safety organisation at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With Safety being a top priority of CERN’s general policy, the Organisation defines and implements a Policy that sets out the general principles governing Safety at CERN. To the end of the attainment of said Safety objectives, the organic units (owners/users of the equipment) are assigned the responsibility for the implementation of the CERN Safety Policy at all levels of the organization, whereas the Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE) has the role of providing assistance for the implementation of the Safety Policy, and a monitoring role related to the implementation of continuous improvement of Safety, compliance with the Safety Rules and the handling of emergency situations. This talk will elaborate on the roles, responsibilities and organisational structure of the different stakeholders within the Organization with regards to Safety, and in particular to cryogenic safety. The roles of actors of particular importance such as the Cryogenic Safety Officers (CSOs) and the Cryogenic Sa...

  6. Temperature control of cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, P.A.; Bartlett, A.J.; Peterson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator is described comprising: a refrigerator heat sink; a source of refrigerant gas under pressure; gas expansion means including a reciprocating piston in a cylinder for expanding the refrigerant gas in a gas expansion space within the cylinder to cool the gas and the refrigerator heat sink to cryogenic temperatures; means for selectively diverting refrigerant gas away from the gas expansion means; and a heat exchanger in thermal communication with the refrigerator heat sink for receiving diverted gas and conducting heat from the refrigerant gas into the refrigerator heat sink to warm the heat sink while keeping the diverted gas out of fluid communication with the gas expansion space

  7. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, M. G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  8. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Affordable Development Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Glen E.; Gerrish, H. P.; Kenny, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of nuclear power for space use in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems will involve significant expenditures of funds and require major technology development efforts. The development effort must be economically viable yet sufficient to validate the systems designed. Efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Project (NCPS) to study what a viable program would entail. The study will produce an integrated schedule, cost estimate and technology development plan. This will include the evaluation of various options for test facilities, types of testing and use of the engine, components, and technology developed. A "Human Rating" approach will also be developed and factored into the schedule, budget and technology development approach.

  9. Analysis of Cryogenic Cycle with Process Modeling Tool: Aspen HYSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, D.M.; Patel, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering deals with the development and improvement of low temperature techniques, processes and equipment. A process simulator such as Aspen HYSYS, for the design, analysis, and optimization of process plants, has features that accommodate the special requirements and therefore can be used to simulate most cryogenic liquefaction and refrigeration processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Cryogenic processes require special attention in terms of the integration of various components like heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson Valve, Turbo expander and Compressor. Here, Aspen HYSYS, a process modeling tool, is used to understand the behavior of the complete plant. This paper presents the analysis of an air liquefaction plant based on the Linde cryogenic cycle, performed using the Aspen HYSYS process modeling tool. It covers the technique used to find the optimum values for getting the maximum liquefaction of the plant considering different constraints of other parameters. The analysis result so obtained gives clear idea in deciding various parameter values before implementation of the actual plant in the field. It also gives an idea about the productivity and profitability of the given configuration plant which leads to the design of an efficient productive plant

  10. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  11. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  12. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  13. Champagne for the cryogenics teams

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Christmas has come early for the LHC as a complete sector of the cryogenic distribution line has been operating at 10 degrees Kelvin (-263°C) for the past two weeks, just a few degrees above the machine's nominal operating temperature.

  14. Operation of large cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.H.; Ferry, B.; Fowler, W.B.; Makara, J.; Peterson, T.; Theilacker, J.; Walker, R.

    1985-06-01

    This report is based on the past 12 years of experiments on R and D and operation of the 27 kW Fermilab Tevatron Cryogenic System. In general the comments are applicable for all helium plants larger than 1000W (400 l/hr) and non mass-produced nitrogen plants larger than 50 tons per day. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. LHC Cryogenics on the mend

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 29 September, repairs began on the LHC cryogenic distribution line, or QRL, to replace a faulty part that occurs in the hundreds of elements of the line that are already on-site. The Accelerator Technology Department is designing a work programme to finish the repairs as soon as possible and minimize delays to the rest of the LHC project.

  16. Sources of Cryogenic Data and Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohling, R. A.; Hufferd, W. L.; Marquardt, E. D.

    It is commonly known that cryogenic data, technology, and information are applied across many military, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and civilian product lines. Before 1950, however, there was no centralized US source of cryogenic technology data. The Cryogenic Data Center of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) maintained a database of cryogenic technical documents that served the national need well from the mid 1950s to the early 1980s. The database, maintained on a mainframe computer, was a highly specific bibliography of cryogenic literature and thermophysical properties that covered over 100 years of data. In 1983, however, the Cryogenic Data Center was discontinued when NBS's mission and scope were redefined. In 1998, NASA contracted with the Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) and Technology Applications, Inc. (TAI) to reconstitute and update Cryogenic Data Center information and establish a self-sufficient entity to provide technical services for the cryogenic community. The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) provided this service until 2004, when it was discontinued due to a lack of market interest. The CIC technical assets were distributed to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Plans are under way in 2006 for CPIA to launch an e-commerce cryogenic website to offer bibliography data with capability to download cryogenic documents.

  17. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    be to actively cool the shield in the hydrogen tank to reduce the parasitic losses. This would allow the use of less expensive, presently available coolers (80 K vs. 20 K) and potentially simplify the system by requiring only a single compressor on the pad amd a single disconnect line. The compressor could be a hefty commercial unit, with only the cold head requiring expensive flight development and qualification. While this is actually a reduced boil off configuration rather than a zero-boil off case, if the cryogen loss could be cut significantly, the increase in hold time and reduced need for draining and refilling the propellant tanks could meet the vehicle operations needs in the majority of instances.Bearing in mind the potential benefits of ZBO, NASA AMES and SNECMA Moteurs decided to exchange their technical views on the subject. This paper will present a preliminary analysis for a multi-mission module using a fairly low thrust cryogenic engine and ZBO during cruise. Initial mass is 5.5. tons (in ETO). The cryogenic engine will be used near each periapsis in order to minimize the AV requirement. The payload obtained by this propulsion system is compared to a classical storable bipropellant propulsion system for several cases (e. g. Mars lander, Jupiter orbiter, Saturn orbiter). For the Jupiter and Saturn cases, the power source could be an RTG or a large parabolic mirror illuminating a solar panel. It is shown -that - due to its much larger specific impulse - the cryogenic ZBO solution provides much higher payloads, especially for exploration missions involving landing on planets, asteroids, comets, or other celestial bodies.

  18. Closed-cycle liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper presents experience gained by SSSPE TRUD in development of NK-33, NK-43, NK-39, and NK-31 liquid propellant rocket engines, which are reusable, closed-cycle type, working on liquid oxygen and kerosene. Results are presented showing the engine structure efficiency, configuration rationality, and optimal thrust values which provide the following specific parameters: specific vacuum impulses in the range 331-353 s (for NK-33 and NK-31 engines, respectively) and specific weight of about 8 kg/tf (NK-33 and NK-43 engines). The problems which occurred during engine development and the study of the main components of these engines are discussed. The important technical data, materials, methodology, and bench development data are presented for the gas generator, turbopump assembly, combustion chamber and full-scale engines.

  19. Cryogenic systems for detectors and particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    It's been one hundred years since the first successful experiments were carried out leading to the liquefaction of oxygen which birthed the field of cryogenics and about sixty years since cryogenics went commercial. Originally, cryogenics referred to the technology and art of producing low temperatures but today the definition adopted by the XII Congress of the International Institute of Refrigeration describes cryogenics as the study of phenomena, techniques, and concepts occurring at our pertaining to temperatures below 120 K. Modern acceptance of the importance and use of cryogenic fluids continues to grow. By far, the bulk of cryogenic products are utilized by industry for metal making, agriculture, medicine, food processing and as efficient storage of fuels. Cryogenics has found many uses in the scientific community as well, enabling the development of ultra low noise amplifiers, fast cold electronics, cryopumped ultra high vacuums, the production of intense magnetic fields and low loss power transmission through the sue of cryogenically cooled superconductors. High energy physic research has been and continues to use cryogenic hardware to produce liquids used as detector targets and to produce refrigeration necessary to cool superconducting magnets to design temperature for particle accelerator applications. In fact, today's super accelerators achieve energies that would be impossible to reach with conventional copper magnets, demonstrating that cryogenics has become an indispensable ingredient in today's scientific endeavors

  20. Cryogenic systems advanced monitoring, fault diagnostics, and predictive maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenics, the study and technology of materials and systems at very low temperature, is widely used for sensors and instruments requiring very highly precise measurements with low electrical resistance, especially for measurements of materials and energies at a very small scale. Thus, the need to understand how instruments operate and perform over time at temperatures below -2920 F (-1800 C) is critical, for applications from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to instrumentation for particle accelerators of all kinds. This book brings to the reader guidance learned from work at the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research (CERN), and its large scale particle accelerator in Switzerland to help engineers and technicians implement best practices in instrumentation at cryogenic temperatures, including a better understanding of fault detection and predictive maintenance. Special problems with devices like flow meters, pressure gauges, and temperature gauges when operating...

  1. Advances in Cryogenics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1998-01-01

    After a decade of intensive R&D in the key technologies of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets and superfluid helium cryogenics, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has now fully entered its co nstruction phase, with the adjudication of major procurement contracts to industry. As concerns cryogenic engineering, this R&D program has resulted in significant developments in several fields, amon g which thermo-hydraulics of two-phase saturated superfluid helium, efficient cycles and machinery for large-capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K, insulation techniques for series-produced cryostats and mu lti-kilometre long distribution lines, large-current leads using high-temperature superconductors, industrial precision thermometry below 4 K, and novel control techniques applied to strongly non-line ar processes. We review the most salient advances in these domains.

  2. Conference on Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors and Electronic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, D B; McCarthy, S E; Cryogenic Refrigeration Conference; International Cryocooler Conference; Cryocoolers 1

    1981-01-01

    This proceedings documents the output of a meeting of refrigeration specialists held at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, CO, on October 6 and 7, 1980. Building on an earlier invitation-only meeting in 1977, the purpose of this first open meeting was to discuss progress in the development of refrigeration systems to cool cryogenic sensors and electronic systems in the temperature range below 20 K and with required cooling capacities below 10 W. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Institute of Refrigeration - Commission A1/2, the Office of Naval Research, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, and the National Bureau of Standards. This first open cryocooler conference consisted of 23 papers presented by representatives of industry, government, and academia. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado as NBS Special Publication #607. Subsequent meetings would become known as the Intern...

  3. Cryogenics for the superconducting super collider: workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Attendance at the workshop and information meeting on Cryogenics for the SSC held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on January 17 to 19, 1984 consisted of 109 engineers and scientists from 19 industrial organizations and 18 laboratories and universities - CERN, DESY, Grenoble, KEK and Saclay were represented. About one-third of the participants were from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Laboratory. Talks which concentrated on informing the audience of the present status of the SSC research and development activities and progress towards design of the components were given, experience with the cryogenic system of the Tevatron was reported, and a wrap-up session was held on the last day where each of the five workshop leaders gave a summary of their group's discussions and conclusions. A brief summary of these presentations is given, with the detailed information gathered by the group leaders forming the bulk of these proceedings

  4. Cryogenic systems advanced monitoring, fault diagnostics, and predictive maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Inglese, Vitaliano; Pezzetti, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Cryogenics, the study and technology of materials and systems at very low temperature, is widely used for sensors and instruments requiring very highly precise measurements with low electrical resistance, especially for measurements of materials and energies at a very small scale. Thus, the need to understand how instruments operate and perform over time at temperatures below -2920 F (-1800 C) is critical, for applications from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to instrumentation for particle accelerators of all kinds. This book brings to the reader guidance learned from work at the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research (CERN), and its large scale particle accelerator in Switzerland to help engineers and technicians implement best practices in instrumentation at cryogenic temperatures, including a better understanding of fault detection and predictive maintenance. Special problems with devices like flow meters, pressure gauges, and temperature gauges when operating...

  5. Modeling Unsteady Cavitation Effects and Dynamic Loads in Cryogenic Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There currently are no analytical or CFD tools that can reliably predict unsteady cavitation dynamics in liquid rocket turbopumps. Cavitation effects, particularly...

  6. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft 3 of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ''cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 x 9 x 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed

  7. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft{sup 3} of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ``cold test pit`` that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 {times} 9 {times} 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub`s proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  8. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft[sup 3] of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 [times] 9 [times] 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were

  9. Sub-scale Waterflow Cavitation and Dynamic Transfer Function Testing of an Oxidizer Turbo-Pump Combined Inducer and Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, D. M.; Patel, S. K.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, Concepts NREC prepared for and performed a series of tests on a 52% scale of a version of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump under a Phase III SBIR with NASA MSFC. The test article was a combined inducer and impeller, tested as a unit. This paper presents an overview of the test rig and facility, instrumentation, signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, testing approach, measurement developments, and lessons learned. Results from these tests were presented in the form of two papers at the previous JANNAF joint propulsion conference, in December of 2011.

  10. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  11. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  12. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  13. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  14. Cryogenic Thermal Performance Testing of Bulk-Fill and Aerogel Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J. P.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Heckle, K. W.

    2007-01-01

    The research testing and demonstration of new bulk-fill materials for cryogenic thermal insulation systems was performed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Thermal conductivity testing under actual-use cryogenic conditions is a key to understanding the total system performance encompassing engineering, economics, and materials factors. A number of bulk fill insulation materials, including aerogel beads, glass bubbles, and perlite powder, were tested using a new cylindrical cryostat. Boundary temperatures for the liquid nitrogen boil-off method were 293 K and 78 K. Tests were performed as a function of cold vacuum pressure from high vacuum to no vacuum conditions. Results are compared with other complementary test methods in the range of 300 K to 20 K. Various testing techniques are shown to be required to obtain a complete understanding of the operating performance of a material and to provide data for answers to design engineering questions.

  15. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  16. Cryogenic MEMS Technology for Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of cryogenic microwave components, such as focal plane polarization modulators, first requires an RF MEMS switching technology that operates...

  17. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  18. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Shell State of the Cylindrical Cryogenic Tank During Filling and Emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are used as the oxidizer and fuel for liquid rocket engines. Liquefied natural gas, which is based on methane, is seen as a promising motor fuel for internal combustion engines. One of the technical problems arising from the use of said cryogenic liquid is to provide containers for storage, transport and use in the propulsion system. In the design and operation of such vessels it is necessary to have reliable information about their temperature condition, on which depend the loss of cryogenic fluids due to evaporation and the stress-strain state of the structural elements of the containers.Uneven temperature distribution along the generatrix of the cylindrical thin-walled shell of rocket cryogenic tanks, in a localized zone of cryogenic liquid level leads to a curvature of the shell and reduce the permissible axle load in a hazard shell buckling in the preparation for the start of the missile in flight with an increasing acceleration. Moving the level of the cryogenic liquid during filling or emptying the tank at a certain combination of parameters results in an increase of the local temperature distribution nonuniformity.Along with experimental study of the shell temperature state of the cryogenic container, methods of mathematical modeling allow to have information needed for designing and testing the construction of cryogenic tanks. In this study a mathematical model is built taking into account features of heat transfer in a cryogenic container, including the boiling cryogenic liquid in the inner surface of the container. This mathematical model describes the temperature state of the thin-walled shell of cylindrical cryogenic tank during filling and emptying. The work also presents a quantitative analysis of this model in case of fixed liquid level, its movement at a constant speed, and harmonic oscillations relative to a middle position. The quantitative analysis of this model has allowed to find the limit options

  19. Aural stealth of portable cryogenically cooled infrared imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, Alexander; Vilenchick, Herman; Broyde, Ramon; Pundak, Nachman

    2006-05-01

    Novel tactics for carrying out military and antiterrorist operations calls for the development of a new generation of portable infrared imagers, the focal plane arrays of which are maintained at a cryogenic temperature. The rotary Stirling cryogenic engines providing for this cooling are usually mounted directly upon the light thin-walled imager frame, which is used for optical alignment, mechanical stability and heat sinking. The known disadvantage of this design approach is that the wideband vibration export produced by the cooler results in structural resonances and therefore in excessive noise radiation from the above imagers. The "noisy" thermal imager may be detected from quite a long distance using acoustic equipment relying upon a high-sensitive unidirectional microphone or aurally spotted when used in a close proximity to the opponent force. As a result, aural stealth along with enhanced imagery, compact design, low power consumption and long life-times become a crucial figure of merit characterising the modern infrared imager. Achieving the desired inaudibility level is a challenging task. As a matter of fact, even the best examples of modern "should-be silent" infrared imagers are quite audible from as far as 50 meters away even when operating in a steady-state mode. The authors report on the successful effort of designing the inaudible at greater then 10 meters cryogenically cooled infrared imager complying with the stringent MIL-STD-1774D (Level II) requirements.

  20. The scope of additive manufacturing in cryogenics, component design, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stautner, W.; Vanapalli, S.; Weiss, K.-P.; Chen, R.; Amm, K.; Budesheim, E.; Ricci, J.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques using composites or metals are rapidly gaining momentum in cryogenic applications. Small or large, complex structural components are now no longer limited to mere design studies but can now move into the production stream thanks to new machines on the market that allow for light-weight, cost optimized designs with short turnaround times. The potential for cost reductions from bulk materials machined to tight tolerances has become obvious. Furthermore, additive manufacturing opens doors and design space for cryogenic components that to date did not exist or were not possible in the past, using bulk materials along with elaborate and expensive machining processes, e.g. micromachining. The cryogenic engineer now faces the challenge to design toward those new additive manufacturing capabilities. Additionally, re-thinking designs toward cost optimization and fast implementation also requires detailed knowledge of mechanical and thermal properties at cryogenic temperatures. In the following we compile the information available to date and show a possible roadmap for additive manufacturing applications of parts and components typically used in cryogenic engineering designs.

  1. Longevity of cryogenically stored seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Christina; Wheeler, Lana; Stanwood, Phillip C

    2004-06-01

    Though cryogenic storage is presumed to provide nearly infinite longevity to cells, the actual shelf life achieved under ultra-cold temperatures has not been addressed theoretically or empirically. Here, we report measurable changes in germination of dried seeds stored under liquid nitrogen conditions for >10 years. There was considerable variability in the extent of deterioration among species and accessions within a species. Aging time courses for lettuce seeds stored at temperatures between 50 and -196 degrees C were fit to a form of the Avrami equation to determine rate coefficients and predict half-life of accessions. A reduction in the temperature dependency on aging rate, determined as a break in the Arrhenius plot, occurred at about -15 degrees C, and this resulted in faster deterioration than anticipated from extrapolation of kinetics measured at higher temperatures. The break in Arrhenius behavior occurred at temperatures in between the glass transition temperature (28 degrees C) and the Kauzmann temperature (-42 degrees C) and also coincided with a major triacylglycerol phase change (-40 to -7 degrees C). In spite of the faster than anticipated deterioration, cryogenic storage clearly prolonged shelf life of lettuce seeds with half-lives projected as approximately 500 and approximately 3400 years for fresh lettuce seeds stored in the vapor and liquid phases of liquid nitrogen, respectively. The benefit of low temperature storage (-18 or -135 degrees C) on seed longevity was progressively lost if seeds were first stored at 5 degrees C. Collectively, these results demonstrate that lowering storage temperature progressively increases longevity of seeds. However, cryogenic temperatures were not sufficient to stop deterioration, especially if initial stages of aging were allowed to progress at higher storage temperatures. This work contributes to reliable assessments of the potential benefit and cost of different genebanking strategies.

  2. Application of cryogenic grinding to achieve homogenization of transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, W.H.; Hill, D.D.; Lucero, M.E.; Jaramillo, L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in collaboration with the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE/RFFO) and with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, Colorado. Researchers on this project have developed a method for cryogenic grinding of mixed wastes to homogenize and, thereby, to acquire a representative sample of the materials. There are approximately 220,000 waste drums owned by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)-50,000 at RFETS and 170,000 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The cost of sampling the heterogeneous distribution of waste in each drum is prohibitive. In an attempt to produce a homogeneous mixture of waste that would reduce greatly the cost of sampling, researchers at NIST and RFETS are developing a cryogenic grinder. The Los Alamos work herein described addresses the implementation issues of the task. The first issue was to ascertain whether samples of the open-quotes small particleclose quotes mixtures of materials present in the waste drums at RFETS were representative of actual drum contents. Second, it was necessary to determine at what temperature the grinding operation must be performed in order to minimize or to eliminate the release of volatile organic compounds present in the waste. Last, it was essential to evaluate any effect the liquid cryogen might have on the structural integrity and ventilation capacity of the glovebox system. Results of this study showed that representative samples could be and had been obtained, that some release of organics occurred below freezing because of sublimation, and that operation of the cryogenic grinding equipment inside the glovebox was feasible

  3. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  4. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  5. Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a

  6. Self-Sealing Cryogenic Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin Xiang; Chow, Wen Lung; Moslemian, Davood; Lin, Gary; Melton, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Self-sealing fitting for cryogenic tubes remains free of leakage from room temperature to liquid-helium temperature even at internal pressure as high as 2.7 MPa. Fitting comprises parts made of materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion to prevent leakage gaps from forming as temperature decreases. Consists of coupling nut, two flared tube ends, and flared O-ring spacer. Spacer contracts more than tube ends do as temperature decreases. This greater contraction seals tube ends more tightly, preventing leakage.

  7. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...... operated at 77 K is designed and implemented for C imaging at 3 T (32.13 MHz), using off-the-shelves components. The design is based on a high electron mobility transistor (ATF54143) in a common source configuration. Required auxiliary circuitry for optimal cryogenic preamplifier performance is also...... presented consisting of a voltage regulator (noise free supply voltage and optimal power consumption), switch, and trigger (for active detuning during transmission to protect the preamplifier). A gain of 18 dB with a noise temperature of 13.7 K is achieved. Performing imaging experiments in a 3 T scanner...

  8. Cryogenic Hydrogen Fuel for Controlled Inertial Confinement Fusion (Cryogenic Target Factory Concept Based on FST-Layering Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, I. E.; Krokhin, O. N.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    A central element of a power plant based on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a target with cryogenic hydrogen fuel that should be delivered to the center of a reactor chamber with a high accuracy and repetition rate. Therefore, a cryogenic target factory (CTF) is an integral part of any ICF reactor. A promising way to solve this problem consists in the FST layering method developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). This method (rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets) is unique, having no analogs in the world. The further development of FST-layering technologies is implemented in the scope of the LPI program for the creation of a modular CTF and commercialization of the obtained results. In this report, we discuss our concept of CTF (CTF-LPI) that exhibits the following distinctive features: using a FST-layering technology for the elaboration of an in-line production of cryogenic targets, using an effect of quantum levitation of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in magnetic field for noncontacting manipulation, transport, and positioning of the free-standing cryogenic targets, as well as in using a Fourier holography technique for an on-line characterization and tracking of the targets flying into the reactor chamber. The results of original experimental and theoretical investigations performed at LPI indicate that the existing and developing target fabrication capabilities and technologies can be applied to ICF target production. The unique scientific, engineering, and technological base developed in Russia at LPI allows one to make a CTFLPI prototype for mass production of targets and delivery thereof at the required velocity into the ICF reactor chamber.

  9. Nitrous Oxide Ethane Ethylene Engine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nitrous Oxide Ethane-Ethylene (NEE) engine is a proposed technology designed to provide spacecraft with non-toxic non-cryogenic high-performance propulsion. With...

  10. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  11. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  12. Effect of cryogenic milling on Al7075 prepared by spark plasma sintering method.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáč, František; Chráska, Tomáš; Molnárová, O.; Málek, P.; Cinert, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 32, S1 (2017), S221-S224 ISSN 0885-7156. [European Powder Diffraction Conference (EPDIC) /15./. Bari, 12.06.2016-15.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15609S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Intermetallic precipitates * cryogenic milling * powder metallurgy * ultrafine-grained materials * Al7075 alloy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.674, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/powder-diffraction/article/effect-of-cryogenic-milling-on-al7075-prepared-by-spark-plasma-sintering-method/17E9F722BAFD428BA7310194FEE551C6

  13. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, D.W.; Rochow, R.

    1993-06-01

    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps

  14. Throttling Cryogen Boiloff To Control Cryostat Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An improved design has been proposed for a cryostat of a type that maintains a desired low temperature mainly through boiloff of a liquid cryogen (e.g., liquid nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. (A cryostat that maintains a low temperature mainly through boiloff of a cryogen at atmospheric pressure is said to be of the pour/fill Dewar-flask type because its main component is a Dewar flask, the top of which is kept open to the atmosphere so that the liquid cryogen can boil at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic liquid can be added by simply pouring it in.) The major distinguishing feature of the proposed design is control of temperature and cooling rate through control of the flow of cryogen vapor from a heat exchanger. At a cost of a modest increase in complexity, a cryostat according to the proposal would retain most of the compactness of prior, simpler pour/fill Dewar-flask cryostats, but would utilize cryogen more efficiently (intervals between cryogen refills could be longer).

  15. Cryogenics for high-energy particle accelerators: highlights from the first fifty years

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067931

    2016-01-01

    Applied superconductivity has become a key technology for high-energy particle accelerators, allowing to reach higher beam energy while containing size, capital expenditure and operating costs. Large and powerful cryogenic systems are therefore ancillary to low-temperature superconducting accelerator devices – magnets and high-frequency cavities – distributed over multi-kilometre distances and operating generally close to the normal boiling point of helium, but also above 4.2 K in supercritical and down to below 2 K in superfluid. Additionally, low-temperature operation in accelerators may also be required by considerations of ultra-high vacuum, limited stored energy and beam stability. We discuss the rationale for cryogenics in high-energy particle accelerators, review its development over the past half-century and present its outlook in future large projects, with reference to the main engineering domains of cryostat design and heat loads, cooling schemes, efficient power refrigeration and cryogenic flu...

  16. Shuttle performance enhancement using an uprated OMS engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallini, Charles J.; Boyd, William C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle's Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) has been investigated as the basis for an enhancement of Shuttle operational flexibility. The Johnson Space Center has given attention to an upgrading of the OME through the use of a gas generator-driven turbopump to raise engine specific impulse. Hardware tests have demonstrated the projected performance gains, which will yield an enhanced, intact ascent-abort capability, as well an an improved on-orbit payload and altitude capability. Attention is given to the application of these capabilities to the Hubble Space Telescope's deployment.

  17. Summary of ISABELLE cryogenic systems workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.

    1976-05-01

    Twenty-four people participated in the ISABELLE Cryogenic System Workshop which was held on June 2 and 3, 1976. The magnet cooling system for ISABELLE, as described in the new proposal, utilizes supercritical helium as the refrigerant instead of pool-boiling helium as in earlier proposals. This new and more cost-effective system was described in detail with discussion of the design parameters for the refrigerator itself, turbomachinery required and the refrigerant distribution system. The testing and prototype development program for ISABELLE cryogenic system components was also reviewed. A small cryogenic turbocompressor/expander system is now on order for testing with an ISABELLE half-cell

  18. Thermal Design and Analysis for the Cryogenic MIDAS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth McElroy

    1997-01-01

    The Materials In Devices As Superconductors (MIDAS) spaceflight experiment is a NASA payload which launched in September 1996 on the Shuttle, and was transferred to the Mir Space Station for several months of operation. MIDAS was developed and built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The primary objective of the experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity and spaceflight on the electrical properties of high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials. The thermal challenge on MIDAS was to maintain the superconductive specimens at or below 80 K for the entire operation of the experiment, including all ground testing and 90 days of spaceflight operation. Cooling was provided by a small tactical cryocooler. The superconductive specimens and the coldfinger of the cryocooler were mounted in a vacuum chamber, with vacuum levels maintained by an ion pump. The entire experiment was mounted for operation in a stowage locker inside Mir, with the only heat dissipation capability provided by a cooling fan exhausting to the habitable compartment. The thermal environment on Mir can potentially vary over the range 5 to 40 C; this was the range used in testing, and this wide range adds to the difficulty in managing the power dissipated from the experiment's active components. Many issues in the thermal design are discussed, including: thermal isolation methods for the cryogenic samples; design for cooling to cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic epoxy bonds; management of ambient temperature components self-heating; and fan cooling of the enclosed locker. Results of the design are also considered, including the thermal gradients across the HTS samples and cryogenic thermal strap, electronics and thermal sensor cryogenic performance, and differences between ground and flight performance. Modeling was performed in both SINDA-85 and MSC/PATRAN (with direct geometry import from the CAD design tool Pro/Engineer). Advantages of both types of models are discussed

  19. Conceptual overview and preliminary risk assessment of cryogen use in deep underground mine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivret, J.; Millar, D. L.; Lyle, G.

    2017-12-01

    This research conducts a formal risk assessment for cryogenic fueled equipment in underground environments. These include fans, load haul dump units, and trucks. The motivating advantage is zero-emissions production in the subsurface and simultaneous provision of cooling for ultra deep mine workings. The driving force of the engine is the expansion of the reboiled cryogen following flash evaporation using ambient temperature heat. The cold exhaust mixes with warm mine air and cools the latter further. The use of cryogens as ‘fuel’ leads to much increased fuel transport volumes and motivates special considerations for distribution infrastructure and process including: cryogenic storage, distribution, handling, and transfer systems. Detailed specification of parts and equipment, numerical modelling and preparation of design drawings are used to articulate the concept. The conceptual design process reveals new hazards and risks that the mining industry has not yet encountered, which may yet stymie execution. The major unwanted events include the potential for asphyxiation due to oxygen deficient atmospheres, or physical damage to workers due to exposure to sub-cooled liquids and cryogenic gases. The Global Minerals Industry Risk Management (GMIRM) framework incorporates WRAC and Bow-Tie techniques and is used to identify, assess and mitigate risks. These processes operate upon the competing conceptual designs to identify and eliminate high risk options and improve the safety of the lower risk designs.

  20. Cryogenic Milling of Titanium Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kozlík

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti Grade 2 was prepared by cryogenic attritor milling in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Two types of milling balls were used—stainless steel balls and heavy tungsten carbide balls. The effect of processing parameters on particle size and morphology, contamination of powder and its microhardness was investigated. Milling in liquid nitrogen was not feasible due to excessive contamination by nitrogen. Minor reduction of particle size and significant alterations in particle morphology depended on type of milling balls and application of stearic acid as processing control agent. Heavily deformed ultra-fine grained (UFG internal microstructure of powder particles was observed by the method of “transmission Kikuchi diffraction”.

  1. A Cryogenic Flow Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the success of the phase I effort, Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Cryogenic Flow Sensor (CFS) for determining mass flow of...

  2. Cryogenic Safety Rules and Guidelines at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN defines and implements a Safety Policy that sets out the general principles governing safety at CERN. As an intergovernmental organisation, CERN further establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In this process, it takes into account the laws and regulation of the Host States (France and Switzerland), EU regulations and directives, as well as international regulations, standards and directives. For the safety of cryogenic equipment, this is primarily covered by the Safety Regulation for Mechanical Equipment and the General Safety Instruction for Cryogenic Equipment. In addition, CERN has also developed Safety Guidelines to support the implementation of these safety rules, covering cryogenic equipment and oxygen deficiency hazard assessment and mitigation. An overview of the cryogenic safety rules and these safety guidelines will be presented.

  3. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of...

  4. Cryogenic MEMS Pressure Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A directly immersible cryogenic MEMS pressure sensor will be developed. Each silicon die will contain a vacuum-reference and a tent-like membrane. Offsetting thermal...

  5. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  6. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  7. A simple low-cost cryogenic controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, I.V.; Bartram, C.P.

    1977-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive cryogenic temperature controller is described. Temperatures from 78 K to 300 K are maintained to 0.1 K. A novel feature, using a power transistor for the heating element, is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Handling Efficiency Improvement

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stennis Space Center (SSC) is NASA’s top annual consumer of cryogenic propellants. Improvements in ground propellant system operations at SSC require having the...

  9. Cryogenic Cycling Behavior of Polymeric Composite Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seferis, James

    2002-01-01

    The basis of this research was an exploration of the fundamental phenomena that determine the response of fiber-reinforced composite materials to thermal cycling between cryogenic and ambient temperatures...

  10. Lightweight Inflatable Cryogenic Tank, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of an inflatable and lightweight polymer-fabric structured pressure vessel designed for the containment of cryogenic fluids....

  11. Environmental compatibility of CRYOPLANE the cryogenic-fuel aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, H.G. [Daimler Benz Aerospace Airbus, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    `CRYOPLANE` is the project name for an aircraft powered by cryogenic fuel, either liquid natural gas (LNG, mainly consisting of methane) or liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}). Emission of CO{sub 2}, unburnt hydrocarbons, soot and sulfur will be completely avoided by hydrogen combustion: LH{sub 2} is an extremely pure liquid. Emission of water as a primary combustion product is increased by a factor of 2.6. Exhaust gases behind hydrogen engines contain more water than behind kerosene engines, and hence can form contrails under a wider range of atmospheric conditions. Liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft promise big advantages relative to kerosene aircraft in terms of environmental compatibility. (R.P.)

  12. Commercially Available Capacitors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Teyssandier, F.; Prêle, D.

    2010-01-01

    Commercially available capacitors are not specified for operation at 77 K or 4 K, and some devices showed a dramatic decrease of capacitance at cryogenic temperature. Furthermore, for voltage biasing of cryogenic low impedance sensors it is very important to know parasitic resistance. In this case, the parasitic Equivalent Series Resistance (ESR) of the capacitor used for the AC-biasing is a bottleneck of the voltage biasing. Involved in TES development and SQUID multiplexing, we have charact...

  13. Modified Apollo cryogenic oxygen tank design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1971-01-01

    Assessment of the Apollo 13 mission indicated that some design changes to be incorporated into Apollo cryogenic oxygen storage tanks. These changes broadly fit into three categories. They were: (1) deletion of the fluid equilibration motors and redesign of heater assembly, (2) material changes for internal tank wiring and density sensor, and (3) the addition of a heater assembly temperature sensor. Development of a cryogenic oxygen tank incorporating these changes is presented.

  14. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data

  15. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    delivering this system will be decided at the national level, based on experiment campaign requirement dates that will be derived through this process. The current milestone date for achieving indirect-drive ignition on the NIF is December 2010. Maintaining this milestone requires that the cryogenic systems be complete and available for fielding experiments early enough that the planned experimental campaigns leading up to ignition can be carried out. The capability of performing non-ignition cryogenic experiments is currently required by March 2006, when the NIF's first cluster of beams is operational. Plans for cryogenic and non-cryogenic experiments on the NIF are contained in NNSA's Campaign 10 Program Plans for Ignition (MTE 10.1) and High Energy Density Sciences (MTE 10.2). As described in this document, the NCTS Program Manager is responsible for managing NIF Cryogenic Target Systems development, engineering, and deployment. Through the NIF Director, the NCTS Program Manager will put in place an appropriate Program Execution Plan (draft attached) at a later time consistent with the maturing and funding these efforts. The PEP will describe management methods for carrying out these activities

  16. High/variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, William H.; Beveridge, John H.

    1988-01-01

    A LOX/LH2 high/variable mixture ratio booster upper stage is described. The engine has high thrust-weight ratio as a booster and high specific impulse as an upper stage engine. Operation at high mixture ratio utilizes the propellants at high bulk density. The engine may use multiple turbopump-preburners for higher thrust ratings. The engine uses the full flow cycle to obtain minimum turbine inlet temperatures for a given chamber pressure and to avoid interpropellant shaft seals and other single point failure modes. A portion of the liquid hydrogen is used to regeneratively cool the thrust chamber assembly. The warmed hydrogen coolant is then used to drive the fuel boost turbopump. All propellants arrive at the gas-gas injector ready to burn. Shear mixing of the parallel flowing high velocity, low density fuel-rich gases with the high density, low velocity oxidizer-rich gases provides complete combustion with a modest chamber volume. Combustion stability is assured by the injection of the heated fuel-rich gases and the comparatively low volume ratio of the propellants before and after combustion. The high area ratio nozzle skirt is fitted with a low area ratio nozzle skirt insert for optimum low altitude performance. The overall engine characteristics make it a candidate for ALS, Shuttle-C, LRB, and SSTO applications.

  17. A model for manuscript submitted to the nth IIR conference on overview of the long-baseline neutrino facility cryogenic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, David [FERMILAB; Adamowski, Mark [Fermilab; Bremer, Johan [CERN; Delaney, Michael [Fermilab; Aurelien, Diaz [CERN; Doubnik, Roza [Fermilab; Haaf, Kevin [Fermilab; Hentschel, Steve [Fermilab; Norris, Barry [Fermilab; Voirin, Erik [Fermilab

    2017-03-09

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration is developing a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located one mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, detectors will be located inside four cryostats filled with a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, at the level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) is developing the conventional facilities and cryogenics infrastructure supporting this experiment. The cryogenics system is composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity, and Internal cryogenics. It will be engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution highlights the main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. It presents its performance, functional requirements and modes of operations. As a result, it also details the status of the design, present and future needs.

  18. Future cryogenic switchgear technologies for superconducting power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Saluja, R.; Damle, T.; Graber, L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces cryogenic switchgear that is needed for protection and control purposes in future multi-terminal superconducting power systems. Implementation of cryogenic switchgear is expected to improve system reliability and minimize overall volume and weight, but such switchgear is not available yet. Design of cryogenic switchgear begins by referring to conventional circuit breakers, a brief review of state-of-the-art switchgear technologies is presented. Then, promising cryogenic interruption media are identified and analysed with respect to physical and dielectric properties. Finally, we propose several cryogenic circuit breaker designs for potential aerospace, marine and terrestrial applications. Actuation mechanism for cryogenic switchgear is also investigated.

  19. Device for delivering cryogen to rotary super-conducting winding of cryogen-cooled electrical machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, I.F.; Gorbunov, G.S.; Khutoretsky, G.M.; Popov, J.S.; Skachkov, J.V.; Vinokurov, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    A device is disclosed for delivering cryogen to a superconducting winding of a cryogen-cooled electrical machine comprising a pipe articulated along the axis of the electrical machine and intended to deliver cryogen. One end of said pipe is located in a rotary chamber which communicates through channels with the space of the electrical machine, and said space accommodating its superconducting winding. The said chamber accommodates a needle installed along the chamber axis, and the length of said needle is of sufficient length such that in the advanced position of said cryogen delivering pipe said needle reaches the end of the pipe. The layout of the electrical machine increases the reliability and effectiveness of the device for delivering cryogen to the superconducting winding, simplifies the design of the device and raises the efficiency of the electrical machine

  20. Thermal barrier coatings for the space shuttle main engine turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, B. N.; Gilmore, H. L.; Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump turbine blades experience extremely severe thermal shocks during start-up and shut-down. For instance, the high pressure fuel turbopump turbine which burns liquid hydrogen operates at approximately 1500 F, but is shut down fuel rich with turbine blades quenced in liquid hydrogen. This thermal shock is a major contributor to blade cracking. The same thermal shock cause the protective ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings to spall or flake off, leaving only the NiCrAlY bond coating which provides only a minimum thermal protection. The turbine blades are therefore life limited to about 3000 sec for want of a good thermal barrier. A suitable thermal barrier coating (TBC) is being developed for the SSME turbine blades. Various TBCs developed for the gas turbine engines were tested in a specially built turbine blade tester. This tester subjects the coated blades to thermal and pressure cycles similar to those during actual operation of the turbine. The coatings were applied using a plasma spraying techniques both under atmospheric conditions and in vacuum. Results are presented. In general vacuum plasma sprayed coatings performed much better than those sprayed under atmospheric conditions. A 50 to 50 blend of Cr2O3 and NiCrAlY, vacuum plasma sprayed on SSME turbopump turbine blades appear to provide significant improvements in coating durability and thermal protection.

  1. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  2. Cryogenic Deflashing for Rubber Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deflashing is the process of removal of excess flashes from the rubber products. Initially deflashing was a manual operation where dozen of workers, seated at small work stations would take each part and trim the excess rubber off with scissors, knives or by grinding. Still the same method is employed in most of the rubber industry. The drawbacks of this method are demand inconsistent and repeatable quality. Work done by hand is often inconsistent. There are commercially available cryogenic deflashing machine but they are too expensive hence cost effectiveness is also a prime factor. The objective of this paper is to develop a technique, to identify the media through which the flashes can be removed easily and effectively. Based on the test results obtained from testing of five different types of media, ABCUT Steel media gave best results. The testing of the ABCUT Steel media on rubber samples like O-rings, grommet tail door, bottom bush etc. shows good results.

  3. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  4. Mass Driver Two - Cryogenic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, K.; Williams, F.; Mongeau, P.; Kolm, H.

    1979-01-01

    The cryogenic module of Mass Driver Two comprises a 3.25 inch (82.55 mm) OD bucket with two 44 kilo-ampere-turn coils made with .028 inch (.71 mm) diam niobium-titanium multi-filamentary cable in a copper matrix, impregnated with lead alloy for thermal inertia, as well as the service station to refrigerate, energize and eject the bucket. The station is housed in a six inch flanged pyrex cross which connects to the four inch pyrex tube of the mass driver itself. The bucket is refrigerated by being forced against a copper braid cradle attached to the bottom of a liquid helium reservoir which protrudes into the cross from above. The bucket is energized inductively by turning off two superconducting coils which are also attached to the helium reservoir, and which have maintained the correct flux linkage through the bucket coils during their cool-down through the critical temperature. Once charging is completed, the clamping pressure is released and the bucket is injected into the mass driver by means of two normal-conductor pulse coils surrounding the horizontal branches of the cross.

  5. Monitoring Engine Vibrations And Spectrum Of Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carol L.; Randall, Michael R.; Reinert, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time computation of intensities of peaks in visible-light emission spectrum of exhaust combined with real-time spectrum analysis of vibrations into developmental monitoring technique providing up-to-the-second information on conditions of critical bearings in engine. Conceived to monitor conditions of bearings in turbopump suppling oxygen to Space Shuttle main engine, based on observations that both vibrations in bearings and intensities of visible light emitted at specific wavelengths by exhaust plume of engine indicate wear and incipient failure of bearings. Applicable to monitoring "health" of other machinery via spectra of vibrations and electromagnetic emissions from exhausts. Concept related to one described in "Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage", (MFS-29734).

  6. Novel Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System for Turbopumps, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ASRI proposes to develop an advanced and commercially viable Non-Intrusive Vibration Monitoring System (NI-VMS) which can provide effective on-line/off-line engine...

  7. Cryogenic systems for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatain, D.; Perin, J.P.; Bonnay, P.; Bouleau, E.; Chichoux, M.; Communal, D.; Manzagol, J.; Viargues, F.; Brisset, D.; Lamaison, V.; Paquignon, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Low Temperatures Laboratory of CEA/Grenoble (France) is involved in the development of cryogenic systems for inertial fusion since a ten of years. A conceptual design for the cryogenic infrastructure of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility has been proposed. Several prototypes have been designed, built and tested like for example the 1500 bars cryo-compressor for the targets filling, the target positioner and the thermal shroud remover. The HIPER project will necessitate the development of such equipments. The main difference is that this time, the cryogenic targets are direct drive targets. The first phase of HIPER experiments is a single shot period. Based oil the experience gained the last years, not only by our laboratory but also by Omega and G.A teams, we could design the new HIPER equipments for this phase. Some experimental results obtained with the prototypes of the LMJ cryogenic system are given and a first conceptual design for the HIPER single shot cryogenic system is shown. (authors)

  8. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel cryogenic coupling will be designed and modeled. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the coupling is based on patented Venturi-Offset...

  9. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  10. Manufacture of Novel Cryogenic Thermal Protection Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA SBIR solicitation X8 "Space Cryogenic Systems" under subtopic X8.01, "Cryogenic Fluid Transfer and...

  11. Low evaporation rate storage media for cryogenic liquids, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Considerable design work has been devoted to the development of cryogenic liquid storage containers. Containers which hold cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen,...

  12. Advanced Sprayable Composite Coating for Cryogenic Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA solicitation X10 "Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer" under subtopic X.01 "Cryogenic Fluid...

  13. In-Space Cryogenic VOST Connect/Disconnect, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two novel cryogenic couplings will be designed, fabricated and tested. Intended for in-space use at cryogenic propellant depots, the couplings are based on patented...

  14. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-01-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ∼12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ∼14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ∼ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  15. Cryogenic Thermometer Calibration Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Thermeau, J P

    1998-01-01

    A cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and is being commissioned in preparation for the very stringent requirements on the temperature control of the LHC superconducting magnets. The temperature is traceable in the 1.5 to 30 K range to standards maintained in a national metrological laboratory by using a set of Rhodium-Iron temperature sensors of metrological quality. The calibration facility is designed for calibrating simultaneously 60 industrial cryogenic thermometers in the 1.5 K to 300 K temperature range, a thermometer being a device that includes both a temperature sensor and the wires heat-intercept. The thermometers can be calibrated in good and degraded vacuum or immersed in the surrounding fluid and at different Joule self-heating conditions that match those imposed by signal conditioners used in large cryogenic machinery. The calibration facility can be operated in an automatic mode and all the control and safety routines are handled by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)...

  16. Cryogenics for Particle Accelerators and Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P; Vandoni, Giovanna; Wagner, U

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenics has become a key ancillary technology of particle accelerators and detectors, contributing to their sustained development over the last fifty years. Conversely, this development has produced new challenges and markets for cryogenics, resulting in a fruitful symbiotic relation which materialized in significant technology transfer and technical progress. This began with the use of liquid hydrogen and deuterium in the targets and bubble chambers of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. It developed more recently with increasing amounts of liquefied noble gases - mainly argon, but also krypton and even today xenon - in calorimeters. In parallel with these applications, the availability of practical type II superconductors from the early 1960s triggered the use of superconductivity in large spectrometer magnets - mostly driven by considerations of energy savings - and the corresponding development of helium cryogenics. It is however the generalized application of superconductivity in particle accelerators - RF ac...

  17. Tensile and Compressive Mechanical Behavior of IM7/PETI-5 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, Karen Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    In order for future space transportation vehicles to be considered economically viable, the extensive use of lightweight materials is critical. For spacecraft with liquid fueled rocket engines, one area identified as a potential source for significant weight reduction is the replacement of traditional metallic cryogenic fuel tanks with newer designs based on polymer matrix composites. For long-term applications such as those dictated by manned, reusable launch vehicles, an efficient cryo-ta...

  18. 49 CFR 173.316 - Cryogenic liquids in cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... filling density for hydrogen, cryogenic liquid is defined as the percent ratio of the weight of lading in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in cylinders. 173.316 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.316 Cryogenic liquids in...

  19. Compact insert design for cryogenic pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias Rigoberto; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Petitpas, Guillaume; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2017-06-14

    A pressure vessel apparatus for cryogenic capable storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure includes an insert with a parallel inlet duct, a perpendicular inlet duct connected to the parallel inlet. The perpendicular inlet duct and the parallel inlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components. The insert also includes a parallel outlet duct and a perpendicular outlet duct connected to the parallel outlet duct. The perpendicular outlet duct and the parallel outlet duct connect the interior cavity with the external components.

  20. Thermoelectric Module Performance in Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Morita, Ryo; Omoto, Kazuyuki; Koji, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tatsuo; Noishiki, Koji

    Performance of thermoelectric (TE) modules for the TE power conversion system combined with open rack type LNG vaporizer (ORV) is discussed. Most of the conventional BiTe TE modules suffer sudden decrease of the power at cryogenic temperature as low as -160°C. This is called as Mayer-Marschall effect. Authors investigated the cause of this effect and found TE modules that could avoid such effect. Performance data of such TE modules obtained at the cryogenic thermoelectric (CTE) test rig which could realize temperature and fluid dynamic condition of the ORV is presented.

  1. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  2. Amplifier development for multiplexed cryogenic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviranta, Mikko

    2012-12-01

    We make some considerations on the question of driving the cable from the cryogenic stage of refrigerators to the room temperature, in the case of multiplexed detector array systems where a high total Shannon information capacity is required. We have constructed large SQUID arrays for the purpose, some of which exhibit lower than 5 × 10-8 Φ0 Hz-1/2 flux noise at 4.2 K and do not require magnetic shielding in a typical laboratory environment. The option of using class-D amplifiers to reduce the cryogenic heat load is briefly reviewed.

  3. Explosive Evaporating Phenomena of Cryogenic Fluids by Direct Contacting Normal Temperature Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Watanabe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic fluids have characteristics such as thermal stratification and flashing by pressure release in storage vessel. The mixture of the extreme low temperature fluid and the normal temperature fluid becomes the cause which causes pressure vessel and piping system crush due to explosive boiling and rapid freezing. In recent years in Japan, the demand of cryogenic fluids like a LH2, LNG is increasing because of the advance of fuel cell device technology, hydrogen of engine, and stream of consciousness for environmental agreement. These fuel liquids are cryogenic fluids. On the other hand, as for fisheries as well, the use of a source of energy that environment load is small has been being a pressing need. And, the need of the ice is high, as before, for keeping freshness of marine products in fisheries. Therefore, we carried out the experiments related to promotion of evaporating cryogenic fluids and generation of ice, in the contact directly of the water and liquid nitrogen. From the results of visualization, phenomena of explosive evaporating and ice forming were observed by using video camera.

  4. Conceptual design of the cryogenic system and estimation of the recirculated power for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Qiu, Lilong; Li, Junjun; Wang, Zhaoliang; Ren, Yong; Wang, Xianwei; Li, Guoqiang; Gao, Xiang; Bi, Yanfang

    2017-01-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is the next tokamak in China’s roadmap for realizing commercial fusion energy. The CFETR cryogenic system is crucial to creating and maintaining operational conditions for its superconducting magnet system and thermal shields. The preliminary conceptual design of the CFETR cryogenic system has been carried out with reference to that of ITER. It will provide an average capacity of 75 to 80 kW at 4.5 K and a peak capacity of 1300 kW at 80 K. The electric power consumption of the cryogenic system is estimated to be 24 MW, and the gross building area is about 7000 m2. The relationships among the auxiliary power consumed by the cryogenic system, the fusion power gain and the recirculated power of CFETR are discussed, with the suggestion that about 52% of the electric power produced by CFETR in phase II must be recirculated to run the fusion test reactor.

  5. Development and flight test of metal-lined CFRP cryogenic tank for reusable rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Ken; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Sato, Eiichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Namiki, Fumiharu; Tanaka, Kohtaro; Watabe, Yoko

    2005-07-01

    A cryogenic tank made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) shell with aluminum thin liner has been designed as a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank for an ISAS reusable launch vehicle, and the function of it has been proven by repeated flights onboard the test vehicle called reusable vehicle testing (RVT) in October 2003. The liquid hydrogen tank has to be a pressure vessel, because the fuel of the engine of the test vehicle is supplied by fuel pressure. The pressure vessel of a combination of the outer shell of CFRP for strength element at a cryogenic temperature and the inner liner of aluminum for gas barrier has shown excellent weight merit for this purpose. Interfaces such as tank outline shape, bulk capacity, maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP), thermal insulation, pipe arrangement, and measurement of data are also designed to be ready onboard. This research has many aims, not only development of reusable cryogenic composite tank but also the demonstration of repeated operation including thermal cycle and stress cycle, familiarization with test techniques of operation of cryogenic composite tanks, and the accumulation of data for future design of tanks, vehicle structures, safety evaluation, and total operation systems.

  6. Performance of Magnetic-Superconductor Non-Contact Harmonic Drive for Cryogenic Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Perez-Diaz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic drives are profusely used in aerospace mainly because of their compactness and large reduction ratio. However, their use in cryogenic environments is still a challenge. Lubrication and fatigue are non-trivial issues under these conditions. The objective of the Magnetic-Superconductor Cryogenic Non-contact Harmonic Drive (MAGDRIVE project, funded by the EU Space FP7, is to design, build, and test a new concept of MAGDRIVE. Non-contact interactions among magnets, soft magnetic materials, and superconductors are efficiently used to provide a high reduction ratio gear that smoothly and naturally operates at cryogenic environments. The limiting elements of conventional harmonic drives (teeth, flexspline, and ball bearings are substituted by contactless mechanical components (magnetic gear and superconducting magnetic bearings. The absence of contact between moving parts prevents wear, lubricants are no longer required, and the operational lifetime is greatly increased. This is the first mechanical reducer in mechanical engineering history without any contact between moving parts. In this paper, the test results of a −1:20 inverse reduction ratio MAGDRIVE prototype are reported. In these tests, successful operation at 40 K and 10−3 Pa was demonstrated for more than 1.5 million input cycles. A maximum torque of 3 N·m and an efficiency of 80% were demonstrated. The maximum tested input speed was 3000 rpm, six times the previous existing record for harmonic drives at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Austenitic Steels at Low Temperature: Joint International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, T; ICEC-ICMC

    1983-01-01

    The need for alternate energy sources has led to the develop­ ment of prototype fusion and MHD reactors. Both possible energy systems in current designs usually require the use of magnetic fields for plasma confinement and concentration. For the creation and maintenance of large 5 to 15 tesla magnetic fields, supercon­ ducting magnets appear more economical. But the high magnetic fields create large forces, and the complexities of the conceptual reactors create severe space restrictions. The combination of re­ quirements, plus the desire to keep construction costs at a mini­ mum, has created a need for stronger structural alloys for service at liquid helium temperature (4 K). The complexity of the required structures requires that these alloys be weldable. Furthermore, since the plasma is influenced by magnetic fields and since magnet­ ic forces from the use of ferromagnetic materials in many configur­ ations may be additive, the best structural alloy for most applica­ tions should be nonmagnetic. Thes...

  8. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Options for the Future Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Fred; Kuck, Fritz; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The main engines for the Future Shuttle will focus on improved safety and operability. Performance enhancements may also be required for vehicle safety purposes to achieve more desirable abort scenarios. This paper discusses the potential improvements that will be considered for implementation into the Future Shuttle. Integrated engine and vehicle health management systems will achieve additional system-level reliability improvements over those currently in development. Advanced instrumentation for detecting leaks, analyzing component wear and degradation, and providing sophisticated operational data will be used for reliable engine control and scheduling maintenance operations. A new nozzle and main combustion chamber (MCC) will reduce failure probability by 50% and allow for higher thrust capability without requiring the entire engine to be redesigned. Turbopump improvements may range from minor component improvements to using 3rd-generation pumps built on the advanced concepts demonstrated by the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) program and the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) prototype engines.The main engines for the Future Shuttle will focus on improved safety and operability. Performance enhancements may also be required for vehicle safety purposes to achieve more desirable abort scenarios. This paper discusses the potential improvements that will be considered for implementation into the Future Shuttle. Integrated engine and vehicle health management systems will achieve additional system-level reliability improvements over those currently in development. Advanced instrumentation for detecting leaks, analyzing component wear and degradation, and providing sophisticated operational data will be used for reliable engine control and scheduling maintenance operations. A new nozzle and main combustion chamber (MCC) will reduce failure probability by 50% and allow for higher thrust capability without requiring the entire engine to be redesigned. Turbopump

  9. A cryogenic DAC operating down to 4.2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. T.; Lehmann, T.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a 10 bit CMOS current steering digital to analog converter (DAC) that operates from room temperature to as low as 4.2 K. It works as the core part of a cryogenic Silicon quantum computer controller circuit producing rapid control gate voltage pulses for quantum bits (qubits) initialization. An improved analog calibration method with a unique unit current cell design is included in the D/A converter structure to overcome the extended cryogenic nonlinear and mismatch effects. The DAC retains its 10 bit linear monotonic behavior over the wide temperature range and it drives a 50 Ω load to 516 mV with a full scale rise time of 10 ns. The differential non-linearity (DNL) of the converter is 0.35LSB while its average power consumption is 32.18 mW from a 3 V power supply. The complete converter is fabricated using a commercial 0.5 μm 1 poly 3 metal Silicon on Sapphire (SOS) CMOS process. He briefly worked as a Lecturer in the Stamford University Bangladesh prior to starting his Ph.D. in 2012 in the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW. His Ph.D. research is focused on cryogenic electronics for Quantum Computer Interface. His main research interests are in designing data converters for ultra-low temperature electronics and biomedical applications. He spent two years as a Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, U.K., where he worked with biologically inspired artificial neural systems. From 1997 to 2000, he was an Assistant Professor in electronics at the Technical University of Denmark, working with low-power low-noise low-voltage analog and mixed analog-digital integrated circuits. From 2001 to 2003 he was Principal Engineer with Cochlear Ltd., Australia, where he was involved in the design of the world's first fully implantable cochlear implant. Today he is Associate Professor in microelectronics at the University of New South Wales, Australia. He has authored over 100 journal papers, conference papers, book chapters

  10. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  11. Cryogenic refrigeration for cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gistau-Baguer, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Neutron moderation by means of a fluid at cryogenic temperature is a very interesting way to obtain cold neutrons. Today, a number of nuclear research reactors are using this technology. This paper deals with thermodynamics and technology which are used for cooling Cold Neutron Sources

  12. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  13. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  14. Transient boiling crisis of cryogenic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deev, [No Value; Kharitonov, VS; Kutsenko, KV; Lavrukhin, AA

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new physical model of boiling crisis under rapid increase of power on the heated surface. The calculation of the time interval of the transition to film boiling in cryogenic liquids was carried out depending on heat flux and pressure. The obtained results are in good

  15. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  16. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  17. Solid State Circuits for Cryogenic Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrac, D.; Spencer, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tests confirm operation of five commercial semiconductor devices at cryogenic temperatures. The five devices - one tunnel diode, one field-effect transistor, and three CMOS integrated circuits - all perform well in circuits immersed in liquid-helium bath. For some tests, bath temperature was reduced to 1,25K by pumping.

  18. Comparison of cryogenic low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, M.; Pernau, H.-F.; Strunk, C.; Scheer, E.; Pietsch, T.

    2017-11-01

    Low-temperature electronic transport measurements with high energy resolution require both effective low-pass filtering of high-frequency input noise and an optimized thermalization of the electronic system of the experiment. In recent years, elaborate filter designs have been developed for cryogenic low-level measurements, driven by the growing interest in fundamental quantum-physical phenomena at energy scales corresponding to temperatures in the few millikelvin regime. However, a single filter concept is often insufficient to thermalize the electronic system to the cryogenic bath and eliminate spurious high frequency noise. Moreover, the available concepts often provide inadequate filtering to operate at temperatures below 10 mK, which are routinely available now in dilution cryogenic systems. Herein we provide a comprehensive analysis of commonly used filter types, introduce a novel compact filter type based on ferrite compounds optimized for the frequency range above 20 GHz, and develop an improved filtering scheme providing adaptable broad-band low-pass characteristic for cryogenic low-level and quantum measurement applications at temperatures down to few millikelvin.

  19. Cryogenic carbonates in cave environments: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Onac, B. P.; Persoiu, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2008), s. 84-96 ISSN 1040-6182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : cryogenic cave carbonate * cave * Romania * stable Isotopes * isotope fractionation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.482, year: 2008

  20. Testing the LHC magnet cryogenic systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The magnets in the LHC will be cooled to 1.9 K (- 270.3°C). To keep this 27 km long machine at such a low temperatures requires one of the largest refrigeration systems in the world. These pictures show the cryogenics plant in the testing area.

  1. Cryogenics system: strategy to achieve nominal performance and reliable operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Casas, J; Claudet, S; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Perin, A; Perinic, G; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    During the LHC operation in 2010 and 2011, the cryogenic system has achieved an availability level fulfilling the overall requirement. To reach this level, the cryogenic system has profited like many other beam-dependent systems from the reduced beam parameters. Therefore, impacts of some failures occurred during the LHC operation were mitigated by using the overcapacity margin, the existing built-in redundancy in between adjacent sector cryogenic plants and the "cannibalization" of spares on two idle cryogenic plants. These two first years of operation were also crucial to identify the weaknesses of the present cryogenic maintenance plan and new issues like SEUs. After the LS1, nominal beam parameters are expected and the mitigated measures will be less effective or not applicable at all. Consequently, a consolidation plan to improve the MTBF and the MTTR of the LHC cryogenic system is under definition. Concerning shutdown periods, the present cryogenic sectorization imposes some restrictions in the type of ...

  2. New cryogenic temperature monitor: PLT-HPT-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera Curbelo, Teodora Aleida; Martín-Fernández, Sergio Gonzáles; Hoyland, R.; Vega-Moreno, A.; Cozar Castellano, Juan; Gómez Reñasco, M. F.; Aguiar-González, M.; Pérez de Taoro, Angeles; Sánchez-de la Rosa, V.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Génova-Santos, R.

    2016-07-01

    The PLT-HPT-32, a new cryogenic temperature monitor, has been developed by the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC) and an external engineering company (Sergio González Martín-Fernandez). The PLT-HPT-32 temperature monitor offers precision measurement in a wide range of cryogenic and higher-temperature applications with the ability to easily monitor up to 32 sensor channels. It provides better measurement performance in applications where researchers need to ensure accuracy and precision in their low cryogenic temperature monitoring. The PLT-HPT-32 supports PTC RTDs such as platinum sensors, and diodes such as the Lake Shore DT-670 Series. Used with silicon diodes, it provides accurate measurements in cryo-cooler applications from 16 K to above room temperature. The resolution of the measurement is less than 0.1K. Measurements can be displayed in voltage units or Kelvin units. For it, two different tables can be used. One can be programmed by the user, and the other one corresponds to Lake Shore DT670 sensor that comes standard. There are two modes of measuring, the instantaneous mode and averaged mode. In this moment, all channels must work in the same mode but in the near future it expected to be used in blocks of eight channels. The instantaneous mode takes three seconds to read all channels. The averaged mode takes one minute to average twenty samples in all channels. Alarm thresholds can be configured independently for each input. The alarm events, come from the first eight channels, can activate the unit's relay outputs for hard-wired triggering of other systems or audible annunciators. Activate relays on high, low, or both alarms for any input. For local monitoring, "Stand-Alone Mode", the front panel of the PLT-HPT-32 features a bright liquid crystal display with an LED backlight that shows up to 32 readings simultaneously. Plus, monitoring can be done over a network "Remote Control Mode". Using the Ethernet port on the PLT-HPT-32, you

  3. Vacuum Bellows, Vacuum Piping, Cryogenic Break, and Copper Joint Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design in preparation for construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak. During the course of this work, questions have arisen in regard to safety barriers and equipment reliability as important facets of system design. The vacuum system designers have asked several questions about the reliability of vacuum bellows and vacuum piping. The vessel design team has asked about the reliability of electrical breaks and copper-copper joints used in cryogenic piping. Research into operating experiences of similar equipment has been performed to determine representative failure rates for these components. The following chapters give the research results and the findings for vacuum system bellows, power plant stainless steel piping (amended to represent vacuum system piping), cryogenic system electrical insulating breaks, and copper joints.

  4. Thermal Expansion and Magnetostriction Measurements at Cryogenic Temperature Using the Strain Gauge Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Huiming; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Huang, Chuangjun; Guo, Shibin; Shan, Yi; Li, Laifeng

    2018-01-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction, the strain responses of a material to temperature and a magnetic field, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely useful to study electronic and phononic properties, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and other interesting phenomena in cryogenic engineering and materials science. However, traditional dilatometers cannot provide magnetic field and ultra-low temperature (thermal expansion and magnetostriction at cryogenic temperature using the strain gauge method based on a Physical Properties Measurements System (PPMS). The interfacing software and automation were developed using LabVIEW. The sample temperature range can be tuned continuously between 1.8 and 400 K. With this PPMS-aided measuring system, we can observe temperature and magnetic field dependence of the linear thermal expansion of different solid materials easily and accurately.

  5. Thermal Expansion and Magnetostriction Measurements at Cryogenic Temperature Using the Strain Gauge Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal expansion and magnetostriction, the strain responses of a material to temperature and a magnetic field, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely useful to study electronic and phononic properties, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and other interesting phenomena in cryogenic engineering and materials science. However, traditional dilatometers cannot provide magnetic field and ultra-low temperature (<77 K environment easily. This paper describes the design and test results of thermal expansion and magnetostriction at cryogenic temperature using the strain gauge method based on a Physical Properties Measurements System (PPMS. The interfacing software and automation were developed using LabVIEW. The sample temperature range can be tuned continuously between 1.8 and 400 K. With this PPMS-aided measuring system, we can observe temperature and magnetic field dependence of the linear thermal expansion of different solid materials easily and accurately.

  6. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  7. Hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Nobuo; Mitsui, Jin

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation in fusion fuel cycle and tritium recovery from heavy water reactor are very important, and therefore the early establishment of these separation techniques are desired. The cryogenic distillation method in particular is promising for the separation of hydrogen isotope and the recovery of high concentrated tritium. The studies of hydrogen isotope separation by cryogenic distillation method have been carried out by using the experimental apparatus made for the first time in Japan. The separation of three components (H 2 -HD-D 2 ) under total reflux conditions was got by using the packing tower of 500 mm height. It was confirmed that the Height Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) was 20 - 30 mm for the vapor's line velocity of 20 - 80 mm/s. (author)

  8. Cryogenic performance of single polymer polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli-Veltin, Bilim

    2018-03-01

    The main objective of the experimental study detailed in this paper is to investigate the performance of fully recyclable, lightweight, low-cost, thermoplastic Polypropylene (PP) composite tapes at low temperatures. Coupons made of [±45] and [0/90] laminates are subjected to tensile and 3-point bending tests at room temperature as well as at -196 °C. In addition to that, cryogenic low velocity impact tests at 268 J and 777 J impact energies are performed on tubular structures. The results are indicating that the laminates made of PP tapes have sufficient ductility for cryogenic applications. Low velocity impact tests showed that the viscoelastic behavior of the material is preserved, even at such low temperatures and more than 72% of impact energy is absorbed by the material.

  9. Cryogenic fluid management (base R/T): Cryogenic fluid systems, Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE), Cryogenic Orbital Hydrogen Experiment (COHE). (Transportation focused technology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Pat

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The concluded remarks are: (1) advanced cryogenic fluid systems technology is enhancing or enabling to all known transportation scenarios for space exploration; (2) an integrated/coordinated program involving LeRC/MSFC has been formulated to address all known CFM needs - new needs should they develop, can be accommodated within available skills/facilities; (3) all required/experienced personnel and facilities are finally in place - data from initial ground-based experiments is being collected and analyzed - small scale STS experiments are nearing flight - program is beginning to yield significant results; (4) future proposed funding to primarily come from two sources; and (5) cryogenic fluid experimentation is essential to provide required technology and assure implementation in future NASA missions.

  10. Alignment Stage for a Cryogenic Dilatometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudik, Matthew; Moore, Donald

    2005-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom alignment stage has been designed and built for use in a cryogenic dilatometer that is used to measure thermal strains. The alignment stage enables precise adjustments of the positions and orientations of optical components to be used in the measurements and, once adjustments have been completed, keeps the components precisely aligned during cryogenic-dilatometer operations that can last as long as several days. The alignment stage includes a case, a circular tilt/tip platform, and a variety of flexural couplings between the case and the platform, all machined from a single block of the low-thermal-expansion iron/nickel alloy Invar, in order to minimize effects of temperature gradients and to obtain couplings that are free of stiction and friction. There are three sets of flexural couplings clocked at equal angles of 120 degrees around the platform, constituting a three-point kinematic support system.

  11. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  12. Cryogenic 3-D Detectors for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    Space and ground-based astronomy is currently undergoing a revolution in detector technology with the advent of cryogenic sensors operating in the sub-Kelvin temperature range. These detectors provide non-dispersive energy resolution at optical through gamma ray energies (e.g, E/Δ E ˜ 1500 at 6 keV), high time resolution (msec or better), and can be made into arrays using a combination of microlithography and multiplexing using SQUID amplifiers. The application of such ``3-D'' detector technology to solar physics could lead to significant advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection in the Sun, including X-ray jet phenomena, and active region dynamics. In this talk, I will review some of the basic principles of cryogenic 3-D detectors, current astronomical applications, and their potential for future NASA solar physics Explorer-class missions. This work was supported in part by the Lockheed Martin Independent Research Program

  13. Cryogenic temperature measurement for large applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ylöstalo, J; Kyynäräinen, J; Niinikoski, T O; Voutilainen, R

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a resistance thermometry system for the acquisition, control and monitoring of temperature in large-scale cryogenic applications. The resistance of the sensor is converted to a voltage using a self-balancing AC bridge circuit featuring square-wave excitation currents down to 1 nA. The system is easily scalable and includes intelligent features to treat special situations such as magnet quenches differently from normal operation.

  14. A breath of fresh air for cryogenics training

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Whether you work full-time in a cryogenic installation or are required to handle cryogenic substances temporarily, you need to have followed the appropriate safety training.   Photo: Christoph Balle. Two new training courses are now available in English and French at CERN: “Cryogenic Safety – Fundamentals” (at the Prévessin Training Centre) and “Cryogenic Safety – Helium Transfer” (at the Cryolab). The first covers the content of levels 1 and 2 of the old “Cryogenic Safety” course. The second is a completely new course for CERN: it covers specific aspects of the transfer of liquid helium, such as the evaporation process of helium and the associated risks to human health (asphyxia due to displacement of oxygen), the colour code for gas bottles, etc. These training modules have been rewritten in response to the increase in the number of projects involving cryogenics and following various related incident...

  15. Impact of the Cryogen Free Revolution on Neutron Scattering Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, Oleg

    A global shortage of helium gas can seriously jeopardise the scientific programmes of neutron scattering laboratories due to the use of cryogenic sample environment in the majority of the neutron scattering experiments. Recently developed cryogen-free technology allows a significant reduction or even a complete elimination of liquid helium consumption. Here we review the impact of the cryogen-free revolution on cryogenic equipment used at large neutron facilities, such as cryostats, dilution refrigerators, superconducting magnets and other cryogenic systems. Particular attention is given to the newly developed superconducting magnets for neutron diffraction and spectroscopy experiments. Use of the cryogen-free approach, as well as cutting-edge superconducting magnet technology and advanced neutron optics allows researcher to achieve extraordinary performance in their experiments, opening up new opportunities in neutron scattering research.

  16. Investigation of a working fluid for cryogenic energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszak, P.; Poliński, J.; Chorowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cryogenic energy storage (CES) systems are promising alternatives to existing electrical energy storage technologies such as a pumped hydroelectric storage (PHS) or compressed air energy storage (CAES). In CES systems, excess electrical energy is used to liquefy a cryogenic fluid. The liquid can be stored in large cryogenic tanks for a long time. When a demand for the electricity is high, the liquid cryogen is pumped to high pressure and then warmed in a heat exchanger using ambient temperature or an available waste heat source. The vaporized cryogen is then used to drive a turbine and generate the electricity. Most research on cryogenic energy storage focuses on liquid air energy storage, as atmospheric air is widely available and therefore it does not limit a location of the energy storage plant. Nevertheless, CES with other gases as the working fluids can exhibit a higher efficiency. In this research a performance analysis of simple CES systems with several working fluids was performed.

  17. Safety Aspects of Big Cryogenic Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorowski, M.; Fydrych, J.; Poliński, J.

    2010-04-01

    Superconductivity and helium cryogenics are key technologies in the construction of large scientific instruments, like accelerators, fusion reactors or free electron lasers. Such cryogenic systems may contain more than hundred tons of helium, mostly in cold and high-density phases. In spite of the high reliability of the systems, accidental loss of the insulation vacuum, pipe rupture or rapid energy dissipation in the cold helium can not be overlooked. To avoid the danger of over-design pressure rise in the cryostats, they need to be equipped with a helium relief system. Such a system is comprised of safety valves, bursting disks and optionally cold or warm quench lines, collectors and storage tanks. Proper design of the helium safety relief system requires a good understanding of worst case scenarios. Such scenarios will be discussed, taking into account different possible failures of the cryogenic system. In any case it is necessary to estimate heat transfer through degraded vacuum superinsulation and mass flow through the valves and safety disks. Even if the design of the helium relief system does not foresee direct helium venting into the environment, an occasional emergency helium spill may happen. Helium propagation in the atmosphere and the origins of oxygen-deficiency hazards will be discussed.

  18. Properties of strain gages at cryogenic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Nobuo; Fujiyoshi, Toshimitsu.

    1978-01-01

    At the time of developing superconduction generators, the stress measurement for rotor parts is required to grasp the safety and performance of the rotor at cryogenic temperature, which is cooled with liquid helium. In case of carrying out the stress measurement with strain gages, the problems are as follows. The strain gages and lead wires are exposed to cryogenic temperature from 4 to 10 K and strong magnetic field of about 3T, and subjected to high centrifugal acceleration of about 500G. In order to establish the techniques of the stress measurement under such conditions, the adhesives and damp-proof coatings for strain gages and strain gages themselves in Japan and foreign countries were examined on the properties at cryogenic temperature. As for the properties of strain gages, mainly the apparent strain owing to temperature change was investigated, and the change of the gage factors was studies only at liquid nitrogen temperature. The stress measurement with strain gages at low temperature had been studied in detail down to liquid nitrogen temperature concerning LNG tanks. The experimental apparatus, the samples, the testing methods and the test results of cooling tests on adhesives and damp-proof coatings, and the temperature characteristics of strain gages are reported. The usable adhesives and coatings were found, and correction by accurate temperature measurement is required for apparent strain. (Kako, I.)

  19. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Anindya [Fermilab; Rane, Tejas [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  20. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Anindya; Rane, Tejas; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2017-12-01

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation are determined. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS are discussed. The supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule are computed through simulation study. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation are made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.

  1. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  2. Cryogenic Safety HSE Seminar | 21 - 23 September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the LHC being the world’s largest superconducting installation, it’s not surprising that CERN is a world leader in cryogenic safety. On 21 and 22 September, over 100 experts in cryogenic safety will be coming to CERN to take part in CERN’s first Cryogenic Safety Seminar, which aims to stimulate collaboration and further the state of the art in this increasingly important field.  

  3. Texture comparison between cold rolled and cryogenically rolled pure copper

    OpenAIRE

    Lapeire, Linsey; Sidor, J; Lombardia, EM; Verbeken, Kim; De Graeve, Iris; Terryn, H; Kestens, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a considerable scientific interest in bulk ultrafine grained materials, due to their potential for superior mechanical properties. One of the possible formation methods of nano-grained materials is cryogenic rolling. The influence of rolling at cryogenic temperatures has been investigated. Significant differences in the textures and the microstructures can be observed between the cryogenically rolled copper and conventionally cold rolled copper, reduced to the same thickness.

  4. Passive Capillary Pumped Cryocooling System for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Significant cost and weight savings of a space mission can be achieved by improving the cryogenic storage technology. Added cryogen mass due to the cryogen boil-off,...

  5. Fluid design studies of integrated modular engine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfield, Bruce; Carek, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed to develop a fluid system design and show the feasibility of constructing an integrated modular engine (IME) configuration, using an expander cycle engine. The primary design goal of the IME configuration was to improve the propulsion system reliability. The IME fluid system was designed as a single fault tolerant system, while minimizing the required fluid components. This study addresses the design of the high pressure manifolds, turbopumps and thrust chambers for the IME configuration. A physical layout drawing was made, which located each of the fluid system components, manifolds and thrust chambers. Finally, a comparison was made between the fluid system designs of an IME system and a non-network (clustered) engine system.

  6. The Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Khedkar, Nitin K.; Jagtap, Bhushan; Singh, T. P.

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the cutting tool life is important and economic factor to reduce the tooling as well as manufacturing cost. The tool life is improved considerably by 92 % after cryogenic treatment. The cryogenic treatment is a one-time permanent, sub-zero heat treatment that entirely changes cross-section of cutting tool. The cryogenic treatment is carried out with deep freezing of cutting tool materials to enhance physical and mechanical properties. The cryogenic treatment improves mechanical such as hardness, toughness and tribological properties such as wear resistance, coefficient of friction, surface finish, dimensional stability and stress relief. The deep cryogenic treatment is the most beneficial treatment applied on cutting tools. The cryogenic treatment is the most advanced heat treatment and popular to improve performance of the cutting tool. The optimization of cryogenic treatment variables is necessary to improve tool life. This study reviews the effects of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, tribological properties of tool steels and machining applications of cutting tool by investigating the surface and performing the surface characterization test like SEM. The economy of cutting tool can be achieved by deep cryogenic treatment.

  7. Highly Flexible and Extremely Durable Polyimide Cryogenic Insulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovative insulation would greatly enhance the usability of, and reduce the inherent losses associated with, cryogenic fuel delivery and storage...

  8. Wrapped-MLI: Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Piping, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New NASA vehicles (EDS, Orion, landers & orbiting fuel depots) need improved cryogenic propellant transfer & storage for long duration missions. Current...

  9. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  10. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  11. Cryogenic Clamp-on Ultrasonic Flowmeters using Single Crystal Piezoelectric Transducers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clamp-on ultrasound cryogenic flowmeters using single crystal piezoelectric transducers are proposed to enable reliable, accurate cryogenic instrumentation needs in...

  12. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  13. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Pawlak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common −65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications—superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor.

  14. Design and test of a small two stage counter-rotating turbine for rocket engine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F. W.; Branstrom, B. R.; Finke, A. K.; Johnson, P. D.; Rowey, R. J.; Veres, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for application in an advanced upper stage rocket engine turbopump. This engine will employ an oxygen/hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low flow rates result in very small airfoil diameter, height and chord. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The unconventional approach employed to meet this challenge is described, along with the detailed design process and resulting airfoil configurations. The method and results of full scale aerodynamic performance evaluation testing of both one and two stage configurations, as well as operation without the secondary stage stator are presented. The overall results of this effort illustrate that advanced aerodynamic design tools and hardware fabrication techniques have provided improved capability to produce small high performance turbines for advanced rocket engines.

  15. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Version 2.0: Program user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman

    1993-01-01

    This Program User's Guide discusses the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design features and capabilities modeled in the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS): Version 2.0 program (referred to as NESS throughout the remainder of this document), as well as its operation. NESS was upgraded to include many new modeling capabilities not available in the original version delivered to NASA LeRC in Dec. 1991, NESS's new features include the following: (1) an improved input format; (2) an advanced solid-core NERVA-type reactor system model (ENABLER 2); (3) a bleed-cycle engine system option; (4) an axial-turbopump design option; (5) an automated pump-out turbopump assembly sizing option; (6) an off-design gas generator engine cycle design option; (7) updated hydrogen properties; (8) an improved output format; and (9) personal computer operation capability. Sample design cases are presented in the user's guide that demonstrate many of the new features associated with this upgraded version of NESS, as well as design modeling features associated with the original version of NESS.

  16. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Version 2.0: Program user's guide. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Petrosky, L.

    1993-03-01

    This Program User's Guide discusses the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design features and capabilities modeled in the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS): Version 2.0 program (referred to as NESS throughout the remainder of this document), as well as its operation. NESS was upgraded to include many new modeling capabilities not available in the original version delivered to NASA LeRC in Dec. 1991, NESS's new features include the following: (1) an improved input format; (2) an advanced solid-core NERVA-type reactor system model (ENABLER 2); (3) a bleed-cycle engine system option; (4) an axial-turbopump design option; (5) an automated pump-out turbopump assembly sizing option; (6) an off-design gas generator engine cycle design option; (7) updated hydrogen properties; (8) an improved output formnd (9) personal computer operation capability. Sample design cases are presented in the user's guide that demonstrate many of the new features associated with this upgraded version of NESS, as well as design modeling features associated with the original version of NESS

  17. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing.

  18. Cryogenic Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasunas, John C.; Francis, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and lightweight mechanism has been developed to accurately move a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) scan mirror (a cube corner) in a near-linear fashion with near constant speed at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation includes a slide mechanism to restrict motion to one dimension, an actuator to drive the motion, and a linear velocity transducer (LVT) to measure the speed. The cube corner mirror is double-passed in one arm of the FTS; double-passing is required to compensate for optical beam shear resulting from tilting of the moving cube corner. The slide, actuator, and LVT are off-the-shelf components that are capable of cryogenic vacuum operation. The actuator drives the slide for the required travel of 2.5 cm. The LVT measures translation speed. A proportional feedback loop compares the LVT voltage with the set voltage (speed) to derive an error signal to drive the actuator and achieve near constant speed. When the end of the scan is reached, a personal computer reverses the set voltage. The actuator and LVT have no moving parts in contact, and have magnetic properties consistent with cryogenic operation. The unlubricated slide restricts motion to linear travel, using crossed roller bearings consistent with 100-million- stroke operation. The mechanism tilts several arc seconds during transport of the FTS mirror, which would compromise optical fringe efficiency when using a flat mirror. Consequently, a cube corner mirror is used, which converts a tilt into a shear. The sheared beam strikes (at normal incidence) a flat mirror at the end of the FTS arm with the moving mechanism, thereby returning upon itself and compensating for the shear

  19. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cryogenic treatment is a recent advancement in the field of machining to improve the properties of cutting tool materials. Tungsten carbide is the most commonly used cutting tool material in the industry and the technique can also be extended to it. Although the importance of tempering after cryogenic treatment has been ...

  20. Texture comparison between cold rolled and cryogenically rolled pure copper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapeire, L.; Sidor, J.; Martinez Lombardia, E.; Verbeken, K.; De Graeve, I.; Terryn, H.A.; Kestens, L.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a considerable scientific interest in bulk ultrafine grained materials, due to their potential for superior mechanical properties. One of the possible formation methods of nano-grained materials is cryogenic rolling. The influence of rolling at cryogenic temperatures has been

  1. Commissioning of cryogenic system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bin; He, Chongchao; Li, Na; Ding, Meiying; Wang, Yaqiong; Yu, Zhang; He, Kun

    2017-12-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source(CSNS) cryogenic system provides supercritical cryogenic hydrogen to neutron moderators, including a helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop and hydrogen safety equipment. The helium refrigerator is provided by Linde with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K. Hydrogen loop system mainly includes cryogenic hydrogen pipes, hydrogen circulator cold-box and accumulator cold-box. Cryogenic hydrogen pump, ortho-para convertor, helium-hydrogen heat-exchanger, hydrogen heater and accumulator are integrated in hydrogen circulation cold-box, and accumulator cold-box. Hydrogen safety equipment includes safety valves, rupture disk, hydrogen sensor, flame detector and other equipment to ensure that cryogenic system in dangerous situations will go down, vents, or takes other measures. The cryogenic system commissioning work includes four steps. First, in order to test the refrigerating capacity of refrigerator, when acceptance testing, refrigerator internal heater was used as thermal load. Second, using simulation load as heat load of moderator, hydrogen loop use helium instead of hydrogen, and cooled down to 20 K, then re-warming and test the leak detection of hydrogen loop system. Third, base on the step 2, using hydrogen as working medium, and optimized the control logic. Forth, cryogenic system with the moderators joint commissioning. Now, cryogenic system is connected with the moderators, and the forth step will be carried out in the near future.

  2. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  3. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid may not be shipped unless it was loaded by, or with the consent of, the owner of the tank car. (2) The amount of...

  4. Support assembly for cryogenically coolable low-noise choke waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccrea, F. E. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A compact cryogenically coolable choked waveguide for low-noise input coupling into a cryogenically cooled device, such as a maser or parametric amplifier, utilizes coaxial stainless steel support tubes surrounding the waveguide and connected in cascade to provide a folded low thermal conduction path. The edges of the tubes connected are welded.

  5. The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pavlov, V.N.; Sidorin, A.O.; Yakovenko, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons based on the 22 Na isotope has been designed and constructed at JINR. Positrons emitted from radioactive source 22 Na have a very broad energy spectrum up to 0.5 MeV. To generate monochromatic beam of slow positrons the solid neon is used as a moderator. The solid neon allows forming slow positron beam of the energy of 1.2 eV at the spectrum width of 1 eV. The efficiency of moderation is 1 % of total positron flux

  6. Linear beam raster for cryogenic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, C; Sinkine, N; Wojcik, R

    2005-02-21

    Based on the H-bridge switch technique a linear beam raster system was developed in 2002. The system generates a rectangular raster pattern with highly uniform ({approx}95%) raster density distribution on cryogenic targets. The two raster frequencies are 24.96 and 25.08 kHz. The turning time at the vertex is 200 ns and the scan linearity is 98%. The beam-heating effect on the target is effectively eliminated. The new raster system allows the use of higher beam current toward 200 muA in many of the experimental proposals at end station Hall A and Hall C of the Jefferson lab.

  7. ngVLA Cryogenic Subsystem Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, Al; Urbain, Denis; Grammer, Wes; Durand, S.

    2018-01-01

    The VLA’s success over 35 years of operations stems in part from dramatically upgraded components over the years. The time has come to build a new array to lead the radio astronomical science into its next 40 years. To accomplish that, a next generation VLA (ngVLA) is envisioned to have 214 antennas with diameters of 18m. The core of the array will be centered at the current VLA location, but the arms will extend out to 1000km.The VLA cryogenic subsystem equipment and technology have remained virtually unchanged since the early 1980s. While adequate for a 27-antenna array, scaling the current system for an array of 214 antennas would be prohibitively expensive in terms of operating cost and maintenance. The overall goal is to limit operating cost to within three times the current level, despite having 8 times the number of antennas. To help realize this goal, broadband receivers and compact feeds will be utilized to reduce both the size and number of cryostats required. The current baseline front end concept calls for just two moderately-sized cryostats for the entire 1.2-116 GHz frequency range, as opposed to 8 in the VLA.For the ngVLA cryogenics, our objective is a well-optimized and efficient system that uses state-of-the-art technology to minimize per-antenna power consumption and maximize reliability. Application of modern technologies, such as variable-speed operation for the scroll compressors and cryocooler motor drives, allow the cooling capacity of the system to be dynamically matched to thermal loading in each cryostat. Significantly, power savings may be realized while the maintenance interval of the cryocoolers is also extended.Finally, a receiver designed to minimize thermal loading can produce savings directly translating to lower operating cost when variable-speed drives are used. Multi-layer insulation (MLI) on radiation shields and improved IR filters on feed windows can significantly reduce heat loading.Measurements done on existing cryogenic

  8. Thin Cryogenic X-ray Windows

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Davenport, M; Elias, N; Aune, S; Franz, J

    2009-01-01

    We describe the construction and tests of cryogenic X-ray windows of 47 mm diameter made of 15 ìm thick polypropylene foil glued on a UHV flange and supported with a strongback mesh machined by electro-erosion. These hermetic windows of the solar axion telescope of the CAST experiment at CERN withstand the static and dynamic pressures of the buffer gas that are normally below 130 mbar, but may reach 1.2 bar when the magnet quenches. They were tested at 60 K up to 3.5 bar static pressure without permanent deformation.

  9. Renovation of the Sissi cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    SISSI (high current superconductor secondary ion source) involved a cryo-generator operating in a close circuit when the whole system was put in service in 1994. Since then the cryo-generator has proved to be insufficiently reliable. A new cryogenic system based on an external liquid helium supply has been designed. The helium transfer lines are surrounded by a shield at liquid nitrogen temperature and numerous layers of super-insulators in order to have minimum thermal losses. The installation was integrated to SISSI in summer 1998 and after the first operating period some improvements concerning the cooling procedure have to be considered. (A.C.)

  10. Explosive Boiling of Superheated Cryogenic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Baidakov, V G

    2007-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the description of the kinetics of spontaneous boiling of superheated liquefied gases and their solutions. Experimental results are given on the temperature of accessible superheating, the limits of tensile strength of liquids due to processes of cavitation and the rates of nucleation of classical and quantum liquids. The kinetics of evolution of the gas phase is studied in detail for solutions of cryogenic liquids and gas-saturated fluids. The properties of the critical clusters (bubbles of critical sizes) of the newly evolving gas phase are analyzed for initial st

  11. Eddy current losses at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovsky, V.; Meerovich, V.; Slonim, M.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper analyses effect of thermal processes on eddy-current losses in construction elements of cryogenic and superconducting devices. Maxwell's equations coupled with heat-conduction equation are solved with taking into account the dependence of resistivity, heat capacity and heat-transfer coefficient on temperature. Analysis of losses as a function of magnetic field, frequency and geometry factors is given for the case of thin strip in a uniform magnetic field. It is shown that losses calculated with taking into account the thermal processes may differ from those obtained at constant temperature

  12. Investigating the effects of critical phenomena in premixed methane-oxygen flames at cryogenic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Abishek; Yellapantula, Shashank; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Methane is increasingly becoming viable as a rocket fuel in the latest generation of launch vehicles. In liquid rocket engines, fuel and oxidizer are injected under cryogenic conditions into the combustion chamber. At high pressures, typical of rocket combustion chambers, the propellants exist in supercritical states where the ideal gas thermodynamics are no longer valid. We investigate the effects of real-gas thermodynamics on transcritical laminar premixed methane-oxygen flames. The effect of the real-gas cubic equations of state and high-pressure transport properties on flame dynamics is presented. We also study real-gas effects on the extinction limits of the methane-oxygen flame.

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  14. Effects of cryogenic temperature on the mechanical and failure characteristics of melamine-urea-formaldehyde adhesive plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Choi, Sung-Woong; Park, Doo-Hwan; Park, Seong-Bo; Kim, Seul-Kee; Park, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2018-04-01

    The present study investigates the applicability of melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resin plywood in cryogenic applications, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier insulation systems. Phenolic-formaldehyde (PF) resin plywood has been extensively used as a structural material in industrial applications. However, many shortcomings of PF resin plywood have been reported, and replacement of PF resin plywood with a new material is necessary to resolve these problems. MUF resin plywood has the advantages of short fabrication time, low veneer cost, and economic feasibility compared to PF resin plywood. However, the mechanical and failure characteristics of MUF resin plywood have not yet been investigated at low temperature ranges. For this reason, adapting MUF resin plywood for cryogenic applications has been difficult, despite the many strong points of the material in engineering aspects. In this study, the effects of cryogenic temperature and thermal treatment on the mechanical characteristics of MUF resin plywood are investigated. The performance of MUF resin plywood is compared with that of PF resin plywood to verify the applicability of the material for use as a structural material in LNG insulation systems. The results demonstrate that MUF resin plywood has mechanical properties comparable with those of PF resin plywood, even at cryogenic conditions.

  15. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed Ground Test Article Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to CRYOTE ground test data. The CRYOTE ground test artide was jointly developed by Innovative Engineering Solutions, United Launch Alliance and NASA KSC. The test article was constructed out of a titanium alloy tank, Sapphire 77 composite skin (similar to G10), an external secondary payload adapter ring, thermal vent system, multi layer insulation and various data acquisition instrumentation. In efforts to understand heat loads throughout this system, the GTA (filled with liquid nitrogen for safety purposes) was subjected to a series of tests in a vacuum chamber at Marshall Space Flight Center. By anchoring analytical models against test data, higher fidelity thermal environment predictions can be made for future flight articles which would eventually demonstrate critical cryogenic fluid management technologies such as system chilldown, transfer, pressure control and long term storage. Significant factors that influenced heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation performance, tank fill levels and pressures and even contact conductance coefficients. This report demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established and includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses.

  16. Modelling and control of large cryogenic refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript is concern with both the modeling and the derivation of control schemes for large cryogenic refrigerators. The particular case of those which are submitted to highly variable pulsed heat load is studied. A model of each object that normally compose a large cryo-refrigerator is proposed. The methodology to gather objects model into the model of a subsystem is presented. The manuscript also shows how to obtain a linear equivalent model of the subsystem. Based on the derived models, advances control scheme are proposed. Precisely, a linear quadratic controller for warm compression station working with both two and three pressures state is derived, and a predictive constrained one for the cold-box is obtained. The particularity of those control schemes is that they fit the computing and data storage capabilities of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) with are well used in industry. The open loop model prediction capability is assessed using experimental data. Developed control schemes are validated in simulation and experimentally on the 400W1.8K SBT's cryogenic test facility and on the CERN's LHC warm compression station. (author) [fr

  17. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  18. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  19. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions

  20. Narrow bandpass cryogenic filter for microwave measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, B I; Klimenko, D N; Sultanov, A N; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2013-05-01

    An ultra-wide stopband hairpin bandpass filter with integrated nonuniform transmission lines was designed and fabricated for highly sensitive measurements at cryogenic temperatures down to millikelvin and a frequency range of 10 Hz-10 GHz. The scattering matrices of the filter were characterized at T = 4.2 K. The filter provides a stopband from 10 Hz to 2.2 GHz and from 2.3 GHz to 10 GHz with more than 50 dB and 40 dB of amplitude suppression, respectively. The center frequency of the passband is f0 = 2.25 GHz with a bandwidth Δf = 80 MHz. The maximum insertion loss in the passband is 4 dB. The filter has a 50 Ω input and output impedance, SubMiniature version A connector termination, and significantly reduced form factor. The wide stopband frequency range and narrow passband in conjunction with small dimensions make the filter suitable to use it as a part of a high sensitive readout for superconducting quantum circuits, such as superconducting quantum bits and cryogenic parametric amplifiers.

  1. Cryogen free cryostat for neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most very low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in the cost of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat with a standard KelvinoxVT® dilution refrigerator insert which provides sample environment for neutron scattering experiments in the temperature range 35 mK - 300 K. The dilution refrigerator insert operates in a continuous regime. The cooling time of the insert is similar to one operated in the Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  2. Neutron Detection with a Cryogenic Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Cristy, S S; Lamberti, V E

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic calorimeters are used for x-ray detection because of their exquisite energy resolution and have found application in x-ray astronomy, and the search for dark matter. These devices operate by detecting the heat pulse produced by ionization in an absorber cooled to temperatures below 1 K. Such temperatures are needed to lower the absorber's heat capacity to the point that the deposition of even a few eV results in a measurable temperature excursion. Typical absorbers for dark matter measurements are massive Si or Ge crystals, and, with Ge, have achieved a resolution of 650 eV at 10 keV. Chow, et al., report the measurement of the 60 keV emission from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am with 230 eV resolution using a superconducting tin absorber. Cunningham, et al., also using a superconducting tin absorber, have recently reported a four-fold improvement over Chow. With such results being reported from the x- and gamma-ray world it is natural to examine the possibilities for cryogenic neutron spectroscopy. Such a det...

  3. Cryogenic refractive index of Heraeus homosil glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.34—3.16 μm and temperature range of 120—335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a fieldwidened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitive performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) and dispersion relation (dn/dλ) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in the literature.

  4. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  5. The DAΦNE cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, M.

    1997-12-01

    The DAΦNE Project utilises superconductivity technology for a total of six superconducting magnets: the two Experiment magnets (KLOE and FINUDA) and the four Compensator Solenoid magnets needed to compensate the magnetic effect of the Experiment magnets on the electron and positron beams. This effect, on beams of 510 MeV (nominal DAΦNE Energy), is expected to be relevant, especially with the aim of achieving a very high luminosity, which is the main target of the Project. The KLOE superconducting magnet has two possible working positions: the first in the DAΦNE Hall, when the Experiment will be in operation, and the second one in the KLOE Assembly Hall. This second position is the first to be utilised for the KLOE magnet Acceptance Test and magnetic field mapping, prior to the mounting of all the experimental apparatus inside the magnet. This note intends to present the DAΦNE Cryogenic System and how the authors have converged to the definition of a common Cryogenic System compatible with all the six superconducting magnets

  6. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  7. Commissioning of the Cryogenic Plant for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at Heidelberg

    CERN Document Server

    von Hahn, R; Grieser, M; Haberstroh, C; Kaiser, D; Lange, M; Laux, F; Menk, S; Orlov, D A; Repnow, R; Sieber, T; Quack, H; Varju, J; Wolf A

    2009-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for low velocity atomic and molecular ion beams is under construction. In contrast to existing electrostatic storage rings, the Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR will be cooled down to temperatures below 2 K. Thus acting as a large cryopump it will provide long storage times and, in addition, open a new field of quantum state controlled molecular physics due to a low heat radiation background from space-like environment. A concept for cooling the storage ring has been developed and is presently tested by means of a linear trap as a prototype with a length of 1/10 of the planned ring. A commercial refrigerator with 21 W at 2 K has been successfully commissioned and was connected to the prototype. This paper presents the status of the cryogenic plant after the commissioning and one year of operation.

  8. Evacuation apparatus with cryogenic pump and trap assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahl, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evacuation apparatus comprising a vessel defining a vacuum chamber therein, vacuumizing means communicating with an opening to said vacuum chamber for selectively drawing a vacuum therein comprising cryogenic pump means disposed closely adjacent to said opening and defined by substantial cryogenically cooled trap surfaces for freezing-out water vapor from air evacuated from said vacuum chamber, said opening being common to said vacuum chamber and to said cryogenic pump means, valve means for selectively opening or closing the opening to said vacuum chamber and movable from a first position within said cryogenic pump means closing said opening to a second position within said cryogenic pump means directly exposing said vacuum chamber to said cryogenic pump means, through said opening, baffle means disposed closely adjacent to the opening to said vacuum chamber for providing substantial open communication to said vacuum chamber and for substantially preventing ingress of contaminants into said vacuum chamber, said baffle means being positioned to provide an optically dense view of said opening when viewed from a downstream side of said baffle means, and a plurality of longitudinally spaced and cryogenically cooled fins mounted in nested relationship within said baffle means and disposed in out-of-contact relationship therewith, said fins being positioned to provide an optically dense view of the downstream side of said baffle means when viewed from said openings. The cryogenic pump is adapted for use in an evacuation apparatus comprising a housing defining an opening to a vacuum chamber, a plurality of metallic plates defining a first chamber therein communicating with said vacuum chamber through said opening and further defining a second chamber at least partially surrounding said first chamber and adapted to be at least partially filled with a cryogenic liqui.d

  9. Replacement of corrosion protection chromate primers and paints used in cryogenic applications on the Space Shuttle with wire arc sprayed aluminum coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, R. L.; Sanders, H. L.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting volatile organic compounds and hexavalent chrome emissions, 'environmentally safe' thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against corrosion pitting and stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. The wire are sprayed aluminum coating has been found to have good potential to provide corrosion protection for flight hardware in cryogenic applications. The coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test and cryogenic flexibility test results will be presented.

  10. Cold atoms in a cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, S.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of quantum information processing attracts increasingly interest, where a complex collection of quantum objects and quantum bits are employed to find the ideal building blocks for quantum information systems. Hybrid quantum systems are therefore promising objects as they countervail the particular drawbacks of single quantum objects. Based on superconducting resonator technology, microwave coplanar waveguides provide a well suited interconnection for photons and solid-state quantum bits (qubits), extensively investigated in recent years. Since a quantum memory is presently missing in those electrical accessible circuit cavity quantum devices, connecting the fast processing in a solid sate device to the exceptional long coherence times in atomic ensembles, the presented work is focused to establish the technological foundations for the hybridization of such quantum systems. The microwave photons stored in a superconducting high finesse microwave resonator are therefore an ideal connection between the atom and the solid state quantum world. In the last decade, the miniaturization and integration of quantum optics and atomic physics manipulation techniques on to a single chip was successfully established. Such atom chips are capable of detailed quantum manipulation of ultra-cold atoms and provide a versatile platform to combine the manipulation techniques from atomic physics with the capability of nano-fabrication. In recent years several experiments succeeded in realization of superconducting atom chips in cryogenic environments which opens the road for integrating super-conductive microwave resonators to magnetically couple an atomic ensemble to photons stored in the coplanar high finesse cavity. This thesis presents the concept, design and experimental setup of two approaches to establish an atomic ensemble of rubidium atoms inside a cryogenic environment, based on an Electron beam driven alkali metal atom source for loading a magneto optical trap in a

  11. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design

  12. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Casagrande, Fabio; Campisi, Isidoro E; Creel, Jonathan; Dixon, Kelly; Ganni, Venkatarao; Gurd, Pamela; Hatfield, Daniel; Howell, Matthew; Knudsen, Peter; Stout, Daniel; Strong, William

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  13. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design.

  14. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  15. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  16. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1-1/2 in. inner pipe size, 3 in. vacuum jacket, and 4 in. inner pipe size, 6 in. vacuum jacket The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 in. and 6 in. pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  17. The DARWIN breadboard cryogenic optical delay line

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dool, T. C.; Gielesen, W.; Kamphues, F.; Loix, N.; Kooijman, P. P.; de Vries, C.; van Weers, H.; Fleury, K.; Stockman, Y.; Velsink, G.; Benoit, J.; Poupinet, A.; Sève, F.

    2017-11-01

    TNO, in cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics, SRON, Dutch Space and CSL, has designed a compact breadboard cryogenic delay line (figure 1) for use in future space interferometry missions. The work is performed under ESA contract 17.747/03 in preparation for the DARWIN mission. The breadboard (BB) delay line is representative of a flight mechanism. The delay line has a single stage voice coil actuator for Optical Path Difference (OPD) control, driving a twomirror cat's eye. Magnetic bearings provide frictionless and wear free operation with zero-hysteresis. The design of the BB delay line has been completed. The development test program, including operation at 100 K has been completed. The verification test programme is currently being carried out and will include functional testing at 40 K.

  18. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 2: Hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Boundary layer principles, along with two-phase concepts, are used to improve existing correlative theory for developed cavity data. Details concerning cavity instrumentation, data analysis, correlative techniques, and experimental and theoretical aspects of a cavitating hydrofoil are given. Both desinent and thermodynamic data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The thermodynamic data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cryogen cavities. The improved correlative formulas were used to evaluate these data. A new correlating parameter based on consideration of mass limiting two-phase flow flux across the cavity interface, is proposed. This correlating parameter appears attractive for future correlative and predictive applications. Agreement between theory and experiment is discussed, and directions for future analysis are suggested. The front half of the cavities, developed on the hydrofoil, may be considered as parabolically shaped.

  19. Cryogenic safety in helium cryostats at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Vittorio; Leclercq, Yann

    2017-12-01

    Cryostats contain large cold surfaces, cryogenic fluids, and sometimes large stored energy (e.g. energized magnets), with the potential risk of sudden liberation of energy through thermodynamic transformations of the fluids, which can be uncontrolled and lead to a dangerous increase of pressure inside the cryostat envelopes. The consequence, in the case of a rupture of the envelopes, may be serious for personnel (injuries from deflagration, burns, and oxygen deficiency hazard) as well as for the equipment. Performing a thorough risk analysis is an essential step to identify and understand risk hazards that may cause a pressure increase and in order to assess consequences, define mitigation actions, and design adequate safety relief devices to limit pressure accordingly. Lessons learnt from real cases are essential for improving safety awareness for future projects. We cover in this paper our experience on cryostats at CERN and the design-for-safety rules in place.

  20. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Scholtens, Brekke E.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient methods for characterizing thermal performance of materials under cryogenic and vacuum conditions have been developed. These methods provide thermal conductivity data on materials under actual-use conditions and are complementary to established methods. The actual-use environment of full temperature difference in combination with vacuum-pressure is essential for understanding insulation system performance. Test articles include solids, foams, powders, layered blankets, composite panels, and other materials. Test methodology and apparatus design for several insulation test cryostats are discussed. The measurement principle is liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry. Heat flux capability ranges from approximately 0.5 to 500 watts per square meter; corresponding apparent thermal conductivity values range from below 0.01 up to about 60 mW/m- K. Example data for different insulation materials are also presented. Upon further standardization work, these patented insulation test cryostats can be available to industry for a wide range of practical applications.

  1. Photolytic separation of isotopes in cryogenic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Battie, W.H.

    Separation of carbon isotopes by photolysis of CS/sub 2/ in cryogenic solutions of nitrogen, krypton and argon with 206 nm light from an iodine resonance lamp is reported. The spectral distributionn of the ultraviolet absorption depends on solvent. Thus, in liquid nitrogen the photolytic decomposition rate of /sup 13/CS/sub 2/ is greater than that of /sup 12/CS/sub 2/ (because the absorption of 206 nm radiation is greater for /sup 13/CS/sub 2/), whereas in liquid krypton and liquid argon the reverse is true. The shift in ultraviolet spectrum is a general phenomenon readily characterized as a function of solvent polarizability, and exhibits behavior similar to that for vibrational transitions occurring in the infrared.

  2. Helium Inventory Management For LHC Cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Pyarali, Maisam

    2017-01-01

    The LHC is a 26.7 km circumference ring lined with superconducting magnets that operate at 1.9 K. These magnets are used to control the trajectory of beams of protons traveling in opposite directions and collide them at various experimental sites across the LHC where their debris is analyzed. The focus of this paper is the cryogenic system that allows the magnets to operate in their superconducting states. It aims to highlight the operating principles of helium refrigeration and liquefaction, with and without nitrogen pre-cooling; discuss the various refrigerators and liquefiers used at CERN for both LHC and Non-LHC applications, with their liquefaction capacities and purposes; and finally to deliberate the management of the LHC inventory and how it contributes to the strategic decision CERN makes regarding the inventory management during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), Extended Year-End Technical Stop (EYETS) and long shutdowns.

  3. Hermeticity of three cryogenic calorimeter geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strovink, M.; Wormersley, W.J.; Forden, G.E.

    1989-04-01

    We calculate the effect of cracks and dead material on resolution in three simplified cryogenic calorimeter geometries, using a crude approximation that neglects transverse shower spreading and considers only a small set of incident angles. For each dead region, we estimate the average unseen energy using a shower parametrization, and relate it to resolution broadening using a simple approximation that agrees with experimental data. Making reasonable and consistent assumptions on cryostat wall thicknesses, we find that the effects of cracks and dead material dominate the expected resolution in the region where separate ''barrel'' and ''end'' cryostats meet. This is particularly true for one geometry in which the end calorimeter caps the barrel and also protrudes into the hole within it. We also find that carefully designed auxiliary ''crack filler'' detectors can substantially reduce the loss of resolution in these areas. 6 figs

  4. Stainless steels for cryogenic bolts and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, F.; Rabbe, P.; Odin, G.

    1975-01-01

    Stainless steel for cryogenic applications are generally austenitic steels which, under the effect of cold-drawing, can or cannot undergo a partial martensitic transformation according to their composition. It has been shown that very high ductility and endurance characteristics at low temperatures, together with very high yield strength and resistances values, can be attained with grades of nitrogenous steels of types Z2CN18-10N and Z3CMN18-8-6N. Optimum ductility values are obtained by employing to the best possible, the martensitic transformations which develop during cold-drawing. From the plotting of the rational traction curves, it is possible to analyse very simply the influence of the composition on the martensitic transformations [fr

  5. Initial performance of upgraded Tevatron cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab began operating a re-designed satellite refrigerator systems in November 1993. Upgrades were installed to operate the Tevatron at a magnet temperature of 3.5 K, approximately 1K lower than the original design. Refrigerator upgrades included new valve boxes, larger reciprocating expanders, the installation of cold vapor compressors, new sub-atmospheric instrumentation and an entirely new distributed controls system. Cryogenic system reliability data for Colliding Physics Run 1B is presented emphasizing a failure analysis for each aspect of the upgrade. Comparison to data for Colliding Physics Run 1A (previous to upgrade) is presented to show the impact of a major system overhaul. New operational problems and their solutions are presented in detail

  6. Cryogenic magnet test facility for fair

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C; Marzouki, F; Stafiniac, A; Floch, E; Schnizer, P; Moritz, G; Xiang, Y; Kauschke, M; Meier, J; Hess, G ,

    2009-01-01

    For testing fast-pulsed superconducting model and pre-series magnets for FAIR (Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research), a cryogenic magnet test facility was built up at GSI. The facility is able to cool either cold masses in a universal cryostat or complete magnets in their own cryo-module. It is possible to operate bath cooled, 2 phase cooled, and supercritical cooled magnets with a maximum current up to 11 kA and a ramp rate up to 14 kA/s. Measurements of magnet heat loss, with calorimetric and a V-I methods, are available, as are quench and magnetic field measurements. Design and functionality of the test facility will be described. Results of measurements with a supercritical cooled magnet and with a 2 phase cooled SIS100 model magnet will be shown.

  7. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4 K heat load of 150 watts; the LN 2 circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations

  8. Development of Large Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    This project aims at developing large cryogenic semiconductor detectors for applications in particle physics and more broadly. We have developed a 150 mm diameter, 43 mm thick, Si-based detector that measures ionization released in an interaction of a particle inside the silicon crystal of high purity, operated at 30 mK temperature. We demonstrated that such a detector can be used to measure recoil energies on the keV scale, and that its stable operation can be maintained indefinitely. Detectors of this type could therefore be used in the fields of direct dark matter searches, coherent neutrino scattering measurements, X-ray observations, as well as in broader applications such as homeland security.

  9. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Pipe Sizing for Solenoid / VLPC Cryogenic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, Russ; Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-02-20

    The addition of a solenoid magnet and VLPC detectors are two of a number of upgrades which will occur at the D-Zero detector in the near future. Both of these upgrades will require cryogenic services for their operation. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the pipe/tube size choices made for these cryogenic services. This was done by calculating the required flow rates to cool down the magnet and VLPC's over a reasonable length of time and to determine the required piping sizes for a given allowable pressure drop. The pressure drops for steady state conditions also are addressed. The cool down requirements drove the pipe size decision. The raw engineering calculations that were done for this project are included as an appendix to this note. The body of this document discusses the methods and results of the calculations. As a quick summary, Figures 1 and 2 show the size selections. Tables 1 and 2 give a more detailed size and description of each section of Solenoid and VLPC transfer line.

  10. Field Testing of Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, Aaron [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Frankman, Dave [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Andrew [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Stitt, Kyler [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Larry [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-07-17

    Sustainable Energy Solutions has been developing Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ (CCC) since 2008. In that time two processes have been developed, the External Cooling Loop and Compressed Flue Gas Cryogenic Carbon Capture processes (CCC ECL™ and CCC CFG™ respectively). The CCC ECL™ process has been scaled up to a 1TPD CO2 system. In this process the flue gas is cooled by an external refrigerant loop. SES has tested CCC ECL™ on real flue gas slip streams from subbituminous coal, bituminous coal, biomass, natural gas, shredded tires, and municipal waste fuels at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, cement kilns, and pilot-scale research reactors. The CO2 concentrations from these tests ranged from 5 to 22% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at a modest rate. The CCC CFG™ process has been scaled up to a .25 ton per day system. This system has been tested on real flue gas streams including subbituminous coal, bituminous coal and natural gas at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, and pilot-scale research reactors. CO2 concentrations for these tests ranged from 5 to 15% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at 90+%. Hg capture was also verified and the resulting effluent from CCC CFG™ was below a 1ppt concentration. This paper will focus on discussion of the capabilities of CCC, the results of field testing and the future steps surrounding the development of this technology.

  11. The DIII-D cryogenic system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Laughon, G.J.; Campbell, G.L.; Langhorn, A.R.; Stevens, N.C.; Tupper, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    The original DIII-D cryogenic system was commissioned in 1981 and was used to cool the cryopanel arrays for three hydrogen neutral beam injectors. Since then, new demands for liquid helium have arisen including: a fourth neutral beam injector, ten superconducting magnets for the electron cyclotron heating gyrotrons, and more recently, the advanced diverter cryopump which resides inside the tokamak vacuum vessel. The original cryosystem could not meet these demands. Consequently, the cryosystem was upgraded in several phases to increase capacity, improve reliability, and reduce maintenance. The majority of the original system has been replaced with superior equipment. The capacity now exists to support present as well as future demands for liquid helium at DIII-D including a hydrogen pellet injector, which is being constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Upgrades to the cryosystem include: a recently commissioned 150 ell/hr helium liquefier, two 55 g/sec helium screw compressors, a fully automated 20-valve cryogen distribution box, a high efficiency helium wet expander, and the conversion of equipment from manual or pneumatic to programmable logic controller (PLC) control. The distribution box was designed and constructed for compactness due to limited space availability. Overall system efficiency was significantly improved by replacing the existing neutral beam reliquefier Joule-Thomson valve with a reciprocating wet expander. The implementation of a PLC-based automatic control system has resulted in increased efficiency and reliability. This paper will describe the cryosystem design with emphasis on newly added equipment. In addition, performance and operational experience will be discussed

  12. The DIII-D cryogenic system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Laughon, G.J.; Campbell, G.L.; Langhorn, A.R.; Stevens, N.C.; Tupper, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    The original DIII-D cryogenic system was commissioned in 1981 and was used to cool the cryopanel arrays for three hydrogen neutral beam injectors. Since then, new demands for liquid helium have arisen including: a fourth neutral beam injector, ten superconducting magnets for the electron cyclotron heating gyrotrons, and more recently, the advanced diverter cryopump which resides inside the tokamak vacuum vessel. The original cryosystem could not meet these demands. Consequently, the cryosystem was upgraded in several phases to increase capacity, improve reliability, and reduce maintenance. The majority of the original system has been replaced with superior equipment. The capacity now exists to support present as well as future demands for liquid helium at DIII-D including a hydrogen pellet injector, which is being constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Upgrades to the cryosystem include: a recently commissioned 150 {ell}/hr helium liquefier, two 55 g/sec helium screw compressors, a fully automated 20-valve cryogen distribution box, a high efficiency helium wet expander, and the conversion of equipment from manual or pneumatic to programmable logic controller (PLC) control. The distribution box was designed and constructed for compactness due to limited space availability. Overall system efficiency was significantly improved by replacing the existing neutral beam reliquefier Joule-Thomson valve with a reciprocating wet expander. The implementation of a PLC-based automatic control system has resulted in increased efficiency and reliability. This paper will describe the cryosystem design with emphasis on newly added equipment. In addition, performance and operational experience will be discussed.

  13. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  14. Fluid Dynamics with Cryogenic Fluid Transfer in Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During chilldown of cryogenic fluid tanks and lines, the interface between the liquid and vapor rapidly changes. Understanding these rapid changes is key...

  15. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated or...

  16. ISO and EIGA standards for cryogenic vessels and accessories

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The EIGA/WG 6’s scope is cryogenic vessels and accessories, including their design, material compatibility, operational requirements and periodical inspection. The specific responsibilities include monitoring international standardization (ISO, CEN) and regulations (UN, TPED, PED...

  17. Safety Management for the Cryogenic System of Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, Sheau-Ping; Hsiao, Feng-Zone; Wang, Jau-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The installation of the helium cryogenic system for the superconducting RF cavity and magnet were finished in the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) at the end of October 2002. The first phase of this program will be commissioned at the end of 2004. This was the first large scale cryogenic system in Taiwan. The major hazards to personnel are cryogenic burn and oxygen deficient. To avoid the injury of the operators and meet the requirements of local laws and regulations, some safety measures must be adopted. This paper will illustrate the methods of risk evaluation and the safety control programs taken at NSRRC to avoid and reduce the hazards from the cryogenic system of the superconducting RF cavity and magnet system.

  18. Small Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Liquids, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a compact, reliable, light weight, electrically driven pump capable of pumping cryogenic liquids, based on scroll pump technology. This pump will...

  19. Cryogenic heat treatment — a review of the current state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Amini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The deep cryogenic heat treatment is an old and effective heat treatment, performed on steels and cast irons to improve the wear resistance and hardness. This process includes cooling down to the liquid nitrogen temperature, holding the samples at that temperature and heating at the room temperature. The benefits of this process are significant on the ferrous materials, but recently some studies focused on other nonferrous materials. This study attempts to clarify the different behavior of some materials subjected to the deep cryogenic heat treatment, as well as explaining the common theories about the effect of the cryogenic heat treatment on these materials. Results showed that polymers exhibit different behavior regarding to their crystallinity, however the magnesium alloys, titanium alloys and tungsten carbide show a noticeable improvement after the deep cryogenic heat treatment due to their crystal structure.

  20. Advanced Insulation Techniques for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to store large amounts of cryogenic fluids for long durations has a profound effect on the success of many future space programs using these fluids for...

  1. Spinning-Scroll Pump for Cryogenic Feed System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is an efficient, compact, lightweight, reliable, electric-driven, cryogenic spinning scroll pump (CSSP) capable of pumping liquid methane or oxygen at...

  2. Evaluation of Cryogenic Readout Electronics for ASTRO-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Toyoki; Hirao, Takanori; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hibi, Yasunori; Noda, Manabu

    Cryogenic readout electronics have been developed for the far-infrared detectors onboard ASTRO-F, the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite. This cryogenic readout circuit should be mounted near the detector array at the liquid helium temperature in order to achieve high sensitivity. We succeeded in developing the cryogenic p-MOS transistor by a standard Bi-CMOS process with a slight modification. By using the new p-MOS transistor, we have made several types of cryogenic electronics, (OP-AMP and CTIA), and evaluated their performances in the liquid helium temperature. The results are: 1. Open loop gain of OP-AMP ~300 2. Input equivalence noise ~3μV/Hz1/2 3. Power consumption ~10μW/ch More details will be shown on the poster.

  3. Advanced insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9.01, "Long Term Cryogenic Propellant...

  4. Nanocoatings for Wicking of Low-Viscosity Cryogens Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop smart, switchable materials systems for use in thermal management systems, including the evaluation of wicking nanocoatings for use in the transport and storage of cryogens.

  5. Dynamic Instability of Undamped Bellows Face Seals in Cryogenic Liquid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudelson, John C

    1966-01-01

    .... The results of the tests indicated that dynamic instability will occur in undamped bellows face seals operating in a cryogenic environment and be of such a magnitude as to damage the sealing surface...

  6. High Effectiveness Heat Exchanger for Cryogenic Refrigerators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an innovative high performance cryogenic heat exchanger manufactured of titanium by photo-etching and diffusion bonding. This is a parallel plate design...

  7. Long Term In-Space Cryogen Storage - Magnetic Isolation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A research activity is proposed to assess the feasibility of magnetic and/or quantum levitation techniques to hold cryogenic fluids in space for extended durations...

  8. Development of cryotribological theories & application to cryogenic devices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2001-03-12

    This is the final report of a research program on low-temperature friction and wear, primarily focused on development of cryotribological theories and application to cryogenic devices, particularly superconducting magnets.

  9. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  10. Testing Tensile and Shear Epoxy Strength at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, S. J.; Doehne, C. J.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper covers cryogenic, tensile testing and research completed on a number of epoxies used in cryogenic applications. Epoxies are used in many different applications; however, this research focused on the use of epoxy used to bond MLI standoffs to cryogenic storage tanks and the loads imparted to the tank through the MLI. To conduct testing, samples were made from bare stainless steel, aluminum and primed aluminum. Testing involved slowly cooling test samples with liquid nitrogen then applying gradually increasing tensile loads to the epoxy. The testing evaluated the strength and durability of epoxies at cryogenic temperatures and serves as a base for future testing. The results of the tests showed that some epoxies withstood the harsh conditions while others failed. The two epoxies yielding the best results were Masterbond EP29LPSP and Scotch Weld 2216. For all metal surfaces tested, both epoxies had zero failures for up to 11.81 kg of mass.

  11. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  12. High-Speed Thermal Characterization of Cryogenic Flows, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna proposes to continue development on a high-speed fiber optic sensor and readout system for cryogenic temperature measurements in liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid...

  13. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  14. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  15. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moreno, Olga; Fernandez, Adolfo; Khainakov, Sergei; Torrecillas, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  16. Computing the Thermodynamic State of a Cryogenic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willen, G. Scott; Hanna, Gregory J.; Anderson, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Tank Analysis Program (CTAP) predicts the time-varying thermodynamic state of a cryogenic fluid in a tank or a Dewar flask. CTAP is designed to be compatible with EASY5x, which is a commercial software package that can be used to simulate a variety of processes and equipment systems. The mathematical model implemented in CTAP is a first-order differential equation for the pressure as a function of time.

  17. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K A; Bhatt, S B

    2012-01-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ∼ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  18. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadeja, K. A.; Bhatt, S. B.

    2012-11-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ~ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  19. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  20. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  1. Uprated OMS engine status and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, W. C.; Brasher, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The baseline Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) of the Space Shuttle has the potential for significant performance uprating, leading to increased Shuttle performance capability. The approach to uprating that is being pursued at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center is the use of a gas generator-driven turbopump to increase OME operating pressure. A higher pressure engine can have a greater nozzle expansion ratio in the same envelope and at the same thrust level, giving increased engine Isp. The results of trade studies and analyses that have led to the preferred uprated OME configuration are described. The significant accomplishments of a pre-development component demonstration program are also presented, including descriptions of test hardware and discussion of test results. It is shown that testing to date confirms the capability of the preferred uprated OME configuration to meet or exceed performance and life requirements. Potential future activities leading up to a full-scale development program are described, and the capability for the uprated OME to be used in future storable propellant upper stages is discussed.

  2. Submersible fans and pumps for cryogenic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Submersible electric motor driven fans of three sizes have been designed, built and operated at 21 0 K at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The largest is a 100-mm diameter, 2 stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity of 6 L/s at 2 m head. It is driven by a 4 pole, 3 phase induction motor that runs at 1750 rpm. The next smaller one is an 85-mm diameter centrifugal pump. It pumps 3 L/s at a head of 5 m. The third is a 75-mm single stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity is 3 L/s at a head of 2 m. The 85-mm pump and the 75-mm fan are driven by 2 pole, 3 phase induction motors running at 3550 rpm. The motors were modified to operate submerged in the cryogenic fluid. The pumps have been operated in liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and pressurized helium gas at 21 0 K. They can also operate with denser fluids such as liquid nitrogen, but rotational speed, capacity, and head will be reduced. They have been operated while submerged in liquid helium

  3. Calibration of Cryogenic Thermometers for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, Ch; Vauthier, N; Thermeau, JP

    2008-01-01

    6000 cryogenic temperature sensors of resistive type covering the range from room temperature down to 1.6 K are installed on the LHC machine. In order to meet the stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets, each single sensor needs to be calibrated individually. In the framework of a special contribution, IPN (Institut de Physique Nucléaire) in Orsay, France built and operated a calibration facility with a throughput of 80 thermometers per week. After reception from the manufacturer, the thermometer is first assembled onto a support specific to the measurement environment, and then thermally cycled ten times and calibrated at least once from 1.6 to 300 K. The procedure for each of these interventions includes various measurements and the acquired data is recorded in an ORACLE®-database. Furthermore random calibrations on some samples are executed at CERN to crosscheck the coherence between the approximation data obtained by both IPN and CERN. In the range of 1.5 K to 30 K...

  4. FRIB Cryogenic Distribution System and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Yang, Shuo [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Nellis, Timothy [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Jones, S. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The MSU-FRIB cryogenic distribution system supports the 2 K primary, 4 K primary, and 35 - 55 K shield operation of more than 70 loads in the accelerator and the experimental areas. It is based on JLab and SNS experience with bayonet-type disconnects between the loads and the distribution system for phased commissioning and maintenance. The linac transfer line, which features three separate transfer line segments for additional independence during phased commissioning at 4 K and 2 K, connects the folded arrangement of 49 cryomodules and 4 superconducting dipole magnets and a fourth transfer line supports the separator area cryo loads. The pressure reliefs for the transfer line process lines, located in the refrigeration room outside the tunnel/accelerator area, are piped to be vented outdoors. The transfer line designs integrate supply and return flow paths into a combined vacuum space. The main linac distribution segments are produced in a small number of standard configurations; a prototype of one such configuration has been fabricated at Jefferson Lab and has been installed at MSU to support testing of a prototype FRIB cryomodule.

  5. Effects of cryogenic irradiation on temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courts, S.S.; Holmes, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Several types of commercially available cryogenic temperature sensors were calibrated, irradiated at 4.2 K by a gamma or neutron source, and recalibrated in-situ to determine their suitability for thermometry in radiation environments. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-irradiation calibrations with the equivalent temperature shift calculated for each sensor at various temperature in the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Four post-irradiation calibrations were performed with annealing steps performed at 20 K, 80 K, and 330 K. Temperature sensors which were gamma irradiated were given a total dose of 10,000 Gy. Temperature sensors which were neutron irradiated were irradiated to a total fluence of 2 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . In general, for gamma radiation environments, diodes are unsuitable for use. Both carbon glass and germanium resistance sensors performed well at lower temperature, while platinum resistance sensors performed best above 30 K. Thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance sensors both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Only thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance temperature sensors were neutron irradiated and they both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range

  6. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

  7. Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36'000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m3 static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for non-isothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressors. T...

  8. Minimizing Uncertainty in Cryogenic Surface Figure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    A new facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center is designed to measure with unusual accuracy the surface figure of mirrors at cryogenic temperatures down to 12 K. The facility is currently configured for spherical mirrors with a radius of curvature (ROC) of 600 mm, and apertures of about 150 mm or less. The goals of the current experiment were to 1) Obtain the best possible estimate of test mirror surface figure, S(x,y) at 87 K and 20 K; 2) Obtain the best estimate of the cryo-change, Delta (x,y): the change in surface figure between room temperature and the two cryo-temperatures; and 3) Determine the uncertainty of these measurements, using the definitions and guidelines of the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. A silicon mirror was tested, and the cry-change from room temperature to 20K was found to be 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  9. Cryogenic controls for the TESLA test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M.; Gerke, Chr.; Knopf, U.; Rettig, S.; Schoeneburg, B.

    1994-12-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is designed to perform intensive testing of the superconducting cavities foreseen for the next generation of linear colliders. The cryogenic system is one part of this facility. The controls for this system will initially use the existing software and hardware to be able to cool down the first cavities fabricated in the TTF workshop. Later the control system will be modified to meet the current standards in process and accelerator controls. The hardware will be changed to use the VME system as the major platform. The operating system and the communication will be based on de-facto standards such as UNIX for the workstations and the front-end computers and TCP/IP for network communication. The application software (EPICS) will be part of a collaboration with several other institutes. The final goal is to port all the software to the POSIX standard and to use Object-Oriented tools wherever possible. The first part of this paper describes the migration from the existing control system to the future design. Special decisions on hardware and software solutions are highlighted. Nonproprietary field busses for remote process I/O are becoming usual for slow control. A suitable bus for our future basic I/O system had to be selected. Finally a new temperature monitor module working on the CAN-bus and its measurement procedure will be explained.

  10. Cryogenic atomic beam source at VEPP-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaeva, L. G.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Popov, S. G.; Rachek, I. A.; Shestakov, Yu. V.; Toporkov, D. K.; Vesnovsky, D. K.; Zevakov, S. A.; Osipov, A. N.; Sidorov, A. A.; Stibunov, V. N.

    1998-01-01

    The experiment on elastic and inelastic scattering of 2 GeV electrons by internal polarized target is in progress at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk. It's carried out by Novosibirsk/St.-Petersburg/Tomsk/Argonne/Illinois/NIKHEF collaboration. A cryogenic Atomic Beam Source having five superconducting sextupoles is under manufacturing to feed by polarized deuterium atoms an internal storage cell target. All the magnets have been manufactured and tested. The magnetic poletip field up to 4.8 T was measured at the cylindrical magnets having 44 mm inner diameter while 3.1 T and 4.0 T were measured for the tapered magnets. The dissociation degree of about 90% has been achieved for a gas throughput 1 mbx1/sec. The expected flux of polarized deuterium atoms into the storage cell is 1.0x10 17 at/sec (in two substrates). The geometry of the magnetic system, results on the dissociation measurements, testing of the superconducting magnet and expected parameters of the target are presented

  11. Cryogenic atomic beam source at VEPP-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, L. G.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Osipov, A. N.; Popov, S. G.; Rachek, I. A.; Shestakov, Yu. V.; Sidorov, A. A.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; Vesnovsky, D. K.; Zevakov, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The experiment on elastic and inelastic scattering of 2 GeV electrons by internal polarized target is in progress at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk. It's carried out by Novosibirsk/St.-Petersburg/Tomsk/Argonne/Illinois/NIKHEF collaboration. A cryogenic Atomic Beam Source having five superconducting sextupoles is under manufacturing to feed by polarized deuterium atoms an internal storage cell target. All the magnets have been manufactured and tested. The magnetic poletip field up to 4.8 T was measured at the cylindrical magnets having 44 mm inner diameter while 3.1 T and 4.0 T were measured for the tapered magnets. The dissociation degree of about 90% has been achieved for a gas throughput 1 mb×1/sec. The expected flux of polarized deuterium atoms into the storage cell is 1.0×1017 at/sec (in two substrates). The geometry of the magnetic system, results on the dissociation measurements, testing of the superconducting magnet and expected parameters of the target are presented.

  12. Natural Frequency Testing and Model Correlation of Rocket Engine Structures in Liquid Hydrogen - Phase I, Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; DeLessio, Jennifer L.; Jacobs, Preston W.

    2018-01-01

    Many structures in the launch vehicle industry operate in liquid hydrogen (LH2), from the hydrogen fuel tanks through the ducts and valves and into the pump sides of the turbopumps. Calculating the structural dynamic response of these structures is critical for successful qualification of this hardware, but accurate knowledge of the natural frequencies is based entirely on numerical or analytical predictions of frequency reduction due to the added-fluid-mass effect because testing in LH2 has always been considered too difficult and dangerous. This fluid effect is predicted to be approximately 4-5% using analytical formulations for simple cantilever beams. As part of a comprehensive test/analysis program to more accurately assess pump inducers operating in LH2, a series of frequency tests in LH2 were performed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's unique cryogenic test facility. These frequency tests are coupled with modal tests in air and water to provide critical information not only on the mass effect of LH2, but also the cryogenic temperature effect on Young's Modulus for which the data is not extensive. The authors are unaware of any other reported natural frequency testing in this media. In addition to the inducer, a simple cantilever beam was also tested in the tank to provide a more easily modeled geometry as well as one that has an analytical solution for the mass effect. This data will prove critical for accurate structural dynamic analysis of these structures, which operate in a highly-dynamic environment.

  13. Uprated OMS Engine Status-Sea Level Testing Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, J. D.; Boyd, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increase operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities for this engine system have been on-going since 1984. More recently, a complete engine designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at sea level conditions by Aerojet. A description of the test hardware and results of the sea level test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope and projected performance at altitude conditions, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities, including ICTB tests at simulated altitude conditions, and recommendations for further engine development, are also discussed.

  14. The cryogenics design of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, M. I.; Bauer, D. A.; Dhuley, R. C.; Lukens, P.; Martin, L. D.; Ruschman, M. K.; Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) experiment is a direct detection dark matter experiment intended for deployment to the SNOLAB underground facility in Ontario, Canada. With a payload of up to 186 germanium and silicon crystal detectors operating below 15 mK, the cryogenic architecture of the experiment is complex. Further, the requirement that the cryostat presents a low radioactive background to the detectors limits the materials and techniques available for construction, and heavily influences the design of the cryogenics system. The resulting thermal architecture is a closed cycle (no liquid cryogen) system, with stages at 50 and 4 K cooled with gas and fluid circulation systems and stages at 1 K, 250 mK and 15 mK cooled by the lower temperature stages of a large, cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. This paper describes the thermal design of the experiment, including details of the cooling systems, mechanical designs and expected performance of the system under operational conditions.

  15. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  16. Novel design of an all-cryogenic RF pound circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basu, Ronni; Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment. In conju......We report on the design, construction and test of a new all-cryogenic RF Pound circuit used to stabilize a 100 MHz VCXO. Here, all active and passive RF components used to accomplish the phase modulation and detect a PM to AM conversion have been installed into the cryogenic environment....... In conjunction with a high-Q cryogenic sapphire resonator a Pound discriminator sensitivity of 0.1 mV/Hz was seen experimentally. Based on this sensitivity and the noise properties of the pre-amplifier of the Pound signal, we calculate a limit of the oscillator's Allan deviation as low as 4middot10-16/radictau...

  17. A word from the DG: A cryogenic success

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The beginning of this month saw the start of a new phase in the LHC project, with its first inauguration, for the LHC cryogenics. This was marked with a symposium in the Globe attended by 178 representatives of the industrial partners and research institutes involved. It also coincided with stable low-temperature operation of the cryogenic plant for sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be cooled down. A look at the LHC web site (http://lhc.web.cern.ch/lhc/) shows this steady operation. The cryogenic system for the LHC is the largest and most complex ever built, involving many large devices on an industrial scale, where reliability is of paramount importance. The LHC’s energy of 7 TeV required a high magnetic field provided by niobium-titanium coils operating at 1.9 K. This is a new temperature regime for large-scale cryogenics, chosen to make use of the excellent heat-transfer properties of helium in its superfluid state. The final design for the LHC cryogenics had to incorporate both newly ordered ...

  18. A High Efficiency Cryocooler for In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is considering multiple missions involving long-term cryogen storage in space. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen are the typical cryogens as they provide the...

  19. LV-IMLI: Integrated MLI/Aeroshell for Cryogenic Launch Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants have the highest energy density of any rocket fuel, and are used in most NASA and commercial launch vehicles to power their ascent. Cryogenic...

  20. Innovative Ultra-High Efficiency Cryogenic Actuators for Rocket Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SBIR Phase I project will develop advanced ultra-high efficiency cryogenic actuators for NASA cryogenic fluid transfer application. The actuator will have low...

  1. Laboratory facility for production of cryogenic targets for hot plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Cwiek, E.

    1990-10-01

    Results of preliminary operational tests of the cryogenic stand designed for the production of small droplets of liquid hydrogen or deuterium are presented. Such cryogenic micro-targets are needed for nuclear and thermonuclear experiments. (author)

  2. A High Efficiency Cryocooler for In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is considering multiple missions involving long-term cryogen storage in space. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen are the typical cryogens as they provide the...

  3. Modeling Dynamic Fracture of Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This work is part of an investigation with the long-range objective of predicting the size distribution function and velocity dispersion of shattered pellet fragments after a large cryogenic pellet impacts a solid surface at high velocity. The study is vitally important for the shattered pellet injection (SPI) technique, one of the leading technologies being implemented at ORNL for the mitigation of disruption damage on current tokamaks and ITER. The report contains three parts that are somewhat interwoven. In Part I we formulated a self-similar model for the expansion dynamics and velocity dispersion of the debris cloud following pellet impact against a thick (rigid) target plate. Also presented in Part I is an analytical fracture model that predicts the nominal or mean size of the fragments in the debris cloud and agrees well with known SPI data. The aim of Part II is to gain an understanding of the pellet fracturing process when a pellet is shattered inside a miter tube with a sharp bend. Because miter tubes have a thin stainless steel (SS) wall a permanent deformation (dishing) of the wall is produced at the site of the impact. A review of the literature indicates that most projectile impact on thin plates are those for which the target is deformed and the projectile is perfectly rigid. Such impacts result in “projectile embedding” where the projectile speed is reduced to zero during the interaction so that all the kinetic energy (KE) of the projectile goes into the energy stored in plastic deformation. Much of the literature deals with perforation of the target. The problem here is quite different; the softer pellet easily undergoes complete material failure causing only a small transfer of KE to stored energy of wall deformation. For the real miter tube, we derived a strain energy function for the wall deflection using a non-linear (plastic) stress-strain relation for 304 SS. Using a dishing profile identical to the linear Kirchkoff-Love profile (for lack

  4. Interfacing ultracold atoms and cryogenic micromechanical oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Andreas

    2015-02-06

    Why is it that our world, which consists of many microscopic quantum systems, can be described in terms of classical physics? This fundamental question about the transition between these two diametrically opposed theories is an unsolved problem of modern physics. In recent years, tremendous progress in the field of optomechanics paved the way for the observation of a large variety of quantum phenomena far beyond the microcosmos. Additional possibilities arise from the skillful combination of different quantum systems to create a so-called hybrid quantum system. In these systems, new possibilities to prepare and detect non-classical states in macroscopic systems arise. In this thesis the setup of a new hybrid quantum system is described that consists of two entirely different systems. The first building block is a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - an ideal realization of a many-body ground state. The second building block is an optomechanical system in a cryogenic environment, a membrane in an optical cavity (membrane in the middle - MiM). Both systems are coupled over a macroscopic distance via a light field. In this particular case, the MiM system is realized using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membrane in a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity. In the course of this thesis, an asymmetric cavity with high reflectivity on resonance was identified as the ideal candidate. Such a system has not yet been reported in the literature, but allows for a strong coupling between the two constituents of the hybrid quantum system. Additionally, fibers are ideally suited to bring light into cryogenic environments due to their low thermal conductivity. In the cryostat, they will be mounted in novel five-axis goniometers. The key parameters for an asymmetric fiber-based cavity is the mode overlap between the cavity mode and the fiber mode. Due to an interference effect, a small change in the mode match already results in a massive amount of light loss of the reflected cavity mode in the

  5. Advantages of a Lunar Cryogenic Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    ESA and collaborating agencies are preparing to establish a Moon Village at a south polar site. Robotic precursor missions will include resource prospecting in permanently shadowed cold traps. The environment there is favorable for infrared and millimeter-wave astronomy. In this paper we examine the evolutionary development of a cryogenic observatory, beginning with small telescopes robotically installed and operated in conjunction with prospecting precursor missions, and continuing into later phases supported from the Moon Village. Relay communications into and out of the cold traps may be shared or else provided by dedicated links. Candidate locations can be selected with the help of data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The first telescope will be primarily a proof-of-concept demonstrator but it can have scientific and applications uses too, supplementing other space-based survey instruments observing astrophysical objects and potentially hazardous asteroids and comets. A south polar site sees only half or the sky but that half includes the galactic center and many other interesting targets. The telescopes can stare at any object for as long as desired, providing monitoring capabilities for transiting or radial velocity planet searches, like NASA's TESS mission. In addition such telescopes are opening the prospect of gathering spectroscopic data on exoplanet atmospheres and cool stars - from UV information to assess the activity of a star to VIS to IR spectral data of the atmosphere and even atmospheric biosignatures. Preliminary design of the first telescope might be funded under a NASA call for lunar science payload concepts. An important additional product can be educational and outreach uses of the observatory, especially for the benefit of people in the developing world who can do southern hemisphere follow-up observations.

  6. Capture of krypton by cryogenic distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geens, L.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Marien, J.; Ooms, E.; Stevens, J.; Boons, J.; Hertschap, M.

    1986-01-01

    Radioactive krypton-85 is liberated into the off-gases during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (chop and leach process). If its release to the atmosphere is to be restricted, it needs to be captured from those off-gases. With the financial support of the C.E.C., krypton recovery by cryogenic distillation in presence of oxygen was investigated. Both oxygen and ozone behaviour in the cryodistillation unit were observed. The ozone decay in the rectification column was studied in absence and in presence of a radiation source. Additionally a demonstration run with krypton-85 was performed. Experiments with different oxygen concentrations up to 21 % volume in the feed gas were carried out. The oxygen was enriched up to 85 % volume in a zone between the krypton layer and the entrance of the rectification column. No oxygen was found in the bottom product. On the other hand, ozone, when fed to the column, accumulates in the bottom product. The decay of ozone in this bottom liquid was measured in absence and in presence of a 500 Ci thulium-170 source. Without the radiation source, it took about 30 days to observe a decay from 0.9 % volume to 0.45 % volume. The decay rate decreased with decreasing ozone concentration. In presence of the 500 Ci thulium-170, a constant decay rate of 0.24 % volume per day was measured. Finally, a demonstration run with 100 Ci krypton-85 was performed in the cryodistillation unit, with air as feed gas. The krypton-85 was fed at a concentration of 30 mCi.h -1 until the total krypton inventory of the rectification column amounted to 40-45 Ci. The active run had a duration of 900 hours, during which no operational problems were encountered. 16 refs, 8 tables, 9 figs

  7. LASERS: A cryogenic slab CO laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Andrei A.; Kozlov, A. Yu; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2009-03-01

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 → V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 μm. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of ~12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved ~14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at ~ 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 μm with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 → V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 μm. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than ±10 %) was stable for more than an hour.

  8. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics

  9. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  10. James Webb Space Telescope Core 2 Test - Cryogenic Thermal Balance Test of the Observatorys Core Area Thermal Control Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Paul; Parrish, Keith; Thomson, Shaun; Marsh, James; Comber, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, will be the largest astronomical telescope ever sent into space. To observe the very first light of the early universe, JWST requires a large deployed 6.5-meter primary mirror cryogenically cooled to less than 50 Kelvin. Three scientific instruments are further cooled via a large radiator system to less than 40 Kelvin. A fourth scientific instrument is cooled to less than 7 Kelvin using a combination pulse-tube Joule-Thomson mechanical cooler. Passive cryogenic cooling enables the large scale of the telescope which must be highly folded for launch on an Ariane 5 launch vehicle and deployed once on orbit during its journey to the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. Passive cooling of the observatory is enabled by the deployment of a large tennis court sized five layer Sunshield combined with the use of a network of high efficiency radiators. A high purity aluminum heat strap system connects the three instrument's detector systems to the radiator systems to dissipate less than a single watt of parasitic and instrument dissipated heat. JWST's large scale features, while enabling passive cooling, also prevent the typical flight configuration fully-deployed thermal balance test that is the keystone of most space missions' thermal verification plans. This paper describes the JWST Core 2 Test, which is a cryogenic thermal balance test of a full size, high fidelity engineering model of the Observatory's 'Core' area thermal control hardware. The 'Core' area is the key mechanical and cryogenic interface area between all Observatory elements. The 'Core' area thermal control hardware allows for temperature transition of 300K to approximately 50 K by attenuating heat from the room temperature IEC (instrument electronics) and the Spacecraft Bus. Since the flight hardware is not available for test, the Core 2 test uses high fidelity and flight-like reproductions.

  11. A cryogenic optical feedthrough using polarization maintaining fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M J; Collins, C J; Speake, C C

    2016-03-01

    Polarization maintaining optical fibers can be used to transmit linearly polarized light over long distances but their use in cryogenic environments has been limited by their sensitivity to temperature changes and associated mechanical stress. We investigate experimentally how thermal stresses affect the polarization maintaining fibers and model the observations with Jones matrices. We describe the design, construction, and testing of a feedthrough and fiber termination assembly that uses polarization maintaining fiber to transmit light from a 633 nm HeNe laser at room temperature to a homodyne polarization-based interferometer in a cryogenic vacuum. We report on the efficiency of the polarization maintaining properties of the feedthrough assembly. We also report that, at cryogenic temperatures, the interferometer can achieve a sensitivity of 8 × 10(-10) rad/√Hz at 0.05 Hz using this feedthrough.

  12. Strategy for conformity of non-standard cryogenic equipment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    CERN as an intergovernmental organization establishes its own Safety Rules as necessary for its proper functioning. In particular, the CERN General Safety Instruction for cryogenic equipment requires that cryogenic pressure equipment at CERN shall comply with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED). However, due to the particular features of some of the cryogenic equipment required for the accelerators, as well as the existence of international collaborations with in-kind contributions from non-EU countries, full compliance with the PED may not always be achieved. This situation is foreseen in the Safety Rules, where CERN HSE will define the Safety requirements applicable to such equipment as well as any eventual additional compensatory measure as to ensure a commensurate level of Safety for our pressure equipment. Where compliance with PED may not be achieved, CERN HSE will become the de facto Notified Body and therefore be in charge of the assessment of the conformity of the equipment to the applica...

  13. Cryogenic distribution box for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, M. R.; Bonnema, E. C.; Cunningham, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    Meyer Tool & Mfg., Inc (Meyer Tool) of Oak Lawn, Illinois is manufacturing a cryogenic distribution box for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The distribution box will be used for the Muon-to-electron conversion (Mu2e) experiment. The box includes twenty-seven cryogenic valves, two heat exchangers, a thermal shield, and an internal nitrogen separator vessel, all contained within a six-foot diameter ASME coded vacuum vessel. This paper discusses the design and manufacturing processes that were implemented to meet the unique fabrication requirements of this distribution box. Design and manufacturing features discussed include: 1) Thermal strap design and fabrication, 2) Evolution of piping connections to heat exchangers, 3) Nitrogen phase separator design, 4) ASME code design of vacuum vessel, and 5) Cryogenic valve installation.

  14. Numerical study of emergency cryogenics gas relief into confined spaces

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The presented work focuses on the risk analysis and the consequences of the unexpected leak to the tunnel of cryogenics gases. Formation of the gas mixture and its propagation along tunnels is an important issue for the safe operation of cryogenic machines, including superconducting accelerators or free electron lasers. As the cryogenics gas the helium and argon will be considered. A minimal numerical model will be presented and discussed. Series of numerical results related to emergency helium relief to the CERN tunnel and related to unexpected leak of the argon to an underground tunnel, will be shown. The numerical results will show temperature distribution, oxygen deficiency and gas cloud propagation in function of intensity of the leak and intensity of the ventilation.

  15. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S; Nawrodt, R; Zimmer, A; Thuerk, M; Vodel, W; Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-03-02

    Upcoming generations of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of optical components (e.g. end mirrors, cavity couplers, beam splitters). The main contributions to this noise are due to the substrate, the optical coating, and the suspension. The thermal noise can be reduced by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. In addition the overall mechanical quality factor should preferable increase at low temperatures. The experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus for investigations of the temperature dependency of the Q-factor of several substrate materials in the range of 5 to 300 K are presented. To perform a ring down recording an electrostatic mode excitation of the samples and an interferometric read-out of the amplitude of the vibrations was used.

  16. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  17. Beam screen cryogenic control improvements for the LHC run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068353; Rogez, Edouard; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Ferlin, Gerard; Tovar-Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the improvements made on the cryogenic control system for the LHC beam screens. The regulation objective is to maintain an acceptable temperature range around 20 K which simultaneously ensures a good LHC beam vacuum and limits cryogenic heat loads. In total, through the 27 km of the LHC machine, there are 485 regulation loops affected by beam disturbances. Due to the increase of the LHC performance during Run 2, standard PID controllers cannot keeps the temperature transients of the beam screens within desired limits. Several alternative control techniques have been studied and validated using dynamic simulation and then deployed on the LHC cryogenic control system in 2015. The main contribution is the addition of a feed-forward control in order to compensate the beam effects on the beam screen temperature based on the main beam parameters of the machine in real time.

  18. Beam screen cryogenic control improvements for the LHC run 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, B.; Rogez, E.; Blanco-Viñuela, E.; Ferlin, G.; Tovar-Gonzalez, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the improvements made on the cryogenic control system for the LHC beam screens. The regulation objective is to maintain an acceptable temperature range around 20 K which simultaneously ensures a good LHC beam vacuum and limits cryogenic heat loads. In total, through the 27 km of the LHC machine, there are 485 regulation loops affected by beam disturbances. Due to the increase of the LHC performance during Run 2, standard PID controllers cannot keeps the temperature transients of the beam screens within desired limits. Several alternative control techniques have been studied and validated using dynamic simulation and then deployed on the LHC cryogenic control system in 2015. The main contribution is the addition of a feed-forward control in order to compensate the beam effects on the beam screen temperature based on the main beam parameters of the machine in real time.

  19. A cryogenic measurement setup for characterization microwave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    A cryogenic measurement setup for characterization microwave devices from room to cryogenic temperatures is presented. The setup allows testing microwave devices at variable temperatures ranging from 300 to 77 K. Frequency doubler (94/188 GHz) has been cooled to 77 K and peak efficiency of 32......% at an input-power level of 207 mW is achieved. For verification experimental results the millimeter-wave GaAs Schottky barrier diode model is developed for CAD simulator. The simulated peak efficiency is 37% at 77 K. The estimation of simulated and measured data of the doubler efficiency versus temperature...... has the same trend from 77 to 300 K which confirmed the cryogenic measurement setup applicability....

  20. Large Cryogenic Helium Refrigeration System for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, CERN is presently building a large distributed cryogenic system to operate the high-field superconducting magnets of the 26.7 km accelerator in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. Refrigeration will be produced at several temperature levels down to 1.8 K, by eight cryogenic plants with a capacity of 18 kW @ 4.5 K (four of which recovered from the former LEP collider and suitably upgraded), feeding eight 2.4 kW @ 1.8 K refrigeration units using several stages of cold hydrodynamic compressors. After recalling the basics of LHC cryogenics, this paper gives an overview of the refrigeration system, from specification to design and production in industry, as well as status of the project.

  1. Cryogenic treatment of steel: from concept to metallurgical understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Subjecting steel to cryogenic treatment to improve its properties was conceived in the 30ies of the previous century. The proof of concept that properties, in particular wear resistance, can indeed be improved importantly, was reported in the next decades. Despite many investigations......, the metallurgical understanding of the microstructural changes involved in cryogenic treatment of steel has remained poor. It is believed that the improvement in wear resistance is promoted by an enhanced precipitation of carbides during tempering, but no explanation has been given as to how this enhanced...... precipitation can be obtained. In the last six years, the authors have applied in situ magnetometry, synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction and dilatometry to enlighten the phase transitions occurring in steels at cryogenic temperatures and to point out the connection between different treatment parameters...

  2. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Geynisman, M; Bossert, R; Darve, C; Ewald, K D; Klebaner, A; Limon, P; Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high-field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up- stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo- design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon-stop prototype.

  3. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  4. Specification of the 2nd cryogenic plant for RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Ki, T.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, Y.; Jo, H. C.; Kim, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    RAON is a rare isotope beam facility being built at Daejeon, South Korea. The RAON consists of three linear accelerators, SCL1 (1st SuperConducting LINAC), SCL2, and SCL3. Each LINAC has its own cryogenic plant. The cryogenic plant for SCL2 will provide the cooling for cryomodules, low temperature SC magnets, high temperature SC magnets, and a cryogenic distribution system. This paper describes the specification of the plant including cooling capacity, steady state and transient operation modes, and cooling strategies. In order to reduce CAPEX with the specification, two suppliers will consider no liquid nitrogen pre-cooling, one integrated cold box, and one back-up HP compressor. The detail design of the plant will be started at the end of this year.

  5. Advanced monitoring, fault diagnostics, and maintenance of cryogenic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, Mario; Pezzetti, Marco

    In this Thesis, advanced methods and techniques of monitoring, fault diagnostics, and predictive maintenance for cryogenic processes and systems are described. In particular, in Chapter 1, mainstreams in research on measurement systems for cryogenic processes are reviewed with the aim of dening key current trends and possible future evolutions. Then, in Chapter 2, several innovative methods are proposed. A transducer based on a virtual ow meter is presented for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators [1]. Furthermore, a comprehensive metrological analysis of the proposed transducer for verifying the metrological performance and pointing out most critical uncertainty sources is described [2]. A model-based method for fault detection and early-stage isolation, able to work with few records of Frequency Response Function (FRF) on an unfaulty compressor, is then proposed [3]. To enrich the proposal, a distributed diagnostic procedure, based on a micro-genetic...

  6. A cryogenic moderator system for JESSICA, a test facility for advanced cold moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzer, H.; Bayer, N.; Hinssen, H.K.; Matzerath, Th.

    2004-01-01

    In this article we like to report on building up and running a cryogenic moderator system for JESSICA, a full scale model of the target-reflector-moderator system for the European spallation source (ESS). The cryogenic moderator system can be charged with different fluids, solids and pellets in fluids at cryogenic temperatures. (orig.)

  7. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, A. N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Li, M. S. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, 13565-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  8. Chemical Engineering in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmeyer, Dennis A.; Meneghelli, Barry; Steinrock, Todd (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The aerospace industry has long been perceived as the domain of both physicists and mechanical engineers. This perception has endured even though the primary method of providing the thrust necessary to launch a rocket into space is chemical in nature. The chemical engineering and chemistry personnel behind the systems that provide access to space have labored in the shadows of the physicists and mechanical engineers. As exploration into the cosmos moves farther away from Earth, there is a very distinct need for new chemical processes to help provide the means for advanced space exploration. The state of the art in launch systems uses chemical propulsion systems, primarily liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to provide the energy necessary to achieve orbit. As we move away from Earth, there are additional options for propulsion. Unfortunately, few of these options can compare to the speed or ease of use provided by the chemical propulsion agents. It is with great care and significant cost that gaseous compounds such as hydrogen and oxygen are liquefied and become dense enough to use for rocket fuel. These low-temperature liquids fall within a specialty area known as cryogenics. Cryogenics, the science and art of producing cold operating conditions for use on Earth, in orbit, or on some other nonterrestrial body, has become increasingly important to our ability to travel within our solar system. The production of cryogenic fuels and the long-term storage of these fluids are necessary for travel. As our explorations move farther away from Earth, we need to address how to produce the necessary fuels to make a round-trip. The cost and the size of these expeditions are extreme at best. If we take everything necessary for our survival for the round-trip, we invalidate any chance of travel in the near future. As with the early explorers on Earth, we need to harvest much of our energy and our life support from the celestial bodies. The in situ production of these energy

  9. Cryogenic System for the Cryomodule Test Stand at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Michael J. [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab

    2017-10-09

    This paper describes the cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS) at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) located at Fermilab. CMTS is designed for production testing of the 1.3 GHz and 3.9GHz cryomodules to be used in the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLSII), which is an upgrade to an existing accelerator at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This paper will focus on the cryogenic system that extends from the helium refrigeration plant to the CMTS cave. Topics covered will include component design, installation and commissioning progress, and operational plans. The paper will conclude with a description of the heat load measurement plan.

  10. Power scaling of cryogenic Yb:LiYF(4) lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Luis E; Ripin, Daniel J; Fan, Tso Yee

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate a cryogenically cooled Yb:LiYF(4) (Yb:YLF) laser with 224W linearly polarized output power (pump-power limited) and a slope efficiency of 68%. The beam quality is characterized by an M(2) approximately 1.1 at 60W output and M(2) approximately 2.6 at 180W output. This level of average laser power is approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than demonstrated previously in cryogenic Yb:YLF. Yb:YLF is attractive for femtosecond pulse generation because of its wide gain bandwidth, and this demonstration shows the potential for high-average-power subpicosecond pulse lasers.

  11. Cryogenic Chamber for Servo-Hydraulic Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, John J.; Tuttle, James

    2009-01-01

    A compact cryogenic test chamber can be cooled to approximately 5 to 6 Kelvin for materials testing. The system includes a temperature controller and multiple sensors to measure specimen temperature at different locations. The testing chamber provides a fast and easy method to perform materials testing at lower than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The purpose of the chamber is to cool a composite lap shear specimen to approximately 20 K so that tensile test force and displacement data may be acquired at this cryogenic temperature range.

  12. Severe deformation twinning in pure copper by cryogenic wire drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, A.; Freudenberger, J.; Geissler, D.; Yin, S.; Schillinger, W.; Sarma, V. Subramanya; Bahmanpour, H.; Scattergood, R.; Khoshkhoo, M.S.; Wendrock, H.; Koch, C.C.; Eckert, J.; Schultz, L.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of low-temperature on the active deformation mechanism is studied in pure copper. For this purpose, cryogenic wire drawing at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) was performed using molybdenum disulfide lubrication. Microstructural investigation and texture analysis revealed severe twin formation in the cryogenically drawn copper, with a broad twin size distribution. The spacing of the observed deformation twins ranges from below 100 nm, as reported in previous investigations, up to several micrometers. The extent of twin formation, which is significantly higher when compared to other cryo-deformation techniques, is discussed with respect to the state of stress and the texture evolution during wire drawing.

  13. Cryogenic storage technology readiness for First Lunar Outpost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: an assessment of cryogenic storage technology; cryogenic boiloff predictions; Space Shuttle/Centaur thermodynamic vent system; zero-g thermodynamic vent system; heat exchanger/mixer pump module; the thick multilayer insulation (MLI) development program; blanket geometry concept evaluations; four-inch thick MLI system on 1/4-scale test tank; combined environments of vibration, acceleration, and temperature testing (CEVAT); Centaur fixed foam insulation; insulation system design; and fixed foam on operational Atlas 2.

  14. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  15. Germanium cryogenic detectors: Alpha surface events rejection capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorucci, S.; Broniatowski, A.; Chardin, G.; Censier, B.; Lesquen, A. de; Deschamps, H.; Fesquet, M.; Jin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Alpha surface events and multiple compton gamma interactions are the two major background components in Ge detectors for double-beta decay investigations. Two different methods have been studied to identify such type of events, using cryogenic Ge detectors developed primarily for dark matter search: (i) combined heat and ionization measurements, and (ii) pulse-shape analysis of the charge collection signals. Both methods show strong separation between electron recoil events and surface alphas. Cryogenic heat-ionization detectors therefore appear able to reject virtually all surface alpha interactions

  16. Current status of large-scale cryogenic gravitational wave telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, K; Ohashi, M; Miyoki, S; Uchiyama, T; Ishitsuka, H; Yamamoto, K; Kasahara, K; Fujimoto, M-K; Kawamura, S; Takahashi, R; Yamazaki, T; Arai, K; Tatsumi, D; Ueda, A; Fukushima, M; Sato, S; Nagano, S; Tsunesada, Y; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Shintomi, T; Yamamoto, A; Suzuki, T; Saito, Y; Haruyama, T; Sato, N; Higashi, Y; Tomaru, T; Tsubono, K; Ando, M; Takamori, A; Numata, K; Aso, Y; Ueda, K-I; Yoneda, H; Nakagawa, K; Musha, M; Mio, N; Moriwaki, S; Somiya, K; Araya, A; Kanda, N; Telada, S; Tagoshi, H; Nakamura, T; Sasaki, M; Tanaka, T; Oohara, K; Takahashi, H; Miyakawa, O; Tobar, M E

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale cryogenic gravitational wave telescope (LCGT) project is the proposed advancement of TAMA, which will be able to detect the coalescences of binary neutron stars occurring in our galaxy. LCGT intends to detect the coalescence events within about 240 Mpc, the rate of which is expected to be from 0.1 to several events in a year. LCGT has Fabry-Perot cavities of 3 km baseline and the mirrors are cooled down to a cryogenic temperature of 20 K. It is planned to be built in the underground of Kamioka mine. This paper overviews the revision of the design and the current status of the R and D

  17. Thermal Design of a Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Suk Yang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System (PSICS cooled by a stirling cryocooler has been designed. The PSICS has an IR sensor inside the cold box which is cooled by a stirling cryocooler with refrigeration capacity of 500mW at 80K in a vacuum vessel. It is important to minimize the heat load so that the background thermal noise can be reduced. In order to design the cryogenic system with low heat load and to reduce the remained heat load, we have performed numerical analyses. In this paper, we present the design factors and the results obtained by the thermal analysis of the PSICS.

  18. Safety experiences in using cryogenic liquid in IGCAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, B.; Singh, Dharmendra S.; Kandasamy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research is engaged in large-scale development work in the field of Fast Reactor Technology associated fuel cycle facilities metallurgy and material science. To meet the growing demands of these activities, the cryogenic are manufactured, stored, and handled in the Centre. Lot of precautionary measures are taken during the plant operations. However, the safety of the men and machine can be ensured only by systematic safety studies. So this study was taken up to identify the hazards of cryogenic, unsafe acts/unsafe conditions and to improve the safety standards in the Centre

  19. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica De Miguel-Soto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  20. Evaluation of hydrogen as a cryogenic wind tunnel test gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The nondimensional ratios used to describe various flow situations in hydrogen were determined and compared with the corresponding ideal diatomic gas ratios. The results were used to examine different inviscid flow configurations. The relatively high value of the characteristic rotational temperature causes the behavior of hydrogen, under cryogenic conditions, to deviate substantially from the behavior of an ideal diatomic gas in the compressible flow regime. Therefore, if an idea diatomic gas is to be modeled, cryogenic hydrogen is unacceptable as a wind tunnel test gas in a compressible flow situation.

  1. Cold power plant based on the cryogenic refueling tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Dovgjallo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the possibility to use a tank with cryogenic refueling as a part of the autonomous complex employing the liquefied natural gas. A cryogenic refueling tank-based installation to utilize a low-grade heat has been designed. During its use extra electric power is generated. To assess a performance capability, the proposed installation calculations have been made for different end pressures in cryogenic refueling tank. In all embodiments, the mass of cryogenic refilled is 866 kg. Depending on the pressure an amount of extra electric power is produced owing to utilizing a low temperature potential of LNG. New values, such as the specific amount of extra energy are introduced. These values allow objective assessment of the potential for extra energy when using the cryogenic products with their subsequent regasification in cryogenic refueling tank taking into consideration the operational constraints and the working fluid flow.A cold energy power plant has been also designed to refuel vehicles with the natural gas. In this paper the turbines with desirable expansion ratio to generate the maximum possible amount of power were selected in an optimal way. The optimum degree of expansion for the first turbine in the first loop will be т = 8.8; for the second turbine in the first loop т = 10; turbines for the second loop т = 3.9. The total amount of generated electric power will be 3725.22 kW•h for 225 min. The action time of cold energy power plant, including the time of methane gasification in cryogenic refueling tank, time of refueling vehicles, and time of electricity generation will be 24 hours. The economic assessment of cold energy power plant has shown that the payback period is 3.4 years.Thus, the performance evaluation by the temperature and pressure levels eliminates the possibility for forming the hydrates.So the calculations have shown that research in the development of power plants looks promising as well as allow you

  2. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel-Soto, Veronica; Leandro, Daniel; Lopez-Aldaba, Aitor; Beato-López, Juan Jesus; Pérez-Landazábal, José Ignacio; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Jamier, Raphael; Roy, Philippe; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2017-11-30

    In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG), and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  3. Method and apparatus for conducting structural health monitoring in a cryogenic, high vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xinlin (Inventor); Beard, Shawn J. (Inventor); Li, Irene (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Sensors affixed to various such structures, where the sensors can withstand, remain affixed, and operate while undergoing both cryogenic temperatures and high vibrations. In particular, piezoelectric single crystal transducers are utilized, and these sensors are coupled to the structure via a low temperature, heat cured epoxy. This allows the transducers to monitor the structure while the engine is operating, even despite the harsh operating conditions. Aspects of the invention thus allow for real time monitoring and analysis of structures that operate in conditions that previously did not permit such analysis. A further aspect of the invention relates to use of piezoelectric single crystal transducers. In particular, use of such transducers allows the same elements to be used as both sensors and actuators.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  5. Boiling of multicomponent working fluids used in refrigeration and cryogenic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogorychny, V. I.; Dolzhikov, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    Working fluids based on mixtures are widely used in cryogenic and refrigeration engineering. One of the main elements of low-temperature units is a recuperative heat exchanger where the return flow cools the direct (cold regeneration is carrying out) resulting in continuous boiling and condensation of the multicomponent working fluid in the channels. The temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of the heat exchanger can be more than 100K, which leads to a strong change in thermophysical properties along its length. In addition, the fraction of the liquid and vapor phases in the flow varies very much, which affects the observed flow regimes in the heat exchanger channels. At the moment there are not so many experimental data and analytical correlations that would allow to estimate the heat transfer coefficient during the flow of a two-phase mixture flow at low temperatures. The work is devoted to the study of the boiling process of multicomponent working fluids used in refrigeration and cryogenic engineering. The description of the method of determination of heat transfer coefficient during boiling of mixtures in horizontal heated channel is given as well as the design of the experimental stand allowing to make such measurements. This stand is designed on the basis of a refrigeration unit operating on the Joule-Thomson throttle cycle and makes it possible to measure the heat transfer coefficient with a good accuracy. Also, the calculated values of the heat transfer coefficient, obtained with the use of various correlations, are compared with the existing experimental data. Knowing of the heat transfer coefficient will be very useful in the design of heat exchangers for low-temperature units operating on a mixture refrigerant.

  6. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  7. The Cryogenic Impact Resistant Evaluation of Composite Materials for Use in Composite Pressure Vessels with an Additional Cryogenic Bonding Scope, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The intent of the proposed effort is to investigate the detailed composite material performance characteristics after being subjected to cryogenic temperatures and...

  8. Parametric optimum analysis of an irreversible Ericsson cryogenic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An irreversible model of an Ericsson cryogenic refrigeration cycle working with an ideal Fermi gas is established, which is composed of two isothermal and two ... University, Xiamen 361005, People's Republic of China; Department of Physics, Quanzhou Normal University, Quanzhou 362000, People's Republic of China ...

  9. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerator for bolometric search of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper describes the design, installation and performance of a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. (CFDR-1200). The performance of ... 50 mK shield and can support a total mass of ∼100 kg (Sn detector and ∼5 cm thick low activity lead shield). ... removed via a water-cooled heat exchanger. The compressed helium is ...

  10. Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králík, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Pavel; Musilová, Věra; Srnka, Aleš; Zobač, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 5 (2011), 055106:1-5 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : cryogenics * heat measurement * heat radiation * micrometry * radiative transfer * thermistors Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.367, year: 2011

  11. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerator for bolometric search of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper describes the design, installation and performance of a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. (CFDR-1200). The performance of CFDR-1200 has been analysed using Takano's model developed for conventional ..... [18] O V Lounasmaa, Experimental principles and methods below 1 K (Academic, New York,. 1974).

  12. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cryogenic treatment; tungsten carbide–cobalt; SEM; XRD; microhardness. 1. Introduction. Tungsten carbide tools can machine metals at speeds that cause the cutting edge to become red hot, without losing its hardness or sharpness. It exhibits about 2–3 times the produc- tivity and 10 times the life of high-speed ...

  13. CFD Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. This study uses first-principles based CFD methodology to compute heat transfer from the tank wall to the cryogenic fluids and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between the tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between the tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that the commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over-predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  14. Cryogenic thermometry with a common diode: type BAS16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic test experiments often require a large number of temperatures to be monitored. In order to reduce cost, we investigated the feasibility of low-cost common diodes. We chose the Philips BAS16 diode in a type SOT23 package. By means of Stycast 2850FT, these diodes were glued into alumina

  15. Performance and Reliability of Solid Tantalum Capacitors at Cryogenic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Performance of different types of solid tantalum capacitors was evaluated at room and low temperatures, down to 15 K. The effect of temperature on frequency dependencies of capacitance, effective series resistances (ESR), leakage currents, and breakdown voltages has been investigated and analyzed. To assess thermo-mechanical robustness of the parts, several groups of loose capacitors and those soldered on FR4 boards were subjected to multiple (up to 500) temperature cycles between room temperature and 77 K. Experiments and mathematical modeling have shown that degradation in tantalum capacitors at low temperatures is mostly due to increasing resistance of the manganese cathode layer, resulting in substantial decrease of the roll-off frequency. Absorption currents follow a power law, I approximately t(sup -m), with the exponent m varying from 0.8 to 1.1. These currents do not change significantly at cryogenic conditions and the value of the exponent remains the same down to 15 K. Variations of leakage currents with voltage can be described by Pool-Frenkel and Schottky mechanisms of conductivity, with the Schottky mechanism prevailing at cryogenic conditions. Breakdown voltages of tantalum capacitors increase and the probability of scintillations decreases at cryogenic temperatures. However, breakdown voltages measured during surge current testing decrease at liquid nitrogen (LN) compared to room-temperature conditions. Results of temperature cycling suggest that tantalum capacitors are capable of withstanding multiple exposures to cryogenic conditions, but the probability of failures varies for different part types.

  16. Test method for measuring insulation values of cryogenic pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, J.F.M.; Blokland, H.; Klaver, B.W.; Beld, C. van de

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a large-area heat flux and temperature sensor (HFT) is used for the evaluation of the insulation value of cryogenic pipes. The HFT is flexible and clamp-on. The test method is relatively simple and can be used in-situ. The HFT makes it possible to monitor insulation performance over

  17. Cryogenic Cave Pearls In the Periglacial Zones of Ice Caves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Orvošová, M.; Filippi, Michal; Vlček, M.; Onac, B. P.; Persoiu, A.; Rohovec, Jan; Světlík, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2013), s. 207-220 ISSN 1527-1404 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/1760 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : caves * cryogenic caves * ice caves * periglacial zones Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.943, year: 2013

  18. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Maria; Versolato, Oscar; Windberger, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H2 partial pressure of about 10−15 mbar...

  19. Cryogenic detection of particles: Development effort in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1987-05-01

    The development of cryogenic detectors of particles, with emphasis on large mass devices, has been reviewed. Most groups are still tooling up and exploring basic properties of sensors. The main discussion themes are summarized and some of the early experimental results are described

  20. Modeling and control of a cryogenic distillation column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, B.; Betlem, Bernardus H.L.; Ruijter, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of constrained multivariable control of a heat-integrated cryogenic distillation process, a rigorous first principles dynamic model was developed and tested against a limited number of experiments. It was found that the process variables showed a large amount

  1. A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, V.B.; Singh, J.D.; Woodruff, T.R.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Notardonato, W.U.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) can produce large strains when deformed (e.g., up to 8%). Heating results in a phase transformation and associated recovery of all the accumulated strain. This strain recovery can occur against large forces, resulting in their use as actuators. Thus an SMA element can integrate both sensory and actuation functions, by inherently sensing a change in temperature and actuating by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. Two aspects of our work on cryogenic SMAs are addressed here. First - a shape memory alloy based cryogenic thermal conduction switch for operation between dewars of liquid methane and liquid oxygen in a common bulkhead arrangement is discussed. Such a switch integrates the sensor element and the actuator element and can be used to create a variable thermal sink to other cryogenic tanks for liquefaction, densification, and zero boil-off systems for advanced spaceport applications. Second - fabrication via arc-melting and subsequent materials testing of SMAs with cryogenic transformation temperatures for use in the aforementioned switch is discussed

  2. Test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokuda, E.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration (CRD). Air monitors will be used to sample for the tracer elements neodymium, terbium, and ytterbium, and dysprosium. The results from this air monitoring will be used to determine if the CRD is successful in controlling dust and minimizing contamination. Procedures and equipment specifications for the test are included

  3. Mechanical and electrical properties of resistance welds at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S T; Kim, S H; Kim, N S; Ludwig, H

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of resistance welds at cryogenic temperatures for the large superconducting magnet such as the superconducting MHD Dipole system for the National Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF SCMS) at the U. of Tennessee Space Institute are reported.

  4. Refrigeration and Cryogenics Specialist. J3ABR54530

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This document package contains an Air Force course used to train refrigeration and cryogenics specialists. The course is organized in six blocks designed for group instruction. The blocks cover the following topics: electrical principles; fundamentals of tubing and piping; metering devices, motor controls, domestic and commercial refrigeration;…

  5. The development of a cryogenic optical delay line for DARWIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Kamphues, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    TNO, in cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics, SRON, Dutch Space and CSL, has designed a compact breadboard cryogenic delay line for use in future space interferometry missions. The work is performed under ESA contract in preparation for the DARWIN mission. The breadboard (BB) delay line is

  6. Cryogenic micro-calorimeters for beta spectroscopy: A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, M.M.; Deptuck, D.; Girit, I.C.; Calaprice, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    Status of efforts to develop a cryogenic micro-calorimeter as a beta spectrometer for 17 keV neutrino searches is given. Experimental requirements are derived. Using NTD germanium thermometry, adequate detector performance (1.5 keV resolution at a base temperature of 130 mK) is demonstrated. Exploration of source deposition and encapsulation is underway. (orig.)

  7. Experimental wear behaviour of cryogenically treated aluminium 6063 and 8011 materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Padmanabhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to focus on the effect of cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al 6061 and Al 8011. The first objective was to understand the degree to which wear behaviour has shown improvement with aluminium grades being treated cryogenically on the specimens. To conduct wear test Aluminium experimental investigation has been carried out on aluminium alloys with cryogenic coolants. The cryogenic coolant has increased the wear resistance properties of aluminium upto 25% when compared to wear of non-cryogenically treated aluminium. The cryogenic treatment was carried out under three different timings for three different rpm’s under varying loads. The paper also studies the micro structural changes under these varying conditions. The experimental investigation of the paper concludes that cryogenically treated aluminium shows increase in wear resistance of nearly 25%.

  8. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  9. A water blown urethane insulation for use in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon

    1995-01-01

    Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) of NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank include polyurethane and polyisocyanurate modified polyurethane foam insulations. These insulations, currently foamed with CFC 11 blowing agent, serve to maintain cryogenic propellant quality, maintain the external tank structural temperature limits, and minimize the formation of ice and frost that could potentially damage the ceramic insulation on the space shuttle orbiter. During flight the external tank insulations are exposed to mechanical, thermal and acoustical stresses. TPS must pass cryogenic flexure and substrate adhesion tests at -253 C, aerothermal and radiant heating tests at fluxes up to approximately 14 kilowatts per square meter, and thermal conductivity tests at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. Due to environmental concerns, the polyurethane insulation industry and the External Tank Project are tasked with replacing CFC 11. The flight qualification of foam insulations employing HCFC 141b as a foaming agent is currently in progress; HCFC 141b blown insulations are scheduled for production implementation in 1995. Realizing that the second generation HCFC blowing agents are an interim solution, the evaluation of third generation blowing agents with zero ozone depletion potential is underway. NASA's TPS Materials Research Laboratory is evaluating third generation blowing agents in cryogenic insulations for the External Tank; one option being investigated is the use of water as a foaming agent. A dimensionally stable insulation with low friability, good adhesion to cryogenic substrates, and acceptable thermal conductivity has been developed with low viscosity materials that are easily processed in molding applications. The development criteria, statistical experimental approach, and resulting foam properties will be presented.

  10. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  11. Simulation and statistical analysis for the optimization of nitrogen liquefaction plant with cryogenic Claude cycle using process modeling tool: ASPEN HYSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, D. M.

    2017-09-01

    Cryogenic technology is used for liquefaction of many gases and it has several applications in food process engineering. Temperatures below 123 K are considered to be in the field of cryogenics. Extreme low temperatures are a basic need for many industrial processes and have several applications, such as superconductivity of magnets, space, medicine and gas industries. Several methods can be used to obtain the low temperatures required for liquefaction of gases. The process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure, which is below the critical pressure, is the basic liquefaction process. Different cryogenic cycle configurations are designed for getting the liquefied form of gases at different temperatures. Each of the cryogenic cycles like Linde cycle, Claude cycle, Kapitza cycle or modified Claude cycle has its own advantages and disadvantages. The placement of heat exchangers, Joule-Thompson valve and turboexpander decides the configuration of a cryogenic cycle. Each configuration has its own efficiency according to the application. Here, a nitrogen liquefaction plant is used for the analysis purpose. The process modeling tool ASPEN HYSYS can provide a software simulation approach before the actual implementation of the plant in the field. This paper presents the simulation and statistical analysis of the Claude cycle with the process modeling tool ASPEN HYSYS. It covers the technique used to optimize the liquefaction of the plant. The simulation results so obtained can be used as a reference for the design and optimization of the nitrogen liquefaction plant. Efficient liquefaction will give the best performance and productivity to the plant.

  12. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  13. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  14. Cryogenic power transmission technology: cryogenic dielectrics. Twelfth quarterly report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    During the reporting period, breakdown measurements with ac, dc, and impulse voltages were taken on several polymer film samples immersed in boiling liquid helium. The observed impulse strengths were found to be a factor of two to a factor of three higher than previously-measured ac strengths. Progress was made on experimental equipment, including reassembly and successful testing of Transformer B of the 700 kVac test system, repair of the Intermediate Voltage Cryostat IV2, and final testing of the 250 kV impulse generator. Voltage and pressure instrumentation underwent improvements, and a new pressurized test fixture for polymer film samples was constructed. The collaborative programs with cryogenic power transmission projects at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory were solidified. Group members also attended various technical meetings. Residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and microhardness measurements were completed on various dispersion-hardened aluminum-gold alloys. Microstructure studies on a 0.12 wt percent gold alloy indicated the formation of precipitates, presumably Al 2 Au, during thermal aging of the solution-heat-treated and quenched sample

  15. Cryogenic Volume-Phase Holographic Grisms for MOIRCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebizuka, Noboru; Ichiyama, Kotaro; Yamada, Toru; Tokoku, Chihiro; Onodera, Masato; Hanesaka, Mai; Kodate, Kashiko; Katsuno Uchimoto, Yuka; Maruyama, Miyoko; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Ichi; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori; Ichikawa, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    We have developed high-dispersion VPH (volume phase holographic) grisms with zinc selenide (ZnSe) prisms for the cryogenic optical system of MOIRCS (Multi-Object near-InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph) for Y-, J-, H-, and K-band observations. We fabricated VPH gratings using a hologram resin. After several heat cycles at between room temperature and 120 K, the VPH gratings were assembled to grisms by gluing with two ZnSe prisms. Several heat cycles were also carried out for the grisms before being installed into MOIRCS. We measured the efficiencies of the VPH grisms in a laboratory, and found them to be 70%-82%. The performances obtained by observations of MOIRCS with the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope have been found to be very consistent with the results in the laboratory test. This is the first astronomical application of cryogenic VPH grisms.

  16. ABS 3D printed solutions for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, E.; Bozzo, B.; Sevilla, P.; Martínez-Pasarell, O.; Puig, T.; Granados, X.

    2017-03-01

    3D printing has become a common, inexpensive and rapid prototyping technique, enabling the ad hoc fabrication of complex shapes. In this paper, we demonstrate that 3D printed objects in ABS can be used at cryogenic temperatures, offering flexible solutions in different fields. Firstly, a thermo-mechanical characterization of ABS 3D printed specimens at 77 K is reported, which allowed us to delimit the type of cryogenic uses where 3D printed pieces may be implemented. Secondly, we present three different examples where ABS 3D printed objects working at low temperatures have provided specific solutions: (i) SQUID inserts for angular magnetometry (low temperature material characterization field); (ii) a cage support for a metamaterial ;magnetic concentrator; (superconductivity application), and (iii) dedicated tools for cryopreservation in assisted reproductive techniques (medicine field).

  17. Proposed cryogenic Q-factor measurement of mirror substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, Sandor; Zimmer, Anja; Vodel, Wolfgang; Thuerk, Matthias; Schmidl, Frank; Seidel, Paul [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2004-03-07

    The thermal noise of optical components (e.g., end mirrors, beam splitters) is one of the limiting factors of the sensitivity of most of the present interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and it will be limiting in the advanced detectors now being designed. This thermal noise occurs mainly in the optical substrates and their mirror coatings. One possible method for minimizing thermal noise is cooling to cryogenic temperatures, maximizing the mechanical Q and maximizing the eigenfrequencies of the substrate. A new cryogenic apparatus for investigations of the temperature dependency of the Q-factor of several substrate materials down to 4.2 K is proposed. Possible methods of mode excitation and ring down measurement are discussed.

  18. Cryogenic system for VECC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, G; Bhattacharyya, T K; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    VEC Centre, Kolkata in India is at an advanced stage of commissioning a K500 superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting coil of the magnet for cyclotron is cooled by liquid helium. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the Dees of the radiofrequency system, maintain the vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The cryogenic system for magnet for cyclotron has been tested by cooling the coil and energizing the magnet. The cryogenic system for cryopanels has also been tested. Heater and temperature sensor were placed on the liquid helium cold head for cryopanel. The temperature of the cold head was observed to be below 20 K upto a heat load of 11.7 watt.

  19. Cryogenic Risk Assessments before Works in the LHC Tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Tests conducted in 2013/4 demonstrated that a small, residual risk to expose personnel to a helium spill exists in the LHC. Helium spills with a mass flow of less than 100 g s^-1 could be caused by workers accidentally damaging sensitive equipment in the cryogenic distribution system, such as instrumentation feedthroughs. In order to control this risk, a cryogenic risk assessment for all works taking place in the vicinity of such sensitive equipment is mandatory. The risk assessment and its recommendations are approved by the hierarchy and the complex manager before work can start. After introducing the risk assessment procedure, I will give some feedback on its implementation and present status.

  20. A sub-Kelvin cryogen-free EPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, Simon J; Stott, Chloe; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; Martinis, Lorenzo; McCulloch, Mark; Piccirillo, Lucio; Collison, David; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard

    2017-09-01

    We present an EPR instrument built for operation at Q band below 1K. Our cryogen-free Dewar integrates with a commercial electro-magnet and bridge. A description of the cryogenic and RF systems is given, along with the adaptations to the standard EPR experiment for operation at sub-Kelvin temperatures. As a first experiment, the EPR spectra of powdered Cr 12 O 9 (OH) 3 [Formula: see text] were measured. The sub-Kelvin EPR spectra agree well with predictions, and the performance of the sub-Kelvin system at 5K is compared to that of a commercial spectrometer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.