WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy a viable energy

  1. Wind energy: A viable alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soin, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the economic feasibility of wind energy in the current economic and political environment. The article specifically addresses the wind farm application to India, with asides to Europe and the US. Topics discussed include cost of energy generation for a 10 MW wind farm, cost comparison for captive energy options (diesel, coal, wind), environmental impacts, and social benefits

  2. Maintaining a Viable Energy Savings Performance Contract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Katherine L; Huckeby, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    Substantial amounts of information are available on Energy Savings Performance Contract award requirements, measurement, and verification, but we have found very little information on the day-to-day...

  3. Contracting of energy services: often a viable alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, M.; Bruendler, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the outsourcing of energy services as a viable alternative to the operation of own energy facilities. The advantages of contracting for enterprises wanting to focus on their core competencies and have their energy infrastructure financed, built, maintained and operated by a third party are discussed. Financial aspects are looked at and examples in connection with the calculation of actual energy costs are given. The article is concluded with tips on the evaluation of offers for contracting services and on the definition of ownership aspects and property boundaries

  4. Nuclear power a viable energy choice for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Global energy use will most likely increase to more than double by 2050, which is e.g. the medium value of the projection in the Intergovernmentals Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES). How to reconcile the projections with the current nuclear status? In its first fifty years, nuclear power has grown from 5 MWe of power production to an installed worldwide capacity of 360 GWe in 30 countries. Nuclear power provides about 16% of the total electricity in the world and is contributing to the reduction of the emission of greenhouse gases from the power sector. The SRES scenarios identify a gap between the current electricity generation capacity and the capacity requirements in 2050 of 360 GWe and 1 500 GWe. Three key factors will determine the future contribution of nuclear power: - improved economics, - national energy choice and supporting infrastructure as well as institutional arrangement, and - the degree to which advances are implemented in evolutionary and innovative reactor and fuel cycle technologies, to address safety, waste and proliferation concerns, as well as economic competitiveness. The economics of nuclear power are one main topic in industrial countries. A Japanese case study on energy security credit shows that nuclear power will eventually be a winner in the long term perspective due to amortisation and stable fuel prices. Nuclear power is also a part of nuclear technologies to address daunting challenges in the developing countries - hunger, disease, poverty, and shortage of drinking water and electricity. (orig.)

  5. Solar energy as a viable and sustainable alternative to fossil fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, F.L.; Ewansiha, K.; Enyeribe, E.

    2007-01-01

    A lot of human and natural resources have been put in the energy sector, but the quantity of supply to consumers is quite inadequate. To sustain industrial output and ensure rapid growth, there is a need for a reliable and efficient supply of energy. A survey was carried out to find out the knowledge of consumers on the use of solar energy as an alternative source of energy.The result indicated that although people are aware of existence, the product is not readily available for man

  6. Nuclear energy: the most viable alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guena, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de

    2006-01-01

    In this article various forms of electric power generation considered clean are discussed. The paper approaches the nuclear, aeolian, solar and fuel cells, and a resume of the vantage and advantage of each one are discussed, emphasizing their impact on the environment

  7. Small-scale automated biomass energy heating systems: a viable option for remote Canadian communities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallum, B. [Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Industry, Economics and Programs Branch

    1997-12-31

    The potential benefits of wood energy (forest biomass) for space heating in Canada`s remote communities was discussed. Diesel fuel and heating oil must be transported into these communities to produce electricity and to heat large public buildings. Below the treeline, roundwood is often used to heat private homes. The move toward environmentally sustainable development has focussed much attention on renewable energy technologies such as biomass energy, (i.e. any form of energy derived from plant or animal materials). Wood is the most readily available biomass fuel in remote communities. Woodchips and sawmill waste can be burned in automated biomass heating systems which provide a convenient way to use low-grade wood to heat large buildings or groups of buildings which would not be feasible to heat with roundwood. It was shown that one cord of spruce can produce 1.5 tonnes of woodchips to ultimately displace 300 litres of heating oil. A description of a small-commercial and small-industrial biomass system was presented. The benefits of biomass were described as: (1) direct savings compared to high-cost oil heat, (2) increased circulation of energy dollars inside the community, and (3) employment opportunities in harvesting, processing and operating biomass systems. A steady supply of good quality woodchips to the heating plant must be ensured. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  8. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success.

  9. Zero energy homes – Are they economically viable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Stephen; Davidson, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Whilst net zero energy homes are espoused in many policy circles, and many bespoke examples have been constructed to demonstrate their technical feasibility, there is a scarcity of evidence demonstrating such a standard would be economically rational, particularly for large scale housing development where orientation and aspect may not always be optimal. Drawing on energy monitoring evidence and construction economics associated with a nearly zero energy housing estate in Adelaide, Australia, this paper explores the economic feasibility of the net zero energy home policy in warm temperate climates. The results demonstrate that using economic tools and assumptions typically applied for building energy regulatory policy changes, net societal economic benefits significantly outweigh costs. The clear economic outcomes, combined with expected health and productivity benefits from improved levels of thermal comfort, should provide security to policy makers to progress home energy standards towards net zero energy performance. -- Highlights: •The concept of net zero energy homes is examined for economic viability. •Evidence is collected from a near net zero energy housing estate. •Conservative results show that societal benefits outweigh costs. •Significant additional benefits gained from net zero energy homes

  10. Viable Short-Term Directed Energy Weapon Naval Solutions: A Systems Analysis of Current Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    control/missile seeker radars  IO 2.3 Conduct electronic jamming of communications/data link/ identification systems o NTA 3.2.5 Conduct Electronic...IO 2.3 Conduct electronic jamming of communications/data link/ identification systems o NTA 3.2.9 Conduct Non-Lethal Engagement  ATFP CCR 12...this requirement for a single LaWS system during normal electrical plant lineup , but would most likely come to full power in the event the system

  11. The Most Economic, Socially Viable, and Environmentally Sustainable Alternative Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2008-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of current energy planning can be attributed to the limited economic, social, and environmental contexts taken into account as a result of the current intellectual and professional division of labor. A preventive approach is developed by which the ratio of desired to undesired effects can be substantially improved. It…

  12. Economically viable and environment-friendly hydro energy in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saks, Ants; Velner, Harald

    2001-01-01

    Hydro energy has been in oblivion in Estonia for about 30 years now. During the 1960s, most of Estonia's small hydropower plants were closed down, just as it was done in the whole Soviet Union. As the only larger hydro plant, the 125 MW plant in Narva, was situated on the Russian side of the Narva River, there were only two or three small hydro plants left. Even those were exploited at low capacity and mainly for heating the buildings. It was not until the 1990s that a number of enthusiasts started to re-establish the hydro plants by reconstructing old installations. The pre-feasibility study 'Hydropower in Estonia' proposed by Estonian and Swedish experts, showed that the restoration of the hydropower plants and watermills is economically feasible and technically possible if advanced technology is used. Hydropower as an alternative ('green') energy source should be used in the best technical-economical way. The first pilot plant in Estonia, the 200 kW Kamari plant was constructed in 1998 with compact-propeller units, in co-operation with Waterpumps WP Oy and ABB. Today, ten new plants have been constructed or are under construction. Hydropower plants/watermills should be reconstructed in accordance with the legislative acts on environment protection

  13. Energy-Tunable Sources of Entangled Photons: A Viable Concept for Solid-State-Based Quantum Relays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Daruka, Istvan; Ortix, Carmine; Rastelli, Armando

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method of generating triggered entangled photon pairs with wavelength on demand. The method uses a microstructured semiconductor-piezoelectric device capable of dynamically reshaping the electronic properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) via anisotropic strain engineering. Theoretical models based on k .p theory in combination with finite-element calculations show that the energy of the polarization-entangled photons emitted by QDs can be tuned in a range larger than 100 meV without affecting the degree of entanglement of the quantum source. These results pave the way towards the deterministic implementation of QD entanglement resources in all-electrically-controlled solid-state-based quantum relays.

  14. Ecological carbon sequestration via wood harvest and storage (WHS): Can it be a viable climate and energy strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, N.; Zaitchik, B. F.; King, A. W.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    A carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which forests are sustainably managed to optimal carbon productivity, and a fraction of the wood is selectively harvested and stored to prevent decomposition under anaerobic, dry or cold conditions. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. The live trees serve as a `carbon scrubber' or `carbon remover' that provides continuous sequestration (negative emissions). The stored wood is a semi-permanent carbon sink, but also serves as a `biomass/bioenergy reserve' that could be utilized in the future.Based on forest coarse wood production rate, land availability, bioconservation and other practical constraints, we estimate a carbon sequestration potential for wood harvest and storage (WHS) 1-3 GtC y-1. The implementation of such a scheme at our estimated lower value of 1 GtC y-1 would imply a doubling of the current world wood harvest rate. This can be achieved by harvesting wood at a modest harvesting intensity of 1.2 tC ha-1 y-1, over a forest area of 8 Mkm2 (800 Mha). To achieve the higher value of 3 GtC y-1, forests need to be managed this way on half of the world's forested land, or on a smaller area but with higher harvest intensity. However, the actual implementation may face challenges that vary regionally. We propose `carbon sequestration and biomass farms' in the tropical deforestation frontiers with mixed land use for carbon, energy, agriculture, as well as conservation. In another example, the forests damaged by insect infestation could be thinned to reduce fire and harvested for carbon sequestration.We estimate a cost of $10-50/tCO2 for harvest and storage around the landing site. The technique is low tech, distributed and reversible. We compare the potential of WHS with a number of other carbon sequestration methods. We will also show its impact on future land carbon sink

  15. Rural and Renewable Energy Project: Renewable and Alternative Energy Devices and Viable Alternatives to Fuelwood and Kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The need for conservation of the nation's trees and other forestry resources so as to make the Government's reafforestation, soil erosion and desertification control programs successful, is a matter that requires serious attention. This is because the bulk of the people of this country, who are in the rural areas, depend massively on fuelwood as their source of energy for cooking. For a large percentage of the urban dwellers, the situation is not much different since the recent increases in the prices of kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas has forced many to opt for fuelwood for cooking. Viable renewable and alternative energy systems like solar cookers, biogas plants, improved wood burning stoves, briquetted biomass and smokeless coal briquettes and stoves are essential for the provision of alternative cooking fuels and methodologies. Furthermore, the inefficient open-to-sun drying method is prevalent, while the rural areas are particularly starved of petroleum products and grid electricity. Modern solar dryers, solar-PV, wind and hydropower can be used to meet some of the energy needs of the rural population. This paper discusses these renewable and alternative devices and how they can be integrated into the Nigerian rural energy system. (author)

  16. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.; Ott, F.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the current energy economy in Austria. The Austrian political aims of sustainable development and climate protection imply a reorientation of the Austrian energy policy as a whole. Energy consumption trends (1993-1998), final energy consumption by energy carrier (indexed data 1993-1999), comparative analysis of useful energy demand (1993 and 1999) and final energy consumption of renewable energy sources by sector (1996-1999) in Austria are given. The necessary measures to be taken in order to reduce the energy demand and increased the use of renewable energy are briefly mentioned. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  17. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of energy production, energy conversion, atomic energy and renewable energy. The development of the energy consumption in Austria for the years 1993 to 1999 is given for the different energy types. The development of the use of renewable energy sources in Austria is given, different domestic heat-systems are compared, life cycles and environmental balance are outlined. (a.n.)

  18. Advanced light water reactors: an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to safety and reliability, a common mission for the international nuclear industry in the 21. century will be ensure affordable electricity. At the Westinghouse Electric Corporation believe our advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design gives us the opportunity to provide the safest, most reliable, lowest cost, most competitive generation method possible for use by nations and utilities worldwide. While the safety and reliability aspects of the ALWR can be proven tangibly and are well-documented, questions have been raised about the technology's ability to work within the world's selling price range for electricity generation. For our industry's financial stability, and especially for the stability of the world's future power needs, Westinghouse has done extensive work on this issue and we are convinced we can meet the competitive challenge. We believe the ALWR can be an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix. This paper will define the competitive challenge that is being addressed by the industry and then analyze three specific areas: capital costs, operating costs, and financing costs. The hidden advantage of nuclear power in responding to these challenges will be explored, and a strong case will be made asserting that the advanced light water reactor will be able to compete in international markets with viable production costs. (authors)

  19. Global zero-carbon energy pathways using viable mixes of nuclear and renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sanghyun; Bradshaw, Corey J.A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A proper mix of nuclear power and renewables achieves sustainable energy future. • A high nuclear share provides cost and land effectiveness compared to nuclear-free. • Only-renewable mix will increase negative economic and environmental impacts. • A deployment of advanced reactor technologies is essential to overcome limitations. - Abstract: What are the most viable global pathways for a major expansion of zero-carbon emissions electricity sources given the diversity of regional technical, socio-political and economic constraints? We modelled a range of zero-emissions energy scenarios across nations that were designed to meet projected final energy demand in 2060, and optimised to derive the best globally aggregated results in terms of minimising costs and land use (a surrogate for environmental impacts). We found that a delayed energy transition to a zero-emissions pathway will decrease investment costs (−$3,431 billion), but increase cumulative CO 2 emissions (additional 696 Gt). A renewable-only scenario would convert >7.4% of the global land area to energy production, whereas a maximum nuclear scenario would affect <0.4% of land area, including mining, spent-fuel storage, and buffer zones. Moreover, a nuclear-free pathway would involve up to a 50% greater cumulative capital investment compared to a high nuclear penetration scenario ($73.7 trillion). However, for some nations with a high current share of renewables and a low projected future energy demand (e.g., Norway), pursuit of a higher nuclear share is suboptimal. In terms of the time frame for replacement of fossil fuels, achieving a global nuclear share of about 50% by 2060 would be a technically and economically plausible target if progressing at a pace of the average historical growth of nuclear power penetration in France from 1970 to 1986 (0.28 MWh person −1 year -1 ). For effective climate-change mitigation, a high penetration of nuclear in association with a nationally

  20. Wormholes in viable f(R) modified theories of gravity and weak energy condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovic, Petar [Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hamburg (Germany); Sossich, Marko [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-03-01

    In this work wormholes in viable f(R) gravity models are analyzed. We are interested in exact solutions for stress-energy tensor components depending on different shape and redshift functions. Several solutions of gravitational equations for different f(R) models are examined. The solutions found imply no need for exotic material, while this need is implied in the standard general theory of relativity. A simple expression for weak energy condition (WEC) violation near the throat is derived and analyzed. High curvature regime is also discussed, as well as the question of the highest possible values of the Ricci scalar for which the WEC is not violated near the throat, and corresponding functions are calculated for several models. The approach here differs from the one that has been common since no additional assumptions to simplify the equations have been made, and the functions in f(R) models are not considered to be arbitrary functions, but rather a feature of the theory that has to be evaluated on the basis of consistency with observations for the Solar System and cosmological evolution. Therefore in this work we show that the existence of wormholes without exotic matter is not only possible in simple arbitrary f(R) models, but also in models that are in accordance with empirical data. (orig.)

  1. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Object of sciences and technologies, energy plays a major part in economics and relations between nations. Jean-Louis Bobin, physicist, analyses the relations between man and energy and wonders about fears that delivers nowadays technologies bound to nuclear energy and about the fear of a possible shortage of energy resources. (N.C.). 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  3. Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  4. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    On the occasion of the World Environment Day the Norwegian Ministry for the Environment held a conference on growth problems in energy consumption. The themes which were treated were energy conservation, hydroelectric power, the role of nuclear power, radioactive waste disposal, fossil fuel resources, ecological limits, pollution and international aspects. Nuclear energy forms the main theme of one lecture and an aspect of several others. (JIW)

  5. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  6. Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Torriti, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energy policy measures has been assessed with various appraisal and evaluation tools since the 1960s. Decision analysis, environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment are all notable examples of progenitors of Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) in the assessment of energy policies, programmes and projects. This chapter provides overview of policy tools which have been historically applied to assess the impacts of energy policies, programmes and projects....

  7. Energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The author places the energy problem in the context of world economy. The various obstacles encountered in the United States to spell out a viable national energy policy are cited. A certain number of practical proposals is given to lead to an 'effective policy' which would allow energy economy at the same time as energy development, that is, including nuclear energy [fr

  8. In search of viable business models for development: sustainable energy in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van den Buuse, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - Although the crucial role of business, and of business-based approaches, in development is increasingly emphasised by academics and practitioners, insight is lacking into the "whether and how" of viable business models, in environmental, social and economical terms. This article analyses

  9. Energies; Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  10. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    at very high temperature where all matter is in the plasma state as the involved energies are orders of magnitude higher than typical chemical binding energies. It is one of the great science and engineering challenges to construct a viable power plant based on fusion energy. Fusion research is a world...... The presentation will discuss the present status of the fusion energy research and review the EU Roadmap towards a fusion power plant. Further the cost of fusion energy is assessed as well as how it can be integrated in the distributed energy system......Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...

  11. Is the price squeeze doctrine still viable in fully-regulated energy markets?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiwak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Simply stated, a price squeeze occurs when a firm with monopoly power on the primary, or wholesale, level engages in a prolonged price increase that drives competitors out of the secondary, or retail level, and thereby extends its monopoly power to the secondary market. A price squeeze will not be found, however, for any short-term exercise in market power. Rather, because anticompetitive effects of a price squeeze are indirect, the price squeeze must last long enough and be severe enough to produce effects on actual or potential competition in the secondary market. In regulated electric industries, a price squeeze claim usually arises from the complex relationship between the supplier, the wholesale customer, the retail customer, and the federal and state regulators. The supplier sells electric power to both wholesale and retail customers. Wholesale transactions are regulated by federal regulators, and retail transactions are regulated at the state level. The wholesale customers in turn sell power to their retail customers. Over the last several years, there have been substantial developments in the application of the price squeeze doctrine to fully-regulated electric utilities. This article will examine the current developments in this area, and attempt to highlight the burdens potential litigants, both plaintiffs and defendants, must overcome to succeed

  12. Nuclear energy: a vital energy choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, Michel

    1980-01-01

    Speaking from the platform of the XIIIth annual session of the International Atomic Energy Agency, at New Delhi, AEC managing director Michel Pecqueur made a solemn appeal to the world community for the decisions which are needed on energy. The present energy crisis can lead the world to a recession and be a factor in grave troubles for peace and balance in the world. The crisis cannot be resolved without accrued recourse to the use of nuclear energy. Two essential themes were outlined: the development of nuclear energy in the world, and the increased reduction of proliferation risks. In concluding, he expressed the hop that with a greater effort in information media, the nuclear fact-of-life would be better accepted by the general public in future, for it is there that lies a brake which may hinder nuclear energy development [fr

  13. Energy a planetary challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, B.; Souviron, J.P

    1996-01-01

    After explaining that nuclear energy as well fossil fuel energy are a problem for environment, in radioactive wastes for the first one and for the greenhouse effect for the second one, a new energy policy for France and for the whole countries in the world is described here. Technological and financial arguments in support of this demonstration, it is possible to live better on making the right choices; The energy future is built on the exploitation of two richnesses the energy economies and the renewable energies, as solar energy or wind energy. Technologies exist, they have to be improved and to be applied with judgment according to areas. This challenge is, above all, a question of policy will. (N.C.)

  14. Energies; Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotard, E.

    2002-02-01

    A review is made about the consequences of the European directive on energy that entered into application in august 2000. It appears that most countries are opening their electricity and gas markets at a faster pace than required by the E.U. directive. European gas imports reached 480 Gm{sup 3} in 2000 and are expected to be over 700 Gm{sup 3} in 2015, so the question of the reliability of the gas suppliers has to be answered at the European level. The current time is marked by an increase of the complexity of the energy market that is due to different factors: 1) the delay in the implementation of European energy directives in France, 2) new arrangement is occurring in United-Kingdom in the energy sector, 3) the lack of a regulating authority in Germany, and 4) the difficulty of inter-connecting the different European energy networks. This transitory period may generate some economic imbalances and competition disturbances by allowing some enterprises to benefit from lower energy prices before others. (A.C.)

  15. A history of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debeir, Jean-Claude; Deleage, Jean-Paul; Hemery, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This document briefly presents a book in which the authors propose a history of energy. They notice that means of conversion of raw energy into useful energy have always met physical limits (depletion of resources, saturation of hydraulic sites by mills, etc.), social limits (wood for rich people and coal for poor people like in England during the 18. century), economic and geopolitical limits (rare energy in the South, petrol as you wish and button-pressing electricity in over-developed countries). They discuss these issues as energy systems are approaching to critical situations, and as global warming accelerates

  16. The geothermal energy, a model energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    This book, largely illustrated by photos maps and schemes, takes stock on the knowledge on the geothermal energy, the low and high energy applications and the evolutions. Examples describe the french context and the channels of heat and electric power production. (A.L.B.)

  17. Geothermal energy, a new energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murr, K

    1960-05-01

    A survey is made of the historical development of geothermal energy, and the geological situations appropriate for its exploitation are described. When prospecting for steam sources, several vertical drillings of about 200 m depth and 60-120 mm diameter are usually sufficient to give adequate knowledge of subsurface conditions. In Iceland, geothermal energy is used primarily for domestic space-heating and climate control in greenhouses, but due to the ready availability of hydroelectricity, geothermal energy is not widely applied for the generation of electricity. In Katanga (Congo), a tin mine is supplied by 220-275 kW power plant which is driven by a nearby hot-water source. Other major developments at the time (1960) included Larderello in Italy and Wairakei in New Zealand. Preliminary results from exploratory boreholes in El Salvador are discussed.

  18. Energy - a vital question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkenbuell, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    The DAG has become involved with the topics and problems of energy policy very early and has already pointed on the necessity of an overall plan for energy policy for the Federal Republic of Germany in the sixties. The claim directed to the legislative bodies in the F. R. of Germany had sprung from the conclusion that endangering energy supply in the medium or long term would lead to a serious disorder within economic and thus social life. In order to meet the risks for industry and society which are related to an endangering of energy supply at an early stage and with regard to the future the DAG think it indispensable to further update the existing political energy programme of the Federal Government. The DAG hope that the political claims which are included in this brochure and which were worked out at the 8th Energiepolitische Bundestagung of the DAG might influence the German programme for energy policy. At the same time this brochure is meant to provide a factual contribution to the present energy discussion which, in general, is still based on emotional arguments. (orig./UA) [de

  19. Nuclear energy: a reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.A.; Nader, R.; Udall, M.K.; Walske, C.

    1980-01-01

    This edited transcript of a televised American Enterprise Institute Public Poicy Forum explores the role of nuclear technology in energy production in the US today. A panel made up of Senator James A. McClure, Ralph Nader, Representative Morris K. Udall, and Dr. Carl Walske and moderated by John Charles Daly examines the lessons learned from the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant and the public attitudes toward nuclear energy, particularly in light of this accident. The experts discuss alternative energy sources, such as coal, gas, biomass, and solar power as well as conservation and more efficient use of present facilities. The issues of nuclear waste disposal and transport and US commitments to countries not self-sufficient in their energy needs are also explored

  20. A sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to encourage electric power production through renewable energies (such as wind energy with the Eole 2000 plan, solar water heaters in overseas departments, wood energy for space heating in buildings, photovoltaic energy), demand side management and cogeneration, and to enhance its purchase conditions by the government-owned EDF utility. Laws have been also introduced concerning air quality and the rational use of energy

  1. A law of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geel, Pieter van

    2004-01-01

    Developing countries have a right to economic growth, and to achieve that they need energy. Without it they cannot bring about poverty reduction or meet the Millennium Development Goals. Two billion people have no access to modern forms of energy. Private enterprise cannot operate without it. Research shows that recurrent power outages inflict severe financial damage on businesses. And schools and health care institutions can clearly provide better services if they have access to power supplies. At the same time, we have to realize that our growing energy consumption is already causing environmental and health problems and damaging our economies. Poorer populations tend to use wood and charcoal as their main energy sources, but indoor wood fires lead to health difficulties, especially among women and children. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 1.6 million people die every year as a result of indoor air pollution. Use of fossil fuels for large-scale power generation and transport is also a source of air pollution, especially in cities in developing countries. According to the World Energy Assessment (2000), urban air pollution caused primarily by emissions from fossil fuels and motorized transport leads to around 800,000 deaths a year worldwide. Consumption of fossil fuels also leads to emissions of the greenhouse gases that cause climate change. More effort is needed to promote the use of renewable energy sources, so that they can eventually meet a greater proportion of our needs. For the next 30 to 50 years, however, there will be no realistic prospect of meeting all of our energy requirements through renewables. So we must also work on energy efficiency, cleaner fuels and modern fossil fuels

  2. A dark energy multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles-Perez, Salvador; Martin-Moruno, Prado; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F

    2007-01-01

    We present cosmic solutions corresponding to universes filled with dark and phantom energy, all having a negative cosmological constant. All such solutions contain infinite singularities, successively and equally distributed along time, which can be either big bang/crunches or big rips singularities. Classically these solutions can be regarded as associated with multiverse scenarios, being those corresponding to phantom energy that may describe the current accelerating universe. (fast track communication)

  3. A dark energy multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Perez, Salvador; Martin-Moruno, Prado; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-21

    We present cosmic solutions corresponding to universes filled with dark and phantom energy, all having a negative cosmological constant. All such solutions contain infinite singularities, successively and equally distributed along time, which can be either big bang/crunches or big rips singularities. Classically these solutions can be regarded as associated with multiverse scenarios, being those corresponding to phantom energy that may describe the current accelerating universe. (fast track communication)

  4. Transportation Energy - Sandia Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Energy Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Menu Stationary Power solar Energy Conversion Efficiency Increasing the amount of electricity produced from a given thermal energy input. Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2

  5. Energy Research - Sandia Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Energy Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Menu Stationary Power solar Energy Conversion Efficiency Increasing the amount of electricity produced from a given thermal energy input. Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2

  6. Energy storage. A challenge for energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, Jean-Baptiste; Nekrasov, Andre; Pastor, Emmanuel; Benefice, Emmanuel; Brincourt, Thierry; Brisse, Annabelle; Cagnac, Albannie; Delille, Gauthier; Hinchliffe, Timothee; Lancel, Gilles; Jeandel, Elodie; Lefebvre, Thierry; Loevenbruck, Philippe; Penneau, Jean-Francois; Soler, Robert; Stevens, Philippe; Radvanyi, Etienne; Torcheux, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Written by several EDF R and D engineers, this book aims at presenting an overview of knowledge and know-how of EDF R and D in the field of energy storage, and at presenting the different technologies and their application to electric power systems. After a description of the context related to a necessary energy transition, the authors present the numerous storage technologies. They distinguish direct storage of power (pumped storage water stations, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, the various electrochemical batteries, metal-air batteries, redox flow batteries, superconductors), thermal storage (power to heat, heat to power) and hydrogen storage (storage under different forms), and propose an overview of the situation of standardisation of storage technologies. In the next part, they give an overview of the main services provided by storage to the electric power system: production optimisation, frequency adjustment, grid constraint resolution, local smoothing of PV and wind production, supply continuity. The last part discusses perspectives regarding the role of tomorrow's storage in the field of electrical mobility, for emerging markets, and with respect to different scenarios

  7. Energy peaks: A high energy physics outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    Energy distributions of decay products carry information on the kinematics of the decay in ways that are at the same time straightforward and quite hidden. I will review these properties and discuss their early historical applications, as well as more recent ones in the context of (i) methods for the measurement of masses of new physics particle with semi-invisible decays, (ii) the characterization of Dark Matter particles produced at colliders, (iii) precision mass measurements of Standard Model particles, in particular of the top quark. Finally, I will give an outlook of further developments and applications of energy peak method for high energy physics at colliders and beyond.

  8. Energy: a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Curtis.

    1995-01-01

    The world appears on the verge of a new era of advanced technologies and new fuels. Although such a transformation is unlikely to take place overnight, change is clearly coming. The question is how much and how fast: Will energy transition amount to a technological revolution, or merely an evolution? A detailed evaluation of the various aspects is given. (author). 23 refs

  9. Energy supply - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittstieg, G.

    1980-12-01

    A briefly commented data collection is presented. The following diagrams are related to energy requirements and consumption as well as primary energy reserves. Finally some comments referring to nuclear energy are given. (UA) [de

  10. Energy as a Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Wolfgang

    Energie wird zum Gebrauchsgegenstand, zur Commodity und rückt doch in den Blickpunkt der Aufmerksamkeit. Volkswirtschaftliche, politische, gesellschaftliche und betriebswirtschaftliche Ansprüche lassen Services rund um die Energieversorgung (Energy-related Services) entstehen. Convenience Services, die den Ansprüchen der Konsumenten gerecht werden, wie Visualisierung von (dezentraler) Energieerzeugung und -verbrauch auf Basis digitaler Smart Meter, die den analogen Ferraris-Zähler ersetzen, sowie optimierter Energieeinsatz halten in Haushalten als digitalisierten Standorten (Smart Sites) Einzug. Energieoptimierung auf Basis des Paradigmas "Verbrauch folgt Erzeugung" stellt Nachfrageflexibilität industrieller Prozesse (Demand Response) als Energie-Effizienz-Faktor in den Vordergrund und lässt Services wie ihre Vermarktung als Regelenergie zur Stabilisierung der Netzfrequenz entstehen. Ein Innovation Action Plan liefert einen Ausblick, wohin die Integration neuer Technologien, die Steigerung der Kundennähe und die Entwicklung neuer Geschäftsmodelle die Energiewirtschaft führen kann. Mit Eco-Home und Power-Pool werden zwei konkrete Beispiele für Energy as a Service vorgestellt.

  11. A Guide to Energy Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Energy audits are a powerful tool for uncovering operational and equipment improvements that will save energy, reduce energy costs, and lead to higher performance. Energy audits can be done as a stand-alone effort or as part of a larger analysis across a group of facilities, or across an owner's portfolio. The purpose of an energy audit (sometimes called an 'energy assessment' or 'energy study') is to determine where, when, why and how energy is used in a facility, and to identify opportunities to improve efficiency. Energy auditing services are offered by energy services companies (ESCOs), energy consultants and engineering firms. The energy auditor leads the audit process but works closely with building owners, staff and other key participants throughout to ensure accuracy of data collection and appropriateness of energy efficiency recommendation. The audit typically begins with a review of historical and current utility data and benchmarking of your building's energy use against similar buildings. This sets the stage for an onsite inspection of the physical building. The main outcome of an energy audit is a list of recommended energy efficiency measures (EEMs), their associated energy savings potential, and an assessment of whether EEM installation costs are a good financial investment.

  12. Distributed energy resources for a zero-energy neighbhourhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Gonzalez, R.M.D.G.; Asare-Bediako, B.; Cobben, J.F.G.; Kling, W.L.; Scharrenberg, G.R.; Dijkstra, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zero energy buildings are on the increasing trend. They are perceived as appropriate technology to reducing CO2 emissions, improving energy efficiency and alleviating energy poverty. The main goal is that a grid-connected building produces enough energy on site to equal or exceed its annual energy

  13. Energy Blocks--A Physical Model for Teaching Energy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Most physics educators would agree that energy is a very useful, albeit abstract topic. It is therefore important to use various methods to help the student internalize the concept of energy itself and its related ideas. These methods include using representations such as energy bar graphs, energy pie charts, or energy tracking diagrams.…

  14. Wind energy: A renewable energy option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Wind turbine generator research programs administered by the Energy Research and Development Administration are examined. The design and operation of turbine demonstration models are described. Wind assessments were made to determine the feasibility of using wind generated power for various parts of the country.

  15. Renewable: A key component of our global energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, D.

    1995-12-31

    Inclusion of renewable energy sources in national and international energy strategies is a key component of a viable global energy future. The global energy balance is going to shift radically in the near future brought about by significant increases in population in China and India, and increases in the energy intensity of developing countries. To better understand the consequences of such global shifts in energy requirements and to develop appropriate energy strategies to respond to these shifts, we need to look at the factors driving choices among supply options by geopolitical consumers and the impact these factors can have on the future energy mix.

  16. A single particle energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  17. A single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A ≤ 89 and for orbital angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei Λ A Z with baryon number A in which a single Λ hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus A Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The Λ hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = -1, isospin I = O and a mass M Λ = 1116 MeV/c 2 . Although the Λ interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V ΛN ∼ 0.5 V NN . As a result, the two-body ΛN system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton Λ 3 H in which the Λ is bound to a deuteron with the Λ-d separation energy being only ∼ 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius ∼ 15 fm exclamation point In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the Λ is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the Λ which can decay either via ''free'' pionic decay Λ → N + π or via induced decay Λ + N → N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime ∼ 10 -10 s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free Λ. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time ∼ 10 -22 s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei

  18. Representing Energy. I. Representing a Substance Ontology for Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.; Vokos, Stamatis

    2012-01-01

    The nature of energy is not typically an explicit topic of physics instruction. Nonetheless, verbal and graphical representations of energy articulate models in which energy is conceptualized as a quasimaterial substance, a stimulus, or a vertical location. We argue that a substance ontology for energy is particularly productive in developing…

  19. For a rational energy transition based on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmin, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    After having recalled the meaning of the concept of energy transition, and stated that this concept is a fuzzy one, this paper addresses the issue of the future of energy through the concept of Energy returned on Energy invested (EROI). It discusses this approach by outlining that energy is the initial driver of economy, and by showing that only hydroelectricity, coal, nuclear and wind energy have a sufficient return rate, and that shale gas is an energy source for the short and medium term. Then, based on data related to world energy resources and consumption, to electric power production from various sources, to pollution health impacts, to electricity prices for industries and for households, it discusses the sustainability of the energy mix regarding energy reserves, health issues, and economic issues. Some examples (Spain, Germany) illustrate economic problems faced by some renewable energies. Finally, the authors outline that, thanks to its nuclear policy, France is the western country which is the most committed in energy transition. Some proposals are made to support nuclear energy, to reduce the use of fossil energies, to launch an ambitious research policy (on energy storage, on photovoltaic energy, on CO 2 hydrogenation, on hydrogen as a fuel), in favour of energy mixes decided at national levels in Europe

  20. A viable axion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.; Wu Taitsun; Yanagida, T.

    1986-02-01

    We discuss whether an axion like excitation can be the source for the monoenergetic positrons observed at GSI. Although a direct extension of the original Peccei Quinn model is experimentally ruled out, it is possible to construct an alternative model which avoids all previous axion bounds, involving quarkonia decays, K decays, nuclear decays and beam dump experiments. The model predicts, at some level, the possibility of flavor changing interactions involving charmed quarks and suggests an appealing regularity for the quark and lepton masses. The expectations of the model for resonant e + e - scattering are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  1. Community Energy: A Social Architecture for an Alternative Energy Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven M.; High-Pippert, Angela

    2005-01-01

    Community energy based on a mix of distributed technologies offers a serious alternative to the current energy system. The nature of community energy and the role that such initiatives might play in the general fabric of civic life is not, however, well understood. Community energy initiatives might involve only those citizens who prefer to be…

  2. Energy for a sustainable world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, Jose; Reddy, A.K.N.; Williams, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The book is devoted to the problem of energy planning for a sustainable world. The principal objective of the conventional approach to energy problem is economic growth and consequently the primary goal of conventional energy planning is to make energy supply expansion possible. This conventional approach is aggravating societal inequalities, environmental and security problems, and eroding self-reliance. On the other hand societal goals in energy planning should be equity, economic efficiency, environmental harmony, long-term viability, self-reliance and peace. These goals are relevant to both developing and industrialised countries. These goals should, therefore, be incorporated in a normative approach to energy planning. This can be done by focussing on end-uses of energy and the services which energy performs. In the first chapter, the relation of global energy problem with other major global problems such as North-South disparities, environmental degradation, climate change, population explosion and nuclear weapons is brought out. The energy strategies for industrialized countries and for developing countries are examined in chapters 2 and 3 respectively. The focus in both chapters is on end-uses of enegy, management of energy demand and exploitation of synergisms. In chapter 4, rough estimates of global energy demand are given and an illustrative energy scenario compatible with societal goals is described. In chapter 5, the policies necessary to implement end-use-oriented energy strategies are outlined. These policies relate to market mechanisms, administrative allocation of energy carriers, regulation and taxes. In the concluding chapter 6, the political feasibility of implementing the kind of energy future envisaged is discussed. The main finding of the authors is that it is possible to formulate energy strategies compatible with the solution of major global problems referred to in chapter 1 with about the same level of global energy use as today. (M.G.B.)

  3. Energy Services: A conceptual review

    OpenAIRE

    Fell, M.

    2017-01-01

    It is often stated that people do not desire energy itself but the ‘energy services’ it provides. Despite its importance, initial searches revealed no obviously dominant definitions of the term ‘energy services’, and inconsistent illustrative examples. This paper presents the results of a content analysis and literature review which aimed to answer the question: ‘what are energy services?’. One hundred and eighty-five articles from the journals Energy Policy and Energy Research and Social Sci...

  4. Measuring energy efficiency: Is energy intensity a good evidence base?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakova, L.; Kovalev, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy intensity measure reflects consumption, not energy efficiency. • Thermodynamic indicators should describe energy efficiency at all levels. • These indicators should have no reference to economic or financial parameters. • A set of energy efficiency indicators should satisfy several basic principles. • There are trade-offs between energy efficiency, power and costs. - Abstract: There is a widespread assumption in energy statistics and econometrics that energy intensity and energy efficiency are equivalent measures of energy performance of economies. The paper points to the discrepancy between the engineering concept of energy efficiency and the energy intensity as it is understood in macroeconomic statistics. This double discrepancy concerns definitions (while engineering concept of energy efficiency is based on the thermodynamic definition, energy intensity includes economic measures) and use. With regard to the latter, the authors conclude that energy intensity can only provide indirect and delayed evidence of technological and engineering energy efficiency of energy conversion processes, which entails shortcomings for management and policymaking. Therefore, we suggest to stop considering subsectoral, sectoral and other levels of energy intensities as aggregates of lower-level energy efficiency. It is suggested that the insufficiency of energy intensity indicators can be compensated with the introduction of thermodynamic indicators describing energy efficiency at the physical, technological, enterprise, sub-sector, sectoral and national levels without references to any economic or financial parameters. Structured statistical data on thermodynamic efficiency is offered as a better option for identifying break-through technologies and technological bottle-necks that constrain efficiency advancements. It is also suggested that macro-level thermodynamic indicators should be based on the thermodynamic first law efficiency and the energy

  5. Auditing energy use -a systematic approach for enhancing energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardhapnrkar, P.M.; Mahalle, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Energy management is a critical activity in the developing as well as developed countries owing to constraints in the availability of primary energy resources and the increasing demand for energy from the industrial and non-industrial users. Energy consumption is a vital parameter that determines the economic growth of any country. An energy management system (EMS) can save money by allowing greater control over energy consuming equipment. The foundation for the energy program is the energy audit, which is the systematic study of factory or building to determine where and how well energy is being used. It is the nucleus of any successful energy saving program -it is tool, not a solution. Conventional energy conservation methods are mostly sporadic and lack a coordinated plan of action. Consequently only apparent systems are treated without the analysis of system interaction. Energy audit on the other hand, involves total system approach and aims at optimizing energy use efficiently for the entire plant. In the present paper a new approach to pursue energy conservation techniques is being discussed. The focus is mainly on the methodology of energy audit, energy use analysis, relating energy with the production, and reducing energy losses, etc. It is observe that with this systematic approach, if adopted, which consists of three essential segments namely capacity utilization fine-tuning of the equipment and technology up-gradation can result in phenomenal savings in the energy, building competitive edge for the industry. This approach along with commitment can provide the right impetus to reap the benefits of energy conservation on a sustained basis. (author)

  6. Wind energy a reference handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Newton, PhD, David E

    2014-01-01

    While covering the fascinating history of wind power as a whole, this timely handbook focuses on current technological developments and the promise--and pitfalls--of wind energy as part of the world's energy future.

  7. A study on energy security and nuclear energy role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Energy security was a major concern for OECD governments in the early 1970s. Since then, successive oil crises, volatility of hydrocarbon prices, as well as terrorist risks and natural disasters, have brought the issue back to the centre stage of policy agendas. Here, an energy security concept has been proposed, which is defined by time frame and space frame as well. Wide-meaning energy security is divided broadly into two categories. One is short-term (∼10 y) energy crisis, which is narrow-meaning energy security. Short-term energy crisis is further divided into contingent crisis, such as energy supply chain (sealane) interruption due to conflict, accident, terrorism, etc., and structural crisis, such as price fluctuations, supply shortage, energy demand increase in Asia, technology development stagnation, etc. The other is long-term (∼100 y) energy crisis and global energy problems, such as fossil fuel exhaustion and global warming. (author)

  8. A low energy solar town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-12-31

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m{sup 2}/year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs.

  9. A low energy solar town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-01-01

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m 2 /year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs

  10. A century of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The author proposes a history of the French nuclear industry and nuclear energy since the Nobel prizes of 1903 and 1911. He describes and comments the context of the energy production sector before the development of the nuclear energy, the development of the institutional context, the successive and different nuclear technologies, the main characteristics of the French program at its beginning, the relationship between the nuclear energy and the public, the main accidents and lessons learned from them, the perspectives of evolution of nuclear energy

  11. Energy education - a multidisciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhad, H.G.

    1993-01-01

    One of the major global issues of the 1990s will be how to best use our scarce energy resources while maintaining a high economic growth rate and improving environmental quality. In fact, the survival of our civilization depends very much on the wise use of conventional energy sources and the development of renewable resources. Although securing our future energy needs requires joint efforts by governments, the public, and industry, the most crucial role is that of energy educators who are needed to train manpower and educate the public. In the past, education has played mainly a reactive role in crisis situations. We must become proactive now. I strongly believe that through appropriate energy education at all levels of our society, we can prevent future energy and environmental crisis and at the same rime provide our people with a safe environment and an adequate supply of energy

  12. Solar energy: a UK assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    A panel convened by UK-ISES to analyze all aspects of solar energy systems and to assess the potential for solar energy utilization and research and development needs in the UK and for export is reported. Topics covered include: solar energy in relation to other energy sources; international solar energy research and development program; the physical nature of solar energy and its availability in the UK and other countries; thermal collection, storage, and low-temperature applications; solar energy and architecture; solar thermal power systems; solar cells; agricultural and biological systems; photochemical systems; social, legal, and political considerations with particular reference to the UK; and future policy on solar research and development for the UK. (WDM)

  13. Municipal energy and climate policy in a liberalized energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, H.

    2001-05-01

    Due to the ongoing process of liberalisation, Dutch municipal energy policy is undergoing significant changes. The probable privatisation of energy companies, the change from what used to be 'their' local energy company to what will become an energy company, results in a need for local administrations to build up energy knowledge, end-use information and financial resources that 'their' energy companies used to share but, because of operating in a competitive market, are now more reluctant to do so. On the other hand offers privatisation and the selling of shares the possibility for some local governments to collect a significant sum of money which can be addressed to energy policy. This process of growing responsibility of local administrations for their own energy policy coincides with the structural change of the nature of the energy supply in the Netherlands. The change towards a more decentralised energy supply results in more energy systems (e.g. PV and wind) coming under the influence of local regulations. Municipal governments will have to act more like actors in a complex policy network, playing different roles at different times in different situations, often stimulating and regulating at the same time. The growing popularity of platforms like energy agencies, bringing together parties like the local government, energy companies and commercial- and housing associations are examples hereof. In this report, another new role for local governments resulting from the liberalisation process is highlighted: the role of energy consumer. It is estimated that the aggregated electricity demand resulting from activities under direct municipal responsibility (e.g. municipal dwellings, traffic lights, public lighting) amounts to a fairly large share of the market. Due to the public interests vested in the local administrations, it is expected that an important part of this demand is demand for green electricity. Also, local governments can use the energy markets to act

  14. A New World Energy Order is coming. Energy debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, P.; Guillet, J.; Birol, F.; Kramer, M.; Van Gool, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peter Odell, Professor Emeritus of International Energy Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, recently wrote a remarkably succinct and provocative paper in which he described his vision of the new world energy order that is on the way in the form of eight propositions. The editors of this new magazine asked three experienced energy analysts as well as the CEO of a major energy company, the Dutch gas producer Gasunie, for a response

  15. Estimating the energy independence of a municipal wastewater treatment plant incorporating green energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Kyu-Jung; Kang, Jihoon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We estimated green energy production in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. • Engineered approaches in mining multiple green energy resources were presented. • The estimated green energy production accounted for 6.5% of energy independence in the plant. • We presented practical information regarding green energy projects in water infrastructures. - Abstract: Increasing energy prices and concerns about global climate change highlight the need to improve energy independence in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This paper presents methodologies for estimating the energy independence of a municipal WWTP with a design capacity of 30,000 m 3 /d incorporating various green energy resources into the existing facilities, including different types of 100 kW photovoltaics, 10 kW small hydropower, and an effluent heat recovery system with a 25 refrigeration ton heat pump. It also provides guidance for the selection of appropriate renewable technologies or their combinations for specific WWTP applications to reach energy self-sufficiency goals. The results showed that annual energy production equal to 107 tons of oil equivalent could be expected when the proposed green energy resources are implemented in the WWTP. The energy independence, which was defined as the percent ratio of green energy production to energy consumption, was estimated to be a maximum of 6.5% and to vary with on-site energy consumption in the WWTP. Implementing green energy resources tailored to specific site conditions is necessary to improve the energy independence in WWTPs. Most of the applied technologies were economically viable primarily because of the financial support under the mandatory renewable portfolio standard in Korea

  16. Energy [r]evolution - a sustainable world energy outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, S.; Muth, J.; Sawyer, S.; Pregger, T.; Simon, S.; Naegler, T.; O'Sullivan, M.; Schmid, S; Pagenkopf, J.; Frieske, B.; Graus, W.H.J.; Kermeli, K.; Zittel, W.; Rutovitz, J.; Harris, S.; Ackermann, T.; Ruwahata, R.; Martense, N.

    2012-01-01

    Energy [R]evolution 2012 provides a consistent fundamental pathway for how to protect our climate: getting the world from where we are now to where we need to be by phasing out fossil fuels and cutting CO2 emissions while ensuring energy security.The Energy [R]evolution Scenario has become a well

  17. Conceptualising energy use and energy poverty using a capabilities framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Rosie; Walker, Gordon; Simcock, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In this article we conceptualise energy use from a capabilities perspective, informed by the work of Amartya Sen, Martha Nussbaum and others following them. Building on this, we suggest a corresponding definition of energy poverty, as understood in the capabilities space. We argue that such an understanding provides a theoretically coherent means of comprehending the relationship between energy and wellbeing, and thus conceptualising energy deprivation, that makes sense across settings including both the global North and South: a coherence which has previously been lacking. At the same time, it has the flexibility to be deployed in a way that is sensitive to local contexts. Understanding energy use in the capabilities space also provides a means for identifying multiple sites of intervention, including some areas that are currently largely overlooked. We argue that this is advantageous for attempts to address energy poverty in the context of climate change and imperatives for the containment of aggregate energy consumption. - Highlights: •We apply the capabilities approach of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum to conceptualising why energy is used and needed. •We propose a definition of energy poverty based on the capabilities approach. •We argue that this understanding integrates approaches to energy poverty from global North and South contexts. •The proposed definition of energy poverty is multi-dimensional. •This understanding opens new conceptual space for interventions to alleviate energy poverty.

  18. Exploiting Sun's Energy Effectively as a Source of Renewable Energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renewable energy, solar energy, photosynthesis, electrolysis, photocatalysis, photovoltaic cell. Abstract. Using Sun's energy effectively to drive important, industriallyrelevant chemical reactions is currently an area of researchthat is attracting a large attention. This route circumventsour reliance on non-renewable sources of ...

  19. For a citizen energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geze, Patrick; Bernon, Francoise; Alphandery, Claude; Albizzati, Amandine; Ballandras, Marc; Berland, Olivier; Peullemeulle, Justine; Causse, Laurent; Olivier, Dominique; Damerval, Francois; Lepage, Corinne; Dughera, Jacques; Bouchart, Christiane; Duracka, Nicolas; Ferrari, Albert; Noe, Julien; Soulias, Emmanuel; Gaspard, Albane; Greenwood, Marianne; Guy, Lionel; Kretzschmar, Cyril; Lalu, Delphine; Naett, Caroline; Raguet, Alex; Rouchon, Jean-Philippe; Ruedinger, Andreas; Sautter, Christian; Tudor, Ivan; Vaquie, Pierre-Francois; Vernier, Christophe; Youinou, Jean-Michel; Verny, Emmanuel; Claustre, Raphael; Leclercq, Michel

    2015-09-01

    This publication by a think tank specialised in social and solidarity economy first outlines that energy transition means a transition from the present energy model to a new model based on three pillars: a drastic reduction of energy consumption through sobriety (energy saving, struggle against wastage), an improvement of energy efficiency, and an energy mix based on renewable and sustainable resources. A first part proposes a discussion of what 'citizen' energy transition can be: general framework of energy transition, pioneering examples in Europe, citizen empowerment, importance of a decentralised model which is anchored in territories, general interest as a priority. Each of these issues and aspects is illustrated by examples. Then, as this evolution towards a citizen-based model requires a change of scale, the authors discuss how to involve public authorities and to adapt regulation, how to develop financing tools, how to support the emergence and development of projects, and how to be part of international dynamics. The author then discuss what their think tank can do to accelerate energy transition. Proposals made in the different chapters are then summarized

  20. Who puts the most energy into energy conservation? A segmentation of energy consumers based on energy-related behavioral characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sütterlin, Bernadette; Brunner, Thomas A.; Siegrist, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to identify and describe different types of energy consumers in a more comprehensive way than previous segmentation studies using cluster analysis. Energy consumers were segmented based on their energy-related behavioral characteristics. In addition to purchase- and curtailment-related energy-saving behavior, consumer classification was also based on acceptance of policy measures and energy-related psychosocial factors, so the used behavioral segmentation base was more comprehensive compared to other studies. Furthermore, differentiation between the energy-saving purchase of daily products, such as food, and of energy efficient appliances allowed a more differentiated characterization of the energy consumer segments. The cluster analysis revealed six energy consumer segments: the idealistic, the selfless inconsequent, the thrifty, the materialistic, the convenience-oriented indifferent, and the problem-aware well-being-oriented energy consumer. Findings emphasize that using a broader and more distinct behavioral base is crucial for an adequate and differentiated description of energy consumer types. The paper concludes by highlighting the most promising energy consumer segments and discussing possible segment-specific marketing and policy strategies. - Highlights: ► By applying a cluster-analytic approach, new energy consumer segments are identified. ► A comprehensive, differentiated description of the different energy consumer types is provided. ► A distinction between purchase of daily products and energy efficient appliances is essential. ► Behavioral variables are a more suitable base for segmentation than general characteristics.

  1. Energy intensity: a new look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, H.

    1995-01-01

    Energy intensity is compared among different countries by dividing their energy use by their gross domestic product (GDP) in dollar terms. GDP (US$), being a varying monetary value, will have different meaning in different countries because of the varying means of converting it into dollars. Therefore distorted results of energy intensity are obtained. The newly devised concept of presenting GDP in terms of purchasing power parity in dollars (US PPP) goes a long way to solving this distortion. It also allows the energy intensity of developing countries to be presented in a more favourable way. (author)

  2. Energy and energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerici, A.

    2007-01-01

    Energy has taken with his reflections on the environment, the geopolitical aspects and its pervasive use in all activities a crucial role for sustainable development of our planet. The energy in the future will be increasingly a global problem [it

  3. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on energy futures; energy demand, energy supplies; exclusive paths and difficult choices--hard, soft, and moderate energy paths; an energy-deficient society; energy shortages; economics of light-water reactors; fast breeder reactor economics; international cooperation in the nuclear field; nuclear recycling; alternative fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors; the nuclear weapons proliferation issue; paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards; the homemade bomb issue; LWR risk assessment; accident analysis and risk assessment; the waste disposal risk; radon problems; risks in our society; health effects of low-level radiation; routine releases of radioactivity from the nuclear industry; low-level radioactivity and infant mortality; the myth of plutonium toxicity; myths about high-level radioactive waste; the aging reactor myth; the police state myth; insurance and nuclear power--the Price-Anderson Act; and solar and nuclear power as partners

  4. Energy supply - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1990-01-01

    The text of a speech celebrating the 10 years operation of the nuclear power plant in Goesgen. The author expresses his opinion on the future of nuclear energy, on the responsibility towards the next generation and on the energy supply for the Third World. He draws attention to the gap between north and south and to the limited amount of resources and mention the CO2-problem and the potential of nuclear energy

  5. The BC energy plan : a vision for clean energy leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    Global warming is a pertinent environmental issue. This report presented a vision and plan for clean energy leadership in British Columbia (BC). The intent of the plan is make the province energy self-sufficient while taking responsibility for the natural environment and climate. The BC energy plan set out targets as well as a strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The plan outlines the steps that industry, environmental agencies, communities and citizens must take to reach goals for conservation, energy efficiency and clean energy. This report provided highlights of the BC energy plan and discussed energy conservation and efficiency targets. It also discussed electricity security and public ownership of electricity in addition to strategies and policy options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electricity. The report presented several policy options for alternative energy including an innovative clean energy fund; generating electricity from mountain pine beatlewood to turn wood waste into energy; and transportation strategies. The report also discussed electricity options such as bioenergy; coal thermal power; geothermal; hydrogen and fuel cell technology; large hydroelectric dams; natural gas; small hydro; solar; tidal energy; and wind. Other topics that were addressed in the report included skills, training and labour; and, oil and gas policy actions. A summary of policy actions was also presented. tabs., figs.

  6. The BC energy plan : a vision for clean energy leadership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    Global warming is a pertinent environmental issue. This report presented a vision and plan for clean energy leadership in British Columbia (BC). The intent of the plan is make the province energy self-sufficient while taking responsibility for the natural environment and climate. The BC energy plan set out targets as well as a strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The plan outlines the steps that industry, environmental agencies, communities and citizens must take to reach goals for conservation, energy efficiency and clean energy. This report provided highlights of the BC energy plan and discussed energy conservation and efficiency targets. It also discussed electricity security and public ownership of electricity in addition to strategies and policy options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electricity. The report presented several policy options for alternative energy including an innovative clean energy fund; generating electricity from mountain pine beatlewood to turn wood waste into energy; and transportation strategies. The report also discussed electricity options such as bioenergy; coal thermal power; geothermal; hydrogen and fuel cell technology; large hydroelectric dams; natural gas; small hydro; solar; tidal energy; and wind. Other topics that were addressed in the report included skills, training and labour; and, oil and gas policy actions. A summary of policy actions was also presented. tabs., figs

  7. Energy [R]evolution 2008-a sustainable world energy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewitt, Wolfram; Teske, Sven; Simon, Sonja; Pregger, Thomas; Graus, Wina; Blomen, Eliane; Schmid, Stephan; Schaefer, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The Energy [R]evolution 2008 scenario is an update of the Energy [R]evolution scenario published in 2007. It takes up recent trends in global socio-economic developments, and analyses to which extent they affect chances for achieving global climate protection targets. The main target is to reduce global CO 2 emissions to 10 Gt per year in 2050, thus limiting global average temperature increase to 2 deg. C and preventing dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. A review of sector and region specific energy efficiency measures resulted in the specification of a global energy demand scenario incorporating strong energy efficiency measures. The corresponding energy supply scenario has been developed in an iterative process in close cooperation with stakeholders and regional counterparts from academia, NGOs and the renewable energy industry. The Energy [R]evolution scenario shows that renewable energy can provide more than half of the world's energy needs by 2050. Developing countries can virtually stabilise their CO 2 emissions, whilst at the same time increasing energy consumption through economic growth. OECD countries will be able to reduce their emissions by up to 80%.

  8. Energy Economics: A Place for Energy Poverty in the Agenda?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The global energy system faces three major strategic challenges in the coming decades: the growing risk of disruptions to energy supply; the threat of environmental damage caused by energy production and use; and persistent energy poverty. The first two challenges have attracted a lot of attention from the energy-economics community, much less so the need to address the problem of energy under-development. On current trends, the number of people in poor countries relying primarily on traditional biomass for their energy needs will continue to rise, while the number lacking access to electricity will barely fall. To change this course, decisive policy action is needed urgently as part of the broader process of human development. Meeting basic human needs, such as food and shelter, must be at the heart of any strategy to alleviate poverty.

  9. Current energy usage and sustainable energy in Kazakhstan: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatayev, Marat; Islam, Tofazzal; Salnikov, Vitaliy

    2014-05-01

    Kazakhstan has abundant natural resources. The country has enough coal to supply its energy needs for the next 150 years, and has the world's largest deposits of uranium, substantial quantities of natural gas and petroleum deposits. However, despite such energy riches, due to the size of the territory, its geography, and the country's economic structure, distribution of electricity in Kazakhstan is not uniform. As a result, Kazakhstani rural and remote areas suffer from serious electricity deficits. According to the latest estimates from the Ministry of Industry and New Technologies, about 25-30% of the Kazakhstani population lives in rural communities, where access to affordable energy (for heating, cooling, cooking, refrigeration, lighting, household as well as IT use) is limited. Furthermore, with the main electricity production infrastructure concentrated in the main urban areas, a high amount of electricity is therefore lost during transmission. Moreover, the consumption of poor quality coal as the main source of power generation creates a significant amount of environmental pollution. To illustrate this development, fuel combustion from coal has produced around 75% of carbon dioxide emissions in Kazakhstan. Thus, in order to address the country's electricity and environmental challenges, the Kazakhstani government is taking initiatives to promote renewable energy resources. However, so far, the outcome of these initiatives remains negligible. The current contribution of renewable energy to the total energy consumption is less than 1% (with 90% provided by hydropower) despite the significant potential for renewable energy in the country. As yet, no comprehensive study has been published on the energy scenario and on the potential for renewable energy resources in Kazakhstan. This comprehensive review aims to present an overview of the country's energy resources, supply and demand as the current energy scenario, while discussing the potential for renewable

  10. The wind energy, a clean and renewable energy; L'energie eolienne, une energie propre et renouvelable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Facing the context of greenhouse gases reduction, the France began a national program of fight against the climatic change, in which the development of the renewable energies plays a major part. Among the renewable energy sources, the wind energy is the only one which is cheap and easily used. After a presentation of the leader of the wind energy in Europe (Germany, Spain and Denmark) and the position of the France, the document details the economical and environmental advantages of the wind energy, as the public opinion concerning this energy source. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nordic Energy Technologies : Enabling a sustainable Nordic energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, Amund; Smith, Benjamin

    2009-10-15

    A high current Nordic competence in energy technology and an increased need for funding and international cooperation in the field are the main messages of the report. This report summarizes results from 7 different research projects relating to policies for energy technology, funded by Nordic Energy Research for the period 2007-2008, and provides an analysis of the Nordic innovation systems in the energy sector. The Nordic countries possess a high level of competence in the field of renewable energy technologies. Of the total installed capacity comprises a large share of renewable energy, and Nordic technology companies play an important role in the international market. Especially distinguished wind energy, both in view of the installed power and a global technology sales. Public funding for energy research has experienced a significant decline since the oil crisis of the 1970s, although the figures in recent years has increased a bit. According to the IEA, it will require a significant increase in funding to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit further climate change. The third point highlighted in the report is the importance of international cooperation in energy research. Nordic and international cooperation is necessary in order to reduce duplication and create the synergy needed if we are to achieve our ambitious policy objectives in the climate and energy issue. (AG)

  12. Energy transition, a new French energy model. Future energies, green growth, sustainable jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royal, Segolene

    2014-01-01

    This publication introduces the new French energy policy for energy transition. It presents and comments the main orientations defined for this policy and which are at the base of the French law on energy transition for a green growth. Thus, it addresses the following topics: to define common objectives for a successful energy transition, to strengthen France's energy independence and to struggle against climate change; to better insulate buildings to save energy, to reduce energy bills and to create jobs; to develop clean transports to improve air quality and to protect the health of French people; to promote renewable energies to diversify energies and to valorise resources of French territories; to struggle against wastage and to promote circular economy from product design to product recycling; to simplify and clarify procedures aimed at improving efficiency and competitiveness; to strengthen nuclear safety and citizen information; and to provide citizen, enterprises, territories and the State with the power to act together

  13. Barriers to renewable energy penetration. A framework for analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Painuly, Jyoti P.

    2001-01-01

    Renewable energy has the potential to play an important role in providing energy with sustainability to the vast populations in developing countries who as yet have no access to clean energy. Although economically viable fur several applications, renewable energy has not been able to realise its...... potential due to several barriers to its penetration. A framework has been developed in this paper to identify the barriers to renewable energy penetration acid to suggest measures to overcome them. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Tidal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochte, H.G.

    1995-01-01

    Together with wave energy, ocean thermal energy, and the often overlooked energy from ocean curents tidal energy belongs to those renewable energy sources that can be subsumed under the generic term of ocean energy. All that these energy sources have in common, however, is that they are found in the ocean. The present article discusses tidal energy with respect to the four principal factors determining the scope of a renewable energy source, namely global, technical, and economic availability and ecological acceptability. (orig.) [de

  15. Energy Fact Sheets - Sandia Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Energy Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Menu Stationary Power solar Energy Conversion Efficiency Increasing the amount of electricity produced from a given thermal energy input. Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2

  16. Hydrogen - A new green energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnu, Franck

    2013-01-01

    A set of articles proposes an overview of the role hydrogen might have as energy in the energy transition policy, a review of different areas of research related to the hydrogen sector, and presentations of some remarkable innovations in different specific fields. Hydrogen might be an asset in energy transition because production modes (like electrolysis) result in an almost carbon-free or at least low-carbon hydrogen production. Challenges and perspectives are evoked: energy storage for intermittent energies (the MYRTE platform), the use of a hydrogen-natural mix (GRHYD program), the development of fuel cells for transport applications, and co-generation (Japan is the leader). Different French research organisations are working on different aspects and areas: the H2E program by Air Liquide, fuel cell technologies by GDF Suez, power electrolyzers and cells by Areva. Some aspects and research areas are more specifically detailed: high temperature electrolysis (higher efficiencies, synthesis of methane from hydrogen), fuel cells (using less platinum, and using ceramics for high temperatures), the perspective of solid storage solutions (hydrogen bottles in composite materials, development of 'hydrogen sponges', search for new hydrides). Innovations concern a project car, storage and production (Greenergy Box), the McPhy Energy storage system, an electric bicycle with fuel cell, easy to transport storage means by Air Liquide and Composites Aquitaine, development of energy autonomy, fuel cells for cars, electrolyzers using the Proton Exchange Membrane or PEM technology

  17. Energy prices and the promotion of energy conservation. A background study for energy conservation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The prices of fuels in the international markets affect the development of consumer prices of energy in Finland. In the near future no factors can be foreseen, which would cause major increases in the prices of oil, coal or gas. It can thus not be expected that increased fuel prices would motivate more efficient energy conservation. In international comparison, consumer prices of energy have been relatively low in Finland. This applies especially to electricity. After the removal of price controls, energy prices have been determined by the markets. The influence of the public authorities in energy pricing is put into effect through taxation. The price of energy has a fairly small effect on energy consumption in a short term, but longer term effects are more significant. Energy products are faxed in all western countries. (orig.)

  18. Promotion of Renewable Energy in a Liberalised Energy Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Niels I

    1998-01-01

    government promotion of energy conservation and of systems based on renewable energy sources. This type of policy may in some instanes conflict with the principles of the unregulated commercial market. The official Danish target is that 35% of energy demand should be covered by renewables by year 2030......Liberalisation of energy markets has been progressing among OECD countries since the early nineties. In Europe this trend was accelerated by the decision in December 1996 by the EU Council of Ministers to adopt a new EU directive on liberalisation of the electricity market. This decision would lead...

  19. Predicting energy performance of a net-zero energy building: A statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneifel, Joshua; Webb, David

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A regression model is applied to actual energy data from a net-zero energy building. • The model is validated through a rigorous statistical analysis. • Comparisons are made between model predictions and those of a physics-based model. • The model is a viable baseline for evaluating future models from the energy data. - Abstract: Performance-based building requirements have become more prevalent because it gives freedom in building design while still maintaining or exceeding the energy performance required by prescriptive-based requirements. In order to determine if building designs reach target energy efficiency improvements, it is necessary to estimate the energy performance of a building using predictive models and different weather conditions. Physics-based whole building energy simulation modeling is the most common approach. However, these physics-based models include underlying assumptions and require significant amounts of information in order to specify the input parameter values. An alternative approach to test the performance of a building is to develop a statistically derived predictive regression model using post-occupancy data that can accurately predict energy consumption and production based on a few common weather-based factors, thus requiring less information than simulation models. A regression model based on measured data should be able to predict energy performance of a building for a given day as long as the weather conditions are similar to those during the data collection time frame. This article uses data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF) to develop and validate a regression model to predict the energy performance of the NZERTF using two weather variables aggregated to the daily level, applies the model to estimate the energy performance of hypothetical NZERTFs located in different cities in the Mixed-Humid Climate Zone, and compares these

  20. Towards a more conservative energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, N.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is treated under the following headings: the meaning of energy policy; previous attempts to formulate United Kingdom energy policy; patterns of energy supply and demand (in the UK) (current and future); towards a more conservative energy policy (the use of energy in the various sectors, the conversion and distribution of energy (coal, nuclear power, electricity, oil and gas, renewable sources)); energy policy in broader perspective (international context, cost benefit assessments, contrasting patterns of energy use, ethical issues). (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear energy - a professional assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: the role of the Watt Committee in nuclear energy; supply and demand, and economics of nuclear power; technical means (types of reactor; fuel cycle; nuclear energy for applications other than large-scale electricity generation); availability of resources (nuclear fuel; British industrial capacity; manpower requirements for a British nuclear power programme); environment (environmental issues; disposal of radioactive wastes); balance of risk and advantage in the peaceful use of nuclear energy (proliferation; safety and risk; benefits; public acceptability, awareness, education); summary and general comments.

  2. Nuclear energy - a professional assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: the role of the Watt Committee in nuclear energy; supply and demand, and economics of nuclear power; technical means (types of reactor; fuel cycle; nuclear energy for applications other than large-scale electricity generation); availability of resources (nuclear fuel; British industrial capacity; manpower requirements for a British nuclear power programme); environment (environmental issues; disposal of radioactive wastes); balance of risk and advantage in the peaceful use of nuclear energy (proliferation; safety and risk; benefits; public acceptability, awareness, education); summary and general comments. (U.K.)

  3. Laser Energy Transmission for a Wireless Energy Supply to Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Nobuki; Takeda, Kazuya

    2008-01-01

    We can find a lot of robot applications in construction activities, where it is very difficult or dangerous for a man to access and only robots can work. The time will come soon when the actual use of those robots is extensively realized and the wireless energy transmission technology using laser is a unique means to supply energy to those robots.

  4. Nuclear energy: a reasonable choice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    2011-01-01

    While nuclear energy appears today as a powerful and carbon-free energy, it generates at the same time doubts and apprehension in the general public. Are these fears justified? Is France the most advanced country in the nuclear domain? Should we fear a Chernobyl-like accident in France? Is any irradiation dangerous? What would be the consequences of a terror attack against a reactor? Will nuclear energy be powerful enough to take up the energy reserves challenge? Will the waste management and the nuclear facilities dismantlement be extremely expensive in comparison with the electricity production costs? Do we know how to manage nuclear wastes on the long-term? This book tries to supply some relevant arguments in order to let the reader answering these questions himself and making his own opinion on this topic. (J.S.)

  5. Tidal energy, a renewable energy within hand reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Tide energy and oceanic current energy represent a strong potentiality for a few countries in the world including France. In the domain of tidal energy there are 2 strategies. The first one is based on the search for the lowest power production cost in order to contribute efficiently to the country's energy mix. Generally this strategy leads to the construction of tidal dams. The second strategy is based on the search for the lowest environmental impact. This strategy is economically competitive only in places where electrical power is expensive like isolated islands. This strategy is illustrated by the tidal power station of the Alderney island. In fact the amount of energy delivered by a tidal power station depends on the rise of the tide and on the surface of the dam. It appears that tidal dams require less surface that hydroelectric power plants. The energy of oceanic currents like Gulf Stream or the thermal energy of oceans or wave power are very little exploited now but represent a potentiality higher by several orders of magnitude than tidal energy. (A.C.)

  6. Energy shortage - a produced crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Five articles of the central organ of the KPD/ML, the 'Roter Morgen', and a declaration of the central committee of th KPD/ML are published here. The articles deal with: raw materials-utilization and deposits; the oil-multis - the world's greatest financial power; the energy industry of the FRG; nuclear power - the new trick of the old bosses; resisting the bulling of oil prices, securing energy supply on the basis of coal. The articles are clearly combative and against capitalism, energy concerns and oil-multis. The energy crisis is declared to be a problem of capitalism which can only be solved by abolishing the capitalist system and its laws of profit. (HSCH) [de

  7. Fostering sustained energy behavior change and increasing energy literacy in a student housing energy challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Robert Stephen

    We designed the Kukui Cup challenge to foster energy conservation and increase energy literacy. Based on a review of the literature, the challenge combined a variety of elements into an overall game experience, including: real-time energy feedback, goals, commitments, competition, and prizes. We designed a software system called Makahiki to provide the online portion of the Kukui Cup challenge. Energy use was monitored by smart meters installed on each floor of the Hale Aloha residence halls on the University of Hawai'i at Manoa campus. In October 2011, we ran the UH Kukui Cup challenge for the over 1000 residents of the Hale Aloha towers. To evaluate the Kukui Cup challenge, I conducted three experiments: challenge participation, energy literacy, and energy use. Many residents participated in the challenge, as measured by points earned and actions completed through the challenge website. I measured the energy literacy of a random sample of Hale Aloha residents using an online energy literacy questionnaire administered before and after the challenge. I found that challenge participants' energy knowledge increased significantly compared to non-challenge participants. Positive self-reported energy behaviors increased after the challenge for both challenge participants and non-participants, leading to the possibility of passive participation by the non-challenge participants. I found that energy use varied substantially between and within lounges over time. Variations in energy use over time complicated the selection of a baseline of energy use to compare the levels during and after the challenge. The best team reduced its energy use during the challenge by 16%. However, team energy conservation did not appear to correlate to participation in the challenge, and there was no evidence of sustained energy conservation after the challenge. The problems inherent in assessing energy conservation using a baseline call into question this common practice. My research has

  8. Energy sources for future. Change to a sustainable energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.

    2005-01-01

    Can Germany give up gasoline and power from coal or nuclear energy and how much does it cost? The book does away with all common misunderstandings due to renewable energy sources and describes a compatible model for a sustainable energy mixing in future. Nevertheless fossil fuels are not denounced but seen as a platform for the advanced system. The author explains first why objections to renewable energy sources base on bad information, and pursues quite an other argumentation as such authors emphasizing the potential of these energy sources. Than he shows in detail the possibility of the optimal energy mixing for biomass, solar power, wind power, geothermal energy, hydropower and energy efficiency. The environment will reward us for this and instead buying expensive resources from foreign countries we will create work places at home. The number of big power plants - taking into account safety risks - will decrease and small units of on-site power generation feeded with this renewable sources will play more and more an important role. (GL) [de

  9. Nuclear energy: a necessary option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles N, A. G.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Esquivel E, J.

    2017-09-01

    With the decree of the Energy Reform and with the creation of the Electricity Industry and Energy Transition Laws; nuclear energy is incorporated into these as a source of clean energy. Currently, the share of electricity generation using conventional technologies is 80% and clean technologies of 20% of which hydroelectric plants represent 50% of these. While the operation of hydroelectric, wind, solar plants, etc. have contributed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GGE), the global effort to mitigate climate change has not observed the expected results, according to the meeting of COP 21 in Paris, where 196 countries agreed, unanimously, to limit the increase of the temperature at 2 degrees Celsius or less for before the year 2100. In Paris, Mexico voluntarily submitted its national mitigation and adaptation contribution to climate change by issuing 162 M ton of CO 2eq as a goal to 2030, that is a ΔGGE of -22%. This means that the electricity sector should contribute to the reduction of 139 M ton of CO 2eq and a ΔGGE of -31%. According to some experts, the goal of reducing gases for the sector could be achieved during the period defined in the Agreement, provided that the share of clean energies is added as established in the Energy Reform and the Development Program of the National Electric System 2016-2030, which establishes the addition of 35,532 MW (62%) of installed capacity in clean technologies, where nuclear energy participates with 4,191 MW (7%) that is, 2,651 MW more. Thus, this article aims to show the importance of the use of nuclear energy in the electricity sector to reduce GGE, achieve international commitments and combat climate change. (Author)

  10. Energy for a new millenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1981-01-01

    In an historically oriented presentation the author shows how today's energy situation has come about, how this situation is conditioned in detail, and which possibilities there are for the future. The technology, the efficiency as well as advantages and risks are compared which are related to the energy carriers like petroleum, natural gas, coal, sun, wind, tides, water power, water and ground heat, nuclear power, and fuel cells. The financial expenditure resp. the efficiency of four basic decisions are compared for the planning of the next steps, continuation of past and present energy policy, curbed growth, forced growth, or the internationalization of the competition with the oil-importing countries. The author tries to render the discussions on the energy situation sensible by scientific arguments. His analyses culminate in a model for the future. (UA) [de

  11. Renewable energies: search for a community strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    During the Energy Council of December 8, 1997, the European Commission has presented a white book entitled 'Energy for the future: renewable energy sources'. This white book aims to increase from 6 to 12% the share of renewable energies in the European energy consumption thanks to a global action plan of rational use of energy in association with renewable energies and to a campaign of four key-actions: 1000000 of photovoltaic systems (50% in the European Union, 50% exported); 10000 MW of wind energy; 10000 MWth of biomass energy and the integration of renewable energies in 100 communities. Short paper. (J.S.)

  12. Tidal energy - a technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    1991-01-01

    The tides are caused by gravitational attraction of the sun and the moon acting upon the world's oceans. This creates a clean renewable form of energy which can in principle be tapped for the benefit of mankind. This paper reviews the status of tidal energy, including the magnitude of the resource, the technology which is available for its extraction, the economics, possible environmental effects and non-technical barriers to its implementation. Although the total energy flux of the tides is large, at about 2 TW, in practice only a very small fraction of this total potential can be utilised in the foreseeable future. This is because the energy is spread diffusely over a wide area, requiring large and expensive plant for its collection, and is often available remote from centres of consumption. The best mechanism for exploiting tidal energy is to employ estuarine barrages at suitable sites with high tidal ranges. The technology is relatively mature and components are commercially available now. Also, many of the best sites for implementation have been identified. However, the pace and extent of commercial exploitation of tidal energy is likely to be significantly influenced, both by the treatment of environmental costs of competing fossil fuels, and by the availability of construction capital at modest real interest rates. The largest projects could require the involvement of national governments if they are to succeed. (author) 8 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs

  13. Energy education; Education a l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this forum is to analyze the role of local and regional energy agencies in promoting low energy consuming technologies and in the information and education of the general public about energy mastery and conservation. (J.S.)

  14. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  15. Energy Survival: entertainment as a resource for local energy actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elburg, Henk van; Moosdijk, Catelijne van de [SenterNovem (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    In 2005, SenterNovem, the Dutch Broadcasting Corporation, a publishing company and a consortium of local authorities launched 'Energy Survival'; a renewing energy marketing strategy for children to create a demand for local energy actions. New elements are powerful branding and the use of cross media techniques through national TV, internet, local events and primary education. Through entertainment, Energy Survival influences children's attitude towards energy consumption and its convincing relation with the environment. It aims at qualifying children to become 'energy ambassadors' in their own local environment: family, school and neighbourhood. Energy Survival has become a well tested energy game-concept for children in whom public and private partners cooperate under one brand name and with a clear division of roles and interests. However, the backbone of the concept is the local approach: local actions in municipalities and in primary schools, supported by television and internet where children learn to deal with the upcoming energy challenges of the planet they will inherit. By providing an internet-based teaching method, especially primary schools will be an effective multiplier to reach children. Broadcasting the energy game on national TV on the one hand, and local events and preliminaries on the other hand, ensure opportunities for widespread 'duplication' of the concept, adapted to local policy priorities regarding sustainable energy because each municipality is permitted to choose its own themes. Despite the fact that the project is still young and that the partners consider it as a 'long term-investment', the first independent monitoring results indicate that Energy Survival so far is quite successful. Ratings of the first TV-series show a national market share of 20 % in the age group 6-12 years and significantly more interaction between children and their parents on energy related issues. The website

  16. Energy cultures. A framework for understanding energy behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Janet [Centre for the Study of Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Barton, Barry [School of Law, University of Waikato (New Zealand); Carrington, Gerry [Department of Physics, University of Otago (New Zealand); Gnoth, Daniel; Lawson, Rob [Department of Marketing, University of Otago (New Zealand); Thorsnes, Paul [Department of Economics, University of Otago (New Zealand)

    2010-10-15

    Achieving a 'step-change' in energy efficiency behaviours will require enhanced knowledge of behavioural drivers, and translation of this knowledge into successful intervention programmes. The 'Energy Cultures' conceptual framework aims to assist in understanding the factors that influence energy consumption behaviour, and to help identify opportunities for behaviour change. Building on a history of attempts to offer multi-disciplinary integrating models of energy behaviour, we take a culture-based approach to behaviour, while drawing also from lifestyles and systems thinking. The framework provides a structure for addressing the problem of multiple interpretations of 'behaviour' by suggesting that it is influenced by the interactions between cognitive norms, energy practices and material culture. The Energy Cultures framework is discussed in the context of a New Zealand case study, which demonstrates its development and application. It has already provided a basis for cross-disciplinary collaboration, and for multi-disciplinary research design, and has provided insights into behavioural change in a case study community. As the conceptual basis of a 3-year research project, the framework has further potential to identify clusters of 'energy cultures' - similar patterns of norms, practices and/or material culture - to enable the crafting of targeted actions to achieve behaviour change. (author)

  17. Energy cultures: A framework for understanding energy behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Janet, E-mail: janet.stephenson@otago.ac.n [Centre for the Study of Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Barton, Barry [School of Law, University of Waikato (New Zealand); Carrington, Gerry [Department of Physics, University of Otago (New Zealand); Gnoth, Daniel; Lawson, Rob [Department of Marketing, University of Otago (New Zealand); Thorsnes, Paul [Department of Economics, University of Otago (New Zealand)

    2010-10-15

    Achieving a 'step-change' in energy efficiency behaviours will require enhanced knowledge of behavioural drivers, and translation of this knowledge into successful intervention programmes. The 'Energy Cultures' conceptual framework aims to assist in understanding the factors that influence energy consumption behaviour, and to help identify opportunities for behaviour change. Building on a history of attempts to offer multi-disciplinary integrating models of energy behaviour, we take a culture-based approach to behaviour, while drawing also from lifestyles and systems thinking. The framework provides a structure for addressing the problem of multiple interpretations of 'behaviour' by suggesting that it is influenced by the interactions between cognitive norms, energy practices and material culture. The Energy Cultures framework is discussed in the context of a New Zealand case study, which demonstrates its development and application. It has already provided a basis for cross-disciplinary collaboration, and for multi-disciplinary research design, and has provided insights into behavioural change in a case study community. As the conceptual basis of a 3-year research project, the framework has further potential to identify clusters of 'energy cultures' - similar patterns of norms, practices and/or material culture - to enable the crafting of targeted actions to achieve behaviour change.

  18. Energy cultures: A framework for understanding energy behaviours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, Janet; Barton, Barry; Carrington, Gerry; Gnoth, Daniel; Lawson, Rob; Thorsnes, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a 'step-change' in energy efficiency behaviours will require enhanced knowledge of behavioural drivers, and translation of this knowledge into successful intervention programmes. The 'Energy Cultures' conceptual framework aims to assist in understanding the factors that influence energy consumption behaviour, and to help identify opportunities for behaviour change. Building on a history of attempts to offer multi-disciplinary integrating models of energy behaviour, we take a culture-based approach to behaviour, while drawing also from lifestyles and systems thinking. The framework provides a structure for addressing the problem of multiple interpretations of 'behaviour' by suggesting that it is influenced by the interactions between cognitive norms, energy practices and material culture. The Energy Cultures framework is discussed in the context of a New Zealand case study, which demonstrates its development and application. It has already provided a basis for cross-disciplinary collaboration, and for multi-disciplinary research design, and has provided insights into behavioural change in a case study community. As the conceptual basis of a 3-year research project, the framework has further potential to identify clusters of 'energy cultures' - similar patterns of norms, practices and/or material culture - to enable the crafting of targeted actions to achieve behaviour change.

  19. Broadband piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting using a nonlinear energy sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liuyang; Tang, Lihua; Liu, Kefu; Mace, Brian R.

    2018-05-01

    A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester (PVEH) is capable of converting waste or undesirable ambient vibration energy into useful electric energy. However, conventional PVEHs typically work in a narrow frequency range, leading to low efficiency in practical application. This work proposes a PVEH based on the principle of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) to achieve broadband energy harvesting. An alternating current circuit with a resistive load is first considered in the analysis of the dynamic properties and electric performance of the NES-based PEVH. Then, a standard rectifying direct current (DC) interface circuit is developed to evaluate the DC power from the PVEH. To gain insight into the NES mechanism involved, approximate analysis of the proposed PVEH systems under harmonic excitation is sought using the mixed multi-scale and harmonic balance method and the Newton–Raphson harmonic balance method. In addition, an equivalent circuit model (ECM) of the electromechanical system is derived and circuit simulations are conducted to explore and validate the energy harvesting and vibration absorption performance of the proposed NES-based PVEH. The response is also compared with that obtained by direct numerical integration of the equations of motion. Finally, the optimal resistance to obtain the maximum DC power is determined based on the Newton–Raphson harmonic balance method and validated by the ECM. In general, the NES-based PVEH can absorb the vibration from the primary structure and collect electric energy within a broad frequency range effectively.

  20. A renewable energy and hydrogen scenario for northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2008-01-01

    renewable energy supply system is demonstrated with the use of the seasonal reservoir-based hydrocomponents in the northern parts of the region. The outcome of the competition between biofuels and hydrogen in the transportation sector is dependent on the development of viable fuel cells and on efficient......A scenario based entirely on renewable energy with possible use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is constructed for a group of North European countries. Temporal simulation of the demand-supply matching is carried out for various system configurations. The role of hydrogen technologies for energy...... of energy trade between the countries, due to the different endowments of different countries with particular renewable energy sources, and to the particular benefit that intermittent energy sources, such as wind and solar, can derive from exchange of power. The establishment of a smoothly functioning...

  1. Energy Costs of Energy Savings in Buildings: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rousse

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is often claimed that the cheapest energy is the one you do not need to produce. Nevertheless, this claim could somehow be unsubstantiated. In this article, the authors try to shed some light on this issue by using the concept of energy return on investment (EROI as a yardstick. This choice brings semantic issues because in this paper the EROI is used in a different context than that of energy production. Indeed, while watts and negawatts share the same physical unit, they are not the same object, which brings some ambiguities in the interpretation of EROI. These are cleared by a refined definition of EROI and an adapted nomenclature. This review studies the research in the energy efficiency of building operation, which is one of the most investigated topics in energy efficiency. This study focuses on the impact of insulation and high efficiency windows as means to exemplify the concepts that are introduced. These results were normalized for climate, life time of the building, and construction material. In many cases, energy efficiency measures imply a very high EROI. Nevertheless, in some circumstances, this is not the case and it might be more profitable to produce the required energy than to try to save it.

  2. Financing Energy Efficient Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Existing buildings require over 40% of the world's total final energy consumption, and account for 24% of world CO2 emissions (IEA, 2006). Much of this consumption could be avoided through improved efficiency of building energy systems (IEA, 2006) using current, commercially-viable technology. In most cases, these technologies make economic sense on a life-cycle cost analysis (IEA, 2006b). Moreover, to the extent that they reduce dependence on risk-prone fossil energy sources, energy efficient technologies also address concerns of energy security.

  3. Financing Energy Efficient Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Existing buildings require over 40% of the world's total final energy consumption, and account for 24% of world CO2 emissions (IEA, 2006). Much of this consumption could be avoided through improved efficiency of building energy systems (IEA, 2006) using current, commercially-viable technology. In most cases, these technologies make economic sense on a life-cycle cost analysis (IEA, 2006b). Moreover, to the extent that they reduce dependence on risk-prone fossil energy sources, energy efficient technologies also address concerns of energy security.

  4. The energy autonomy: a new policy for the renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, H.

    2007-01-01

    The energy question is central to control the climatic change and avoid the wars resulting from the foreign resources dependence. But how act for a real energy autonomy? The author explains many ideas and reveals the real stakes of the question. It is time to change now, before the fossil fuels dry up and the nuclear cannot hide its dangerous and expensive face. In this framework, a policy in favor of the energy auto-sufficiency is an action in favor of the peace. (A.L.B.)

  5. A solar energy collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasil' yev, L.L.; Avakyan, Yu.V.; Bogdanov, V.M.; Gagiyan, L.A.; Grakovich, L.P.; Karapetyan, G.S.; Morgun, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A collector whose primary component is a heating pipe is proposed. The evaporation zone located in the lower half of the heating pipe has an external absorption coating. Chambers that open upward and contain the evaporating fluid are mounted within this region along the top. In order to improve operational reliability of the collector, these chambers are mounted on one coated wall; the area of projection of each of the chambers onto the horizontal plane is greater than the area of the projection of each of the chambers placed above it. The coating may be in the form of photocells; a filter is mounted on the chamber side inside the evaporation zone. The evaporation zone may take the form of a cylinder with a segmented base; the photocells are mounted on a flat section of the lateral surface. The collector may be used to cool the photocells.

  6. A mine of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallon, M.

    1982-01-01

    In July 1978 the then Union Corporation (which is a wholly-owned Subsidiary of the larger Gencor Group) announced its intention to develop Beisa mine in the Orange Free State. They started up a medium sized uranium mine with gold as a by-product. The main idea was for the processing of uranium. The planning of the uranium recovery plant, the actual mining, and the recovery and extraction of uranium are discussed

  7. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of energy storage in the present context, this document outlines that it is an answer to economic, environmental and technological issues. It proposes a brief overview of the various techniques of energy storage: under the form of chemical energy (hydrocarbons, biomass, hydrogen production), thermal energy (sensitive or latent heat storage), mechanical energy (potential energy by hydraulic or compressed air storage, kinetic energy with flywheels), electrochemical energy (in batteries), electric energy (super-capacitors, superconductor magnetic energy storage). Perspectives are briefly evoked

  8. Towards a new energy revolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabourbin, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    At the time of the 19. century's 'energy revolution', a man was consuming about 20.000 kcal/day. Today, in industrialized countries and if we include all forms of energies (space heating, transport, production, feeding etc.) this consumption reaches up to 230.000 kcal/day. We have reached a 'power society' which has put no limit to its growth needs. However, this growth is based on an immoderate consumption of fossil fuels which are on the way of exhaustion. A new energy revolution appears as inevitable to us, but will it be similar or in opposition to the previous ones? This revolution will have to integrate a new parameter: the need to fit with a sustainable development philosophy. To determine the conditions of this revolution, it is useful to analyse the energy systems from the needs to the resources, in a historical, philosophical and technical manner. Starting from this analysis, this book explores the possibilities to build the transition towards this new energy revolution. (J.S.)

  9. Dossier Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijer, H.; Holwerda, B.; Schrauwers, A.; Van de Graaf, A.; Van Gelder, T.

    2003-01-01

    Several aspects with respect to energy are discussed in a special section of this magazine: the security of energy supply in a liberalized market, saving energy by outsourcing (e.g. compressed air contracting), the profits of a liberalized energy market for businesses, incentives for energy saving projects and innovations, an energy efficiency project at Ineos Silicas (producer of zeolites), and energy efficient electronic equipment [nl

  10. Education to energy; Education a l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, A. [Clerc Infos, 93 - Montreuil (France)

    2004-06-01

    This dossier presents the actions and thoughts carried out in France in the domain of education to energy mastery and to renewable energy uses: new pedagogical approaches and programs in schools, experience feedback of an environmental education experiment launched in September 2003 in 84 French schools, drawing contests and exhibitions, shows, games, distribution of pedagogical booklets for students and teachers, leisure activities and experimental projects (building of a mini-wind turbine, solar furnace etc..), exhibition of scale models of energy systems, etc.. A quick overview of some equivalent approaches in Norway, Denmark and other European countries is presented in conclusion. (J.S.)

  11. Energy piles. A fundamental energy pile; Energiepfaehle. Eine fundamentale Energiequelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Holger; Beldermann, Nico [GF-Tec GmbH, Roedermark (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The Maintower, the new airport in Berlin/Brandenburg, a lot of Ikea buildings, and also small office buildings or residential buildings may exchange energy with the underground by means of pile fundaments. At the correct planning and execution, energy piles are low-cost geothermal power plants which sustainable generate heating and cooling for the buildings standing on them. Even more energy can be generated safely under compliance with the groundwater protection by means of a new development of the material and the transfer.

  12. Ocean energy conversion - A reality

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    -depth analysis of application and achievements of OTEC, tidal energy, impact of astronomical forces on tide, prospects of tidal power plants, wave energy conversion and its mathematical approach for both linear and non-linear waves, economic viability, problems...

  13. Appendix A: Energy storage technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The project financial evaluation section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  14. Denmark: a geography of energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselip, James Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Since the oil crises of the 1970s, when Denmark was 90% dependent upon imported oil, the country has decoupled economic growth from energy consumption and greatly diversified its sources of energy....

  15. Energy revolution: From a fossil energy era to a new energy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caineng Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to predict the future situation of global energy development. In view of this, we reviewed the history of energy use and understood that new energy sources will usher in a new era following oil & gas, coal and wood one after another in the past time. Although the fossil energy sources are still plenty in the world, great breakthroughs made in some key technologies and the increasing demand for ecological environmental protection both impel the third time of transformation from oil & gas to new energy sources. Sooner or later, oil, gas, coal and new energy sources will each account for a quarter of global energy consumption in the new era, specifically speaking, accounting for 32.6%, 23.7%, 30.0% and 13.7% respectively. As one of the largest coal consumer, China will inevitably face up to the situation of tripartite confrontation of the coal, oil & gas and new energy. The following forecasting results were achieved. First, the oil will be in a stable period and its annual production peak will be around 2040, reaching up to 45 × 108 t. Second, the natural gas will enter the heyday period and its annual production peak will be around 2060, reaching up to 4.5 × 1012 m3, which will play a pivotal role in the future energy sustainable development. Third, the coal has entered a high-to-low-carbon transition period, and its direct use and the discharged pollutants will be significantly reduced. In 2050, the coal will be dropped to 25% of the primary energy mix. Last, the development and utilization of new energy sources has been getting into the golden age and its proportion in the primary energy mix will be substantially enhanced. On this basis, we presented some proposals for the future energy development in China. At first, we should understand well that China's energy production and consumption has its own characteristics. Under the present situation, we should strengthen the clean and efficient use of coal resources, which

  16. Energy scenarios: a prospective outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, Thierry; Claustre, Raphael; Charru, Madeleine; Sukov, Stephane; Marignac, Yves; Fink, Meike; Bibas, Ruben; Le Saux, Gildas

    2011-01-01

    A set of articles discusses the use of energy scenarios: how useful they can be to describe a possible future and even to gather the involved actors, how they have been used in France in the past (for planning or prediction purposes, with sometimes some over-assessed or contradictory results, without considering any decline of nuclear energy, or by setting an impossible equation in the case of the Grenelle de l'Environnement), how the scenario framework impacts its content (depending on the approach type: standard, optimization, bottom-up, top-down, or hybrid). It also discusses the issue of choice of hypotheses on growth-based and de-growth-based scenarios, outlines how energy saving is a key for a sustainable evolution. Two German scenarios regarding electricity production (centralisation or decentralisation) and French regional scenarios for Nord-Pas-de-Calais are then briefly discussed

  17. Geothermal energy: a brief assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunis, B.C.; Blackett, R.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1982-07-01

    This document includes discussions about geothermal energy, its applications, and how it is found and developed. It identifies known geothermal resources located in Western's power marketing area, and covers the use of geothermal energy for both electric power generation and direct applications. Economic, institutional, environmental, and other factors are discussed, and the benefits of the geothermal energy resource are described.

  18. Energy intermittency

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The first book to consider intermittency as a key point of an energy system, Energy Intermittency describes different levels of variability for traditional and renewable energy sources, presenting detailed solutions for handling energy intermittency through trade, collaboration, demand management, and active energy storage. Addressing energy supply intermittency systematically, this practical text:Analyzes typical time-distributions and intervals between episodes of demand-supply mismatch and explores their dependence on system layouts and energy source characteristicsSimulates scenarios regar

  19. Energy. A sector in danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, L.

    2011-01-01

    Just like the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents slowed down the pace of development of nuclear energy, several countries put their project of construction of new nuclear reactors into question again after the accident of Fukushima, or at least decided a security assessment of their installations. The article comments the reactions of different political actors in France belonging either to the government or to the opposition. The level of this last accident may surely impact the development of nuclear reactors throughout the world, but may not stop it because of energy needs. Safety standards might be reassessed and some countries might choose other energy sources like gas for example. As Areva claims a high safety level for the EPR, a discussion emerges about the compliance of some French installations (Fessenheim, Cadarache) with anti-seismic construction standards

  20. World Energy Roadmap - A Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharthi, A.A.; Alfehaid, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    The dialogue between energy consumers and producers that has been going on for the past fifteen years has revealed the basic parameters of the complex energy scene. While the consumers are concerned with security of supply, the producers have equal concern with access to markets. A common ground for the two groups is sustainable development because both aim at the continuous flow of oil to ensure continued economic growth. Both have valid concerns and share equal responsibility towards the world at large where competitive advantages available to both groups are employed to achieve global sustainable development. The key to achieving this goal in a world of competing and (to some extent) conflicting priorities is not only a sizable and irreversible investment by both groups, but also the desire to relax unwarranted regulations that have hindered progress in the energy industry. (auth)

  1. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennenbaum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Wuestite - a solar energy carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidenkaff, A; Nueesch, P; Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Reller, A [Hamburg Univ., Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Hydrogen is produced when Wuestite (Fe{sub 1-y}O) is oxidised by water. This reaction is part of a two-step thermochemical metal oxide cycle for the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical energy carriers, characterised by a high chemical potential. The reaction was studied in a tubular furnace with on-line gas analysis and further characterised in detail by DTA und high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The influence of non-stoichiometry, morphology and temperature on the mechanism and kinetics of the water-splitting reaction was determined. (author) 3 figs., tabs., 3 refs.

  3. Energy policies for increased industrial energy efficiency: Evaluation of a local energy programme for manufacturing SMEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thollander, Patrik; Danestig, Maria; Rohdin, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    The most extensive action targeting the adoption of energy efficiency measures in small- and medium-sized manufacturing industries in Sweden over the past 15 years was project Highland. This paper presents an evaluation of the first part of this local industrial energy programme, which shows an adoption rate of more than 40% when both measures that have already been implemented and measures that are planned to be implemented are included. A comparison between this programme and another major ongoing programme for the Swedish energy-intensive industry indicates that the approach used in project Highland aimed at small- and medium-sized industries is an effective way to increase energy efficiency in the Swedish industry. The major barriers to energy efficiency among the firms were related to the low priority of the energy efficiency issue

  4. Energy assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Energy industry initiatives during the 1970s and during the 1990s are compared. During the 1970s, the objective was to reduce energy consumption and to reduce dependency on foreign fuel. Today, the emphasis is on reducing energy costs and to improve net operating income. The challenges posed by the drive to reduce energy costs are discussed. As a tool in the drive to reduce energy cost, the energy assessment process was described. The process entails a detailed analysis of energy consumption, an investigation of energy rates and an assessment of site conditions and equipment, with a view towards an optimum combination that will lead to energy cost reductions

  5. A perspective on energy exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, A.J.

    1983-06-01

    Based on New Brunswick Power's energy export experience over the past two decades, it appears that Canada could have a very special and unique opportunity to input into the US energy market over the coming decades. The CANDU reactor can offer one of these opportunities. Such business opportunities can be of very real benefit to both countries and to the particular regions involved. Like any other form of business, this one must be carefully planned and must be conducted in an environment conducive to the achievement of the objectives of the business

  6. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  7. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancharoen, K; Zhu, D; Beeby, S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω

  8. Understanding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Shelby, Blake; Mattingly, Christine

    2016-01-01

    "Energy" is a term often used in everyday language. Even young children associate energy with the food they eat, feeling tired after playing soccer, or when asked to turn the lights off to save light energy. However, they may not have the scientific conceptual understanding of energy at this age. Teaching energy and matter could be…

  9. Energy Systems in the Era of Energy Vectors A Key to Define, Analyze and Design Energy Systems Beyond Fossil Fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Orecchini, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    What lies beyond the era of fossil fuels? While most answers focus on different primary energy resources, Energy Systems in the Era of Energy Vectors provides a completely new approach. Instead of providing a traditional consumption analysis of classical primary energy resources such as oil, coal, nuclear power and gas, Energy Systems in the Era of Energy Vectors describes and assesses energy technologies, markets and future strategies, focusing on their capacity to produce, exchange, and use energy vectors. Special attention is given to the renewable energy resources available in different areas of the world and made exploitable by the integration of energy vectors in the global energy system. Clear definitions of energy vectors and energy systems are used as the basis for a complete explanation and assessment of up-to-date, available technologies for energy resources, transport and storage systems, conversion and use. The energy vectors scheme allows the potential realisation of a worldwide sustainable ener...

  10. Future energy, exotic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumon, R

    1974-01-01

    The Detroit Energy Conference has highlighted the declining oil reserves, estimated worldwide at 95 billion tons vs. an annual rate of consumption of over 3 billion tons. The present problem is one of price; also, petroleum seems too valuable to be simply burned. New sources must come into action before 1985. The most abundant is coal, with 600 billion tons of easily recoverable reserves; then comes oil shale with a potential of 400 billion tons of oil. Exploitation at the rate of 55 go 140 million tons/yr is planned in the U.S. after 1985. More exotic and impossible to estimate quantitatively are such sources as wind, tides, and the thermal energy of the oceans--these are probably far in the future. The same is true of solar and geothermal energy in large amounts. The only other realistic energy source is nuclear energy: the European Economic Community looks forward to covering 60% of its energy needs from nuclear energy in the year 2000. Even today, from 400 mw upward, a nuclear generating plant is more economical than a fossil fueled one. Conservation will become the byword, and profound changes in society are to be expected.

  11. Renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouni, Georgia; Frank, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has in a series of projects gathered information and knowledge on renewable energy from various sources, both within and outside the academic world. In this article, we synthesize and summarize some of the main points on renewable energy from the various Energy Committee projects and the Committee's Energy 2050 symposium, regarding energy from water and wind, bioenergy, and solar energy. We further summarize the Energy Committee's scenario estimates of future renewable energy contributions to the global energy system, and other presentations given at the Energy 2050 symposium. In general, international coordination and investment in energy research and development is crucial to enable future reliance on renewable energy sources with minimal fossil fuel use.

  12. Dynamical analysis for a vector-like dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landim, Ricardo C.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica-Matematica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we perform a dynamical analysis for a vector field as a candidate for the dark energy, in the presence of a barotropic fluid. The vector is one component of the so-called cosmic triad, which is a set of three identical copies of an abelian field pointing mutually in orthogonal directions. In order to generalize the analysis, we also assumed the interaction between dark energy and the barotropic fluid, with a phenomenological coupling. Both matter and dark energy eras can be successfully described by the critical points, indicating that the dynamical system theory is a viable tool to analyze asymptotic states of such cosmological models. (orig.)

  13. Energy Materials: A Classified Listing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography includes 615 books and audiovisual products on energy and related topics. Books are listed in the following categories: reference, general, alternative sources, citizen action, coal, conservation and ecology, economics and politics, electricity, gas, geothermal, nuclear power, oil, solar, water, wind, and juveniles. A/V materials…

  14. Energy Choices. A North European Energy Map; Vaegval Energi. Nordeuropeisk Energikarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenkvist, Stefan; Stenkvist, Maria; Paradis, Hanna

    2008-11-15

    Oil, coal and natural gas dominate the energy consumption in Northern Europe, as well as in the world at large. The energy supply mix varies between the countries of the region. For example, a large proportion of biomass and waste in Finland and Latvia (Norway) and Sweden use a high proportion of hydroelectric power, while Poland has a very high proportion of coal in their energy mix. Energy use per person in Northern Europe is more than twice as high compared with the average global - but lower than the average in the OECD. In Northern Europe, there are three separate networks for energy transfer: natural gas, electricity and heating. The expansion of the natural gas network has been strong since 1970. Gas pipelines today covers large parts of Europe and new pipelines are planned. The electricity grids and their transmission capacity has grown. Electricity began to be transferred between the Nordic countries during the 1960s. Today, the North European countries are linked with a number of high capacity cables. While the networks for district heating has grown, these systems are separate for individual cities. In recent years, the region's net imports of oil rose, as (Norway's oil production has declined since the early 2000s. On the other hand, the North European countries in 2007 became, for the first time, net exporters of natural gas. As the energy systems expand, trade in energy increases - both within the region and with the rest of Europe and the rest of the world. Several new energy projects are planned in Northern Europe for expanded capacity in oil refineries and new pipelines for natural gas and transmission lines for electricity. The energy integration in the region is therefore expected to increase further. In the long term, climate policy will be of greater importance, both for the region's use of primary energy and for the look of the region's future energy map

  15. Energy politics: Can we achieve a sustainable energy path?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicklas, M.

    1993-01-01

    The political pressures affecting global energy choices are numerous, vary by country, and are significantly changing. In evaluating our energy future, one cannot escape recognition of three dominant areas where reality more than politics will dictate needs and directions. Within the next decade the magnitude and importance of population growth, energy resource availability, and the environmental and societal costs of energy will gradually increase and dominate global energy decisionmaking. This paper will discuss these major forces, how they have influenced past actions, and how they will shape our energy future

  16. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  17. Energy alternatives in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1973, the oil prices have increased tenfold. Currently we are already short by 7% in energy demand which is increasing in an exponential order. Also environmental problems associated with conventional energy generation need a serious consideration as a concept of clean energy. Various sources available are as follows. 1) coal energy 2) hydroelectric 3) nuclear energy. In India, thermal power obtained from amounts to 72.8%, hydroelectric amounts to 25.3% and nuclear about 2 to 3%. Non-conventional energy sources are mostly non-polluting except for the fact that no economically viable methods are invented to harness the power effectively. Following are the non-conventional energy resources. 1) solar energy:- this can be applied in different ways. 1) photothermal, 2) photovoltaics, 3) photosynthesis, 4) bio-energy. ii) wind energy, iii) ocean energy iv) geothermal energy. It can be concluded that nuclear energy is the only way out to current situation. Energy conservation and energy consciousness should also be implemented. (author)

  18. Energy problems in a global view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.-E.

    1976-01-01

    Energy problems in general are examined, considering first the ecosystem of pre-Newtonian societies, then that of industrial societies and their resulting energy consumptions. Primary energy sources are listed and the manner in which they are used is described. New techniques (uranium isotope separation, energy conversion, solar energy, controlled fusion) are discussed as a function of their potential saving in energy expenditure. Solutions are proposed for the future of post-industrial societies [fr

  19. Energy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    These 8 charts bring information on with the primary energy consumption, energy indicators, energy bill, prices and electric power, petroleum, natural gas and solid mineral fuels from January 2003 to January 2006. (A.L.B.)

  20. A Wind Forecasting System for Energy Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jennifer; Lynch, Peter; Sweeney, Conor

    2010-05-01

    Accurate forecasting of available energy is crucial for the efficient management and use of wind power in the national power grid. With energy output critically dependent upon wind strength there is a need to reduce the errors associated wind forecasting. The objective of this research is to get the best possible wind forecasts for the wind energy industry. To achieve this goal, three methods are being applied. First, a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model called WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) is being used to predict wind values over Ireland. Currently, a gird resolution of 10km is used and higher model resolutions are being evaluated to establish whether they are economically viable given the forecast skill improvement they produce. Second, the WRF model is being used in conjunction with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ensemble forecasts to produce a probabilistic weather forecasting product. Due to the chaotic nature of the atmosphere, a single, deterministic weather forecast can only have limited skill. The ECMWF ensemble methods produce an ensemble of 51 global forecasts, twice a day, by perturbing initial conditions of a 'control' forecast which is the best estimate of the initial state of the atmosphere. This method provides an indication of the reliability of the forecast and a quantitative basis for probabilistic forecasting. The limitation of ensemble forecasting lies in the fact that the perturbed model runs behave differently under different weather patterns and each model run is equally likely to be closest to the observed weather situation. Models have biases, and involve assumptions about physical processes and forcing factors such as underlying topography. Third, Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) is being applied to the output from the ensemble forecasts in order to statistically post-process the results and achieve a better wind forecasting system. BMA is a promising technique that will offer calibrated

  1. Energy, tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Frantál, B. (Bohumil)

    2015-01-01

    The chapter provides a general definition of energy and resume the role and environmental impacts of tourism as one of the largest global industries and energy consumers.Then the energy tourism nexus is conceptualized from three perspectives: The first is energy as a driver of tourism. The second is energy as a constraint of tourism. The third is energy as an attraction and object of tourists´interests.

  2. Blueprint for a business energy tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, C.

    1998-11-01

    This report argues the case for energy taxation as against emissions trading to reduce energy consumption by UK businesses, and presents a blueprint for the implementation of energy taxes. The case for a business energy tax is set out, and the use of energy taxes in other European countries such as Denmark, Austria, the Netherlands, Finland and Sweden is outlined. The form of energy tax for the UK and key questions on operation of an energy tax are discussed, and tax relief for investments which reduce emissions, the potential effects of tax relief on energy intensive industry, and the combination of policy measures are considered

  3. Wave energy: a Pacific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Robert; Ruehl, Kelley; Hovland, Justin; Meicke, Stephen

    2012-01-28

    This paper illustrates the status of wave energy development in Pacific rim countries by characterizing the available resource and introducing the region's current and potential future leaders in wave energy converter development. It also describes the existing licensing and permitting process as well as potential environmental concerns. Capabilities of Pacific Ocean testing facilities are described in addition to the region's vision of the future of wave energy.

  4. Energy poverty: A special focus on energy poverty in India and renewable energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhide, Anjali; Monroy, Carlos Rodriguez [Department of Business Administration, School of Industrial Engineering, Technical University of Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    As a large percentage of the world's poor come from India, development in India is a key issue. After the establishment of how access to energy enhances development and the achievement of the millennium development goals, energy poverty has become a major issue. In India there is a great interest in addressing the subject of energy poverty, in order to reach development goals set by the Government. This will imply an increase in India's energy needs. In a climate of change and environmental consciousness, sustainable alternatives must be considered to address these issues. Renewable energy technologies could provide a solution to this problem. The Government of India has been focussing in implementing electricity policies as well as on promoting renewable energy technologies. The focus of this article is to bring to light the problems faced in India in terms of energy consumption as well as the hindrances faced by renewable-based electrification networks. Government policies aimed at addressing these issues, as well as the current state of renewable energy technologies in India are discussed, so as to analyse the possibility of a solution to the problems of finding a sustainable method to eradicate energy poverty in India. The research reveals that the Government of India has been unable to meet some of its unrealistic development goals, and in order to achieve the remaining goals it will have to take drastic steps. The Government will have to be more aggressive in the promotion of renewable energy technologies in order to achieve sustainable development in India. (author)

  5. A perfect match: Nuclear energy and the National Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    In the course of developing the National Energy Strategy, the Department of Energy held 15 public hearings, heard from more than 375 witnesses and received more than 1000 written comments. In April 1990, the Department published an Interim Report on the National Energy Strategy, which compiles those public comments. The National Energy Strategy must be based on actual experience and factual analysis of our energy, economic and environmental situation. This report by the Nuclear Power Oversight committee, which represents electric utilities and other organizations involved in supplying electricity from nuclear energy to the American people, provides such an analysis. The conclusions here are based on hard facts and actual worldwide experience. This analysis of all the available data supports -- indeed, dictates -- expanded reliance on nuclear energy in this nation's energy supply to achieve the President's goals. 33 figs

  6. Europe running out of energy - For a common energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derdevet, M.

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 was marked by the European elections and the general public was wondering about the usefulness of the European Union. The author speaks in favour of a reversal of this idea and fights for the implementation of a common energy policy. He demonstrates how the European Union can act in this way for the benefit of all European citizens. The book shows up the stakes of the present day world indissociable from the energy topics: volatility of oil prices, economical and financial crisis, rise of new competitive powers for supplies, rise of global risks (greenhouse effect, pollution), geopolitical tensions (Iraq, Russian-Ukrainian crisis, Georgia crisis..). The author shows how the creation of a European energy community, a solidarity mechanism based on a powerful market and public utility, would allow to overcome these main challenges of the 21. century. (J.S.)

  7. Nuclear energy has a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy appears to be a main asset to France in the context of the worldwide economic slump. Nuclear power provides a cheap electricity that spares the buying power of households and increases the competitiveness of French enterprises. Nuclear industry with major companies like EDF, AREVA and CEA and 450 small and medium-sized enterprises, represents a core resistant to industrial decline. Nuclear industry is a good provider of work and globally it represents 2% of all the jobs in France. Concerning the trade balance, nuclear power plays twice; first by exporting equipment and services for a value of 7 billions euros a year and secondly by sparing the cost of energy imports that would be necessary if nuclear power was not here which is estimated to 20 billions euros a year. (A.C.)

  8. Nuclear energy - a green energy solution to global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The manner in which the world has conducted itself in exploiting energy resources so far particularly in the post industrial revolution period, is now looming as one of the greatest challenges to the sustainability of development or even sustainability of life. Global climate change is no more a perceived threat, it is now a reality and we are not in a position to engage ourselves to debate on the issue. It is in fact a little late in taking the right corrective action if we have any concern for our future generations. The efforts of the scientists and engineers are to gradually replace the energy from burning of carbonaceous material to clean and intense source of energy i.e. nuclear fission and fusion

  9. Energy [R]evolution 2010-a sustainable world energy outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, S.; Pregger, T.; Simon, S.; Naegler, T.; Graus, W.H.J.; Lins, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy [R]evolution 2010 scenario is an update of the Energy [R]evolution scenarios published in 2007 and 2008. It takes up recent trends in global energy demand and production and analyses to which extent this affects chances for achieving climate protection targets. The main target is to

  10. Barriers to renewable energy development: A case study of large-scale wind energy in Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Garrett; Noble, Bram; Belcher, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy is receiving increased attention as a viable alternative to non-renewable electrical generation, however, meeting global energy demands will require a more ambitious renewable energy program than is currently the case. There have been several reviews of potential technological, economic, social, or public barriers and solutions to renewable energy investment. Although important, there is also need for multi-dimensional analyses of these barriers and identification of the most significant underlying barriers if viable solutions are to be developed. In this paper we apply a theoretical framework to examine stakeholder's perceptions and understanding of the barriers to wind energy development in Saskatchewan, Canada. We identify and examine the most significant underlying barriers to investment in renewable energy and the interactions between those barriers. Results show a number of perceived barriers to wind energy investment, however, these barriers can be explained in large part by knowledge barriers, if not disagreement over whether the current level of investment in wind energy is sufficient. We show that barriers to renewable energy cannot be explained solely by technological, social, political, or economic factors in isolation, and that a multi-dimensional approach, identifying and explaining the underlying sources of these barriers, is necessary to develop viable solutions. - Highlights: ► Meeting future wind energy objectives requires an ambitious investment program. ► A framework is applied to identify and explain perceived barriers to wind energy. ► Stakeholders perceived technological and political barriers as the most significant. ► These could be explained by knowledge barriers and complacency with the status quo. ► Even with additional investment these underlying barriers will constrain progress.

  11. Energy Data Management (EDM) in a liberalised energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbricht, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the role of Energy Data Management (EDM) in a liberalised Swiss energy market in the light of increasing international dynamics in this area. The requirements placed on such EDM systems are reviewed and the changes necessary in the structures and processes of electricity supply organisations are discussed. A possible design for future software systems is presented. Such systems have to be flexible enough to cover various structural possibilities as Swiss legislation on the subject has not yet been passed. The handling of data on energy-flow balances when third-party power is transferred in shared mains systems is discussed and scheduling aspects of power generation and transmission are looked at. The billing of power to customers with a free choice of supplier is looked at, as is the situation involving utilities that supply not only electricity but gas, district heating and water too

  12. A New Challenge for Alternative Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Editorial Department of China Power Enterprise Management

    2009-01-01

    @@ The year 2008 sees a turning point in China's strategy of promoting energy saving and emissions reduction,as well as development of renewable energy.Oil price breaking US$140 and large area in China suffering from ice and snow disaster,a result of global warming,have both stressed the importance of developing alternative energy.Today,alterative energy accounts for a very small portion in China's power industry.Therefore,it is imminently required to speed up energy restructuring,to vigorously develop power generation with alternative energy such as nuclear energy,hydroenergy,wind energy,solar energy,biomass energy,geothermic energy,thus to realize sustainable development.

  13. Wind energy utilization: A bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Bibliography cites documents published to and including 1974 with abstracts and references, and is indexed by topic, author, organization, title, and keywords. Topics include: Wind Energy Potential and Economic Feasibility, Utilization, Wind Power Plants and Generators, Wind Machines, Wind Data and Properties, Energy Storage, and related topics.

  14. Energy Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical…

  15. A New Method to Energy Saving in a Micro Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Vallati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of energy production systems is a relevant issue that must be considered in order to follow the fossil fuels consumption reduction policies and CO2 emission regulation. Increasing electricity production from renewable resources (e.g., photovoltaic systems and wind farms is desirable but its unpredictability is a cause of problems for the main grid stability. A system with multiple energy sources represents an efficient solution, by realizing an interface among renewable energy sources, energy storage systems, and conventional power generators. Direct consequences of multi-energy systems are a wider energy flexibility and benefits for the electric grid, the purpose of this paper is to propose the best technology combination for electricity generation from a mix of renewable energy resources to satisfy the electrical needs. The paper identifies the optimal off-grid option and compares this with conventional grid extension, through the use of HOMER software. The solution obtained shows that a hybrid combination of renewable energy generators at an off-grid location can be a cost-effective alternative to grid extension and it is sustainable, techno-economically viable, and environmentally sound. The results show how this innovative energetic approach can provide a cost reduction in power supply and energy fees of 40% and 25%, respectively, and CO2 emission decrease attained around 18%. Furthermore, the multi-energy system taken as the case study has been optimized through the utilization of three different type of energy storage (Pb-Ac batteries, flywheels, and micro—Compressed Air Energy Storage (C.A.E.S..

  16. Energy management in a microgrid with distributed energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Linfeng; Gari, Nicolae; Hmurcik, Lawrence V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A performance metric is proposed with the consideration of price, environment effect, and service quality. • Models of a microgrid and a microgrid network are designed with distribute energy resources and storage. • Different cases in MG operation are discussed. - Abstract: A smart grid power system with renewable energy resources and distributed energy storage shows significant improvement in the power system’s emission reduction, reliability, efficiency, and security. A microgrid is a smart grid in a small scale which can be stand-alone or grid-tied. Multi microgrids form a network with energy management and operational planning through two-way power flow and communication. To comprehensively evaluate the performance of a microgrid, a performance metric is proposed with consideration of the electricity price, emission, and service quality, each of them is given a weighting factor. Thus, the performance metric is flexible according to the consumers’ preference. With the weighting factors set in this paper, this performance metric is further applied on microgrids operated as stand-alone, grid-tied, and networked. Each microgrid consists of a solar panel, a hydrogen fuel cell stack, an electrolyzer, a hydrogen storage tank, and a load. For a stand-alone system, the load prediction lowers down the daily electricity consumption about 5.7%, the quantity of H 2 stored fluctuates in a wide range, and overall performance indexes increase with the solar panel size. In a grid-tied MG, the load prediction has a significant effect on the daily consumed electricity which drops 25% in 4 days, some day-time loads are shifted to the night time, and the capacity of hydrogen tank is lower than that in a stand-alone MG. In a network with multiple MGs, the control of the power distribution strongly affects the MG’s performance. However, the overall performance index instead of any specific index increases with the MG’s power generated from renewable energy

  17. Energy landscapes in a crowded world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasqualetti, Martin; Stremke, Sven

    2018-01-01

    One of the main drivers of landscape transformation has been our demand for energy. We refer to the results of such transformations as "energy landscapes". This paper examines the definition of energy landscapes within a conceptual framework, proposes a classification of energy landscapes, and

  18. Microalgae as a Renewable Source of Energy: A Niche Opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Jegan Porphy Jegathese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Algae are believed to be a good source of renewable energy because of its rapid growth rate and its ability to be cultivated in waste water or waste land. Several companies and government agencies are making efforts to reduce capital cost and operating costs and make algae fuel production commercially viable. Algae are the fastest growing plant and theoretically have the potential to produce more oil or biomass per acre when compared to other crops and plants. However, the energy efficiency ratio and carbon and water footprint for algal based biofuels still need to be evaluated in order to fully understand the environmental impact of algal derived biofuels.

  19. Global energy modeling - A biophysical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Michael

    2010-09-15

    This paper contrasts the standard economic approach to energy modelling with energy models using a biophysical approach. Neither of these approaches includes changing energy-returns-on-investment (EROI) due to declining resource quality or the capital intensive nature of renewable energy sources. Both of these factors will become increasingly important in the future. An extension to the biophysical approach is outlined which encompasses a dynamic EROI function that explicitly incorporates technological learning. The model is used to explore several scenarios of long-term future energy supply especially concerning the global transition to renewable energy sources in the quest for a sustainable energy system.

  20. A study on electric bicycle energy efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan EVTIMOV

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a construction of an experimental electric bicycle for evaluation of the energy efficiency. The bicycle is equipped with onboard computer which can store the information about motion and energy consumption. The result concerning power, energy consumption, recharging during brake process, etc. are given. Energy consumption for 3 typical city routes is studied.

  1. A Sustainable Energy System in Latvia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lotte Holmberg

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents some of the problems in the Latvian energy system, the Latvian economy and how a sustainable restructuring of the energy system with renewable energy, co-generation and the production of energy technology can help solve some of the problems....

  2. Solar energy in Germany: a national commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persem, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This document presents some key information and figures about the development of solar energy in Germany: national energy plan and share of solar energy in the German energy mix, the photovoltaic industry: a dynamic industry which creates jobs, 2006-2012 evolution of photovoltaic power plant costs, solar thermal resource potentialities and effective exploitation

  3. Energy management in a commercial organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxley, C. W.

    1979-07-01

    Implementation of energy management programs by the Debenhams Group, operators of a chain of department stores in England, Scotland, and Wales, is discussed. How the systems relate to building operations is considered in the following subjects: group activities and energy costs; energy management; information base; standards action; lighting and energy; new store design; development (control of services). (MCW)

  4. Is atomic energy different from a nucleus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young

    1995-07-01

    This book describes of two faces of nuclear energy : the secret of a nuclear, the history of nuclear energy : the scientists with a nuclear, the nuclear energy generation : the third disapprobation, a nuclear weapon : Choice of fear, the Korean peninsula and a nuclear and nuclear energy and utilization in peace. It consists of 31 questions and the answers of the questions about nuclear energy and nucleus.

  5. Soft energy vs nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    During the early 1960s, a plentiful, inexpensive supply of petroleum enabled Japanese industry to progress rapidly; however, almost all of this petroleum was imported. Even after the first oil crisis of 1973, the recent annual energy consumption of Japan is calculated to be about 360 million tons in terms of petroleum, and actual petroleum forms 73% of total energy. It is necessary for Japan to reduce reliance on petroleum and to diversify energy resources. The use of other fossil fuels, such as coal, LNG and LPG, and hydraulic energy, is considered as an established alternative. In this presentation, the author deals with new energy, namely soft energy and nuclear energy, and discusses their characteristics and problems. The following kinds of energy are dealt with: a) Solar energy, b) Geothermal energy, c) Ocean energy (tidal, thermal, wave), d) Wind energy, e) Biomass energy, f) Hydrogen, g) Nuclear (thermal, fast, fusion). To solve the energy problem in future, assiduous efforts should be made to develop new energy systems. Among them, the most promising alternative energy is nuclear energy, and various kinds of thermal reactor systems have been developed for practical application. As a solution to the long-term future energy problem, research on and development of fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are going on. (author)

  6. A survey of renewable energies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals set by the Grenelle agreement was to reach a ratio of 23% for the part of renewable energies in the final energies consumed in France by 2020. In 2005 this ratio was 10 per cent. In this article the situation in 2010 for wind energy, solar energy, biomass, wood heating and geothermal energy are reported. It appears that the results are promising but the reduction of fiscal incentives might jeopardize the objective for 2020. (A.C.)

  7. Energy problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefling, O.

    1980-01-01

    The physical and technical fundamentals of energy conversion are described in popular form. There are chapters on fossil nuclear, and renewable energy sources. The final chapter attempts to give a picture of the complex interactions in the fields of energy economy and energy policy. (UA) [de

  8. Energy efficiency through energy audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esan, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Energy is an essential factor to economic and social development and improved standards of living in developing countries. Nigeria in particular. There is a strong need for greater energy efficiency in every sector of economy in order to reduce costs. enhance competitiveness, conserve energy resources and reduce environmental impacts associated with production, distribution and use of energy. Energy auditing and monitoring has a significant role in any energy management and conservation project. Energy auditing as an important part of industrial energy management on plant level, represents a complex of activities aiming at the efficient use of energy. The activities are undertaken by a team of experts who use a set of measuring instruments to monitor and evaluate all the necessary data to elaborate a package of recommendations on improvements in the field of energy efficiency and possible product quality. The inefficient conversion and use of energy have been identified as a central problem for all developing countries, Nigeria inclusive, since they all consume significantly higher amounts of energy per unit of GDP than OECD countries. This aggravates energy-related environmental problems and is also a burden on domestic resources and foreign exchange. Energy prices have risen drastically in many developing countries, while energy intensities remain high. Price changes alone are not rapidly translating energy efficiency improvements. Identifying and removing the obstacles to greater energy efficiency should be priority for government in developing countries. This is why the Energy Commission, an apex organ of government on Energy matters in all its ramifications is out to encourage relatively low-cost energy audits for the Textile industries - such audits can identify ''good house-keeping's' measures, such as simply process improvements, that reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This will be followed by the training of plant workers/energy managers

  9. Energy options?; Energie opties?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, W. (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    March 2006 the so-called Options Document was published by the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP). The document is an overview of technical options to reduce energy consumption and emission of greenhouse gases up to 2020. Next to a brief summary of the document a few reactions and comments on the contents of the document are given. [Dutch] Maart 2006 publiceerde het Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland (ECN) en het Milieu- en Natuurplanbureau (MNP) het zogenaamde Optiedocument energie en emissies 2010-2020. Daarin wordt een overzicht gegeven van de technische mogelijkheden voor vermindering van het energieverbruik en de uitstoot van broeikasgassen en luchtverontreinigende stoffen tot 2020. Naast een korte samenvatting van het document worden enkele reacties gegeven op de inhoud.

  10. Nuclear energy: a select bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The titles are divided between: historical (6); official (17); general (32). The aspects covered include: UK government policy; energy policy; economics; safety; hazards; reactor types; radioactive waste management; environment; socio-economic. (U.K.)

  11. Energy crisis? The likelihood of a global energy crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franssen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper assess global energy problems and compares the energy crises of the 1970s with current US energy problems. The reaction of the OECD countries to the oil crises of 1973/4 and 1979/80, the perception of future oil supplies, and the difficulties faced by ordinary consumers in accepting that there is an energy crisis are discussed along with the Californian electricity crisis, the falling US natural gas supplies, and the low return on investment in the US refining industry. The prospect of another oil crisis, and the need for consumers to learn to live with price volatility are considered

  12. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  13. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  14. What energies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Energy consumption has developed significantly since the Second World War and population growth and improved living standards should see needs increasing even more. Traditional forecasts show that this energy consumption will continue to depend heavily on fossil energy. However, resources are limited and their use have a negative impact on the greenhouse effect and climate change. There is therefore a need to develop large quantities of renewable energy sources, to intensify energy saving programs and to pursue research in certain key areas

  15. Energy Leapfrogging

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur A. van Benthem

    2015-01-01

    Today's less developed countries (LDCs) have access to energy technologies that did not exist when today's richer countries were at similar stages of development. Do LDCs therefore consume less energy per capita than rich countries in the past? And is their economic growth associated with a lower growth in energy consumption? Can they "leapfrog" to a lower-carbon economy? I use data on energy consumption, prices, and gross domestic product for 76 countries to estimate the energy intensity of ...

  16. Advantage Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Increased focus has been placed on the issues of energy access and energy poverty over the last number of years, most notably indicated by the United Nations (UN) declaring 2012 as the 'International Year of Sustainable Energy for All'. Although attention in these topics has increased, incorrect assumptions and misunderstandings still arise in both the literature and dialogues. Access to energy does not only include electricity, does not only include cook stoves, but must include access to all types of energy that form the overall energy system. This paper chooses to examine this energy system using a typology that breaks it into 3 primary energy subsystems: heat energy, electricity and transportation. Describing the global energy system using these three subsystems provides a way to articulate the differences and similarities for each system's required investments needs by the private and public sectors.

  17. Energy optimization for a wind DFIG with flywheel energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzaoui, Ihssen, E-mail: hamzaoui-ihssen2000@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Instrumentation, Faculty of Electronics and Computer, University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El-Alia 16111 Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria); Laboratory of Instrumentation, Faculty of Electronics and Computer, University of Khemis Miliana, Ain Defla (Algeria); Bouchafaa, Farid, E-mail: fbouchafa@gmail.com [Laboratory of Instrumentation, Faculty of Electronics and Computer, University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El-Alia 16111 Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    The type of distributed generation unit that is the subject of this paper relates to renewable energy sources, especially wind power. The wind generator used is based on a double fed induction Generator (DFIG). The stator of the DFIG is connected directly to the network and the rotor is connected to the network through the power converter with three levels. The objective of this work is to study the association a Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) in wind generator. This system is used to improve the quality of electricity provided by wind generator. It is composed of a flywheel; an induction machine (IM) and a power electronic converter. A maximum power tracking technique « Maximum Power Point Tracking » (MPPT) and a strategy for controlling the pitch angle is presented. The model of the complete system is developed in Matlab/Simulink environment / to analyze the results from simulation the integration of wind chain to networks.

  18. The hydro energy; Energie hydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachey, C.

    2000-05-01

    This paper is a first approach of the hydro energy energy. It presents the principle and the applications of this energy source. It proposes recommendations on the sizing and the cost estimation of an installation and the environmental impacts of this energy. (A.L.B.)

  19. Biogas: A renewable energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imiere, E.E.; Ojih, V.B.; Esiekpe, L.E.; Okafor, M.C.; Attoh, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    Biogas refers to a gas produced by the biological breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen. Biogas can be used as a fuel in any country for any heating purpose such as cooking. By means of digesters, the energy in the gas can be converted to electricity and heat. Biogas like natural gas can also be used to power motor vehicle. Biogas is a renewable fuel which qualifies it for a renewable energy subsidy. It is non-toxic, environment-friendly and serve as a means of combating global warming. Biogas is presently being used in U.S.A, U.K, China, Sweden, Brazil, and India amongst others for domestic purposes, transportation and power generation. In this regard, this paper discusses biogas production. It also presents a model design of domestic biogas plant suitable for Nigerian households. The paper recommends that Nigerian Government should intensify efforts in educating the masses on this novel technology for a sustainable global development. A biogas plant designed for Nigerian household discussed in this paper is also recommended.

  20. Nuclear energy: a master card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaud, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Here are exposed the elements of the French doctrine of nuclear deterrence. The historical points, from the American deterrence to the actual situation are detailed. The political aspects, with the non proliferation, the ecologists pressure and the anti nuclear pacifism are evoked to precise the uncertainty of the actual French deterrence. 9 analysis are on the deterrence subject, then the civil aspect of nuclear energy is discussed, with the advantages and the disadvantages of the nuclear power plants and the reprocessing in two analysis; a special mention is noted for the reactor safety in Eastern Europe, in the last article. (N.C.)

  1. A shared vision for energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Energy plays an important role in Canadian society. With vast and diverse energy resources, Canada is a major participant in international energy markets. This report discussed the challenges and opportunities of Canada's energy sector, such as meeting the demand for energy; conserving and using existing energy more efficiently; developing new and innovative energy technologies; moving to renewable, greener and cleaner energy sources; improving transmission and transportation capacity; improving regulatory approval processes; and meeting demand for a skilled and available workforce. The report also discussed formalization of the role of provinces and territories in international energy discussions. A seven point action plan was also presented in order to provide concrete solutions and actions if the full potential of Canada's energy sector was to be achieved. These steps included promoting energy efficiency and conservation; accelerating the development and deployment of energy research and technologies that advance more efficient production, transmission and use of clean and conventional energy sources; facilitating the development of renewable, green and/or cleaner energy sources to meet future demand while contributing to environmental goals; and, developing and enhancing a modern, reliable, environmentally safe, and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy. Other actions were also presented, such as improving the timeliness and certainty of regulatory approval decision-making processes while maintaining rigorous protection of the environment and public interest; developing and implementing strategies to meet energy-sector human resource needs now and into the future; and, pursuing formalized participation of provinces and territories in international discussions and negotiations on energy. It was concluded that immediate action and sustained effort by all is needed in order to ensure that all

  2. Basic Science for a Secure Energy Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Anticipating a doubling in the world's energy use by the year 2050 coupled with an increasing focus on clean energy technologies, there is a national imperative for new energy technologies and improved energy efficiency. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research that provides the foundations for new energy technologies and supports DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research crosses the full spectrum of materials and chemical sciences, as well as aspects of biosciences and geosciences, with a focus on understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter and energy at electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. In addition, BES is the home for national user facilities for x-ray, neutron, nanoscale sciences, and electron beam characterization that serve over 10,000 users annually. To provide a strategic focus for these programs, BES has held a series of ``Basic Research Needs'' workshops on a number of energy topics over the past 6 years. These workshops have defined a number of research priorities in areas related to renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy -- as well as cross-cutting scientific grand challenges. These directions have helped to define the research for the recently established Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and are foundational for the newly announced Energy Innovation Hubs. This overview will review the current BES research portfolio, including the EFRCs and user facilities, will highlight past research that has had an impact on energy technologies, and will discuss future directions as defined through the BES workshops and research opportunities.

  3. A comparison of European energy taxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2004-01-01

    Energy and pollution are two closely related topics, and justifiably so, even if the environmental repercussions of energy consumption affect society to varying degrees. Today, there is a revival of interest for 'clean' energy solutions with respect to the traditional, more polluting, energy sources. The boundary between these two energy categories remains difficult to established. Natural gas is a perfect example because it is considered as a clean alternative to hydrocarbons, while its use generates greenhouse gases. Taking into consideration these criteria, together with some others, in particular economical and strategic, each country must establish environmental policies in which energy taxes play a key role. This study examines the taxation of traditional types of energy (automotive fuels, fuel oil, natural gas and electricity) within the European Union. The goal is to provide an overview of environmental taxes applied to energy in Europe, prior to the application of the new directive that sets minimum rates for these energies starting in 2004

  4. Negawatt manifesto - Making energy transition a success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, Thierry; Jedliczka, Marc; Marignac, Yves; Hessel, Stephane; Lovins, Amory

    2012-01-01

    For ten years, the Negawatt association has taken a fresh look at our ways of consuming and producing energy. After the realisation of its 2011 scenario, the association has wished to complete this work with a reflexion full of ideas and operational measures and addressed to all citizens and to decision-makers. This manifesto describes with pedagogy and lucidity a possible and desirable path to get out of our energy and climate crises. Contents: 1 - Energy in crisis; 2 - Energy in its all forms; 3 - From the approach to the scenario: preparing the energy transition; 4 - Buildings and energy transition; 5 - Key-sectors of the transition: transports, industry and agriculture; 6 - Advent of renewable energies; 7 - From the nuclear twilight to the renewable dawn; 8 - Costs and benefits of the energy transition; 9 - The 'true value' of energy; 10 - From the status time to the action one. A series of 26 graphs summarizes the Negawatt approach. (J.S.)

  5. Energy Consumption vs. Energy Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L. T.; Zhang, Tengyan; Schlup, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Energy is necessary for any phenomenon to occur or any process to proceed. Nevertheless, energy is never consumed; instead, it is conserved. What is consumed is available energy, or exergy, accompanied by an increase in entropy. Obviously, the terminology, "energy consumption" is indeed a misnomer although it is ubiquitous in the…

  6. A Dual Function Energy Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Tolmie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat can be collected from local energy sources and concentrated into a relatively small volume, and at a useful working temperature, by using a heat pump as the concentrator. That heat can be stored and utilized at a later date for applications like space heating. The process is doing two things at the same time: storing heat and shifting the power demand. The concentration step can be done at night when there is normally a surplus of power and its timing can be directly controlled by the power grid operator to ensure that the power consumption occurs only when adequate power is available. The sources of heat can be the summer air, the heat extracted from buildings by their cooling systems, natural heat from the ground or solar heat, all of which are free, abundant and readily accessible. Such systems can meet the thermal needs of buildings while at the same time stabilizing the grid power demand, thus reducing the need for using fossil-fuelled peaking power generators. The heat pump maintains the temperature of the periphery at the ambient ground temperature so very little energy is lost during storage.

  7. A Comprehensive Plan for Global Energy Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, T.

    2009-05-01

    There is no dearth of information regarding the grave crises faced by humanity in the 21st century. There is also growing consensus that the wholesale burning of fossil fuels must come to an end, either because of climate change or other still-salient reasons such as air pollution or major conflicts over dwindling reserves of cheaply recoverable oil and gas resources. At the same time, global demographics predict with disquieting certainty a world with up to 9 or 10 billion souls by mid-century. The vast expansion of energy consumption that this population represents, along with further increases in already-unacceptable levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, demands that we quickly develop almost limitless sources of clean, economical power. What is sorely lacking in the public debate are realistic solutions. Expanding wind and solar generating capacity is an important near-term goal, but neither of these technologies represents a viable solution for generating base load power at the vast scales that will be required. Energy efficiency measures are likewise well-directed, but the combination of rising population along with increasingly energy-intensive economic activity by the large fraction of Earth's current population residing in developing nations suggests that absolute energy demand will continue to rise even with radically improved energy efficiency. Fortunately we have the technologies available to provide virtually unlimited clean energy, and to utilize and recycle our resources so that everyone can improve their standard of living. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), developed at the Argonne National Laboratory in the 80's and 90's and currently championed by General Electric, is a technology that fills the bill on every count, and then some. IFRs are safe, environmentally clean, economical, and free of conflict over fuel supply. IFRs can safely consume as fuel the nuclear waste from the current installed base of light-water reactors

  8. A gloomy future for energy - can we afford nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmet, L.; Svensson, B.

    1977-01-01

    Should Sweden continue in the nuclear club or instead look for alternative sources of energy. The answer to this question is perhaps that nuclear energy will become too expensive. This, at least, is indicated by the rapid cost increases in the whole nuclear-fuel cycle in recent years. (H.E.G.)

  9. Toward a Low-Carbon Economy : Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Review

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energy and energy efficiency projects continue to perform strongly in the World Bank Group (WBG) energy portfolio and are increasingly being mainstreamed in the WBG's energy lending. In fiscal 2007 a total of US$1,433 million supported 63 renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in 32 countries. In addition to operational activities, the WBG engages in a variety of economic sector work and technical assistance focused on renewable energy and energy efficiency. This work is an...

  10. A closed-loop energy price controlling method for real-time energy balancing in a smart grid energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagoz, B. Baykant; Kaygusuz, Asim; Akcin, Murat; Alagoz, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Future smart grids will require a flexible, observable, and controllable network for reliable and efficient energy delivery under uncertain generation and demand conditions. One of the mechanisms for efficient and reliable energy generation is dynamic demand-responsive generation management based on energy price adjustments that creates a balance in energy markets. This study presents a closed-loop PID (proportional–integral–derivative) controller-based price control method for autonomous and real-time balancing of energy demand and generation in smart grid electricity markets. The PID control system can regulate energy prices online to respond dynamically and instantaneously to the varying energy demands of grid consumers. Independent energy suppliers in the smart grid decide whether to sell their energy to the grid according to the energy prices declared by the closed-loop PID controller system. Energy market simulations demonstrate that PID-controlled energy price regulation can effectively maintain an energy balance for hourly demand fluctuations of consumers. - Highlights: • This study presents a control theoretic approach for management of energy balance. • A closed-loop PID controller-based price controlling method is used in smart grid. • The simulation results demonstrate advantages of PID-based energy price control. • This method is appropriate for demand responsive management of smart grid markets

  11. Tapping a new energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sable Offshore Energy Project is one of Canada's largest construction projects which is bringing a new industry to Nova Scotia. A five-party consortium comprised of Mobil Oil Canada, Shell Canada, Imperial Oil, Nova Scotia Resources and Mosbacher, has formed an enterprise called Sable Offshore Energy Inc. The consortium plans to bring natural gas to markets in Canada and the United States before the end of 1999. The Santa Fe Galaxy II is one of the world's most modern marine all-weather drilling rigs that will soon begin the drilling of wells. Once in production, the project will produce half a billion cubic feet of natural gas daily from three production platforms that will tap three separate undersea natural gas fields. The gas will then be transported 200 km to shore near Goldboro, Nova Scotia, through an undersea pipeline. There, it will be treated to remove any remaining water and to separate liquid natural gas from the gas proper. The natural gas liquids will then be carried by an onshore pipeline to a new facility at Point Tupper where they will be processed into propane, butane and condensate. There will be enough gas to meet the potential demand in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Large urban centres such as Halifax and Saint John will be served by secondary lines that branch off the main pipeline, but developing smaller markets will take time because the necessary infrastructure does not yet exist. The project has already created thousands of jobs in the province. 5 figs

  12. National energy data profile - Brazil 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a more detailed study on the chances of further developing the clean brazilian energy matrix up to the year of 2030. The report intends to discuss the options compatible with Brazilian energy resources and existing viable technologies. The report also forecasts data on energy up to the year of 2030, concerned to the fields of energy supply, processing sector and demand

  13. Nuclear energy in Romania - a road to energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Lucaciu, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Program in Romania is a part of the national and European energy policy: sustainable development, security of energy supply and competitiveness; Romania has a proven experience in construction, commissioning and operation of NPPs, as well as the necessary support infrastructure: Unit 2 completion represents the major project of Nuclearelectrica during its first decade of existence; Innovative approach of Nuclearelectrica related is applied to Cernavoda NPP Units 3 and 4 completion: Major project for the second decade of company life; Risks management and allocation – major tool for project management and financing closure; Support from the political class is crucial, considering that the completion of such projects are covering more than one elections cycle

  14. Implementation of a sustainable energy plantation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bassam, N.; Bacher, W.

    2000-01-01

    Renewable energy sources should be developed to form the foundation of the global energy structure in the future. This is related to the shortage of fossil energy resources, the greenhouse effects, the increasing number of world's population and the increasing demand for energy and food. Fuels derived from energy crops are not only potentially renewable, but are also sufficiently similar in origin to the fossil fuels to provide direct substitution. They can be converted into a wide variety of energy carriers. Together with solar- and wind technique, adequate energy supply can be to meet the demand of people in rural regions. The concept of Integrated Energy Farms (IEF) has been developed and described in this contribution which includes a decentralised living area from which the daily necessities (food and energy) can be produced directly on-site for approximately 700 people. The area needed to produce biofuels will not exceed 10 % of the whole farm area. (Author)

  15. Deciphering energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this book, the author aims at giving some explanations about the various terms regarding energy which are present in our everyday life, in speeches, in papers and magazines, on the air, in our energy bills, for instance: energy poverty, price of a barrel of oil, resources and proved reserves, intermittency and energy storage, fossil and renewable energies, and so on. In a first part, the author addresses issues ranging from the development needs of a society to the energy assessment of a country, i.e.: nature and quantity of needs in services provided by energy, analysis of the required quantity of energy products needed to satisfy these needs, stages between primary resources and service delivery, description of the French consumption of available final energy products (per product and per economic sector). In the second part, he addresses energy supply, energy sectors and environmental issues, thus focusing on the front end of the energy system, i.e. ways of production from primary energy resources to final energy products: main physical characteristics and description of the different fissile, fossil and renewable energies, description of the main sectors of production of final energy products (fuels, electricity, heat) with a specific attention to electricity. In this part, local, regional and global environmental issues related to the exploitation of these energy sectors are discussed: sources of atmospheric pollution related to energy, relationship between energy and global warming, role of the different greenhouse gases emitted by these sectors, and quantitative analysis of these emissions. The third part addresses the economy of energy systems. The author proposes a cost assessment method which can be used for the production analysis as well as the economic analysis of a specific energy product. He also described external costs and profits, and methods to take those hidden costs and profits into account. Other economic tools are discussed and compared

  16. Global Energy Assessment. Toward a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, T B; Nakicenovic, N; Patwardhan, A; Gomez-Echeverri, L [eds.

    2012-11-01

    The Global Energy Assessment (GEA) brings together over 300 international researchers to provide an independent, scientifically based, integrated and policy-relevant analysis of current and emerging energy issues and options. It has been peer-reviewed anonymously by an additional 200 international experts. The GEA assesses the major global challenges for sustainable development and their linkages to energy; the technologies and resources available for providing energy services; future energy systems that address the major challenges; and the policies and other measures that are needed to realize transformational change toward sustainable energy futures. The GEA goes beyond existing studies on energy issues by presenting a comprehensive and integrated analysis of energy challenges, opportunities and strategies, for developing, industrialized and emerging economies. This volume is an invaluable resource for energy specialists and technologists in all sectors (academia, industry and government) as well as policymakers, development economists and practitioners in international organizations and national governments.

  17. Energy Needs and Environmental Demand - Seen from a Banker's Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietmeyer, Hans

    1998-01-01

    This presentation was given by the president of the Deutschen Bundesbank, who is also Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the German Federal Environmental Foundation. He said that the current low oil price had contributed to slow down the worldwide rise in prices at the various levels. The development in Japan is very important for Asia as a whole. Early stabilization of the economic and financial situation in Russia is very important for the world economy. The situation may be difficult in Southeast Asia and in the former Soviet states. But in other areas the world economy is doing well. The crisis countries must put their financial sectors in order, which involves financial restructuring and the creation of viable supervision systems and market economy conditions. Climate and environmental considerations must be borne in mind in the future progress of national and international energy policy. In the long run, more energy must come from renewable energy sources and the total energy consumption must go down. Many petroleum groups and energy suppliers are already investing substantial sums in solar energy. The German Government is sponsoring renewable energy sources by a number of programmes. Energy conservation is the simplest and cheapest way of protecting the climate and conserving resources. The idea that all energy should be renewable is a pipe dream of the future

  18. A multivariate-utility approach for selection of energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S; Husseiny, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    A deterministic approach is devised to compare the safety features of various energy sources. The approach is based on multiattribute utility theory. The method is used in evaluating the safety aspects of alternative energy sources used for the production of electrical energy. Four alternative energy sources are chosen which could be considered for the production of electricity to meet the national energy demand. These are nuclear, coal, solar, and geothermal energy. For simplicity, a total electrical system is considered in each case. A computer code is developed to evaluate the overall utility function for each alternative from the utility patterns corresponding to 23 energy attributes, mostly related to safety. The model can accommodate other attributes assuming that these are independent. The technique is kept flexible so that virtually any decision problem with various attributes can be attacked and optimal decisions can be reached. The selected data resulted in preference of geothermal and nuclear energy over other sources, and the method is found viable in making decisions on energy uses based on quantified and subjective attributes. (author)

  19. Thermal energy accumulators. A bibliographical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlety, Paul

    1971-01-01

    Energy storage is a challenge, notably for spacecraft, submarines and non-polluting automotive vehicles. After a comparison of mass energies of different principles of energy accumulation (magnetic, electrostatic, solid elasticity, kinetic energy, gaseous elasticity, electro-chemistry, sensitive heat, freezing heat, fuels, radioactivity, nuclear fission or fusion, mass energy), the author discusses the choice of thermal storage, presents the main bodies used for thermal energy accumulation (molten salts such as lithium hydride or lithium salt eutectics, or other compounds such as alumina, paraffins), and gives an overview of the main theoretical problems [fr

  20. Energy accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, G.A. de.

    1981-01-01

    G.A. de Boer reacts to recently published criticism of his contribution to a report entitled 'Commentaar op het boek 'Tussen Kernenergie en Kolen. Een Analyse' van ir. J.W. Storm van Leeuwen' (Commentary on the book 'Nuclear Energy versus Coal. An Analysis by ir. J.W. Storm van Leeuwen), published by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs. The contribution (Appendix B) deals with energy analyses. He justifies his arguments for using energy accountancy for assessing different methods of producing electricity, and explains that it is simply an alternative to purely economic methods. The energy conversion yield (ratio of energy produced to energy required) is tabulated for different sources. De Boer emphasises that his article purposely discusses among other things, definitions, forms of energy, the limits of the systems, the conversion of money into energy and the definition of the energy yield at length, in order to prevent misunderstandings. (C.F.)

  1. The renewable energies: a topical issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    This document analyzes the situation of the renewable energies in the french energy sector. The first part presents the part of the renewable energies in the energy production and consumption, their interest in the fight against the climatic change and in the employment creation. The second part details for each renewable energy source the government policy in favor their development and the legislative framework. The third part provides data on cost, CO 2 emissions, life cycle and employments to illustrate the analysis. The last part presents the government objectives of the renewable energies development for 2010. (A.L.B.)

  2. Energy analysis of a supermarket refrigeration system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Munch; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    From 1995 to 1998, an energy test method for supermarket refrigeration systems was developed in a project financed by the Danish Energy Agency. The purpose of the energy test method is to provide the means for evaluating the energy efficiency of these systems. The test method requires measurements...... of air temperatures and energy consumption to be carried out on the selected supermarket refrigeration system. In addition to the measurements required by the method, more measurements of individual energy consumptions have been carried in the case described in this paper. The purpose of the additional...

  3. Renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghmans, J.

    1994-01-01

    Renewable energy sources have a small environmental impact and can be easily integrated within existing structures. Moreover, the use of renewable energy sources can contribute to achieve a zero emission of carbon dioxide by 2100, provided an efficient environmental policy during the next 40 years. This includes a correct pricing policy of renewable energy sources with respect to nuclear energy and fossil fuel. The latter energy sources have been favoured in the past. In addition, an open market policy, the restructuring or conversion of existing international energy institutes, and international treaties for the protection of the natural environment are needed in view of achieving the zero carbon dioxide emission objective. (A.S.)

  4. Alternative energy review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    A review is presented of electricity generation technologies which are considered to be alternatives to more conventional technologies. The review is limited to those technologies which have application in Ontario, and provides descriptions, technical and economic assessments, environmental information, and forecasts of potential use of solar energy, wind energy, fuel cells, biomass energy, peat, and municipal solid wastes. Of these technologies, only municipal solid waste combustion is economically viable under current conditions, but government policies prohibit the implementation of new facilities. Certain photovoltaic and wind energy technologies are being found viable for remote sites unconnected to the power grid. Wood waste combustion is viable in the forest products industry. The total potential contribution of these six alternative technologies to Ontario's energy production is forecast at under 190 MW to a range of 685-1,465 MW by the year 2005, according to three different scenarios. The technologies showing the greatest future promise are fuel cells, photovoltaics, and biomass. Except for municipal waste combustion, cost continues to be a significant barrier to utility-scale application of alternative generation technologies in Ontario. However, private individuals and corporations (non-utility generators) may adopt some of these technologies in the absence of access to the power grid, in cogeneration applications, or for demonstration purposes. 120 refs., 79 figs., 93 tabs

  5. A broadened typology on energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    A broadened typology describing the interconnection between energy and security is developed in this paper, with the aim of improving understanding of the relationship between energy and security by applying different research and policy perspectives. One approach involves studying energy as an object exposed to security threats, using concepts such as security of supply or security of demand. Another approach involves studying the role of the energy system as the subject in generating or enhancing insecurity. The latter approach includes studying the conflict-generating potential inherent in the economic value of energy, the risk of accidents and antagonistic attacks to energy infrastructure and the security risks related to the negative environmental impact of the energy system. In order to make a comprehensive analysis of the security consequences of proposed energy policies or strategies, all these aspects should be taken into account to varying degrees. The typology proposed here could be a valuable tool for ensuring that all security aspects have been considered. - Highlights: • The paper presents a broadened typology of energy and security, useful for policy analysis. • The energy system can be an object for security threats and as a subject generating or contributing to insecurity. • Energy as an object for security threats includes the concepts of security of supply and security of demand. • The economic value of energy can contribute to insecurity. • Technological and environmental risks of specific energy systems also provide potential threats to human security

  6. A vision for a continental energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.; Tobin, B.; Angevine, G.; Fryer, K.; Martin, L.T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presented a vision with respect to a continental energy strategy and the principles and goals that must underlie such a strategy. These principles include relying on signals emanating from energy markets to guide investment; limiting the role of government to that of ensuring that the policy and institutional framework is conducive to the development and operation of competitive and innovative energy markets; and ensuring free and open energy trade in energy commodities, both within the continent and with the rest of the world. The paper also identified a number of important factors that, would shape and condition continental energy development and trade. The paper provided an overview of the North American energy use and supply situation for the following resources: oil; natural gas; electricity; coal; nuclear power; hydroelectricity; geothermal energy; wind power; solar power; and ethanol. It also discussed the contribution of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) through increased natural gas exports. It was concluded that given the petroleum resources of the three countries and their increased value because of higher oil and gas prices, there was considerable incentive for Canada, the United States, and Mexico to streamline regulations in order to facilitate the efficient development, transportation, and use of the continent's energy resources in accordance with market conditions. 38 refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs

  7. Controller for a wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David G.; Bull, Diana L.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2015-09-22

    A wave energy converter (WEC) is described, the WEC including a power take off (PTO) that converts relative motion of bodies of the WEC into electrical energy. A controller controls operation of the PTO, causing the PTO to act as a motor to widen a wave frequency spectrum that is usable to generate electrical energy.

  8. Italy: a national energy strategy in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaes, Joel

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the status and perspectives of the Italian energy policy. It outlines that this policy has known many changes during the past decades. The country has been depending for years on oil imports and on electricity imports from its neighbours even though ENI and ENEL are major world actors. It had chosen nuclear energy to gain independence until the Chernobyl accident which resulted in a moratorium. On the side of renewable energies, Italy has notably developed geothermal energy, and possesses an important hydraulic energy fleet, while solar photovoltaic and wind energy started their development rather late and still at a rather slow pace. Thus, a new energy strategy has been implemented in 2012 with some main objectives: reduction of energy costs, meeting of European objectives regarding energy and climate, improvement of energy supply security and of energy independence, and development of a sustainable economy through the development of the energy sector. This strategy resulted in very good results in terms of energy efficiency, and of growth rate for the photovoltaic sector

  9. Measuring energy security. A conceptual note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frondel, Manuel; Schmidt, Christoph M.

    2008-11-06

    Along with the oil price, concerns about the security of energy supply have soared once again in recent years.Yet, more than 30 years after the OPEC oil embargo in 1973, energy security still remains a diffuse concept. This paper conceives a statistical indicator that aims at characterizing the energy supply risk of nations that are heavily dependent on energy imports. Our indicator condenses the bulk of empirical information on the imports of fossil fuels originating from a multitude of export countries as well as data on the indigenous contribution to the domestic energy supply into a single parameter. Applying the proposed concept to empirical energy data on Germany and the U.S. (1980-2004), we find that there is a large gap in the energy supply risks between both countries, with Germany suffering much more from a tensed energy supply situation today than the U.S. (orig.)

  10. Energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the available sources of energy in the world is presented. About 80 percent of primary energy utilization is based on fossile fuels, and their dominant role is not expected to change in the foreseeable future. Data are given on petroleum, natural gas and coal based power production. The role and economic aspects of nuclear power are analyzed. A brief summary of renewable energy sources is presented. The future prospects of the world's energy resources are discussed, and the special position of Hungary regarding fossil, nuclear and renewable energy and the country's energy potential is evaluated. (R.P.)

  11. Tangible and fungible energy: Hybrid energy market and currency system for total energy management. A Masdar City case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouridis, Sgouris; Kennedy, Scott

    2010-01-01

    We propose the introduction of an energy-based parallel currency as a means to ease the transition to energy-conscious living. Abundant fossil energy resources mask the internal and external energy costs for casual energy consumers. This situation is challenging communities that draw a significant fraction of their primary energy consumption from renewable energy sources. The Masdar Energy Credit (MEC) system is a way of translating the fundamental aspects behind energy generation and usage into a tangible reality for all users with built-in fungibility to incentivize collectively sustainable behavior. The energy credit currency (ergo) corresponds with a chosen unit of energy so that the total amount of ergos issued equals the energy supply of the community. Ergos are distributed to users (residents, commercial entities, employees, and visitors) on a subscription basis and can be surrendered in exchange for the energy content of a service. A spot market pricing mechanism is introduced to relate ergos to 'fiat' currency using a continuously variable exchange rate to prevent depletion of the sustainable energy resource. The MEC system is intended to: (i) meet the sustainable energy balance targets of a community (ii) support peak shaving or load shifting goals, and (iii) raise energy awareness.

  12. China's Energy Equation: A Strategic Opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burke, James

    2001-01-01

    .... Continued economic growth, which is the key to China's future, is constrained by a skewed energy equation in which domestic and foreign energy supplies are far removed from China's burgeoning population...

  13. So watt? Energy: a citizens' affair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, B.; Gassin, H.; Testart, J.

    2005-02-01

    This book proposes a clear and well documented analysis of the energy debate, from the energy crisis to the climatic change. The authors explain that there is no possible CO 2 emissions abatement without energy mastery. The energy mastery must be decentralized, while the French energy policy, based on nuclear energy, is at the opposite. According to the authors, the energy independence of France is an utopia and France is dependent of fossil fuels like any other western country. Moreover, if the energy policy of some European countries is changing, the one of France remains the same. They try to analyze the reasons why our society is developing unsuitable and risky systems, and show how it would be possible to proceed differently. The key word of this demonstration is 'democracy' and a change is possible only if everyone acts as a citizen of a common world. (J.S.)

  14. A review of energy in Rwanda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Bonfils [Department of Physics, National University of Rwanda, P.O. Box 117, Huye District, South Province (Rwanda)

    2010-01-15

    During the last two decades, Rwanda has experienced an energy crisis mostly due to lack of investment in the energy sector. With the growing of the population and increasing industrialization in urban areas, energy provided by existing hydro and thermal power plants has been increasingly scarce with high energy costs, and energy instability. Furthermore, as wood fuel is the most important source of energy in Rwanda, the enduring dependence on it and fossil fuel consumption as well, will continue to impact on the process of environmental degradation. Rwanda is rich with abundant renewable energy resources such as methane gas in Lake Kivu, solar, biomass, geothermal; and wind energy resource is currently being explored. Recently, the Government has given priority to the extension of its national electrical grid through development of hydro power generation projects, and to rural energy through development of alternative energy projects for rural areas where access to national grid is still difficult. This paper presents a review of existing energy resources and energy applications in Rwanda. Recent developments on renewable energy are also presented. (author)

  15. Energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, W.

    1974-01-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  16. Energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefele, W [Nuclear Research Centre, Applied Systems Analysis and Reactor Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)

    1974-07-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  17. Towards a fossil free energy future. The next energy transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, M.; Greber, L.; Hall, J.; Bartels, C.; Bernow, S.; Hansen, E.; Raskin, P.; Von Hippel, D. (Stockholm Environment Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The report provides technical analysis and documentation as input to the Greenpeace project 'Towards a fossil free energy future'. It presents a main scenario and several variants for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the technical methods and assumptions used to develop them. The goal is to investigate the technical, economic and policy feasibility to phasing out fossil fuels over the next century as part of a strategy to avert unacceptably high levels or rates of global warming. 209 refs., 42 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. Geopolitics of energy in a transition world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, A.

    1995-01-01

    Here is a study about worldwide energy forecasting from an economic analysis of our days, in developed countries, and with a forecasting about energy demand in developing countries. Nuclear power, petroleum, natural gas, coal are studied. The problem of environment protection which help some energy like gas or be prejudicial to some other like coal is evoked. The most important question is about the formidable energy demand for south-east Asia countries and how it will be answered. 13 figs

  19. Energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a speech of the CEA's (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) general administrator about energy efficiency as a first rank challenge for the planet and for France, this publications proposes several contributions: a discussion of the efficiency of nuclear energy, an economic analysis of R and D's value in the field of fourth generation fast reactors, discussions about biofuels and the relationship between energy efficiency and economic competitiveness, and a discussion about solar photovoltaic efficiency

  20. Sociologies of energy. Towards a research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Ariztía

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a panoramic view of the field of the social studies of energy while introducing the articles of the special issue. It begins by discussing the progressive interest on studying the social aspects of energy. We relate this interest to the increasing challenges imposed by global climate change as well as the growing sociological attention to the material dimension of social life. The article suggests understanding energy and energy related phenomena as a socio-technical object which involve material, social, cultural and technical elements. The article then briefly describes different research areas concerning the intersection between energy and society and present the contributions to the monograph. We suggest that the articles comprised in this special issue are not only relevant for social scientist interested on energy related issues; they might also help energy professionals and researchers from outside the social sciences to further problematize the social aspects and challenges of energy.

  1. Energy infrastructure: hydrogen energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziroglu, T N

    1979-02-01

    In a hydrogen system, hydrogen is not a primary source of energy, but an intermediary, an energy carrier between the primary energy sources and the user. The new unconventional energy sources, such as nuclear breeder reactors, fusion reactors, direct solar radiation, wind energy, ocean thermal energy, and geothermal energy have their shortcomings. These shortcomings of the new sources point out to the need for an intermediary energy system to form the link between the primary energy sources and the user. In such a system, the intermediary energy form must be transportable and storable; economical to produce; and if possible renewable and pollution-free. The above prerequisites are best met by hydrogen. Hydrogen is plentiful in the form of water. It is the cheapest synthetic fuel to manufacture per unit of energy stored in it. It is the least polluting of all of the fuels, and is the lightest and recyclable. In the proposed system, hydrogen would be produced in large plants located away from the consumption centers at the sites where primary new energy sources and water are available. Hydrogen would then be transported to energy consumption centers where it would be used in every application where fossil fuels are being used today. Once such a system is established, it will never be necessary to change to any other energy system.

  2. Towards a Low Energy Society from me

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen; Christensen, Bente Lis

    The book is based on energy planning research at Technical University of Denmark. With 1980 as a base year, two possible scenarios for future development in Denmark are analysed and described with respect to technology used and life style practised. In a high-energy society the country's energy c...

  3. Agegraphic dark energy as a quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingfei; Liu, Hongya; Zhang, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a dark energy model characterized by the age of the universe, dubbed ''agegraphic dark energy'', was proposed by Cai. In this paper, a connection between the quintessence scalar-field and the agegraphic dark energy is established, and accordingly, the potential of the agegraphic quintessence field is constructed. (orig.)

  4. Energy audit for energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanetkar, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Energy audit is a very effective management tool for betterment of plant performance. The energy audit has a problem solving approach rather than a fault finding technique. The energy conservation is a rational use of energy. It has been the experience of the developed countries that energy is one issue which results into cost savings with relatively much less efforts/cost in comparison with other resources used in production, development and adoption of energy efficiency equipment and practices in most of production process has been the result of same technique. (author). 1 tab

  5. Comparing primary energy attributed to renewable energy with primary energy equivalent to determine carbon abatement in a national context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallachóir, Brian P O; O'Leary, Fergal; Bazilian, Morgan; Howley, Martin; McKeogh, Eamon J

    2006-01-01

    The current conventional approach to determining the primary energy associated with non-combustible renewable energy (RE) sources such as wind energy and hydro power is to equate the electricity generated from these sources with the primary energy supply. This paper compares this with an approach that was formerly used by the IEA, in which the primary energy equivalent attributed to renewable energy was equated with the fossil fuel energy it displaces. Difficulties with implementing this approach in a meaningful way for international comparisons lead to most international organisations abandoning the primary energy equivalent methodology. It has recently re-emerged in prominence however, as efforts grow to develop baseline procedures for quantifying the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions avoided by renewable energy within the context of the Kyoto Protocol credit trading mechanisms. This paper discusses the primary energy equivalent approach and in particular the distinctions between displacing fossil fuel energy in existing plant or in new plant. The approach is then extended provide insight into future primary energy displacement by renewable energy and to quantify the amount of CO2 emissions avoided by renewable energy. The usefulness of this approach in quantifying the benefits of renewable energy is also discussed in an energy policy context, with regard to increasing security of energy supply as well as reducing energy-related GHG (and other) emissions. The approach is applied in a national context and Ireland is case study country selected for this research. The choice of Ireland is interesting in two respects. The first relates to the high proportion of electricity only fossil fuel plants in Ireland resulting in a significant variation between primary energy and primary energy equivalent. The second concerns Ireland's poor performance to date in limiting GHG emissions in line with its Kyoto target and points to the need for techniques to quantify the potential

  6. Nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Wilmer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of nuclear energy are reviewed and assessed from a sustainable development perspective highlighting key economic, environmental and social issues, challenges and opportunities relevant for energy policy making.. The analysis covers the potential role of nuclear energy in increasing the human and man-made capital assets of the world while preserving its natural and environmental resource assets as well as issues to be addressed in order to enhance the contribution of nuclear energy to sustainable development goals. (author)

  7. The nuclear: a vital choice for energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper read from the platform of the 13th annual session of the International Agency of Atomic Energy is a plea in favour of the development of nuclear energy. The majority of the reports of enquiry conclude by underlining the sane and efficient character of nuclear reactors. To face up to the energy crisis, France has decided to increase tenfold its production of nuclear energy between 1975 and 1985 -Future prospects [fr

  8. A proposed programme for energy risk research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The report consists of two parts. Part I presents an overview of technological risk management, noting major contributions and current research needs. Part II details a proposed program of energy research, including discussions of some seven recommended projects. The proposed energy risk research program addresses two basic problem areas: improving the management of energy risks and energy risk communication and public response. Specific recommended projects are given for each. (Auth.)

  9. Architecture and Energy. Towards a broader Focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Michael; Marsh, Rob

     Architecture and Energy. Towards a broader focus. By Michael Lauring and Rob Marsh   In typical new Danish dwellings build according to the standards of the Building Regulations 2008 approximately 35% of the primary energy use is related to heat consumption divided into 23% room heating and 12% ...... & Hacker (2008): Bygninger, Energi, Klima. Mod et nyt paradigme.  Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut (Danish Building Research Institute). [2] Marsh, Larsen, Lauring & Christensen (2006): Arkitektur og energi. Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut (Danish Building Research Instititute)....

  10. IEA World Energy Outlook 2010-A comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    The World Energy Outlook 2010 is a comprehensive energy report issued by the IEA. It is rewritten annually to reflect the world's changing energy and economy realities; it also introduces new issues relevant to the energy sector. This year it dealt with Caspian Energy, Energy Poverty and Energy Subsidies. WEO is controversial in few aspects; it still promotes a 450 Scenario which has become out of reach. This year however it introduced a more realistic New Policies Scenario which will need a lot of good will and investments to accomplish. Governmental policies are going to chart future energy sector performance; increasingly this is becoming decided by non-OECD countries. A more pragmatic future energy outlook is needed to reflect developing countries priorities for growth and utilization of local resources and how to accommodate this with abatement priorities through energy efficiency measures and technologies. - Research highlights: → We critically review the findings of the IEA - World Energy Outlook 2010. → The main '450 Scenario' is no longer realistic. → Some of the other indicators like the Energy Development Index are also critically reviewed and improvements proposed.

  11. Energy in a state of shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Pastre, Olivier; Mestrallet, Gerard; Jouzel, Jean; Geoffron, Patrice; Boniface, Pascal; Lorenzi, Jean-Herve; Bornard, Pierre; Levitte, Jean-David; Jacquillat, Bertrand; Gallois, Louis; Gaymard, Clara; Perthuis, Christian de; Schwarz, Virginie; Lechevin, Bruno; Baud, Olivier; Moulin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The news concerning energy are in a continuous state of shock: falling oil prices, shale gas revolution in the US, energy transition policies, gas crisis between Russia and Ukraine, etc. The energy world is also facing major challenges, notably the climatic change. In its first part, this book presents in a highly pedagogical way, the key world energy data and their main economic, environmental and political related issues. Issues and perspectives are described for each energy system, with a particular interest in the European energy system and the future 'Energy Union' that is intended to secure the european energy supply. In the second part, the authors give the floor to twelve experts who raise alarm about the specific energy issue before the forthcoming COP 21 conference on climatic change in Paris: overview of the climatic change issue (by Jean Jouzel), energy transition policies in Europe (by Patrice Geoffron), the negotiations inside a hypothetical 'international community' (by Pascal Boniface), energy transition and financing, the green growth, giving a price to carbon, energy policy and democracy, etc

  12. Alternative energy sources or integrated alternative energy systems? Oil as a modern lance of Peleus for the energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szklo, Alexandre; Schaeffer, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    In this viewpoint, we discuss the importance of consorting alternative energy sources with oil, and not of opposing them. That is why we introduce the concept of alternative energy systems, which we feel is broader-ranging and more effective than alternative energy sources, as this deals with the actual transformation process of the global energy system. Alternative energy systems integrate oil with other energy sources and pave the way for new systems, which will benefit from what we call the 'virtues of oil'. They produce energy carriers for multi-fuel and multi-product strategies, where flexibility is a key target, allied to other co-benefits, especially those related to the increased use of renewable energy sources. The concept of alternative energy systems can bring a new light to the oil transition era discussion and might also influence energy policies for promoting renewables

  13. Energy management of a large estate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oughton, R J

    1986-01-01

    The paper outlines energy management of the Property Services Agency (PSA) estate, which has been pursued since 1972. PSA's current expenditure on energy in buildings is Pound 235M per annum (1983-1984), and while energy management has been in operation the aggregate annual saving achieved across the civil and armed services estate is estimated at 33%. The development of energy management is described; the initial organisation concentrated on the existing estate. An Energy Database was generated for the whole of the civil estate and routine monitoring and targetting of consumption was instituted. Regional Energy Conservation Officers were appointed with responsibilities for energy management of defined areas of the estate and a headquarters group was set up to direct the campaign and determine policy. The funding of all energy efficiency applications depends on a favourable value analysis. The calculations used in establishing investment priorities were based on CIBSE (Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers) methods. This was quickly followed by the introduction of design techniques to promote energy efficiency in new building work. The use of Design Energy Targets is a prominent feature. Over the period to date an in-house training programme in energy conservation has been established for technical staff involved in building design and operation and for general staff. An expanding range of in-house publications on energy efficiency is also available.

  14. Energy economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Develi, Abdulkadir; Kaynak, Selahattin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    Energy resources, the basic input in every area of the economy, have a fundamental function for society's welfare. Traditional energy resources are, however, rapidly decreasing. Energy supply has been falling behind in meeting global demand, and is causing increased focus on efficiency and economy concepts in recent energy policies. Since the existing energy resources are not spread evenly among the countries, but instead are concentrated in certain regions and countries, a monopolistic situation arises. Equally, supply assurance is an issue, since the energy supply is held by certain regions and countries who have monopolistic pricing power. Both the EU and many other countries are studying how to marketize energy. This book focuses on the importance of energy and the problems posed by it. It will be useful for the academic community, related sectors and decision makers.

  15. Energy conservation. A goal for Albertans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, L

    1988-01-01

    In late 1985, the Public Advisory Committees to the Environmental Council of Alberta began working toward a draft conservation strategy for Alberta. A prospectus was published and meetings and workshops held, the goal being a conservation strategy in place by 1992. This report is one of a series of discussion papers on relevant sectors such as agriculture, fish and wildlife, tourism, and various specific energy sources. This report focuses on energy use in general in the province, including the role of energy conservation in a conservation strategy, the potential for energy conservation, barriers, actions to encourage conservation, the impacts of conserving energy, and the next steps to take. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Marine Renewable Energy Seascape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair G.L. Borthwick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy production based on fossil fuel reserves is largely responsible for carbon emissions, and hence global warming. The planet needs concerted action to reduce fossil fuel usage and to implement carbon mitigation measures. Ocean energy has huge potential, but there are major interdisciplinary problems to be overcome regarding technology, cost reduction, investment, environmental impact, governance, and so forth. This article briefly reviews ocean energy production from offshore wind, tidal stream, ocean current, tidal range, wave, thermal, salinity gradients, and biomass sources. Future areas of research and development are outlined that could make exploitation of the marine renewable energy (MRE seascape a viable proposition; these areas include energy storage, advanced materials, robotics, and informatics. The article concludes with a sustainability perspective on the MRE seascape encompassing ethics, legislation, the regulatory environment, governance and consenting, economic, social, and environmental constraints. A new generation of engineers is needed with the ingenuity and spirit of adventure to meet the global challenge posed by MRE.

  17. A review on global wind energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidur, R.; Islam, M.R.; Rahim, N.A.; Solangi, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing negative effects of fossil fuel combustion on the environment in addition to limited stock of fossil fuel have forced many countries to inquire into and change to environmentally friendly alternatives that are renewable to sustain the increasing energy demand. Energy policy plays a vital role to mitigate the impacts of global warming and crisis of energy availability. This paper explores the wind energy industry from the point of view of the wind energy policy. It is noticed that energy policy could help increasing wind power generation as well as stimulating the energy industry. It may be stated that without specific energy policy, a country would not be able to solve the acute problems like reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission, scarcity of energy, etc. This paper discussed the existing successful energy policies for few selected countries. Based on literatures, it has been found that FIT, RPS, incentives, pricing law and Quota system are the most useful energy policies practiced by many countries around the world. Then, status of wind energy policy for Malaysia was investigated and compared with few selected countries around the world. (author)

  18. Energy consumption and energy prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Data are presented on energy consumption and energy prices related to a number of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) lands covering the period 1951-1990. The information sources are described and the development of energy consumption and prices in Denmark are illustrated in relation to these other countries. The energy intensity (the relation between energy consumption and the gross national product) is dealt with. Here it is possible to follow development during the whole post-war period. It is generally understood that Denmark saved large amounts of energy after 1973-74 but, taken over the whole post-war period, savings and decline in energy-gross national product relations are less dramatic compared to conditions in other OECD countries. Energy coefficients or elasticities show the relative rise in consumption compared to the relative rise in gross national product (growth rate). This is shown to be typically unstable and an eventual connection with the amount of energy price increase and/or the growth rate of the national economy is considered. Results of Granger causuality tests on energy consumption, national income and energy prices are presented. Effective energy prices were very low in Denmark up to 1970 when they suddenly began to increase. Since the oil crisis Denmark's energy consumption has fallen whereas the other countries have used rather more energy than before. Effective promotion of energy savings must be seen in relation to the fact that the 1970 basis level of energy consumption and intensity was unusually high. The high effective energy prices have also encouraged energy savings in Denmark. (AB)

  19. Nuclear energy, radiation and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, energy has been the subject of much debate. Energy is the backbone of technology and economic development. Today, most machines run on electricity and they are needed to make anything and everything. Hence, our energy requirements have spiraled in the years following the industrial revolution. This rapid increase in use of energy has created problems of demand and supply in addition to the environmental consciousness which picked momentum in last decades of 20 th century. The impending crisis the world over due to overuse of nonrenewable energy sources to reduce this gap shall soon lead to a situation for all concerned to take a prudent decision to tap other sources of energy, including relatively new renewable sources. Future economic growth crucially depends on the long-term availability of energy from sources that are affordable, accessible and environmentally friendly. The drive for more energy has had the happy consequences of spawning new technologies and improving earlier ones. Emphasis on renewable sources has resulted in viable harnessing of solar, wind and tidal energies. Even though these sources offer relatively clean energy, their potential to supply reliable energy in large scale in an economically viable way is limited. Nuclear energy offers a major source of commercial energy, which is economic, reliable and environmentally benign

  20. Energy Statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    For the years 1992 and 1993, part of the figures shown in the tables of the Energy Review are preliminary or estimated. The annual statistics of the Energy Review appear in more detail from the publication Energiatilastot - Energy Statistics issued annually, which also includes historical time series over a longer period. The tables and figures shown in this publication are: Changes in the volume of GNP and energy consumption; Coal consumption; Natural gas consumption; Peat consumption; Domestic oil deliveries; Import prices of oil; Price development of principal oil products; Fuel prices for power production; Total energy consumption by source; Electricity supply; Energy imports by country of origin in 1993; Energy exports by recipient country in 1993; Consumer prices of liquid fuels; Consumer prices of hard coal and natural gas, prices of indigenous fuels; Average electricity price by type of consumer; Price of district heating by type of consumer and Excise taxes and turnover taxes included in consumer prices of some energy sources

  1. Energy trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, K.; Schroeter, S.

    2009-01-01

    Two brief articles and two interviews deal with the subject of energy trading. Power and gas exchanges in Europe multiply, but, experts say, we are nowhere near a mature, integrated European energy market as yet. Trading regulations need to be improved and harmonised and interconnections expanded. European Energy Review assesses the state of energy trading in Europe and interviews the ceo's of NordPool (the Nordic power exchange) and APX (Amsterdam Power Exchange)

  2. Effective energy storage from a triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Wang, Jie; Wang, Sihong; Li, Shengming; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-03-11

    To sustainably power electronics by harvesting mechanical energy using nanogenerators, energy storage is essential to supply a regulated and stable electric output, which is traditionally realized by a direct connection between the two components through a rectifier. However, this may lead to low energy-storage efficiency. Here, we rationally design a charging cycle to maximize energy-storage efficiency by modulating the charge flow in the system, which is demonstrated on a triboelectric nanogenerator by adding a motion-triggered switch. Both theoretical and experimental comparisons show that the designed charging cycle can enhance the charging rate, improve the maximum energy-storage efficiency by up to 50% and promote the saturation voltage by at least a factor of two. This represents a progress to effectively store the energy harvested by nanogenerators with the aim to utilize ambient mechanical energy to drive portable/wearable/implantable electronics.

  3. A high energy physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional open-quotes Hidden Symmetries close quotes are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover open-quotes New Physicsclose quotes associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given

  4. Nuclear energy and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy and the renewable energies namely: solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy and biomass are complementary. They are not polluting and they are expected to develop in the future to replace the fossil fuels

  5. Energy from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K.J. (Tate and Lyle, Ltd., Reading, England); Vlitos, A.J.; Coombs, J.

    1983-09-01

    The most-abundant biomass is wood, of which cellulose is a major component. Burning releases directly as heat, solar energy which has been stored in the wood as a result of the process of photosynthesis. It is also possible to convert cellulose to simple sugars which may be fermented to ethanol, a more convenient source of energy as a fuel for internal combustion engines; alternatively, wood may be gasified at high temperature in the presence of steam. The resulting synthesis gas can be catalytically converted into methanol. Neither route to a liquid fuel from cellulosic residues has yet been proved economically feasible. However, alcoholic fermentation of sugar, or glucose obtained by the hydrolysis of starch may provide a commercially viable process for the production of fuel alcohol. Both sugar and starch are agricultural food products which are obtained from cane sugar, maize and cassava. Other sources of fermentable sugars and starch include pineapple, sweet sorghum, sago palm, yams and other root crops. The energy input required to grow and process agricultural products may be greater than the energy yield in the form of anhydrous fermentation alcohol. As a consequence, only sugar cane and possibly sweet sorghum can be regarded as giving a net positive energy yield. Maize and, on a more-limited scale, cassava, may provide a viable process, given an additional source of low-grade energy, as is evident from the successful exploitation of these crops for fuel-alcohol production in the US and Brazil. 31 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  7. Energy taxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    This study presents the energy taxation, as an energy policy tool, applied to the fossil fuels and to the electric power. Taxes, tax revenue and taxation in function of the energy content or the carbon content are discussed. Many tables and statistical data illustrate this analysis and allow the comparison with other countries in Europe. (A.L.B.)

  8. Wind energy in a global world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler Jensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    For the past 25 years there has been a dramatic development in the wind energy sector, with regard to the increase in overall utilisation of wind energy as well as technological development, the development of markets and expectations to the role of wind energy in the global electricity supply...... system. The purpose of this paper is to outline developments in the global capacity of wind energy this past quarter of a century, including technology, market aspects, scientific developments, testing and certification, formulation of standards and scenarios for the future development of wind energy...

  9. Prospects for sustainable energy: a critical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassedy, E.S. Jr

    2000-04-01

    This book explores the historical origins, technical features, marketability, and environmental impacts of the complete range of sustainable energy technologies: solar, biomass, wind, hydropower, geothermal power, ocean-energy sources, solar-derived hydrogen fuel, and energy storage. The aim is to inform policy analysts and decision makers of the options available for sustainable energy production. The book is therefore written so as to be accessible to an audience from a broad range of backgrounds and scientific training. It will also be a valuable supplementary text for advanced courses in environmental studies, energy economics and policy, and engineering

  10. A renewable energy strategy for Lao PDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milattanapheng, Chantho; Sysoulath, Hatsady; Green, Joanta; Kurukulasuriya, Mahinda

    2010-09-15

    The Government of Lao PDR (GoL) has set up the vision to 2020 ''to secure an adequate power supply throughout the country to facilitate national socio-economic development objectives in an environmentally sustainable manner''. To ensure achieving this goal, the government institutions have introduced various policies and strategies for supporting energy sector development. Lao PDR is in the process of developing a renewable energy strategy. A renewable energy strategy would facilitate the increase in the overall use and more effective use of renewable energy. This paper will discuss the salient points of the new renewable energy strategy.

  11. Planning for a 100% independent energy system based on smart energy storage for integration of renewables and CO2 emissions reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajačić, Goran; Duić, Neven; Zmijarević, Zlatko

    2011-01-01

    Energy, Buildings as Positive Power Plants, Energy Storage and Smart grids in combination with Plug-in Vehicles. All these pillars must be supported by the use of smart energy storage. The results of previous research has shown that in order to increase security, efficiency and viability, there is need...... for energy storage, in primary or secondary form, in order to transfer energy surplus from period of excess to the period when there is a lack. The problem of today’s storage systems is that they increase the cost of already expensive, distributed and renewable energy sources. That makes the large scale use...... of storage systems even less economically viable in market circumstances, despite economics of scale. The paper shows results of an energy planning methodology applied to several cases where use of smart energy storage system helps integration of energy flows, transformations and energy demand...

  12. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  13. Energy 93, energy in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilo, D.; Bar Mashiah, D.; Er-El, J.

    1993-01-01

    For the first time this report includes a chapter entitles 'energy and peace'. Following is an overview of israel's energy economy and some principal initiatives in its various sectors during 1992/93 period. 46 figs, 13 tabs

  14. A Review of Energy Storage Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David

    2010-01-01

    A brief examination into the energy storage techniques currently available for the integration of fluctuating renewable energy was carried out. These included Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage (PHES), Underground Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage (UPHES), Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES...... than PHES depending on the availability of suitable sites. FBES could also be utilised in the future for the integration of wind, but it may not have the scale required to exist along with electric vehicles. The remaining technologies will most likely be used for their current applications...

  15. Energy crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    From energy policy to the problem of public acceptance of nuclear power, problems like energy supply, energy strategies, the race of industrial countries for the short energy reserves, the West German energy demand until the year 2.000, energy conservation, and the controversy over increased use of nuclear energy are reviewed. (GL) [de

  16. Guidelines for a sustainable energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maichel, G.; Klemmer, P.; Voss, A.; Grill, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    The publication contains four contributions of four different authors which elaborate the role, functions and capabilities of policymakers, the energy industry, and the population (consumers) in the process of designing, implementing, enforcing and accepting the paradigms and the framework conditions that will initiate and finally support in concrete terms a transition towards sustainable development in the context of energy demand and energy consumption in Europe. The titles of the four contributions (translated for the purpose of this abstract) are: 1. Regulatory policy and/or a free market system in the energy sector. 2. Self-commitments and self-regulatory approaches in the energy industry. 3. What does it take to establish a system of sustainable energy supply? 4. For an energy policy fit for the future in the 21. century. (orig./CB) [de

  17. Energy efficiency improvement potentials and a low energy demand scenario for the global industrial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Graus, Wina H J; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of energy efficiency measures can significantly reduce industrial energy use. This study estimates the future industrial energy consumption under two energy demand scenarios: (1) a reference scenario that follows business as usual trends and (2) a low energy demand scenario that takes

  18. A simple dynamic energy capacity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gander, James P.

    2012-01-01

    I develop a simple dynamic model showing how total energy capacity is allocated to two different uses and how these uses and their corresponding energy flows are related and behave through time. The control variable of the model determines the allocation. All the variables of the model are in terms of a composite energy equivalent measured in BTU's. A key focus is on the shadow price of energy capacity and its behavior through time. Another key focus is on the behavior of the control variable that determines the allocation of overall energy capacity. The matching or linking of the model's variables to real world U.S. energy data is undertaken. In spite of some limitations of the data, the model and its behavior fit the data fairly well. Some energy policy implications are discussed. - Highlights: ► The model shows how energy capacity is allocated to current output production versus added energy capacity production. ► Two variables in the allocation are the shadow price of capacity and the control variable that determines the allocation. ► The model was linked to U.S. historical energy data and fit the data quite well. ► In particular, the policy control variable was cyclical and consistent with the model. ► Policy implications relevant to the allocation of energy capacity are discussed briefly.

  19. Energy catastrophes and energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of energy catastrophes in the production of energy serves to make estimation of the true social costs of energy production difficult. As a result, there is a distinct possibility that the private marginal cost curve of energy producers lies to the left or right of the true cost curve. If so, social welfare will not be maximized, and underconsumption or overconsumption of fuels will exist. The occurrence of energy catastrophes and observance of the market reaction to these occurrences indicates that overconsumption of energy has been the case in the past. Postulations as to market reactions to further energy catastrophes lead to the presumption that energy consumption levels remain above those that are socially optimal

  20. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  1. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  2. Savings impact of a corporate energy manager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, B.D.; O'Donnell, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the cost savings impact of employing an energy manager with a 16,000-employee corporation. The corporation, Canada's second largest airline, is currently operating nearly 3,000,000 ft 2 of mixed-use facilities spread across the country, with an annual energy budget for ground facilities of over Cdn $4,000,000. This paper outlines the methodology used by the energy manager to deploy an energy management program over a two-year period between April 1995 and May 1997. The paper examines the successes and the lessons learned during the period and summarizes the costs and benefits of the program. The energy manager position was responsible for developing an energy history database with more than 100 active accounts and for monitoring and verifying energy savings. The energy manager implemented many relatively low-cost energy conservation measures, as well as some capital projects, during the first two years of the program. In total, these measures provided energy cost savings of $210,000 per year, or 5% of the total budget. In each case, technologies installed as part of the energy retrofit projects provided not only cost savings but also better control, reduced maintenance, and improved working conditions for employees

  3. Interactions between renewable energy policy and renewable energy industrial policy: A critical analysis of China's policy approach to renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Sufang; Andrews-Speed, Philip; Zhao, Xiaoli; He, Yongxiu

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes China's policy approach to renewable energies and assesses how effectively China has met the ideal of appropriate interactions between renewable energy policy and renewable energy industrial policy. First we briefly discuss the interactions between these two policies. Then we outline China's key renewable energy and renewable industrial policies and find that China's government has well recognized the need for this policy interaction. After that, we study the achievements and problems in China's wind and solar PV sector during 2005–2012 and argue that China's policy approach to renewable energies has placed priority first on developing a renewable energy manufacturing industry and only second on renewable energy itself, and it has not effectively met the ideal of appropriate interactions between renewable energy policy and renewable energy industrial policy. Lastly, we make an in-depth analysis of the three ideas underlying this policy approach, that is, the green development idea, the low-carbon leadership idea and indigenous innovation idea. We conclude that Chinas' policy approach to renewable energies needs to enhance the interactions between renewable energy policy and renewable energy industrial policy. The paper contributes to a deeper understanding of China's policy strategy toward renewable energies. -- Highlights: •Interactions between renewable energy policy and renewable energy industrial policy are discussed. •China's key renewable energy and renewable energy industrial policies are outlined. •Two empirical cases illustrate China's policy approach to renewable energies. •We argue that China needs to enhance the interactions between the two policies. •Three ideas underlie China's policy approach to renewable energies

  4. A cultural model of household energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzenhiser, Loren

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the development of demand-side research, from an early interest in conservation behavior to a later focus on physical, economic, psychological and social models of energy consumption. Unfortunately, none of these models account satisfactorily for measured energy consumption in the residential sector. Growing interest in the end-uses of energy (e.g. in support of load forecasting, demand-side management and least-cost utility planning), increasing international studies of energy use, and continuing work in the energy and lifestyles research tradition now support an emerging cultural perspective on household energy use. The ecological foundations of the cultural model and its applications in energy research are discussed, along with some of the analytic consequences of this approach. (author)

  5. Energy information systems: a general overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The unprecedented energy crises that engulfed the world in early 1970s brought about a spurt in energy research all over the world, which in turn caused the rapid growth of literature in the field. In order to achieve effective bibliographical control, proper dissemination of information, and rapid access to the desired document, energy information systems of diverse scope came into being. The paper describes the special features of several information systems like (i) International Nuclear Information Systems, which covers world literature on nuclear science and technology (ii) Energy Information Services which takes cares of energy information transfer among the Commonwealth countries of the Asia and Pacific region; (ii) Information Network on New Energy Sources and Technologies for Asia And Pacific. This system is being developed to ensure smooth energy information transfer amongst non-commonwealth countries of Asia and the Pacific. (author)

  6. Renewable energies it is time to go; Energies renouvelables a vous d'agir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    After the presentation of the allocutions, offered by ministries and specialists, the questions and answers of the conference are detailed. It concerns the political aspects of the renewable energies part in the energy policy, the energy consumption and the energy efficiency, the local policies and the renewable energies in the life, architecture and urban areas. (A.L.B.)

  7. Buildings Energy Efficiency: Interventions Analysis under a Smart Cities Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Battista

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the world’s population lives in urban areas and in inefficient buildings under the energy point of view. Starting from these assumptions, there is the need to identify methodologies and innovations able to improve social development and the quality of life of people living in cities. Smart cities can be a viable solution. The methodology traditionally adopted to evaluate building energy efficiency starts from the structure’s energy demands analysis and the demands reduction evaluation. Consequently, the energy savings is assessed through a cascade of interventions. Regarding the building envelope, the first intervention is usually related to the reduction of the thermal transmittance value, but there is also the need to emphasize the building energy savings through other parameters, such as the solar gain factor and dye solar absorbance coefficients. In this contribution, a standard building has been modeled by means of the well-known dynamic software, TRNSYS. This study shows a parametrical analysis through which it is possible to evaluate the effect of each single intervention and, consequently, its influence on the building energy demand. Through this analysis, an intervention chart has been carried out, aiming to assess the intervention efficiency starting from the percentage variation of energy demands.

  8. Renewable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    Bent Sorensen’s Renewable Energy: Physics, Engineering, Environmental Impacts, Economics and Planning, Fifth Edition, continues the tradition by providing a thorough and current overview of the entire renewable energy sphere. Since its first edition, this standard reference source helped put...... renewable energy on the map of scientific agendas. Several renewable energy solutions no longer form just a marginal addition to energy supply, but have become major players, with the promise to become the backbone of an energy system suitable for life in the sustainability lane. This volume is a problem...... structured around three parts in order to assist readers in focusing on the issues that impact them the most for a given project or question. PART I covers the basic scientific principles behind all major renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, and biomass. PART II provides in-depth information...

  9. Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beurskens, H.J.M. [SET Analysis, Kievitlaan 26, 1742 AD Schagen (Netherlands); Brand, A.J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Unit Wind Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Over the years, wind energy has become a major source of renewable energy worldwide. The present chapter addresses the wind resource, which is available for exploitation for large-scale electricity production, and its specific physical properties. Furthermore, the technical options available to convert the energy of the air flow into mechanical energy and electricity are described. Specific problems of large-scale integration of wind energy into the grid as well as the present and future market developments are described in this chapter. Finally, environmental aspects are discussed briefly.

  10. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  11. Poland's energy, a special case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furfari, Samuele

    2014-01-01

    Poland, the sixth member state in terms of population (39 million inhabitants) and with the eighth largest GDP in the EU, stands out more and more clearly on the environmental front, especially as far as energy is concerned. One of the reasons may be that in terms of GDP/capita Poland comes only 23 out of 27... The only European economy to have grown every year over the last twenty years, it has given higher priority than elsewhere to promoting growth, to production cost reduction and to limiting increases in consumer prices. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy - a spiritual perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the search for energy (historical); from uranium to the bomb (radioactivity); the principle of fission (atomic structure; isotopes); fear of nuclear reactors (types of reactor; antinuclear groups; economic argument; socio-political argument; psychological argument); Capra and the dance of life; elements and ethers (life ethers and subtle elements); origins of matter (etheric forces; the primal matrix); the balance of gold and silver (etheric forces, which can only be directly perceived in the spirit); Lucifer, Ahriman and nuclear accident; Christ's resurrection and the essence of matter; the opening of the abyss; the divine mother. (U.K.)

  13. A review of building energy regulation and policy for energy conservation in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaro, Joseph; Mwasha, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of energy use, worldwide, hfs raised concerns over problems of energy supply and exhaustion of energy resources. Most of the developed countries are implementing building energy regulations such as energy standards, codes etc., to reduce building energy consumption. The position of developing countries with respect to energy regulations implementation and enforcement is either poorly documented or not documented at all. In addition, there is a lack of consistent data, which makes it difficult to understand the underlying changes that affect energy regulation implementation in developing countries. In that respect, this paper investigates the progress of building energy regulations in developing countries and its implication for energy conservation and efficiency. The present status of building energy regulations in 60 developing countries around the world was analysed through a survey of building energy regulations using online survey. The study revealed the present progress made on building energy regulations in relation to implementation, development and compliance; at the same time the study recommends possible solutions to the barriers facing building energy regulation implementation in the developing world. - Research Highlights: →Progress and implications of energy regulations in developing countries. →Investigation assessed the progress made on energy regulations using online survey. →Energy regulation activities is progressively increasing in developing countries. →The study identified 25 developing countries without energy regulatory standards. →The study shows relationship between energy regulation and energy consumption.

  14. Energy Union: a global road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourneur, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and comments the strategy defined by the European Commission in its document entitled 'Energy Union: secure, sustainable, competitive, affordable energy for every European' which defines a framework and a road-map for the emergence and progress of a Europe of energy. Such an Energy Union means solidarity between members, a free circulation of energy across borders, a priority for energy efficiency, a transition towards a low carbon society, and competitive and affordable prices for the European citizen. The author outlines the present weaknesses of the Europe of energy: first world energy importer, twelve countries being under the required interconnection level (10 per cent of the installed production should be able to cross the borders), some countries depending on a unique provider for their energy imports, low energy performance for buildings and high oil-dependence for transports. On the other hand, good results have already been reached regarding the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. To be successful, this new strategy thus requires high investments and the development of new standards

  15. Energy Revolution. A Sustainable Pathway to a Clean Energy Future for Europe. A European Energy Scenario for EU-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, S.; Baker, C.

    2005-09-01

    Greenpeace and the Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment of the German Aerospace Center (DLR),have developed a blueprint for the EU energy supply that shows how Europe can lead the way to a sustainable pathway to a clean energy future. The Greenpeace energy revolution scenario demonstrates that phasing out nuclear power and massively reducing CO2-emissions is possible. The scenario comes close to a fossil fuels phase-out by aiming for a 80% CO2 emissions reduction by 2050.The pathway in this scenario achieves this phase-out in a relatively short time-frame without using technological options (such as 'clean coal') that are ultimately dead ends, deflecting resources from the real solutions offered by renewable energy. Whilst there are many technical options that will allow us to meet short-term EU Kyoto targets (-8% GHG by 2010), these may have limited long-term potential. The Greenpeace Energy Revolution Scenario shows that in the long run, renewable energy will be cheaper than conventional energy sources and reduce EU's dependence from world market prices from imported fossil and nuclear fuels.The rapid growth of renewable energy technologies will lead to a large investment in new technologies.This dynamic market growth will result in a shift of employment opportunities from conventional energy-related industries to new occupational fields in the renewable energy industry. Renewable energy is expected to provide about 700,000 jobs in the field of electricity generation from renewable energy sources by 2010

  16. SOLAR ENERGY: A NECESSARY INVESTMENT IN A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    23, No. 1, March 2004. Okoro and Madueme. 58. SOLAR ENERGY: A NECESSARY INVESTMENT IN A DEVELOPING. ECONOMY ... research on how to develop the non-conventional methods of .... meat, vegetable, and dairy products.

  17. The enigma of energy: A philosophical inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro-Franceschi, Vidette

    1998-06-01

    A philosophical inquiry was undertaken to examine the enigma of energy in an attempt to clarify and further illuminate the basic ideas of energy. Beginning with the origin of the concept-Aristotle's conceptualization of energeia-and continuing through to the present day with an overview of the historical conceptual development of energy in Western science, an analysis and interpretation of the scientific and philosophic literature was performed. Literature regarding aspects of human sentience was also examined for underlying ideas of energy. And, finally, selected medical and nursing science theoretical frameworks were analyzed with the hope of further grasping the philosophical underpinnings related to the phenomenon of human energy. Certain ideas of energy became evident. Energy can be viewed as a process and this view works well within the physical science domain. When energy is viewed as a process it falls within the mechanistic tradition: things are viewed as particulate, and cause and effect related. However, energy can also be viewed as a phenomenon, a thing. As a phenomenon, energy is continually transforming and actualizing inherent potentials in a communal process. When energy is recognized as the sole phenomenon responsible for everything in existence, it becomes evident that all is essentially one. In addition, when energy is viewed in this manner it becomes increasingly difficult to deny the purposive character underlying all nature. It is argued that the mystery ultimately leads to something far beyond what we know exists. One of the intuitive feelings of this researcher was that there were at least two different ideas of energy in the sciences of medicine and nursing, which, while different, shared some common elements as well. An examination of Hippocrates', Nightingale's, Selye's, Levine's, and Rogers' ideas, as well as the basic tenets of alternative health care, revealed two distinct worldviews regarding human energy which are congruent with the

  18. A policy of nuclear energy or energy conservation - on the construction of a wrong alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traube, K.

    1981-01-01

    From the content: a secret good-bye - wrong information from the energy experts - is there any priority for the efficient utilization of energie - do nuclear energy and energy conservation measures complement each other - the hidden socio-political dimensions - counter-information is necessary. (HP) [de

  19. Perspectives for a global energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, P.

    1987-01-01

    The economic development of the industrial world and the population explosion in the Third World will lead to a further increase in world energy consumption. Up to the year 2020 a doubling of today's consumption must be reckoned with. Further increases may be necessary in order to raise the per capita consumption of the population in the Third World. In order to meet this increasing demand it is necessary to consider all available energy sources. The nonrenewable energy sources oil, coal, gas and uranium will have to carry a greater proportion than the current 80 %. The resources suffice for that. However many obstacles must be surmounted in order to secure an essentially increasing energy production. Shortage symptoms with oil are to be expected within a foreseeable space of time. Only coal and nuclear energy can close the gap. In order to avert adverse effects on the climate, CO 2 emissions must be controlled. This can best be achieved by promoting water power, solar energy and nuclear energy as the principal sources. The postulates of the Swiss energy policy 'saving', 'substitution', 'research' and 'provision' seek to guarantee the energy supply. The promotion of hydro, solar and nuclear power must be added. The postulate of a withdrawal from nuclear energy is untenable considering its worldwide development. It would retard Switzerland in its pursuit of supply security and a better environment. 6 figs

  20. Energy : branch out now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebel, J.; Pluvinage, S

    2008-01-01

    This articled proposed the use of renewable energy sources to address the challenge of increasing energy demand and concerns about greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Hydrocarbon exploitation is expected to peak by 2030, and while coal is still abundant, pollution increases with its utilization. The authors discussed the feasibility of using waste heat from industry to heat buildings. Solutions for urban traffic control were also discussed with reference to high quality public transportation, bicycle and pedestrian paths, and car pooling. Plans are underway to have about 20 hydrogen buses in circulation during the 2010 Olympic games in Whistler, British Columbia. Windpower has also become a major contender as a viable energy source, particularly with new technologies that have helped to maintain the efficiency of wind turbines. This article also discussed the use of biofuels derived from living matter. Bioenergy can be exploited from agricultural, forest or aquatic biomass. This biomass can be used to produce fuels or electricity. On a short term basis, the objective is to improve the yield of biogas, such as methane, from organic matter. The viability of deep geothermal energy was also discussed along with solar energy. Ideally, solar energy combines 3 types of technologies, notably passive, thermal and photovoltaic energy. Flexibility and affordability of materials are needed to facilitate the widespread commercialization of solar energy. The article concluded with a review of nuclear energy, which has been touted as the solution to climate change because it emits very few greenhouse gases and other atmospheric pollutants. 15 figs

  1. A safe energy supplying for France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffin-Payne, J.

    2001-01-01

    Contrarily to other European nations like United-kingdom, Germany or Norway, France has no important fossil energy resources. The 2 major oil crisis (in 1973 and 1979) made public opinion abruptly aware of the urgent necessity for the diversification of energy supplying. Today the French production of electricity rests on nuclear energy, fossil energy and renewable energies (hydroelectricity). France is the first European country for nuclear energy (88 millions tons of oil equivalent in 1999) and for renewable energy (29 millions toe). The energy independence rate has sharply increased in 20 years from 26% in 1973 it reaches now 49%. France has developed an important capacity of fossil fuels storage about 10.5 milliards m 3 , it means that France can face a 30% decrease in its energy imports for a year without reducing its industrial output. Because of their energy choices Switzerland and France are the European countries the least sensible to price fluctuations of oil and gas. The doubling of oil price has implied a 0.32 francs rise of kWh cost in France and a 1.8 francs rise elsewhere in Europe. (A.C.)

  2. Energy Poverty in Europe: A Multidimensional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Andrea Bollino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the European Commission’s “Third Energy Package”, the challenges posed by energy poverty have been recently acknowledged by European legislation. The paper develops a synthetic indicator of energy poverty for the purpose of assessing households’ well-being across different domains of inequality in access to energy services and to a healthy domestic environment. These dimensions are broadly defined in terms of energy affordability and thermal efficiency, two of the main manifestations of energy poverty. The analysis focuses on Europe and expands on existing economic literature by employing a fuzzy analysis for the definition of a multidimensional energy poverty index, which is then used to investigate the role of individual and household characteristics in shaping energy poverty. We find that during the European crisis energy poverty has been more stable than monetary poverty, and that thermal efficiency plays a crucial role in shaping individual and countries’ average degrees of energy poverty. JEL codes: I32; Q41; D10; D63

  3. High energy physics program at Texas A ampersand M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The Texas A ampersand M experimental high energy physics program has been supported since its inception by DOE Contract DE-AS05-81ER40039. During that period we established a viable experimental program at a university which before this time had no program in high energy physics. In 1990, the experimental program was augmented with a program in particle theory. In the accompanying final report, we outline the research work accomplished during the final year of this contract and the program being proposed for consideration by the Department of Energy for future grant support. Some of the particular areas covered are: Collider detector at Fermilab program; the TAMU MACRO program; SSC R ampersand D program; SSC experimental program; and theoretical physics program

  4. Romania needs a strategy for thermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leca Aureliu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy sector in Romania consists of three sub-sectors: electricity, natural gas and heat. Among these, the sub-sector of thermal energy is in the most precarious situation because it has been neglected for a long time. This sub-sector is particularly important both due to the amount of final heat consumption (of over 50% of final energy consumption, and to the fact that it has a direct negative effect on the population, industry and services. This paper presents the main directions for developing a modern strategy of the thermal energy sub-sector, which would fit into Romania’s Energy Strategy that is still in preparation This is based on the author’s 50 years of experience in this field that includes knowledge about the processes and the equipment of thermal energy, expertise in the management and restructuring of energy companies and also knowledge of the specific legislation. It is therefore recommended, following the European regulations and practices, the promotion and upgrading of district heating systems using efficient cogeneration, using trigeneration in Romania, modernizing buildings in terms of energy use, using of renewable energy sources for heating, especially biomass, and modernizing the energy consumption of rural settlements.

  5. Quantifying the geopolitical dimension of energy risks: A tool for energy modelling and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, Beatriz; García-Verdugo, Javier; San-Martín, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Energy risk and security are topical issues in energy analysis and policy. However, the quantitative analysis of energy risk presents significant methodological difficulties, especially when dealing with certain of its more qualitative dimensions. The aim of this paper is to quantitatively estimate the geopolitical risk of energy supply with the help of a multivariate statistical technique, factor analysis. Four partial energy risk factors were computed for 122 countries, which were subsequently aggregated to form the composite GESRI (Geopolitical Energy Supply Risk Index). The results demonstrate that advanced economies present a lower level of geopolitical energy risk, especially countries with energy resources, while less-developed countries register higher levels of risk regardless of their energy production. Although this indicator is computed for countries, it can be aggregated for regions or corridors, and it could also be applied to model and scenario building. The different uses of the GESRI could eventually lead to practical implications in the energy policy field, as well as in the energy planning and energy management areas. - Highlights: • We quantitatively estimate the multidimensional geopolitical risk of energy supply. • Factor analysis was used to reveal energy risk, a variable not directly observable. • Advanced economies with energy resources present the lowest level of energy risk. • Less-developed countries obtain high risk values even when they are energy producers. • The proposed index can be used for energy planning and energy management purposes

  6. Challenges to a climate stabilizing energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, C.; Dilmaghani, M.; Baksi, S.

    2007-01-01

    The paper surveys the major challenges to stabilizing the atmospheric CO 2 concentration. Climate change, and policies to deal with it, is viewed as an energy problem. The energy problem stems from the fact that no combination of carbon-free energies is currently capable of displacing fossil fuels as the main sources of the world's base load energy requirements. The paper provides rough estimates of the amount of carbon-free energy required to stabilize climate, the potential contribution of 'conventional' carbon-free energies, the contribution of renewable energies, and the size of an 'advanced energy technology gap'. The findings indicate that stabilizing CO 2 concentration will require a long-term commitment to research, develop, and eventually deploy new energy sources and technologies including hydrogen. The paper suggests that the role of technology is what makes stabilizing CO 2 concentration economically feasible. In this respect energy technology and economics are complementary, with advances in the former requiring something more than a reliance on market-based instruments, such as carbon taxes and emission permits. The analysis has implications for the credibility of commitments to target climate change-related factors such as CO 2 emissions.(author)

  7. Challenges to a climate stabilizing energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Chris; Baksi, Soham; Dilmaghani, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    The paper surveys the major challenges to stabilizing the atmospheric CO 2 concentration. Climate change, and policies to deal with it, is viewed as an energy problem. The energy problem stems from the fact that no combination of carbon-free energies is currently capable of displacing fossil fuels as the main sources of the world's base load energy requirements. The paper provides rough estimates of the amount of carbon-free energy required to stabilize climate, the potential contribution of 'conventional' carbon-free energies, the contribution of renewable energies, and the size of an 'advanced energy technology gap'. The findings indicate that stabilizing CO 2 concentration will require a long-term commitment to research, develop, and eventually deploy new energy sources and technologies including hydrogen. The paper suggests that the role of technology is what makes stabilizing CO 2 concentration economically feasible. In this respect energy technology and economics are complementary, with advances in the former requiring something more than a reliance on market-based instruments, such as carbon taxes and emission permits. The analysis has implications for the credibility of commitments to target climate change-related factors such as CO 2 emissions

  8. Towards a sustainable energy strategy for Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coxworth, A.; Bigland-Pritchard, M.; Coxworth, E.; Orb, J.

    2007-01-01

    The production and consumption of energy raises significant environmental concerns regarding the depletion of non-renewable resources; air and water pollution; waste management; and damage of habitats. Saskatchewan, as elsewhere, needs to develop new approaches to meeting its energy needs. This report was intended to help decision-makers to consider the possibility of a sustainable, safe, environment and climate-friendly energy future for Saskatchewan. It provided an overview of energy use trends in Saskatchewan for refined petroleum products; natural gas; coal; primary electricity; and total energy consumption. Sustainability was defined and the need for change was discussed. Energy efficiency improvement and conservation opportunities in buildings, industry, electrical generation, and transport were also presented. The role of government in promoting energy efficiency was also discussed. Renewable energy opportunities were also offered for bio-energy; electrical generation; heating with renewables; and prospects for a renewables-fuelled Saskatchewan. Next, the report discussed technical, economic, political, and social barriers to progress. Several recommendations were offered in terms of energy efficiency and conservation; electricity generation; transportation; heating and cooling; industry; and financing change. 85 refs

  9. Switchgrass a valuable biomass crop for energy

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The demand of renewable energies is growing steadily both from policy and from industry which seeks environmentally friendly feed stocks. The recent policies enacted by the EU, USA and other industrialized countries foresee an increased interest in the cultivation of energy crops; there is clear evidence that switchgrass is one of the most promising biomass crop for energy production and bio-based economy and compounds. Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy provides a comprehensive guide to  switchgrass in terms of agricultural practices, potential use and markets, and environmental and social benefits. Considering this potential energy source from its biology, breed and crop physiology to its growth and management to the economical, social and environmental impacts, Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy brings together chapters from a range of experts in the field, including a foreword from Kenneth P. Vogel, to collect and present the environmental benefits and characteristics of this a ...

  10. A model for dark energy decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, Elcio, E-mail: eabdalla@usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970, São Paulo (Brazil); Graef, L.L., E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970, São Paulo (Brazil); Wang, Bin, E-mail: wang_b@sjtu.edu.cn [INPAC and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-04

    We discuss a model of nonperturbative decay of dark energy. We suggest the possibility that this model can provide a mechanism from the field theory to realize the energy transfer from dark energy into dark matter, which is the requirement to alleviate the coincidence problem. The advantage of the model is the fact that it accommodates a mean life compatible with the age of the universe. We also argue that supersymmetry is a natural set up, though not essential.

  11. Towards a sustainable future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Diaz-Balart, Fidel

    1999-01-01

    The only form of having a future energy insurance is to find a road environmentally sustainable to take place and to use the energy. Their production and non alone use should be compatible with the environmental priorities of the society but rather they should be organized in such a way that they have a social consent, under the principle that so that there is economic development an economic and sure energy supply it should exist

  12. Energy for rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Frauke; Benders, Rene M.J.; Moll, Henri C.

    2009-01-01

    About 72 million households in rural India do not have access to electricity and rely primarily on traditional biofuels. This research investigates how rural electrification could be achieved in India using different energy sources and what the effects for climate change mitigation could be. We use the Regional Energy Model (REM) to develop scenarios for rural electrification for the period 2005-2030 and to assess the effects on greenhouse gas emissions, primary energy use and costs. We compare the business-as-usual scenario (BAU) with different electrification scenarios based on electricity from renewable energy, diesel and the grid. Our results indicate that diesel systems tend to have the highest CO 2 emissions, followed by grid systems. Rural electrification with primarily renewable energy-based end-uses could save up to 99% of total CO 2 emissions and 35% of primary energy use in 2030 compared to BAU. Our research indicates that electrification with decentralised diesel systems is likely to be the most expensive option. Rural electrification with renewable energy tends to be the most cost-effective option when end-uses are predominantly based on renewable energy, but turns out to be more costly than grid extensions when electric end-use devices are predominantly used. This research therefore elaborates whether renewable energy is a viable option for rural electrification and climate change mitigation in rural India and gives policy recommendations.

  13. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  14. Solar Energy in the Home. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Allen A.; Woodland, James A.

    Recommended for grades 10-12 physical, earth, or general science classes, this 5-7 day unit is designed to give students a general understanding of solar energy and its use as a viable alternative to present energy sources. Along with this technology, students examine several factors of solar energy which influence the choice of solar home site…

  15. Development of a platform for roadmapping nanotechnology for energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwqar, Mohammad Sohail

    2004-02-01

    This report includes the vision for global energy sector to develop a highly reliable, economically viable, and environmentally benign power generation and delivery systems with the help of nanotechnology. This scenario will provide indispensable public services and sustain the economic growth. The need to take advantage of the science of ultra-small scales such as nanotechnology is emphasized. The application of nanotechnology in future energy systems, specially the advanced renewables (photovoltaics, fuel cells, etc) are explained in a systematic and organized manner. The role of nanotechnology for the ubiquitous digital society and minimal carbon emissions (clean environment) with the help of nanotechnology is also envisioned. This report attempts to roadmap nanotechnology for energy through to 2030

  16. Energy efficiency: a recipe for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Produced in cooperation with ADEME and Enerdata, this report presents and evaluates energy efficiency policies and trends in about 90 countries around the world. It reviews the impact of energy efficiency measures and highlights the trends and results of their implementation. Energy efficiency is ''a low hanging fruit'' on the ''energy tree'' which can help address a number of objectives at the same time and at a low or negative cost: security of supply, environmental impacts, competitiveness, balance of trade, investment requirements, social aspects and others. Despite its significant potential for energy savings, energy efficiency is still far from realising this potential. Why? There is no single answer to this question. A meaningful response requires major research and an analytical effort.

  17. Energy efficiency: a recipe for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Produced in cooperation with ADEME and Enerdata, this report presents and evaluates energy efficiency policies and trends in about 90 countries around the world. It reviews the impact of energy efficiency measures and highlights the trends and results of their implementation. Energy efficiency is ''a low hanging fruit'' on the ''energy tree'' which can help address a number of objectives at the same time and at a low or negative cost: security of supply, environmental impacts, competitiveness, balance of trade, investment requirements, social aspects and others. Despite its significant potential for energy savings, energy efficiency is still far from realising this potential. Why? There is no single answer to this question. A meaningful response requires major research and an analytical effort.

  18. Securing a Home Energy Managing Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren Aagaard; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2016-01-01

    Energy management in households gets increasingly more attention in the struggle to integrate more sustainable energy sources. Especially in the electrical system, smart grid towards a better utilisation of the energy production and distribution infrastructure. The Home Energy Management System...... (HEMS) is a critical infrastructure component in this endeavour. Its main goal is to enable energy services utilising smart devices in the households based on the interest of the residential consumers and external actors. With the role of being both an essential link in the communication infrastructure...... for balancing the electrical grid and a surveillance unit in private homes, security and privacy become essential to address. In this chapter, we identify and address potential threats Home Energy Management Platform (HEMP) developers should consider in the progress of designing architecture, selecting hardware...

  19. Energy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  20. A search for space energy alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Billman, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper takes a look at a number of schemes for converting radiant energy in space to useful energy for man. These schemes are possible alternatives to the currently most studied solar power satellite concept. Possible primary collection and conversion devices discussed include the space particle flux devices, solar windmills, photovoltaic devices, photochemical cells, photoemissive converters, heat engines, dielectric energy conversion, electrostatic generators, plasma solar collectors, and thermionic schemes. Transmission devices reviewed include lasers and masers.

  1. Renewable energy education: a worldwide status review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandpal, Tara C.; Broman, Lars

    2015-02-15

    The need for renewable energy education and training at all levels is globally recognized. During the last three decades, a large number of countries across the globe have initiated academic programmes on renewable energy technologies and related aspects. A review of published literature on renewable energy education initiatives across the globe, challenges faced, and potential approaches towards efficient and effective solutions are presented in the paper.

  2. Energy coefficients for a propeller series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Smærup

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency for a propeller is calculated by energy coefficients. These coefficients are related to four types of losses, i.e. the axial, the rotational, the frictional, and the finite blade number loss, and one gain, i.e. the axial gain. The energy coefficients are derived by use...... of the potential theory with the propeller modelled as an actuator disk. The efficiency based on the energy coefficients is calculated for a propeller series. The results show a good agreement between the efficiency based on the energy coefficients and the efficiency obtained by a vortex-lattice method....

  3. Arctic wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, E. [Kemijoki Oy (Finland); Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Tammelin, B. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Arctic wind energy research was aimed at adapting existing wind technologies to suit the arctic climatic conditions in Lapland. Project research work included meteorological measurements, instrument development, development of a blade heating system for wind turbines, load measurements and modelling of ice induced loads on wind turbines, together with the development of operation and maintenance practices in arctic conditions. As a result the basis now exists for technically feasible and economically viable wind energy production in Lapland. New and marketable products, such as blade heating systems for wind turbines and meteorological sensors for arctic conditions, with substantial export potential, have also been developed. (orig.)

  4. Arctic wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltola, E.; Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M.; Tammelin, B.

    1998-01-01

    Arctic wind energy research was aimed at adapting existing wind technologies to suit the arctic climatic conditions in Lapland. Project research work included meteorological measurements, instrument development, development of a blade heating system for wind turbines, load measurements and modelling of ice induced loads on wind turbines, together with the development of operation and maintenance practices in arctic conditions. As a result the basis now exists for technically feasible and economically viable wind energy production in Lapland. New and marketable products, such as blade heating systems for wind turbines and meteorological sensors for arctic conditions, with substantial export potential, have also been developed. (orig.)

  5. Hybrid Hydro Renewable Energy Storage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Asit Kr

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting wind & tidal turbine pumped-storage solutions for improving the energy efficiency and economic sustainability of renewable energy systems. Indicated a viable option to solve problems of energy production, as well as in the integration of intermittent renewable energies, providing system flexibility due to energy load’s fluctuation, as long as the storage of energy from intermittent sources. Sea water storage energy is one of the best and most efficient options in terms of renewable resources as an integrated solution allowing the improvement of the energy system elasticity and the global system efficiency.

  6. Energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxey, M.N.

    1982-06-01

    There seems to be a trend towards expecting energy conservation to be a panacea for the world's ills. In fact, a global perspective on energy needs shows that more, not less, energy is needed and technological innovation in energy sources is essential in order to meet the needs of more than just the developed countries. Energy-intensive technology is the amplification of our natural resources rather than their depletion. A fundamental bioethical principle must be established if we are to analyze and organize scientific evidence about hazards from currently feasible energy resources, and separate genuine from counterfeit claims to credibility. In particular, public fears about radiation hazards and radioactive waste disposal are influenced too much by rhetorical cleverness and forensic skills of a vociferous minority. Potential hazard management is ethically equitable only if it is proportioned to actual basic harm that can be identified and reduced by expenditures of human effort, time and money

  7. A glance on the German energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audigier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    As Germany has decided to phase out nuclear by 2022 while aiming at ambitious objectives in terms of energy savings and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, this report first highlights the interest of such an energy transition. It discusses the immediate consequences of the shutting down of the first eight reactors. It gives an overview of the German energy mix and discusses the objectives and challenges of the energy policy, and how this policy is implemented (by restructuring the electric grid, by building flame-based thermal power stations, by searching for a solution for electricity mass storage, by creating the conditions of an efficient energy saving policy). It discusses the consequences of this policy for the European and French energy policy

  8. A handbook of nuclear energy. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelis, H.

    1982-01-01

    With this new edition of his book 'Nuclear energy', first edited in 1977, which is extremely enlarged and brought up to date, the author has given an overall picture of nuclear energy in which the physical and technical basis and the industrial, economic and environmental aspects of nuclear energy are discussed in a systematic outline. In this second volume the topics of nuclear fuel cycle, safety and environment, and international policies against the proliferation of nuclear weapons are discussed. (UA) [de

  9. Evaluating energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Intended as a primer on the relationship between the development and use of various energy resources and resulting ecological consequences, the book is designed for a course that can serve students with or without much background in the biological or physical sciences. A review is presented of the major concepts used in atmospheric science, the general picture of energy principles and laws, the status of energy resources both in the United States and worldwide, and an analysis of how questions of energy demand are approached. Three classes of energy sources are addressed: solar, biomass, and coal. The ecological impacts of carbon dioxide, acid deposition, petroleum, electrical power-generation, and nuclear technology are discussed. Also given is a discussion of alternative technologies in energy production

  10. Renewable energy activities in Senegal: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youm, I.; Sarr, J.; Kane, M.M.; Sall, M.

    2000-01-01

    Like many countries in Africa, Senegal is facing economical decline, energy crisis and serious desertification problem in rural areas. These issues could be removed if renewable energy is used as a primary source of energy in rural areas. What is required is a strategy to implement renewable energy technologies at large scale. The government and many non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have tried to comprehend and have strived to address the problem of energy. This paper present a review of activities in the field of renewable energy applications in Senegal, which goes back to the mid 1970s and will discuss the socio-economic benefits that the country has derived from these environmentally sound and appropriate sources of energy. The development and trial of systems were mostly funded so far by donor agencies in collaboration with government and NGOs. Among the applications being supported are solar lighting, water pumping and small power plants. Recent efforts have been aimed at restructuring the programmes and giving them a market orientation. Future trends, some suggestion and recommendations for successful dissemination of renewable energy sources are also drawn. The present situation is seen to be much more promising and favourable for renewable energy. (Author)

  11. Energy management for the future. A sourcebook of ideas and activities for energy conservation learning programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This book serves as a teaching aid for Canadian school programs in energy conservation and energy management. Suitable curriculum areas and objectives are outlined, and suggestions are presented for organizing thematic study units. References are made throughout to appropriate use of additional media such as filmstrips. Five study units, each with its own classroom activities, are detailed: energy resources, energy and the home, energy and food, energy and leisure, and energy in transportation. Suggestions are given for ongoing energy management educational programs to be tried out once the study units have been completed. 23 figs.

  12. Energy future Santa Cruz: A citizens' plan for energy self-reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J.; Stayton, R.

    The results of a grassroots energy conservation project which involved more than 3,100 residents of Santa Cruz, California, is discussed. Citizens attended forums and town meetings to suggest ideas for solving the community's energy problems. These ideas were then evaluated by the Energy Future Advisory Board and compiled into the Energy Future Plan. The energy plan covers such topics as new residences, residential retrofit, automobile efficiency, farm efficiency, commercial greenhouses, local food production, commercial efficiency, land use planning, energy education and financing, and solar, wind, and ocean energy. An energy implementation guide and glossary are included.

  13. A study of the role played by renewable energies in China's sustainable energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiliang; Molin, Huo; Ruoshui, Wang; Martinot, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This paper first provides an overview of the context of renewable energy development in China, including the country's recent renewable energy legislation. Further, it summarizes the current status of renewable energy development and the role it plays in the national energy supply. Next it introduces the national indicative targets for renewable energies in 2010 and 2020, and conducts a long term scenario of the role of renewable energies in China's energy system transition till 2050. It discusses the main risks involved in China's renewable energy development, and proposes some policy measures for risk management. (author)

  14. Energy Literacy in Canada: A summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Eisler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveys among the general population, business and policy leaders, and aboriginal Canadians reveal that, among all three groups, there is ample general knowledge about the way Canadians use energy and the costs related to it. But when they think about economic and social policy issues of importance, Canadians tend to consider energy a low priority. While this may be the consequence of living in an energysecure country, given that the economy’s strength, growth and resilience are so intimately linked to secure and sustainable sources of energy, that lack of engagement can only be problematic for policymakers dealing with energy-related issues. It can lead to important choices being made without widespread public awareness, input and agreement. But, even more worrisome is that these surveys found that all three Canadian cohorts surveyed severely lack trust in the key voices that speak on energy issues. They hold negative views of energy company executives, mistrust information from industry associations, and lack trust in their provincial and federal governments. Aboriginal Canadians were the least likely to trust all these sources. The importance of trust cannot be overstated. The absence of trust can lead to negative consequences for investment in the energy system, and can undermine public confidence in leadership, making the challenge of improving energy literacy that much more difficult. An early step towards remedying that credibility gap could include creating independent, credible, centralized institutions that serve as clearing houses for non-politicized energy information, such as the Energy Information Administration in the United States. In addition, it is clear that Canada can only benefit from measures that nurture robust yet sober debate about energy issues, that will help stimulate public engagement. To that end, the creation of a national advisory coalition, comprised of aboriginal Canadians, academics, opinion leaders and

  15. Energy - a cluster with competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Production of energy technology is one of the world economy's growth areas, and its role in trade within the OECD has grown steadily. There are several reasons for this trend. First among these is the fact that the markets for energy technology and energy production have opened up significantly in recent years. Specialist producers investing more in R and D and providing ancillary services are also winning market share at the expense of more traditional local suppliers. Added to this, economic grown has been focused on countries that do not have their own energy technology production and are dependent on imported technology. Specialization in energy technology is still at an early stage, and only a few countries such as Finland and Japan have staked a real claim to this market. And even in the Finnish case things are happening rapidly. Energy technology accounted for only 3.5% of Finnish exports a little more than 10 years ago, while they already accounted for over 7% in 1998. The manufacturing of energy equipment in Finland embraces energy production, transmission and distribution, and energy technologies

  16. Energy Planning - a Tool for Sustainable Energy Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning Gulbrandsen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Working with energy and environment policy development in industry and local communities proves the importance of a systematic approach to management and handling of technology- and economical issues for a successful outcome. Raising awareness and competence is one the most important ways to fight poverty and raise prosperity. The industrial sectors need to improve their capacity to increase the cost efficiency and to meet the future competition from other countries and other domestic competitors, and the municipalities have to be more service-minded and efficient in their efforts to develop an agenda for delivering cost efficient services to the public sector. Lessons learned show that a comprehensive information service has to be set up for keeping all partners involved updated and informed about the progress of the different steps in the policy scheme. Information can be delivered on different levels depending of the partner status. Normally information meeting has to be arranged during the project execution and supplied with flyers with basic information concerning the progress, investment and expected results.(author)

  17. A generic framework for the description and analysis of energy security in an energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Larry

    2012-01-01

    While many energy security indicators and models have been developed for specific jurisdictions or types of energy, few can be considered sufficiently generic to be applicable to any energy system. This paper presents a framework that attempts to meet this objective by combining the International Energy Agency's definition of energy security with structured systems analysis techniques to create three energy security indicators and a process-flow energy systems model. The framework is applicable to those energy systems which can be described in terms of processes converting or transporting flows of energy to meet the energy–demand flows from downstream processes. Each process affects the environment and is subject to jurisdictional policies. The framework can be employed to capture the evolution of energy security in an energy system by analyzing the results of indicator-specific metrics applied to the energy, demand, and environment flows associated with the system's constituent processes. Energy security policies are treated as flows to processes and classified into one of three actions affecting the process's energy demand or the process or its energy input, or both; the outcome is determined by monitoring changes to the indicators. The paper includes a detailed example of an application of the framework. - Highlights: ► The IEA's definition of energy security is parsed into three energy security indicators: availability, affordability, and acceptability. ► Data flow diagrams and other systems analysis tools can represent an energy system and its processes, flows, and chains. ► Indicator-specific metrics applied to a process's flow determine the state of energy security in an energy system, an energy chain, or process. ► Energy policy is considered as a flow and policy outcomes are obtained by measuring flows with indicator-specific metrics. ► The framework is applicable to most jurisdictions and energy types.

  18. Accessible energy for everybody, a modern challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derdevet, M.

    2011-01-01

    Energy poverty and energy insecurity have suddenly become priority issues in public debate across Europe and in the world at large. Consumer energy vulnerability is now taken very seriously both at national level and by the European Union. This article introduces the concept of energy accessibility, bringing together different individual State ideas, and points out that while causes may be different, consequences are the same. After reviewing the current situation in France, the author indicates several avenues to explore in order to combat the lacunae and reaches the conclusion that a 'Marshall plan' calling on European solidarity would both improve conditions and reinforce Europe's cohesion. (author)

  19. WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS - A TECHNICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RAMESH BABU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind power production has been under the main focus for the past decade in power production and tremendous amount of research work is going on renewable energy, specifically on wind power extraction. Wind power provides an eco-friendly power generation and helps to meet the national energy demand when there is a diminishing trend in terms of non-renewable resources. This paper reviews the modeling of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS, control strategies of controllers and various Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT technologies that are being proposed for efficient production of wind energy from the available resource.

  20. Dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Dark energy research aims to illuminate the mystery of the observed cosmic acceleration, one of the fundamental problems in physics and astronomy today. This book presents a systematic and detailed review of the current state of dark energy research, with the focus on the examination of the major observational techniques for probing dark energy. It can be used as a textbook to train students and others who wish to enter this extremely active field in cosmology.

  1. Oil, gas and other energies, a primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legault, A.

    2007-09-01

    At a time when the topic of energy is front and centre, this book examines the basic concepts that are essential to grasping the energy issues of the 21 st century. Ail the main questions that people have about energy, especially oil and gas, are addressed, providing students, academics, journalists, representatives of government and other institutions and interested readers in general with the information they need to understand the complex, multifaceted energy sector. Abundantly illustrated, this book represents five years of exhaustive research on a fascinating and highly controversial topic. If discusses all the processes related to fossil forms of energy, from the formation of hydrocarbons (crude oil and natural gas) to the delivery of oil and gas to consumers. It also examines renewable energy options and climate change issues in addressing the major geopolitical challenges facing the energy sector. Content: 1 - The Extraordinary History of the Earth; 2 - The Formation of Oil and Gas; 3 - Energy, Past and Present; 4 - Renewable Energies; 5 - The Essence of Oil and Gas; 6 - Geography of Oil and Gas; 7 - The Outlook for Petroleum Prices and Demand Until 2030; 8 - Global Warming; 9 - Liquefied Natural Gas;10 - The Big Three: Russia, China and the United States

  2. Energy knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shove, E. [Lancaster Univ., Centre for the Study of Environmental Change (United Kingdom)

    1997-11-01

    James Thurber`s grandmother `lived the latter years of her life in the horrible suspicion that electricity was dripping invisibly all over the house`. The idea that electricity might leak from empty light sockets is both bizarre and at the same time strangely plausible. Delivered in a variety of forms, gas, electricity, oil, coal, wood etc.; energy permits countless services and is embodied in almost everything we find around us. Both everywhere, and nowhere, it remains a mysterious if not magical feature of everyday life. So the image of leaking light sockets is appealing not just because it is a quaintly ridiculous idea conjured up by a confused old lady but because it precisely articulates lingering uncertainty about the intangible qualities of this most pervasive resource. Taking the invisibility of energy as a point of departure, this paper explores the different kind of knowledge we have of energy use. Although the technologies of domestic energy measurement are familiar enough, we know what a meter looks like and we all get energy bills, it still requires an act of faith to believe in the `reality` of energy consumption. Those who have learned the official languages of energy efficiency have access to richer vocabularies of revealing terminology and can talk more confidently in terms of kilowatts, U values and the rest. But how do these different knowledge relate, and how do different ways of knowing energy influence perceptions of the possibilities and problems of energy conservation? In exploring these issues, the paper re-examines theories of energy and knowledge implicit in energy policy and energy related research. (au) 22 refs.

  3. Ocean energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This annual evaluation is a synthesis of works published in 2006. Comparisons are presented between the wind power performances and European Commission White Paper and Biomass action plan objectives. The sector covers the energy exploitation of all energy flows specifically supplied by the seas and oceans. At present, most efforts in both research and development and in experimental implementation are concentrated on tidal currents and wave power. 90% of today worldwide ocean energy production is represented by a single site: the Rance Tidal Power Plant. Ocean energies must face up two challenges: progress has to be made in finalizing and perfecting technologies and costs must be brought under control. (A.L.B.)

  4. A sustainable energy-system in Latvia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lotte Holmberg

    2003-01-01

    but a negative trade-balance. With this in mind, it is important that Latvia is able to meet the challenge and use the economic development to develop a sustainable energy-system and a sounder trade-balance. A combination of energy planning, national economy and innovation processes in boiler companies will form...

  5. Energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  6. Transporation Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2012-06-30

    This Transportation Energy Project is comprised of four unique tasks which work within the railroad industry to provide solutions in various areas of energy conservation. These tasks addressed: energy reducing yard related decision issues; alternate fuels; energy education, and energy storage for railroad applications. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team examined these areas and provided current solutions which can be used to both provide important reduction in energy usage and system efficiency in the given industry. This project also sought a mode in which rural and long-distance education could be provided. The information developed in each of the project tasks can be applied to all of the rail companies to assist in developing efficiencies.

  7. Wind energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented.

  8. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, F.; Kappelmeyer, O.; Herde, O.A.

    1992-01-01

    Objective of this brochure is to present the subject Geothermics and the possible use of geothermal energy to the public. The following aspects will be refered to: -present energy situation -geothermal potential -use of geothermal energy -environemental aspects -economics. In addition, it presents an up-dated overview of geothermal projects funded by the German government, and a list of institutions and companies active in geothermal research and developments. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Soft energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovins, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    A compact energy concept opposes the existing development course of energy supply. This concept does without projects for opening-up oil and gas occurrences in the Arctic and in offshore seas, and also without a further extension of nuclear energy. Energy consumption is to be stabilized in the long-run on today's level by a utilization of energy which is to be substantially improved in a technical and economic respect. Oil and gas are to be replaced by 'soft', regenerative, mainly decentralized energy sources, in the course of about 30 years time. Solar energy is to be used for heating and service water, biogas as motor fuel being generated primarily from reference which will come from agriculture and forestry. Wind and hydroelectric power are to be used for generating electricity. In the first part, concepts for the present and future energy policy are discussed, in the second part, a lot of figures are given, supporting the respective arguments. In the third part the relationships between social and energy-economic developments are pointed out. (UA) [de

  10. Public acceptance as a mainstay of energy policy planning; Gesellschaftliche Akzeptanz als Saeule der energiepolitischen Zielsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauff, Jochen; Heider, Conrad; Arms, Hanjo [A.T. Kearney, Berlin (Germany); Gerber, Jochen [GVS Netz GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany); Schilling, Martin [Decision Institute, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    How will it be possible in future to implement energy policy in Germany, that is to say carry out major infrastructural projects needed for its energy supply? Aside from new laws for accelerating planning and construction, viable solutions must always be built on trust developed through transparent decision processes and earnest, timely participation procedures. Although the path to public acceptance can be toilsome, current examples show that dedication to the pursuit of a workable energy policy is of crucial importance.

  11. Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  12. Energy fiscality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This report gives a general presentation of energy fiscality in France: taxes on energy, mechanisms of stabilization of government's fiscal incomes in case of significant oil prices change, some particularities of energy taxes, the fiscality according to the energy content and according to the carbon content. The fiscality of petroleum products (automotive fuels and other products), natural gas and electricity in France is presented in appendixes together with a comparison of the fiscality in use in the rest of Europe (automotive fuels, domestic fuels, natural gas and electricity for domestic use and for industrial use). (J.S.)

  13. A common vision of energy risk? Energy securitisation and company perceptions of risk in the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Stoddard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union, energy security is provided by EU institutions, member states and commercial energy companies. However, despite the important role companies play in the provision of European energy security, it is not immediately evident to what extent the interests of the internationally operating energy firms are in line with the energy security preferences held by EU institutions. Analysing this relationship from the perspective of perceptions of energy security and energy business risk, this paper examines the extent to which there is a convergence between the energy securitisation of the European Commission and the observation of business risk as perceived by major European and international energy firms. It finds that while there are some significant areas where Commission securitisation contradicts energy company interests (e.g. climate change and energy prices there is also a high degree of convergence, in particular regarding perceptions of upstream political risk.

  14. Casimir energy of a nonuniform string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, L.; Lambiase, G.; Nesterenko, V. V.

    2000-07-01

    The Casimir energy of a nonuniform string built up from two pieces with different speeds of sound is calculated. A standard procedure of subtracting the energy of an infinite uniform string is applied, the subtraction being interpreted as the renormalization of the string tension. It is shown that in the case of a homogeneous string this method is completely equivalent to zeta renormalization.

  15. A Unique Climate and Energy Policy - Key Problems and Possible Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granic, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses problems of independent application of climate and energy policy. In order to accomplish the goals from The Paris Climate Agreement, an agreement about the goals and measures for climate preservation from 2015, a unique climate and energy policy is suggested, as well as the measures for the implementation of it. To achieve no CO2 and GHG emissions in the energy sector, to have it be completely market based, energy efficient and technologically approved, a unique climate and energy policy is a necessary option and the only viable option to accomplish previously agreed climate goals.(author).

  16. Architecture and energy. Towards a 2020 low-energy strategy; Arkitektur og energi mod en 2020-lavenergistrategi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R.

    2011-07-01

    In the movement towards a 2020 low-energy strategy a more nuanced design process is needed where energy conservation measures are merged and integrated with the need for good thermal indoor climate and good daylight conditions in architecture as a whole. This publication gives an idea on how architects can integrate low-energy strategies step by step early in the design process by utilizing the architecture's spatial and passive energy-saving properties to meet the 2020 low-energy class. (LN)

  17. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Du, H.; Bouchot, V.; Lopez, S.; Bialkowski, A.; Colnot, A.; Rigollet, C.; Sanjuan, B.; Millot, R.; Brach, M.; Asmundsson, R.; Giroud, N.

    2010-01-01

    Geothermal energy has shown a revival for several years and should strongly develop in a near future. Its potentiality is virtually unexhaustible. Its uses are multiple and various: individual and collective space heating, heat networks, power generation, heat storage, heat exchanges etc.. Re-launched by the demand of renewable energy sources, geothermal energy has become credible thanks to the scientific works published recently which have demonstrated its economical and technical relevance. Its image to the public is changing as well. However, lot of work remains to do to make geothermal energy a real industry in France. Several brakes have to be removed rapidly which concern the noise pollution of geothermal facilities, the risk of bad results of drillings, the electricity costs etc. This dossier gives an overview of today's main research paths in the domain of geothermal energy: 1 - geothermal energy in France: historical development, surface and deep resources, ambitions of the French national energy plan (pluri-annual investment plan for heat generation, incentives, regional 'climate-air-energy' schemes), specific regulations; 2 - geothermal energy at the city scale - sedimentary basins: Ile-de-France 40 years of Dogger reservoir exploitation, potentialities of clastic reservoirs - the Chaunoy sandstones example; 3 - geothermal power generation: conventional reservoirs - the Bouillante model (Guadeloupe, French Indies); the Soultz-sous-Forets pilot plant (Bas-Rhin, France); the supercritical reservoirs - the Krafla geothermal area (Iceland). (J.S.)

  18. A Miniature Coupled Bistable Vibration Energy Harvester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, D; Arthur, D C; Beeby, S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the design and test of a miniature coupled bistable vibration energy harvester. Operation of a bistable structure largely depends on vibration amplitude rather than frequency, which makes it very promising for wideband vibration energy harvesting applications. A coupled bistable structure consists of a pair of mobile magnets that create two potential wells and thus the bistable phenomenon. It requires lower excitation to trigger bistable operation compared to conventional bistable structures. Based on previous research, this work focused on miniaturisation of the coupled bistable structure for energy harvesting application. The proposed bistable energy harvester is a combination of a Duffing's nonlinear structure and a linear assisting resonator. Experimental results show that the output spectrum of the miniature coupled bistable vibration energy harvester was the superposition of several spectra. It had a higher maximum output power and a much greater bandwidth compared to simply the Duffing's structure without the assisting resonator

  19. Energy Provider: Delivered Energy Efficiency: A global stock-taking based on case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    In 2011 the IEA and the Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP) took on a work programme focused on the role of energy providers in delivering energy efficiency to end-users. This work was part of the IEA’s contribution to the PEPDEE Task Group, which falls under the umbrella of the International Partnership on Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC). In addition to organizing regional dialogues between governments, regulators, and energy providers, the PEPDEE work stream conducted global stock-takings of regulatory mechanisms adopted by governments to obligate or encourage energy providers to delivery energy savings and the energy savings activities of energy providers. For its part the IEA conducted a global review of energy provider-delivered energy savings programmes. The IEA reached out to energy providers to identify the energy savings activities they engaged in. Some 250 energy saving activities were considered, and 41 detailed case studies spanning 18 countries were developed. Geographic balance was a major consideration, and much effort was expended identifying energy provider-delivered energy savings case studies from around the world. Taken together these case studies represent over USD 1 billion in annual spending, or about 8% of estimated energy provider spending on energy efficiency.

  20. Renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Cheon Seok

    2009-09-01

    This book tells of renewable energy giving description of environment problem, market of renewable energy and vision and economics of renewable energy. It also deals with solar light like solar cell, materials performance, system and merit of solar cell, solar thermal power such as solar cooker and solar collector, wind energy, geothermal energy, ocean energy like tidal power and ocean thermal energy conversion, fuel cell and biomass.

  1. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role that energy storage may have on the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of energy storage, thermal energy storage including sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, thermochemical heat storage, and seasonal heat storage, electricity storage including batteries, pumped hydroelectric storage, compressed air energy storage, and superconducting magnetic energy storage, and production and combustion of hydrogen as an energy storage option

  2. Energy: nuclear energy; Energies: l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, M. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  3. Making the energy transition a European success. Tackling the democratic, innovation, financing and social challenges of the energy union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin-Carlin, Thomas; Vinois, Jean-Arnold; Rubio, Eulalia; Fernandes, Sofia; Delors, Jacques; Letta, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    If there is one project today which carries a positive vision for Europe, it is definitely the energy transition. Energy is the foundation of our nations' power and is a key element in our daily lives. If Europe's architects are preparing a democratic, innovative, economically viable and socially fair Energy Union, it will contribute to a Europe that serves its citizens and paves the way for the rest of the world. If we fail in this project, the architects will have to give way to the fire-fighters, who will exhaust themselves putting out the fires caused by our past mistakes: climate refugees, dependence on Russia and Saudi Arabia, worsened energy poverty, the bankruptcy of energy suppliers who failed to adapt their strategy. The Energy Union, which we have been championing since 2010 and which is currently fully supported by President Juncker, is an ambitious project which can already be bolstered by the successes achieved by the European Union. The USA's withdrawal from the Paris Agreement further strengthens European leadership and enables us to attract innovators and investors who understand the opportunity created by the energy transition. This Report clearly sets out four objectives which could contribute to the success of the Energy Union, and in turn restore trust between Europe and Europeans. - Firstly, democracy must be at the heart of the Energy Union's governance. This involves mechanisms for more direct participation of citizens, local elected representatives and civil society in the major choices which shape national and European energy strategies. - Secondly, Europe must implement a genuine innovation-driven industrial policy to make our companies the world leaders in clean energy. - Thirdly, public and private investment arbitrations must fully integrate the energy transition's objectives. - Fourthly, the Energy Union must serve a just and fair energy transition via a 'Social Pact for the Energy Transition' which strives to create jobs for our

  4. A Nuclear Energy Elective for "Ungineers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R. L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes a course in the technology of nuclear energy which responds to the immediate concerns of students in areas such as environmental effects, weapons effects, national energy needs, and medical and forensic applications. Includes a course outline and description of appropriate textbooks, (GS)

  5. European moves to a communal energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klijs, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has endeavoured to discover whether there is talk of a communal energy policy in the EEC and if so how far are the developments, on what foundation is the policy based and what factors are hindering its realisation. It is concluded that as yet there is scarely any talk of a communual energy policy within the activities of the EEC, although the growing dependence on oil imports is seen as a reason to discuss this policy. The main aim of such a policy is to reduce oil imports from 61% of energy sources in 1973 to 30% in 1985, since the oil from Arab lands is seen as a totally unreliable energy source. A very strong development in nuclear energy is seen as a means of reducing oil imports. The failure of a European energy policy cannot be blamed on the different conceptions of the member states. The choice against oil imports and for nuclear energy is general, and each member is initially trying to make the national energy provision safe. (C.F.)

  6. A right to energy for all

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, M.

    2004-01-01

    DROIT A L'ENERGIE - SOS FUTUR is an International Association constituted under French law. Its aim is to make the Right to Energy a fundamental right for every one. In order to meet the growing requirement for energy, a certain number of conditions need to be fulfilled. These include effectively managing resources, protecting the planet's climate, promoting 'Energy Ethics', and clearing up any inconsistencies. Satisfying these conditions requires a determined mobilization of the resources and key players in the energy field, of the institutions, the public authorities, the operators, the NGOs and the associations, etc. Consequently, DROIT A L'ENERGIE - SOS FUTUR works hard to bring together the various parties involved in order to find long-term solutions by putting forward proposals aimed at: 1) Continuing ongoing work in order to have the Right to Energy recognised as a fundamental right by the main international bodies, 2) Changing the current thinking of companies in the energy sector by creating new assessment criteria other than those based on economic performance (jobs and training, the environmental impact of the activity, CO 2 emissions and the processing of waste, and investments devoted to research and development), Setting up a global electrification agency under the auspices of the United Nations, and... 4) Setting up a fossil fuel monitoring body. (author)

  7. A physicist's views on energy problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revol, Ch.J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The energy problem is one of the most serious challenges facing our civilization. The issue is not whether there are sufficient energy resources in the short- or medium-term, even though world consumption is already considerable, but rather how can we satisfy the world's current and future energy requirements without compromising the planet's ecological balance and how can we ensure an equitable distribution of an acceptable level of energy resources between all countries, including developing countries? The problem has now become a worldwide one with consequences that are also world-wide. The developed countries have lost control of the Earth's ecological future. In 1990 the developing countries consumed only a quarter of the world's energy resources. By 2020 they will already be consuming 60 %. New environmental) friendly technologies will have to be invented to produce sufficient energy at competitive prices. It is not just in the interests of the developed countries to help developing countries to acquire these new technologies, it is also their moral duty to do so. Any injunction to the developing countries not to burn coal and oil as we have done to date would be indefensible. Nuclear energy appears to be one of the possible ways of combating global warming since it produces no CO 2 and is currently the only source or energy capable of meeting demand for several centuries at least. This is the general background to the proposal of Carlo Rubbia and his team of CERN physicists for a new way of exploiting nuclear fission energy which addresses the question: can one imagine fission-based nuclear energy that would be acceptable to our society in other words, an ecological source of nuclear energy? (author)

  8. Casimir energy and a cosmological bounce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Sampaio, Marco

    2006-01-01

    We review different computation methods for the renormalized energy-momentum tensor of a quantized scalar field in an Einstein static universe. For the extensively studied conformally coupled case, we check their equivalence; for different couplings, we discuss violation of different energy conditions. In particular, there is a family of masses and couplings which violate the weak and strong energy conditions but do not lead to spacelike propagation. Amongst these cases is that of a minimally coupled massless scalar field with no potential. We also point out a particular coupling for which a massless scalar field has vanishing renormalized energy-momentum tensor. We discuss the backreaction problem and in particular the possibility that this Casimir energy could both source a short inflationary epoch and avoid the big bang singularity through a bounce

  9. Wind Power: A Renewable Energy Source for Mars Transit Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Kohout, Lisa; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Martian environment presents significant design challenges for the development of power generation systems. Nuclear-based systems may not be available due to political and safety concerns. The output of photovoltaics are limited by a solar intensity of 580 W/sqm as compared to 1353 W/sqm on Earth. The presence of dust particles in the Mars atmosphere will further reduce the photovoltaic output. Also, energy storage for a 12-hour night period must be provided. In this challenging environment, wind power generation capabilities may provide a viable option as a Martian power generation system. This paper provides an analysis of the feasibility of such a system.

  10. Energy confinement in a high-current reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Z.G.; Lee, G.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1985-07-01

    The ion temperature gradient driven (eta/sub i/) mode is proposed as a candidate for the cause of anomalous transport in high current reversed field pinches. A 'four-field' fluid model is derived to describe the coupled nonlinear evolution of resistive interchange and eta/sub i/ modes. A renormalized theory is discussed, and the saturation level of the fluctuations is analytically estimated. Transport scalings are obtained, and their implications discussed. In particular, these results indicate that pellet injection is a potentially viable mechanism for improving energy confinement in a high temperature RFP

  11. Atlas of world energies: is a fair and clean development possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merenne-Schoumaker, B.; Barre, B.; Bailly, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is no possible human activity without a minimum of energy. The differences in the access to energy explains the huge disparities between regions. While developed countries have the possibility to limit their energy consumption without threatening the quality of life of their citizens, the energy needs for the economic development of the rest of the world are enormous. There is no energy production and consumption without harmful effect and environmental impact. This impact is increasing with the population and is threatening the low income groups first. This atlas, rich of more than 200 maps and info-graphies, takes stock of the energy question and allows to understand the different energy stakes that make the core of the 21. century dilemma: how to conciliate the development of societies and the environmental constraints? Can we cultivate even more biofuels without starving the Earth? Is nuclear energy the solution for the environment? Can coal be clean? Are renewable energy sources viable? (J.S.)

  12. Optimal control of a wave energy converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, R.W.M.; Leth, J.; Andersen, P; Heemels, W.P.M.H.

    2017-01-01

    The optimal control strategy for a wave energy converter (WEC) with constraints on the control torque is investigated. The goal is to optimize the total energy delivered to the electricity grid. Using Pontryagin's maximum principle, the solution is found to be singular-bang. Using higher order

  13. Toward buildings with a positive energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visier, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    As the results of the recent 'Grenelle of the Environment', which assembled French officials and organizations for a wide-ranging discussion of ecological issues, enter into application, buildings should gradually switch from being the foremost consumers of energy to becoming producers of energy. The stakes, technically, economically and socially, are enormous

  14. A unified treatment of high energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K.; Ostapchenko, S.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that high energy interactions as different as electron-positron annihilation, deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, proton-proton interactions, and nucleus-nucleus collisions have many features in common. Based upon this observation, a model for all these interactions is constructed which relies on the fundamental hypothesis that the behavior of high energy interactions is universal. (author)

  15. Energy autonomy: a possible technological break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, G.

    2009-01-01

    The energy access is one of the main challenges of our century. The new stakes concern the design of more autonomous products. Two channels are possible to answer this problem: energy saving or design of new products. The author analyzes the second choice with the development of new nuclear reactors, associated to the hydrogen production. (A.L.B.)

  16. A theological view of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    The author presents a theological perspective on nuclear power based on Israel's history, as revealed in the Hebrew Bible and the Alexandrian Greek Septuagint. Nuclear energy is described as God's energy choice for the whole of creation, which can be made as safe as traditional sources

  17. Steps to design a household energy game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnheer, J.D.L.; van Oostendorp, H.

    2016-01-01

    Research where gamification is used to influence household energy consumption is an emerging field. This paper reviews the design and effectiveness of ten games that aim to influence household energy consumption and presents a novel gamification approach in which real world activities are

  18. Energy, a crucial environmental subject. Special issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In this issue of the magazine ArenA special attention is paid the use of energy in the Netherlands, the related problems and solutions, and the agenda for the Section Energy of the Dutch Association of Environmental Professionals (VVM) resulting from the technological, administrative and economical problems and solutions

  19. Energy use behaviour: A window of opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    The environmental impact of electric vehicles depends on the kind of energy used to charge them. They are typically charged at peak times, when extra fossil fuels are needed to meet energy demands. A study shows that e-mails targeting electric vehicle charging for new owners can be effective for promoting greener charging behaviours.

  20. Nuclear power. A cornerstone of energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, H.R.; Harvey, M.

    1985-09-01

    Energy options for Canada are examined. Increasing difficulties with oil and gas supplies will induce a growth in electricity demand beyond that presently projected. Nuclear power is the only option that can supply as much energy as needed for as long as needed at predictable costs and with minimal environmental effects

  1. Nuclear Energy, a way for tomorrow spacecrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    To better explore the solar system, the NASA will uses new propulsion modes, in particular the nuclear energy. These articles present the research programs in the domain and the particularities of the nuclear energy in the projects. (A.L.B.)

  2. Motivated creativity: A conservation of energy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskes, M.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation developed a novel conservation of energy principle to explain how approach and avoidance motivation influence performance. On the one hand, we showed that avoidance motivated people can excel when they are sufficiently stimulated to invest their energy and cognitive resources. This

  3. Energy sustainability through green energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Atul

    2015-01-01

    This book shares the latest developments and advances in materials and processes involved in the energy generation, transmission, distribution and storage. Chapters are written by researchers in the energy and materials field. Topics include, but are not limited to, energy from biomass, bio-gas and bio-fuels; solar, wind, geothermal, hydro power, wave energy; energy-transmission, distribution and storage; energy-efficient lighting buildings; energy sustainability; hydrogen and fuel cells; energy policy for new and renewable energy technologies and education for sustainable energy development

  4. Wind energy's role in a deregulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The current status of wind energy in Canada was the focus of this presentation. Wind energy is the fastest growing source of new electrical power in the world. In 1997 the world-wide capacity was 1495 MW, with Germany (535 MW), Spain (263 MW) and Denmark (259 MW) leading the way. It is clear that Canadian markets lag behind the world in recognizing the value of wind energy. The rationale for this is economic downturn, cheap hydrocarbon energy, a closed electricity market, minimal commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, and a significant oversupply of installed capacity. Nevertheless, there are many potential benefits for Canadian grids by wind generated electricity, not the least of which are tangible reductions in carbon emissions per kWh. It was noted that significant risk reductions have resulted from size and technological improvements. Besides being environmentally benign, wind energy also provides unequaled opportunities for load matching, distributed generation, and low operating and ongoing fuel costs. Aggressive marketers such as Enron and Vision Quest have predicted that because of these advantages, and the willingness of many potential customers to pay more for 'green' energy, renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, will capture a significant share of the world energy market over the next 20 years. tabs., figs

  5. Regulatory frameworks for decentralised energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodman, Bridget; Baker, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers aspects of the current regulatory frameworks for markets and infrastructure which can inhibit the deployment of decentralised energy. The government has stated that decentralised energy can make a positive contribution to reducing the UK's carbon emissions, but recognises that at the moment the technologies face market and regulatory barriers. If it is to become a viable alternative to centralised generation, energy market design and the regulation of energy infrastructure will have to evolve to ensure that decentralised options are no longer locked out. (author)

  6. Operation optimization of a distributed energy system considering energy costs and exergy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Somma, M.; Yan, B.; Bianco, N.; Graditi, G.; Luh, P.B.; Mongibello, L.; Naso, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation optimization model of a Distributed Energy System (DES). • Multi-objective strategy to optimize energy cost and exergy efficiency. • Exergy analysis in building energy supply systems. - Abstract: With the growing demand of energy on a worldwide scale, improving the efficiency of energy resource use has become one of the key challenges. Application of exergy principles in the context of building energy supply systems can achieve rational use of energy resources by taking into account the different quality levels of energy resources as well as those of building demands. This paper is on the operation optimization of a Distributed Energy System (DES). The model involves multiple energy devices that convert a set of primary energy carriers with different energy quality levels to meet given time-varying user demands at different energy quality levels. By promoting the usage of low-temperature energy sources to satisfy low-quality thermal energy demands, the waste of high-quality energy resources can be reduced, thereby improving the overall exergy efficiency. To consider the economic factor as well, a multi-objective linear programming problem is formulated. The Pareto frontier, including the best possible trade-offs between the economic and exergetic objectives, is obtained by minimizing a weighted sum of the total energy cost and total primary exergy input using branch-and-cut. The operation strategies of the DES under different weights for the two objectives are discussed. The operators of DESs can choose the operation strategy from the Pareto frontier based on costs, essential in the short run, and sustainability, crucial in the long run. The contribution of each energy device in reducing energy costs and the total exergy input is also analyzed. In addition, results show that the energy cost can be much reduced and the overall exergy efficiency can be significantly improved by the optimized operation of the DES as compared with the

  7. Energy Storage System for a Pulsed DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.; Cortes, M.; Mendez, P.; Maisonnier, D.; Hayward, J.

    2006-01-01

    Several designs have been proposed for DEMO, some of which will operate in pulsed mode. Since a fusion power plant will be required to deliver continuous output, this challenge must be solved. For the reference DEMO, energy storage is required at a level of 250 MWhe with a capability of delivering a power of 1 GWe. Although DEMO is scheduled to be built in about 30 years, the design of the energy storage system must be based on current technology, focusing on commercially available products and on their expected future trends. From a thorough review of the different technologies available, thermal energy storage, compressed air energy storage, water pumping, fuel cells, batteries, flywheels and ultracapacitors are the most promising solutions to energy storage for a pulsed DEMO. An outline of each of these technologies is described in the paper, showing its basis, features, advantages and disadvantages for this application. Following this review, the most suitable methods capable of storing the required energy are examined. Fuel cells are not suitable due to the power requirement. Compressed air energy storage has a lower efficiency than the required one. Thermal energy storage, based on molten salts, so more energy can be stored with a better efficiency, and water pumping are shown as the main solutions, based on existing technology. However, those are not the only solutions capable of solving our challenge. Hydrogen production, using water electrolysis, hydrogen storage and combustion in a combined cycle can achieve our energy and power requirements with an acceptable efficiency. All these solutions are studied in detail and described, evaluating their current cost and efficiency in order to compare them all. (author)

  8. Energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    The author first discusses the various concepts and definitions associated with energy needs, and then the difference between actual needs and energy needs by distinguishing personal needs, needs of the productive sector, energetic needs and services. In the next part, he discusses how energy needs are assessed. He discusses the relationship between energy needs and energy consumption, how energy consumptions can be analysed and interpreted. He comments how energy needs can be assessed and analysed in time and in space. He notices and explains why economy and climate are the main causes of spatial differences for energy needs per habitant, and comments the evolution of energy consumption over long periods

  9. Energy resources

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Andrew L

    1975-01-01

    Energy Resources mainly focuses on energy, including its definition, historical perspective, sources, utilization, and conservation. This text first explains what energy is and what its uses are. This book then explains coal, oil, and natural gas, which are some of the common energy sources used by various industries. Other energy sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, water, and nuclear energy sources are also tackled. This text also looks into fusion energy and techniques of energy conversion. This book concludes by explaining the energy allocation and utilization crisis. This publ

  10. Geothermal Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluska, Oscar P.; Tangir, Daniel; Perri, Matias S.

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of geothermal energy is given that includes a short description of the active and stable areas in the world. The possibilities of geothermal development in Argentina are analyzed taking into account the geothermal fields of the country. The environmental benefits of geothermal energy are outlined

  11. FY 2009 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Annual Report: A Year of Energy Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-01-01

    This FY2009 Annual Report surveys the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) accomplishments in renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development, commercialization and deployment of technologies, and strategic energy analysis. It offers NREL's vision and progress in building a clean, sustainable research campus and reports on community involvement.

  12. World energy outlook 2006: the International energy Agency (I.E.A.) report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Between the increasing of energy consumption and then, increasing of carbon dioxide emissions, and the decreasing of hydrocarbon reserves it is urgent to find others energy supplies strategies. The nuclear energy is able to bring a determining contribution to the solution of the world energy problem. (N.C.)

  13. Creating a sustainable energy future for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneborn, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A joint industry approach is needed to put in place a sustainable energy system that is economically and technologically feasible. The industry sectors involved must include the renewable energy industry, energy efficiency industry and the natural gas industry. Conventional forecasts of energy futures make far less use of these industries than is economically and technically feasible. Existing forecasts make the trade off between acceptable levels of economic growth, limitation of greenhouse gases and dependence on coal and oil appear more difficult than they actually are and overlook the benefits of sustainable energy industry development. This paper outlines how national gains from carefully targeted action can exceed national losses while substantially reducing greenhouse gases and creating jobs at zero or negative costs. (author). 3 figs., 27 refs

  14. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Alice L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

  15. Nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development, which emerged from the report of the 1987 World Commission on Environment and Development (the Brundtland report), is of increasing interest to policy makers and the public. In the energy sector, sustainable development policies need to rely on a comparative assessment of alternative options, taking into account their economic, health, environmental and social aspects, at local, regional and global levels. This publication by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency investigates nuclear energy from a sustainable development perspective, and highlights the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in this respect. It provides data and analyses that may help in making trades-off and choices in the energy and electricity sectors at the national level, taking into account country-specific circumstances and priorities. It will be of special interest to policy makers in the nuclear and energy fields

  16. Developing a retail energy service business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleckaitis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Opportunities in the retail energy market and some of the steps that Consumersfirst Ltd. plans to take to carve out an appropriate niche for itself in what is expected to be a fiercely competitive deregulated energy market in Ontario are discussed. The major components of Consumersfirst Ltd's (Canadian division of IPLE's retail energy services), are a multi-faceted energy strategy, featuring unbundling Consumers Gas, acquisition of complementary enterprises such as e.g. HVAC contractors, investigation of green energy opportunities, and alliances and joint ventures with companies providing complementary services, such as e.g. Hydro-Quebec. The critical success factors, as always, are understanding customer needs, defining clear and differentiated value propositions, delivering on promises, selecting the right people for the job, and taking the longer-term view. Most important of all is to realize that there is no proven or single 'end state' model as markets are constantly evolving. figs

  17. Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  18. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role wind energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of wind energy use, the wind energy resource, wind energy technology including intermediate-size and small wind turbines and intermittency of wind power, public attitudes toward wind power, and environmental, siting and land use issues

  19. A hybrid energy efficient building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calay, Rajnish Kaur; Wang, Wen Chung

    2013-01-01

    The present paper presents a high performance cooling/heating ventilation system using a rotary heat exchanger (RHE), together with a reverse-cycle heat pump (RCHP) that can be integrated with various heat sources. Energy consumption in the building sector is largely dominated by the energy consumed in maintaining comfortable conditions indoors. For example in many developed countries the building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems consume up to 50% of the total energy consumed in buildings. Therefore energy efficient HVAC solutions in buildings are critical for realising CO 2 targets at local and global level. There are many heating/cooling concepts that rely upon renewable energy sources and/or use natural low temperature heat sources in the winter and heat sinks in the summer. In the proposed system, waste energy from the exhaust air stream is used to precondition the outdoor air before it is supplied into the building. The hybrid system provides heating in the winter and cooling in the summer without any need for additional heating or cooling devices as required in conventional systems. Its performance is better than a typical reheat or air conditioning system in providing the same indoor air quality (IAQ) levels. It is shown that an energy saving up to 60% (heat energy) is achieved by using the proposed hybrid system in building ventilation applications. -- Highlights: • Hybrid ventilation system: the hybrid ventilation system uses a rotating regenerator and a reversible heat pump. • Heat recovery: heat recovery from exhaust air stream by rotary wheel type heat exchanger. • Reversible cycle heat pump (RCHP): additional heating or cooling of the supply air is provided by the RCHP. • Energy efficiency: energy savings of up to 60% using the proposed system are achievable

  20. Energy conservation in India: a profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The decade and half since the oil crisis of 1973 has been a period that has witnessed a steady growth of the energy conservation ethos in India. Housekeeping and low risk conservation options have been largely preferred so far. The IMWG (Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Utilization and Conservation of Energy) study did not evaluate potential saving through the introduction of high risk and high pay-off technologies. The potential for energy conservation in India is substantial. However, some of the barriers to achieving the potential in the past have been energy prices which deviate from rational tariffs and prices, a lack of information on specific measures and of options for achieving energy conservation, paucity of capital for schemes requiring technology upgradation and efficiency improvements, and the inadequacy if institutional arrangement for promoting energy conservation in different sectors of the economy. Recent efforts pursued by several organizations however provide some basis for optimism. Given the growing capital intensity of the energy sector in India, more vigorous efforts are likely to be made in the future. In particular, success stories in some industrial units indicate that decentralized efforts by the units themselves can achieve a great deal in improving the efficiency of energy use, particularly in the Indian industry. Policies to promote such programmes would help accelerate energy conservation efforts in industrial units and in other sectors. It is therefore hoped that the intensity of energy use in several sectors of the indian economy will be reduced significantly in the coming years. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Focus on energy conservation: a project list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    The Urban Land Institute (ULI) has prepared the following list of outstanding energy conserving projects for the US Department of Energy. As requested by the Department, the list includes descriptions of land developments and individual buildings suggested by members of ULI and by other sources. The projects have been selected to exemplify the major energy saving techniques in use today, with emphasis on those strategies most significant for people engaged in the business of land development. To make the list a useful reference for developers and public officials, ULI has attempted to cover energy conservation in the broadest sense from overall site planning to the functioning of individual building components. Focusing too closely on the myriad types of hardware available has been avoided and examples of the basic considerations important to energy-conscious planning and design are provided. Details on some heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems are provided in order to acquaint readers with major innovations in the field.

  2. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, D.F.; Brady, L.L.; Newell, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U. S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  3. Renewable energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgitte Egelund

    2016-01-01

    Renewable energy projects are increasingly confronted by local opposition, which delays and sometimes even prevents their implementation. This reflects the frequent gap between support for the general idea of renewables as a strategy for reducing carbon emissions, and acceptance of renewable energy...

  4. Energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1972-01-01

    A study carried out around 1970 on the world energy future is described. One method is based on world energy evaluations extrapolated to 1985 and 2000. The other one is prospective and tries to account for changes in life style and technology and relations with the developing countries [fr

  5. Energy future Santa Cruz. A citizens plan for energy self-reliance: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J.; Stayton, R.

    A grassroots energy conservation project which involved more than 3100 residents of Santa Cruz, California, is discussed. Citizens attended forums and town meetings to suggest ideas for solving the community's energy problems. These ideas were then evaluated by the Energy Future Advisory Board and compiled into the Energy Future Plan. The plan covers such topics as new residences, residential retrofit, automobile efficiency, farm efficiency, commercial greenhouses, local food production, commercial efficiency, land use planning, energy eduction and financing, and solar, wind, and ocean energy. If the plan is successfully implemented, the energy that the community is projected to use in 1991 can be lowered by 24 to 35 percent.

  6. The energy broadening resulting from electron stripping process of a low energy Au- beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniike, Akira; Sasao, Mamiko; Hamada, Yasuji; Fujita, Junji; Wada, Motoi.

    1994-12-01

    Energy loss spectra of Au + ions produced from Au - ions by electron stripping in He, Ar, Kr and Xe have been measured in the impact energy range of 24-44 keV. The energy broadening of the Au + beam increases as the beam energy increases, and the spectrum shows a narrower energy width for heavy target atoms. The dependence of the spectrum width upon the beam energy and that upon the target mass are well described by the calculation based on the unified potential and semi-classical internal energy transfer model of Firsov's. (author)

  7. Energy Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus T.; Madsen, Dines; Christiensen, Thomas

    Energy measurement has become an important aspect of our daily lives since we have learned that energy consumption, is one of the main source of global warming. Measuring instruments varies from a simple watt-meter to more sophisticated microprocessor control devices. The negative effects...... that fossil fuels induce on our environment has forced us to research renewable energy such as sunlight, wind etc. This new environmental awareness has also helped us to realize the importance of monitoring and controlling our energy use. The main purpose in this research is to introduce a more sophisticated...... but affordable way to monitor energy consumption of individuals or groups of home appliances. By knowing their consumption the utilization can be regulated for more efficient use. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate our idea....

  8. Nuclear energy: a safe and environmentally sound energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perves, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    After having recalled some data regarding the impact on health of different sources of electricity production (coal, oil, nuclear) and air pollution, the author proposes an overview of the impact of nuclear energy on health and on the environment. As far as the impact on health is concerned, he briefly describes the impact of ionizing radiations and the associated cancer risk, how to protect oneself against radioactivity and ionizing radiations. He addresses how risks are managed in nuclear industrial installations: principles (prevention, control, and return on experience), defence in-depth (example of French nuclear plants). He addresses issues of protection of persons and of the environment in different cases: normal operating conditions, releases and wastes, transport of nuclear wastes and materials, dismantling operations. He comments the consequences and lessons learned from accidents (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Fukushima), and finally evokes the situation in France and the concerns about the Cigeo project

  9. Tidal energy, a renewable energy within hand reach; Les marees, une energie renouvelable a portee de lune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielo, O.

    2011-06-15

    Tide energy and oceanic current energy represent a strong potentiality for a few countries in the world including France. In the domain of tidal energy there are 2 strategies. The first one is based on the search for the lowest power production cost in order to contribute efficiently to the country's energy mix. Generally this strategy leads to the construction of tidal dams. The second strategy is based on the search for the lowest environmental impact. This strategy is economically competitive only in places where electrical power is expensive like isolated islands. This strategy is illustrated by the tidal power station of the Alderney island. In fact the amount of energy delivered by a tidal power station depends on the rise of the tide and on the surface of the dam. It appears that tidal dams require less surface that hydroelectric power plants. The energy of oceanic currents like Gulf Stream or the thermal energy of oceans or wave power are very little exploited now but represent a potentiality higher by several orders of magnitude than tidal energy. (A.C.)

  10. Ocean energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, R.H.; Justus, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    This timely volume provides a comprehensive review of current technology for all ocean energies. It opens with an analysis of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), with and without the use of an intermediate fluid. The historical and economic background is reviewed, and the geographical areas in which this energy could be utilized are pinpointed. The production of hydrogen as a side product, and environmental consequences of OTEC plants are considered. The competitiveness of OTEC with conventional sources of energy is analysed. Optimisation, current research and development potential are also examined. Separate chapters provide a detailed examination of other ocean energy sources. The possible harnessing of solar ponds, ocean currents, and power derived from salinity differences is considered. There is a fascinating study of marine winds, and the question of using the ocean tides as a source of energy is examined, focussing on a number of tidal power plant projects, including data gathered from China, Australia, Great Britain, Korea and the USSR. Wave energy extraction has excited recent interest and activity, with a number of experimental pilot plants being built in northern Europe. This topic is discussed at length in view of its greater chance of implementation. Finally, geothermal and biomass energy are considered, and an assessment of their future is given. The authors also distinguished between energy schemes which might be valuable in less-industrialized regions of the world, but uneconomical in the developed countries. A large number of illustrations support the text. This book will be of particular interest to energy economists, engineers, geologists and oceanographers, and to environmentalists and environmental engineers

  11. Sustainable energy system. A case study from Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebremedhin, A.; Karlsson, B. [Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Bjoernfot, K. [Shell Raffinaderi AB, Torslandavaegen, Box 8889, SE-402 72 (Sweden)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents some of the results of a power system analysis for Chile. The two major Chilean electric systems are roughly modelled and optimized using a linear programming method with the option to integrate renewable energy sources like wind power, solar power, mini-hydropower and biomass-fired power and also 'municipal waste'. A total of four different scenarios are outlined: reference system, new production units, gas and coal price variations and a policy measure to encourage power production based on renewable energy. The objective of the scenarios was to illustrate under what conditions integration of the different energy sources in the existing production system is possible. The study shows that even under current conditions, mini-hydro and waste to energy plants are economically viable. Wind power might be interesting alternatives if policy instrument measures are applied. On the other hand, it is hard for the other energy sources to enter the system even when higher price levels of gas and coal are applied. The system is more sensitive to coal price increases than to gas price increases and this mainly encourages CO{sub 2} emission reduction. (author)

  12. Energy flow around a moving dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H; Kirchner, H O K

    2009-01-01

    A dislocation moving in a lattice emits lattice waves. We study the energy flow accompanying the lattice wave emission in a molecular dynamics situation. About two thirds of the static free energy are emitted as lattice waves from the moving dislocation. Work done by the region around the dislocation helps to initiate the motion from the unstable equilibrium state under a small applied stress, or to compensate the energy emitted as lattice waves when the dislocation makes a long distance motion under a larger stress.

  13. News: energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willot, D.

    2003-01-01

    At the beginning of 2003 the French government launched a national debate about the energies. 6 conferences are due to be held during the first semester. The opening conference in Paris was dedicated to the distribution of energy resources in the world, to the struggle against climate warming and to the opening and deregulation of markets. The following conferences that will take place in Strasbourg, Nice, Bordeaux and Rennes will focus on topics such as controlling the energy consumption in industries, companies and households, and reviewing the pros and cons of the different sources of energy. The ending conference will be held in Paris, the participants will try to find consistencies in the previous debates and will draw some conclusions that will help the French authorities to define the next energy policy. (A.C.)

  14. Energy questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Working Paper is about the energy crisis. Its chief aim is to give a lot of information about the various sources of energy and the problems about the supply and the use of them. It is in five parts. Part One illustrates the importance of energy in the world economy and particularly in Britain. Part Two describes the various sources of energy; coal, oil, gas, electricity and nuclear, and discusses the renewable sources and energy conservation. Part Three gives arguments for and against a nuclear future. Part Four describes the debate in the Churches on the nuclear option and Part Five sets out some theological and ethical themes relevant to responsible decision making on these matters. (author)

  15. Energy Magazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The present issue of the Energy Magazine is including a summary of the six years of implementation of the energy and sustainable development project, which also includes the participation of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). The substantially parameters and indicators defined by this project have been applied in case studies for Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and El Salvador and have yielded sound results. A few pages are dedicated to highlight the preliminary results stemming from the initiative aimed at promoting hydropower projects that OLADE started with the Government of Quebec last year. The main themes included are: Energy efficiency in OLADE-GTZ cooperation. Liberalization and energy development, Energy statistics

  16. Energy quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, David I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops economic definitions of energy quality for individual fuels and energy aggregates. There are use- and exchange-value concepts, as well as marginal and total measures, of energy quality. A factor augmentation or quality coefficients approach corresponds to the use-value definition while indicators based on distance functions and relative prices are exchange-value based definitions. These indicators are identical when the elasticity of substitution between fuels is infinity but diverge or cannot be computed for other interfuel elasticities of substitution. When the elasticity of substitution is zero only the quality coefficients approach is defined. I also show that 1) the ratio of an energy volume index to aggregate joules cannot be considered a complete indicator of aggregate energy quality as it does not account for quality changes in the component fuels 2) demand curve integrals do not provide information on relative use-values or fuel qualities when the elasticity of substitution is unity or less. (author)

  17. Energy quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, David I. [Arndt-Corden Division of Economics, Crawford School of Economics and Government and Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    This paper develops economic definitions of energy quality for individual fuels and energy aggregates. There are use- and exchange-value concepts, as well as marginal and total measures, of energy quality. A factor augmentation or quality coefficients approach corresponds to the use-value definition while indicators based on distance functions and relative prices are exchange-value based definitions. These indicators are identical when the elasticity of substitution between fuels is infinity but diverge or cannot be computed for other interfuel elasticities of substitution. When the elasticity of substitution is zero only the quality coefficients approach is defined. I also show that 1) the ratio of an energy volume index to aggregate joules cannot be considered a complete indicator of aggregate energy quality as it does not account for quality changes in the component fuels 2) demand curve integrals do not provide information on relative use-values or fuel qualities when the elasticity of substitution is unity or less. (author)

  18. Survey report on establishing a new energy and energy saving vision in Fukui Prefecture; Fukuiken shin energy sho energy vision sakutei chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Surveys and discussions were given on establishing a new energy and energy saving vision in Fukui Prefecture. The energy consumption in Fukui Prefecture for fiscal 1996 was 25242 x 1 billion kcal, being 0.7% of the nation's total consumption. The per capita energy consumption is about a little greater than the national average. The energy consumption structure is characterized by large consumption in the transportation department, especially in automotive consumption. Carbon dioxide discharge is as little as being ranked 13th among all the prefectures in Japan. The availability and usable quantity of new energies in Fukui Prefecture is estimated as 1659939 x 10{sup 3} kWh/year as electric power, 9436 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year as gas, and 3536720 x 10{sup 6} kcal/year as heat. Energies could be saved most greatly by enhancing automotive fuel consumption rate, followed by effects of energy saving activities based on spontaneous action plans established by the industrial departments. New energies selected to be worked on importantly include: solar energy power generation, wind power generation, clean energy fueled automobiles, wastes energy, co-generation and solar heat. (NEDO)

  19. Energy policy in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddle, R.

    1997-01-01

    The outlook of world energy markets was described with a focus on the prospects for oil and gas supply and reserves. Implications of this outlook for energy policy-making were discussed. The three major projections of world primary energy demand were described. According to these projections world primary energy demand will grow steadily. Demand is expected to rise 46 per cent between now and 2010. Fossil-based fuels will account for almost 90 per cent of total primary energy demand in 2010 which is about the same share as today. A structural shift in the shares of different regions in world commercial energy demand is likely to occur, i.e. the OECD share of world energy demand will fall in favour of that of the developing regions. It was also projected that oil will remain the dominant fuel with a share of about 40 per cent in 2010. World gas demand was also projected to grow at an average annual rate of 3 per cent over the outlook period. The rising fossil fuel consumption implies rising greenhouse gas emissions. It was noted that by 2010, without active policy intervention to change the course of energy demand, the world energy-related carbon emissions could be almost 50 per cent greater than 1990 levels. It was suggested that the main role for governments should be to establish a framework to enable competitive energy markets to function efficiently while ensuring that energy security and environmental concerns are addressed. Emergency response measures should be maintained in relation to oil, and the implications of growing dependence on imports of oil and gas from remote and potentially insecure countries should be monitored. The role of government should also include regulation of the environmental consequences of energy supply and use at the local, regional and global level. Government should also regulate the natural monopoly elements of the grid-based industries. There is also a role for government in continuing to encourage research and development

  20. Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Energy Drinks Share: © Thinkstock Energy drinks are widely promoted as products that increase ... people has been quite effective. Next to multivitamins, energy drinks are the most popular dietary supplement consumed ...

  1. Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  2. The Durham Strategic Energy Alliance : building a roadmap to meet Ontario's present and future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, K.; Lindeblom, D.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge facing Ontario in gaining access to affordable, flexible and reliable energy at a time when energy demand is escalating was discussed. The Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA) was created in 2005 to position Ontario's Durham Region as a Canadian leader in timely, sustainable and reliable energy solutions. Durham employs about 10,000 workers directly in the energy industry. The region also produces nearly 30 per cent of the province's power from local generating stations. It is also home to an energy focused teaching and research institution at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. The DSEA is composed of business, industry, government and academic institutions committed to taking action on advancing energy solutions in all aspects of the energy life-cycle. Members have a stake in promoting sustainable energy solutions in energy supply and generation, manufacturing of energy solutions, transmission, distribution, conservation and/or consumption of all forms of energy. Since its creation, the DSEA has taken measures to exploit the energy opportunities in Durham Region and plans to significantly expand its activities in the future, particularly in building commercialization capabilities through an energy cluster. New links and formalized networks will be established to achieve this goal. Innovative networks will be developed to connect Durham's academic community with business, industry and energy clusters which are developing globally. The overall DSEA strategy is to develop Durham's energy cluster so that it evolves quickly into Ontario's energy commercialization center. There are three areas where such strategy will be recognized: energy technology adoption/demonstration centre; energy technology adoption officer; and, energy cluster outreach/network. 1 fig

  3. System Energy Assessment (SEA, Defining a Standard Measure of EROI for Energy Businesses as Whole Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Zarnikau

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A more objective method for measuring the energy needs of businesses, System Energy Assessment (SEA, measures the combined impacts of material supply chains and service supply chains, to assess businesses as whole self-managing net-energy systems. The method is demonstrated using a model Wind Farm, and defines a physical measure of their energy productivity for society (EROI-S, a ratio of total energy delivered to total energy expended. Energy use records for technology and proxy measures for clearly understood but not individually recorded energy uses for services are combined for a whole system estimate of consumption required for production. Current methods count only energy needs for technology. Business services outsource their own energy needs to operate, leaving no traceable record. That uncounted business energy demand is often 80% of the total, an amount of “dark energy” hidden from view, discovered by finding the average energy estimated needs for businesses far below the world average energy consumed per dollar of GDP. Presently for lack of information the energy needs of business services are counted to be “0”. Our default assumption is to treat them as “average”. The result is a hard measure of total business demand for energy services, a “Scope 4” energy use or GHG impact assessment. Counting recorded energy uses and discounting unrecorded ones misrepresents labor intensive work as highly energy efficient. The result confirms a similar finding by Hall et al. in 1981 [1]. We use exhaustive search for what a business needs to operate as a whole, tracing internal business relationships rather than energy data, to locate its natural physical boundary as a working unit, and so define a business as a physical rather than statistical subject of scientific study. See also online resource materials and notes [2].

  4. Energy alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    English. A special committe of the Canadian House of Commons was established on 23 May 1980 to investigate the use of alternative energy sources such as 'gasohol', liquified coal, solar energy, methanol, wind and tidal power, biomass, and propane. In its final report, the committee envisions an energy system for Canada based on hydrogen and electricity, using solar and geothermal energy for low-grade heat. The committe was not able to say which method of generating electricty would dominate in the next century, although it recommends that fossil fuels should not be used. The fission process is not specifically discussed, but the outlook for fusion was investigated, and continued governmental support of fusion research is recommended. The report proposes some improvements in governmental energy organizations and programs

  5. A Comparative Review of a Dozen National Energy Plans. Focus on Renewable and Efficient Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); James, Ted L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Dozens of groups have submitted energy, environmental, and economic recovery plans for consideration by the Obama administration and the 111th Congress. This report provides a comparative analysis of 12 national proposals, focusing especially on energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) market and policy issues.

  6. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...... velocity c/n, where n is the complex index of refraction. The angle-resolved energy-loss spectrum of a Drude conductor is analyzed in detail and it is shown that the low-energy peak due to Ohmic losses is enhanced compared to the classical approximation....

  7. Biomass a fast growing energy resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    Biomass as an energy resource is as versatile as the biodiversity suggests. The global net primary production, NPP, describes the annual growth of biomass on land and in the seas. This paper focuses on biomass grown on land. A recent estimate for the NPP on land is 120 billion tons of dry matter. How much of this biomass are available for energy purposes? The potential contribution of wood fuel and energy plants from sustainable production is limited to some 5% of NPP, i.e. 6 Bt. One third of the potential is energy forests and energy plantations which at present are not economic. One third is used in rural areas as traditional fuel. The remaining third would be available for modern biomass energy conversion. Biomass is assigned an expanding role as a new resource in the world's energy balance. The EU has set a target of doubling the share of renewable energy sources by 2010. For biomass the target is even more ambitious. The challenge for biomass utilization lies in improving the technology for traditional usage and expanding the role into other areas like power production and transportation fuel. Various technologies for biomass utilization are available among those are combustion, gasification, and liquefaction. Researchers have a grand vision in which the chemical elements in the hydrocarbon molecules of biomass are separated and reformed to yield new tailored fuels and form the basis for a new world economy. The vision of a new energy system based on fresh and fossilized biomass to be engineered into an environmentally friendly and sustainable fuel is a conceivable technical reality. One reason for replacing exhaustible fossil fuels with biomass is to reduce carbon emissions. The most efficient carbon dioxide emission reduction comes from replacing brown coal in a steam-electric unit, due to the efficiency of the thermal cycle and the high carbon intensity of the coal. The smallest emission reduction comes from substituting natural gas. (BA)

  8. Energy prospects for the Mediterranean area through 2030: a sustainable energy future requires a real energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Jannet-Allal, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean Energy Observatory (MEO), an association of the main energy companies around the Mediterranean, celebrated its 20. anniversary last October. For that occasion, the organisation published a special edition of its magazine GEM, Global Energy for the Mediterranean, which, apart from covering the history of the association, presents an in-depth analysis of the Mediterranean energy market in 2011 and its prospects going out to 2030. This collective assessment, undertaken by a team from MEG, benefited from the expertise of several members of the organization, as well as the inputs from well-known experts from the energy sector. The same survey has also been reviewed in the May 2012 issue of the specialist publication Medenergie. This article has been drawn from that study. (author)

  9. Energy mix of the future will be a mosaic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.

    2000-01-01

    parallel path approach by major oil companies of using the profitability of the core business to finance new investments in clean energy development as a way to position themselves for the future when public demand and the economics of new technologies converge toward making a mix of conventional and renewable energy sources an economically viable proposition

  10. Energy mix of the future will be a mosaic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.

    2000-06-30

    by the parallel path approach by major oil companies of using the profitability of the core business to finance new investments in clean energy development as a way to position themselves for the future when public demand and the economics of new technologies converge toward making a mix of conventional and renewable energy sources an economically viable proposition.

  11. Defusing the Energy Trap: The Potential of Energy-Denominated Currencies to Facilitate a Sustainable Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouridis, Sgouris

    2014-01-01

    The universal adoption of fiat currencies and of the fractional reserve banking system coincided with access to and ability to utilize energy-dense fossil fuels leading to unprecedented rates of economic expansion. The depletion of economically recoverable fossil fuels though sets the stage for systemic crises as it is not adequately priced in the current market system. An energy-based system of exchange can be adopted in parallel to or in place of fiat currencies in order to facilitate a sustainable energy transition (SET) and mitigate the impacts of such crises. Energy-backed and energy-referenced currencies are discussed as two possible variants for their ability to realign the economic system to the thermodynamic limits of the physical world. The primary advantage of an energy-referenced currency over the current mechanisms for SET (like feed-in-tariffs or carbon taxes) is realized with the decoupling of the monetary and credit functions, especially when debt is tied to future energy availability. While energy-backed (credit) systems can be easier to adopt on a regional scale, the full transition to an energy-reference currency system requires significant reform of the financial and monetary system although it would not radically disrupt the current economic valuations given the high degree of correlation between value and embodied energy.

  12. Defusing the Energy Trap: The Potential of Energy-Denominated Currencies to Facilitate a Sustainable Energy Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouridis, Sgouris, E-mail: ssgouridis@alum.mit.edu [Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-02-26

    The universal adoption of fiat currencies and of the fractional reserve banking system coincided with access to and ability to utilize energy-dense fossil fuels leading to unprecedented rates of economic expansion. The depletion of economically recoverable fossil fuels though sets the stage for systemic crises as it is not adequately priced in the current market system. An energy-based system of exchange can be adopted in parallel to or in place of fiat currencies in order to facilitate a sustainable energy transition (SET) and mitigate the impacts of such crises. Energy-backed and energy-referenced currencies are discussed as two possible variants for their ability to realign the economic system to the thermodynamic limits of the physical world. The primary advantage of an energy-referenced currency over the current mechanisms for SET (like feed-in-tariffs or carbon taxes) is realized with the decoupling of the monetary and credit functions, especially when debt is tied to future energy availability. While energy-backed (credit) systems can be easier to adopt on a regional scale, the full transition to an energy-reference currency system requires significant reform of the financial and monetary system although it would not radically disrupt the current economic valuations given the high degree of correlation between value and embodied energy.

  13. Defusing the Energy Trap: The Potential of Energy-Denominated Currencies to facilitate a Sustainable Energy Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgouris eSgouridis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The universal adoption of fiat currencies and of the fractional reserve banking system coincided with access to and ability to utilize energy-dense fossil fuels leading to unprecedented rates of economic expansion. The depletion of economically recoverable fossil fuels though sets the stage for systemic crises as it is not adequately priced in the current market system. An energy-based system of exchange can be adopted in parallel to or in place of fiat currencies in order to facilitate a sustainable energy transition (SET and mitigate the impacts of such crises. Energy-backed and energy-referenced currencies are discussed as two possible variants for their ability to realign the economic system to the thermodynamic limits of the physical world. The primary advantage of an energy-referenced currency over the current mechanisms for SET (like feed-in tariffs or carbon taxes is realized with the decoupling of the monetary and credit functions, especially when debt is tied to future energy availability. While energy-backed (credit systems can be easier to adopt on a regional scale, the full transition to an energy-reference currency system requires significant reform of the financial and monetary system although it would not radically disrupt the current economic valuations given the high degree of correlation between value and embodied energy.

  14. The energy in Colombia: A wholesale market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    One year ago, the national government's energy politics, gave beginning to a novel strategy for the restructuring of the sector: The setting in march of the wholesale energy market -WEM - and the opening of the energy bag under the administration of interconnection electric S.A. E. P. S., ISA. After a year of works, the positive balance of the market and their permanent growth, are the best letter in presentation of this sector of the national economy. The wholesale energy market is conformed by generating companies. The generating ones are the companies with capacity of superior generation to the 20 MW that they are connected to the national interconnected system; it doesn't care if the origin of this energy is hydraulic, gas, coal or liquid fuel. The generators participate in the WEM with energy offers for price and with their long-term contracts. In the bag they can also offer or to buy energy the generators with capacity between 1 and 20 MW, registered in the National Center of Office CO of ISA, as WEM participants. These can be associated to a generator, to a distributor, to be conformed by one or several groups of big consumers or for organized companies for this purpose, as Mamonal in Cartagena. These users with more demand to 2 MW assisted in oneself place, receive the name of Not Regulated Clients -NRC - and they can hire their energy in free form. The commission of energy regulation and gas ERG modified the tops for these clients starting from January of 1997, the not regulated clients will be this way those that have a same demand or superior to 1 MW; and in January of 1998, bigger than 0.5 MW

  15. Energy balance in a coaxial plasma diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.A. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The energy fluxes in a coaxial system with a propagating convective magnetic-field wave are considered in an electron MHD model with inertia-free electrons. In contrast to the previous results obtained by other authors, it is shown that, with allowance for a finite electron pressure after the passage of the wave front, the energy flux at the boundary between the generator and coaxial system is continuous. The balance of energy fluxes in the system is studied. The angular anode point is shown to play an important role in this balance

  16. Renewable energy: power for a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaygusuz, Kamil

    2001-01-01

    By the end of the 21 century, according to United National projections, the number of people on the earth is likely to have approximately doubled. How can a world of 10 to 12 billion people be provided with adequate supplies of energy, cleanly, safely and substantially? There is a growing consensus that renewable energy sources will be a very important part of the answer. The growing interest in 'renewables' has been prompted in part, by increasing concern over the pollution, resource depletion and possible climate change implications of our continuing use of conventional fossil and nuclear fuels. But recent technological developments have also improved the cost-effectiveness of many of the renewables, making their economic prospects look increasingly attractive. It describes the achievements and progress made in hydropower, biomass conversion, geothermal, solar thermal technology, wind energy conversion and the increasing usage of photovoltaics. It is evident that global warming is setting in and is going to change the climate as well as the terrain of many countries unless drastic measures are taken. The Kyoto meeting emphasised the importance of limiting CO 2 emissions and to abide by some form of agreement to reduce emissions. Present study concludes that renewable energy penetration into the energy market is much faster than was expected in recent years and by 2030, 15-20 percent of our prime energy will be met by renewable energy. (Author)

  17. How a future energy world could look?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  18. How a future energy world could look?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, M.

    2012-10-01

    The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization) and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  19. Solar Energy a Path to India's Prosperity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Yogender Pal; Singh, Arashdeep; Kannojiya, Vikas; Kesari, J. P.

    2018-05-01

    Solar energy technology has grabbed a worldwide interest and attention these days. India also, having a huge solar influx and potential, is not falling back to feed its energy demand through non-conventional energy sources such as concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). This work will try to add some comprehensive insight on solar energy framework, policy, outlook and socio-economic challenges of India. This includes its prominent areas of working such as grid independent and `utility-scale' power production using CSP or PV power plants, rural as well as urban electrification using PV, solar powered public transportation systems, solar power in agrarian society—water pumping, irrigation, waste management and so on and so forth. Despite the fact that, a vast legion of furtherance and advancement has been done during the last decade of solar energy maturation and proliferation, improvements could be suggested so as to augment the solar energy usage in contrast to conventional energy sources in India.

  20. A Meta Model for Domestic Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.,J SREEKANTH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of energy consumption particularly in micro level is of vital importance in terms of energy planning and also implementation of any Clean Development Mechanism (CDM activities that has become the order of the world today. It may be difficult to model household energy consumption using conventional methods such as time series forecasting due to many influencing factors. This paper presents a step wise regression model for forecasting domestic energy consumption based on micro level household survey data collected from Kerala, a state in southern part of India. The analysis of the data reveals significant influence of socio-economic, demographic, geographic, and family attributes upon total household energy requirements. While a wide variation in the pattern of energy requirements across the domestic sector belonging to different expenditure classes, per capita income level can be identified as the most important explanatory variable influencing variation in energy requirements. The models developed also demonstrates the influence of per capita land area, residential area among the higher income group while average age and literacy forms significant variables among the lower income group.

  1. Nuclear energy for a sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrini, B.; Oriolo, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power currently produces over 628 M tep of the generated energy in 1997 avoiding about 1978 Mt of CO 2 emission and gives a significant contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emission. The competitive position of nuclear power might be strengthened, if market forces or government policy were able to give energy security and to control greenhouse gas, relying upon market mechanism and including environmental costs in economic analysis. In this case, taking into account the entire up-stream and down-stream chains for electricity generation, it can be seen that the greenhouse emission from nuclear plants, is lower than that of renewable energy chains. This paper investigates the potential role of nuclear power in global energy supply up to 2020 and analyzes the opportunities and the challenges for research, governments and nuclear industries of a broad nuclear power development in response to environmental concerns. The authors think that nuclear energy will have to compete in the same framework and under the same conditions as all other energy sources and so analyze the possibility of re-launching nuclear energy: it will have to couple nuclear safety and economic competitiveness [it

  2. Thermodynamic calculation of a district energy cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, B.; Bauer, A.; Kraut, G.; Scherberich, F.D.

    1975-08-01

    This paper presents a calculation model for a nuclear district energy circuit. Such a circuit means the combination of a steam reforming plant with heat supply from a high-temperature nuclear reactor and a methanation plant with heat production for district heating or electricity production. The model comprises thermodynamic calculations for the endothermic methane reforming reaction as well as the exothermic CO-hydrogenation in adiabatic reactors and allows the optimization of the district energy circuit under consideration. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear energy from a viewpoint of women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junko

    2004-01-01

    This is interview with Junko Ogawa, the president of WIN-Global and WIN-Japan. WIN-Japan is a national constitution of WIN-Global, which established in 1993. Three objects of WIN consists of expediting the progress of understanding of nuclear energy for women and children, developing member's ability and increasing international exchange as an international women group. The activity of WIN-Japan and WIN-Global are explained. She told that the nuclear energy is indispensable energy and Japan has to establish atomic fuel cycle as a peaceful cycle. (S.Y.)

  4. Energy transition? A lever for competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Institut Montaigne

    2013-01-01

    At a time when the 'energy transition' is being hotly debated by the nation, the right energy policy will he based on three pillars: supply private and business consumers at attractive prices; contain the risks associated with excessively high dependence on external sources of supply; finally reduce environmental pollution. Making these fully operative will require that all prices reflect costs at national level and that a full-fledged energy policy be put in place by the European Union over the time frame 2030-2050. (author)

  5. Hydro-energy; Energie hydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Tardieu, B. [Coyne et Bellier, 92 - Gennevilliers (France)

    2005-07-01

    The first part of this study concerns the different type of hydraulic works. The second part presents the big hydro-energy, its advantages and disadvantages, the industrial risks, the electric power transport network, the economy and the development perspectives. The third part presents the little hydro-energy, its advantages and disadvantages, the decentralized production and the development perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  6. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael C. [Illinois Dept. of Nuclear Safety, IL (United States). Emergency Planning Section

    1997-12-31

    Socio-political aspects of the use of nuclear energy and radiation are presented. The behaviour of the general population, and many of the world`s political organizations who still resist or reject nuclear energy as a viable resource is discussed. The benefits from the production of electricity, medical diagnostics and treatment, engineering accomplishments, and scientific research applications involving the use of nuclear technology and radioactive materials are emphasized

  7. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    Socio-political aspects of the use of nuclear energy and radiation are presented. The behaviour of the general population, and many of the world's political organizations who still resist or reject nuclear energy as a viable resource is discussed. The benefits from the production of electricity, medical diagnostics and treatment, engineering accomplishments, and scientific research applications involving the use of nuclear technology and radioactive materials are emphasized

  8. Energy Drinks: A Contemporary Issues Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita; Deuster, Patricia A; Shearer, Jane

    2018-02-01

    Since their introduction in 1987, energy drinks have become increasingly popular and the energy drink market has grown at record pace into a multibillion-dollar global industry. Young people, students, office workers, athletes, weekend warriors, and service members frequently consume energy drinks. Both health care providers and consumers must recognize the difference between energy drinks, traditional beverages (e.g., coffee, tea, soft drinks/sodas, juices, or flavored water), and sports drinks. The research about energy drinks safety and efficacy is often contradictory, given the disparate protocols and types of products consumed: this makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Also, much of the available literature is industry-sponsored. After reports of adverse events associated with energy drink consumption, concerns including trouble sleeping, anxiety, cardiovascular events, seizures, and even death, have been raised about their safety. This article will focus on energy drinks, their ingredients, side effects associated with their consumption, and suggested recommendations, which call for education, regulatory actions, changes in marketing, and additional research.

  9. Energy perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, B.

    2005-01-01

    In France and in Europe, the political vision of energy production has not yet been taken to heart as much as its importance merits, despite a certain awareness of the gravity of the phenomena within the population. It would already be very difficult to halve the consumption of fossil fuels in France in 2050, without a swift and profound change in our energy-consumption choices (in particular in transport) and a considerable research effort. To divide it by four seems unrealistic, since France, unlike other countries, has already benefited from the transition from electricity produced from fossil fuels to nuclear electricity which does not emit CO 2 . A major evolution in energy, in Europe and throughout the World, is inevitable in the course of the century. To prevent this from being too violent and painful, a process of fundamental research and technological development should be launched forthwith, in all fields of energy production, storage and use, with a large effort supported by major research programmes. Some recommendations are given for the main research fields that should be: capture and long term storage of CO 2 , energy savings in transport, energy supply to large cities and nuclear power plant enhancement, hydrogen storage, wind energy and its unavailability problem, use of forest resources, photovoltaic electricity in rural and isolated regions, temporary storage of electricity

  10. US residential energy demand and energy efficiency: A stochastic demand frontier approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, Massimo; Hunt, Lester C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates a US frontier residential aggregate energy demand function using panel data for 48 ‘states’ over the period 1995 to 2007 using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Utilizing an econometric energy demand model, the (in)efficiency of each state is modeled and it is argued that this represents a measure of the inefficient use of residential energy in each state (i.e. ‘waste energy’). This underlying efficiency for the US is therefore observed for each state as well as the relative efficiency across the states. Moreover, the analysis suggests that energy intensity is not necessarily a good indicator of energy efficiency, whereas by controlling for a range of economic and other factors, the measure of energy efficiency obtained via this approach is. This is a novel approach to model residential energy demand and efficiency and it is arguably particularly relevant given current US energy policy discussions related to energy efficiency.

  11. Planning for energy needs: a look at three new communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B

    1981-05-01

    Case histories describe how three communities are building in new sites in order to increase their self-sufficiency. Each community acted as its own developer. Cerro Gordo, Oregon is planned as a self-contained, laissez faire shelter from urban blight, but problems have kept investors and developers away. Rock Ridge Community, Wisconsin is building earth-sheltered duplex buildings out of prestressed concrete to provide a simple life for the Quaker community. Septic-tank placement and other probjems have raised costs, but the settlement plan remains viable. Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin residents are rebuilding above the floodplain in an urban-renewal project which uses volunteers and local talent to build energy-efficient structures that rely heavily on passive solar energy. (DCK)

  12. Energy Healing for Cancer: A Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agdal, Rita; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob; Johannessen, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Background: This article explores the evidence base of efficacy and effectiveness of ‘energy healing’ for cancer patients. The term ‘energy healing’ refers to a wide variety of therapies which are based on the premise that the healer transfers energy to the patient. Among the most researched form...... the complex character of potential outcomes, cross-disciplinary methodologies may be relevant. To extend the scope of clinical trials, psychosocial processes should be taken into account and explored, rather than dismissed as placebo....

  13. World energy: a study in inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fells, I.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings of the 12th World Energy Conference are discussed under the headings: developing countries' standpoint (energy and food famine, great increase in population); biogas perhaps the answer; coal - 'expensive misjudgement' (over-optimistic predictions of demand, but developing countries an important future coal market); price of stack gas clean-up; explaining the nuclear case (need to explain nuclear case to counter the anti-nuclear lobby); collaborative fast reactor development in Europe; nuclear energy in developing countries; fuel for transport - a neglected subject. (U.K.)

  14. Does nuclear energy have a future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, F.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear energy contributes 17% to global electricity production and almost 40% to the public supply in Germany. Operators of nuclear power plants are having to invest considerable effort in trying to set the public thinking and boring public opinion away from an emotional rejection towards a rational consideration of the risks of different energy systems. It is argued that in view of the specific problems of environmental pollution through CO 2 it should be possible to bring about public acceptance of nuclear energy utilization. (DG) [de

  15. A Snapshot of the Danish Energy Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    a deeper look at Danish energy policy in general and at the electricity sector in particular. What are the major objectives of Danish energy policy? What is the logic behind an integrated approach that encompasses all energy sectors? How has market integration evolved in the Nordic countries? How does...... the offshore wind tendering system work? What are the principles underlying grid expansion within Denmark? What types of consumer participation schemes exist? This paper aims to explore some of the lessons learned from the Danish experience. At the same time, this paper can serve as an introductory overview...

  16. Hydrogen, an energy carrier with a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The inefficient use, associated with pollutants, of the fossil energy carriers coal, crude oil and natural gas, will deplete resources, if the energy demand increases exponentially, in the not-too-distant future. That is the reason why the hydrogen-energy concept gains in importance. This requires drastic changes in structure in a lot of technological fields. This task is only to be mastered if there is cooperation between all special fields, in order to facilitate the economical production, distribution and utilization of hydrogen. (orig.) [de

  17. Building a universal nuclear energy density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G F

    2007-01-01

    This talk describes a new project in SciDAC II in the area of low-energy nuclear physics. The motivation and goals of the SciDAC are presented as well as an outline of the theoretical and computational methodology that will be employed. An important motivation is to have more accurate and reliable predictions of nuclear properties including their binding energies and low-energy reaction rates. The theoretical basis is provided by density functional theory, which the only available theory that can be systematically applied to all nuclei. However, other methodologies based on wave function methods are needed to refine the functionals and to make applications to dynamic processes

  18. Iran: a (re)emerging energy power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchard, D.; Therme, C.

    2007-01-01

    This document first describes the energy situation in Iran: the energy sector is insufficiently developed due to a lack of investments and the prudence of foreign groups, while ambitious gas pipeline projects take place; however, the important domestic consumption reduces the country's exportation capacity. The second part discusses about the domestic and international political context that is not propitious for energy development (internal tensions that paralyse decision making, international sanctions, etc.) while Iran try to by-pass these difficulties through its relations with Russia and Asia. Several scenarios are then proposed, linked to the possible evolutions of the nuclear litigation

  19. Geothermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzella A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology, spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth’s crust.

  20. Geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity) worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology), spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth's crust.

  1. Annual Energy Usage Reduction and Cost Savings of a School: End-Use Energy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghoul, M. A.; Bakhtyar, B.; Asim, Nilofar; Sopian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Buildings are among the largest consumers of energy. Part of the energy is wasted due to the habits of users and equipment conditions. A solution to this problem is efficient energy usage. To this end, an energy audit can be conducted to assess the energy efficiency. This study aims to analyze the energy usage of a primary school and identify the potential energy reductions and cost savings. A preliminary audit was conducted, and several energy conservation measures were proposed. The energy conservation measures, with reference to the MS1525:2007 standard, were modelled to identify the potential energy reduction and cost savings. It was found that the school's usage of electricity exceeded its need, incurring an excess expenditure of RM 2947.42. From the lighting system alone, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction of 5489.06 kWh, which gives a cost saving of RM 2282.52 via the improvement of lighting system design and its operating hours. Overall, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction and cost saving of 20.7% when the energy conservation measures are earnestly implemented. The previous energy intensity of the school was found to be 50.6 kWh/m2/year, but can theoretically be reduced to 40.19 kWh/mm2/year. PMID:25485294

  2. Energy Savings in a Market Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The paper outlines the concept of energy savings as opposed to energy efficency. Afterwards are described briefly the up and down role of energy savings in recent Danish energy policy. It discusses the failure of leaving electricity savings and Integrated Resource Planning to the electricity...

  3. United States Department of Energy: a history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    This pamphlet traces the origins of the Department of Energy and outlines the history of the Department as reflected in the energy policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan. It attempts to place recent energy policy into historical perspective by describing the evolution of the federal Government's role in energy research, development, and regulation.

  4. Polymer Energy-Turning waste into energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radosevich, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Polymer Energy system is an award-winning, innovative, proprietary process to convert waste plastics to renewable energy. Plastics play a very important role in our daily lives. Throughout the world the demand of plastic, particularly plastic packaging, continues to rapidly grow. Previous waste management methods such as landfill disposal, incineration and recycling have failed to provide opportunities for the complete reuse of plastic waste. The Polymer Energy uses a process called catalytic pyrolysis to efficiently convert plastics to crude oil. The system provides an integrated plastic waste processing system which offers an alternative to landfill disposal, incineration and recycling - while also being a viable, economical and environmentally responsible waste management solution. The Polymer Energy system is modular in design. A single module can produce up to 775 litres of crude oil for every tone of typical plastic waste processed. System capacity can range from 200 tons to 400 tons of plastic wastes processed per month. Overall plant design capacity can be easily scaled up by adding additional modules. The output crude oil is high-grade and can be further processed in a refinery or used to power low-rpm machines such as electric generation turbines. The technology has won several industry awards, including the prestigious 2006 European Environment Press Award for innovative waste management solutions. (Author)

  5. Ocean energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    There are 5 different ways of harnessing ocean energy: tides, swells, currents, osmotic pressure and deep water thermal gradients. The tidal power sector is the most mature. A single French site - The Rance tidal power station (240 MW) which was commissioned in 1966 produces 90% of the world's ocean energy. Smaller scale power stations operate around the world, 10 are operating in the European Union and 5 are being tested. Underwater generators and wave energy converters are expanding. In France a 1 km 2 sea test platform is planned for 2010. (A.C.)

  6. Wind energy aggregation: A coalitional game approach

    KAUST Repository

    Baeyens, E.; Bitar, E.Y.; Khargonekar, P.P.; Poolla, K.

    2011-01-01

    power output as single entity into a forward energy market. We prove that wind power generators will always improve their expected profit when they aggregate their generated power and use tools from coalitional game theory to design fair sharing

  7. A personal history: Technology to energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, C.

    1995-01-01

    This personal history spans a half century of participation in the frontiers of applies science and engineering ranging from the nuclear weapons project of World War II, through the development of nuclear power, engineering education, and risk analysis, to today's energy research and development. In each of these areas, this account describes some of the exciting opportunities for technology to contribute to society's welfare, as well as the difficulties and constraints imposed by society's institutional and political systems. The recounting of these experiences in energy research and development illustrates the importance of embracing social values, cultures, and environmental views into the technologic design of energy options. The global importance of energy in a rapidly changing and unpredictable world suggests a strategy for the future based on these experiences which emphasizes the value of applied research and development on a full spectrum of potential options

  8. A survey of some solar energy retrofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The report briefly describes a survey of some solar energy retrofits, such as solar heaters and Trombe walls, that can be easily adapted into existing buildings belonging to the Department. With their relatively high cost, commercial solar heaters ha...

  9. Wind Energy: A Maturing Power Supply Possibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Erik Lundtang; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggests that wind energy for electrification will prove to be an appropriate technology with very positive socioeconomic benefits, especially in developing countries. Provides examples of projects conducted by a Danish wind research laboratory. (TW)

  10. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  11. Geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemale, J.

    2009-01-01

    The geothermal energy, listed among the new and renewable energy sources, is characterized by a huge variety of techniques and applications. This book deals with the access to underground geothermal resources and with their energy valorization as well. After a presentation of the main geological, hydrogeological and thermal exploitation aspects of this resource, the book presents the different geothermal-related industries in detail, in particular the district heating systems, the aquifer-based heat pumps, the utilizations in the agriculture, fishery and balneology sectors, and the power generation. (J.S.)

  12. Clean energy, renewable energies; Energie propre, energies renouvelables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This document is the compilation of the 4 issues of the 'energie propre - energie renouvelables' newsletter published by the regional energy agency of Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur region (ARENE). Each issue is a technical file presenting a particular facility or installation: the pico-hydraulic power plant of the Allos lake (Mercantour, French Alps), the 'Chute de la Guerche' and 'Chute de Chastillon' hydraulic power plant exploited by the Isola town; the pico-hydraulic power plant of the drinkable water network of Hameau des Agnielles village, the direct solar thermal floor. (J.S.)

  13. Energy Analysis at a Near Zero Energy Building. A Case-Study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Rey-Hernández

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops an energy analysis for an existing near Zero Energy (nZEB and Zero Carbon Emissions building called LUCIA, located at the university campus in Valladolid (Spain. It is designed to supply electricity, cooling and heating needs through solar energy (Photovoltaic Systems, PV, biomass and an Earth–Air Heat Exchanger (EAHE, besides a Combined Heat Power (CHP. It is currently among the top three buildings with the highest LEED certification in the World. The building model is simulated with DesignBuilder version 5. The results of the energy analysis illustrate the heating, cooling and lighting consumptions expected, besides other demands and energy uses. From this data, we carried out an energy balance of the nZEB, which will help to plan preventive actions when compared to the actual energy consumptions, improving the management and control of both the building and its systems. The primary energy indicator obtained is 67 kWh/m2 a year, and 121 kWh/m2 a year for renewable energy generation, with respect to 55 kWh/m2 and 45 kWh/m2 set as reference in Europe. The Renewable Energy Ratio (RER is 0.66. These indicators become a useful tool for the energy analysis of the nZEB according to the requirements in the European regulations and for its comparison with further nZEB.

  14. Renewable energy sources: Energy Efficiency Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgarensky, Mihael

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the activities of the Energy Efficiency Agency, its main functions, as well as the new legislation stimulating the use of RES, stipulated in the new Energy Law of Bulgaria. The second part of the paper describes the potential of renewable energy in i.e. wind energy; solar energy; biomass energy; hydro energy; geothermal energy; draft of a National Program on RES 2005-2015. The third part describes the main issues of the new ENERGY EFFICIENCY LAW and the established Energy efficiency fund. (Author)

  15. Renewable Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditterich, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to expose middle school students to a variety of alternative energy sources with a variety of practical applications. It was part of an Austria-wide IMST-project (IMST stands for innovation makes students strong). As part of this exposure, several classes of about 80 students visited a number of locations for alternative energy resources, including a hydroelectric site, a biological energy plant, a wind turbine manufacturing plant, a water purification station as well as others others. A short film was made to document the project in order that non-participants in the class could also gain knowledge on alternative energy. The three minute film will be shown at the poster.

  16. Global Energy Trends - 2016 report. Towards a Peak in Energy Demand and CO2 Emissions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    Celebrating the 20. anniversary of this yearly publication, Enerdata has newly released its annual Global Energy Trends publication for 2016. The full report presents in-depth information on the energy markets as well as upcoming trends for all energies in the G20. With over 400 premium sources, Enerdata analysts highlight major developments in 2015 concerning global demand, supply and key indicators across the globe. The main trends outlined in the report are: - Economic slowdown: the lowest growth since 2002; - Almost no growth in energy consumption; - New decrease of energy intensity; - Stabilization of CO 2 -energy emissions; - INDC targets achievement requires a double breakthrough. The Global Energy Trends Analysis also provides additional graphs about trends by energy: - Coal: most consumed energy source in G20 countries; - Oil: fall in prices to around 40-50 US$/bbl; - Oil production: USA overtake Russia and catch up with Saudi Arabia; - Gas: Stabilisation of gas demand for the 2. consecutive year; - Electricity: Stagnation of electricity consumption; - Wind Power and Solar PV: Asia engine of development. Growth in energy consumption (%/year) for G20 countries: - Second consecutive year of decline: low growth and decrease in energy intensity; - India drives the energy consumption growth; - Near stagnation in China (after a first sharp slowdown in 2014); - Economic recession in Brazil and Russia; - USA: decrease primarily linked to the industrial sector (energy efficiency + less energy-intensive industry); - Rebound in Europe: economic growth + climate effect 2015/2014

  17. The role of built environment energy efficiency in a sustainable UK energy economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Joseph A.; Johnstone, Cameron M.; Kelly, Nicolas J.; Strachan, Paul A.; Tuohy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Energy efficiency in the built environment can make significant contributions to a sustainable energy economy. In order to achieve this, greater public awareness of the importance of energy efficiency is required. In the short term, new efficient domestic appliances, building technologies, legislation quantifying building plant performance, and improved building regulations to include installed plant will be required. Continuing these improvements in the longer term is likely to see the adoption of small-scale renewable technologies embedded in the building fabric. Internet-based energy services could deliver low-cost building energy management and control to the mass market enabling plant to be operated and maintained at optimum performance levels and energy savings quantified. There are many technology options for improved energy performance of the building fabric and energy systems and it is not yet clear which will prove to be the most economic. Therefore, flexibility is needed in legislation and energy-efficiency initiatives

  18. A framework to characterize energy efficiency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trianni, Andrea; Cagno, Enrico; De Donatis, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel framework to characterize energy efficiency measures is proposed. • It allows a greater knowledge sharing, facilitating the adoption of the best measures. • It supports policy-makers in developing drivers for industrial energy efficiency. - Abstract: The need to increase the diffusion of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) is of crucial importance to achieve a consistent reduction of energy consumption and green house gases (GHG) emissions. A clear comprehension of the characteristics of such EEMs could assist in gathering and capitalizing all the information needed by industrial firms in selecting and adopting technologies, as well as by policy-makers in designing appropriate policies for their diffusion. Therefore, in this study, starting from a literature review of the studies analyzing the attributes of EEMs, we aim at providing an innovative and comprehensive framework to characterize such measures, based on 17 attributes grouped according to six categories, such as: economic, energy, environmental, production-related, implementation-related and the possible interaction with other systems. We applied this scheme to an extensive range of EEMs in cross-cutting technologies, i.e. motors, compressed air, lighting and HVAC systems. The analysis provides a relevant contribution firstly to the structuring and the sharing of knowledge on EEMs and hence to the comprehension of the barriers currently hindering their adoption; secondly, it provides a structured basis for the analysis of the drivers that policy-makers should develop in order to promote industrial energy efficiency

  19. Electricity storage - A challenge for energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, Jean-Baptiste; Nekrasov, Andre; Pastor, Emmanuel; Benefice, Emmanuel; Brincourt, Thierry; Cagnac, Albannie; Brisse, Annabelle; Jeandel, Elodie; Lefebvre, Thierry; Penneau, Jean-Francois; Radvanyi, Etienne; Delille, Gautier; Hinchliffe, Timothee; Lancel, Gilles; Loevenbruck, Philippe; Soler, Robert; Stevens, Philippe; Torcheux, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    After a presentation of the energetic context and of its issues, this collective publication proposes presentations of various electricity storage technologies with a distinction between direct storage, thermal storage and hydrogen storage. As far as direct storage is concerned, the following options are described: pumped energy transfer stations or PETS, compressed air energy storage or CAES, flywheels, various types of electrochemical batteries (lead, alkaline, sodium, lithium), metal air batteries, redox flow batteries, and super-capacitors. Thermal storage comprises power-to-heat and heat-to-power technologies. Hydrogen can be stored under different forms (compressed gas, liquid), in saline underground cavities, or by using water electrolysis and fuel cells. The authors propose an overview of the different services provided by energy storage to the electricity system, and discuss the main perspectives and challenges for tomorrow's storage (electric mobility, integration of renewable energies, electrification of isolated areas, scenarios of development)

  20. Energy swaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellett, Jack

    1999-01-01

    This chapter reviews the range of available energy swap structures giving details of the plain vanilla, differential, margin or crack, participation, double-up, extendable, pre-paid, off-market, and curve-lock and backwardation swaps. The application of energy swaps, end-user benefits and concerns, the structure of the swap market, comparisons with other swap markets, market sectors, and energy swaps in financing structures are described. The role of the intermediary, and future developments are examined. The pricing of a swap and success in the swaps market are discussed

  1. Energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; Walton, Richard I

    2011-01-01

    In an age of global industrialisation and population growth, the area of energy is one that is very much in the public consciousness. Fundamental scientific research is recognised as being crucial to delivering solutions to these issues, particularly to yield novel means of providing efficient, ideally recyclable, ways of converting, transporting and delivering energy. This volume considers a selection of the state-of-the-art materials that are being designed to meet some of the energy challenges we face today. Topics are carefully chosen that show how the skill of the synthetic chemist can

  2. Energy requirement of some energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, P.F.; Hemming, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    The energy requirements for the sources of energy under examination are expressed as the fraction of total energy consumed in the production of a unit of gross output. Clearly there are vast differences between the energy requirements of these sources of fuels. Using energy analysis it is possible to indicate points of futility where no net energy is produced (i.e. Xsub(f) = 1). For North Sea oil fields using current technology, this appears to occur at a field size of 100,000-200,000 tons of recoverable reserves of oil. For oil shales exploited using above-ground retorting, the outer limit is at a grade of about 5 gal/ton. For uranium ores used to fuel a burner reactor, the cut-off grade was found to be of the order of 20 ppm. However, it should be remembered that at Xsub(f) = 1, there is no net output and the price of the fuel would be infinite. Because of payments to labour and capital, the upper limit of economic viability may well occur at values of Xsub(f) from 0.1 to 0.2. Thus uranium ores of a grade of 100 ppm U 3 O 8 or less may not be ecomically viable using current burner reactors and this in turn implies an upper bound for the total thermal reactor capacity. For oil shales exploited using above-ground retorting and room-and-pillar mining 15-20 gal/ton shale may represent the upper limit of economic viability, depending on the efficiency that can be achieved in a commercial-scale retort

  3. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Several issues concerning nuclear energy in France during 1996 are presented: permission of a demand for installing underground laboratories in three sites (Marcoule, Bure and Chapelle-Baton); a report assessing the capacity of Superphenix plant to operate as a research tool; the project of merging between Framatome and Gec-Alsthom companies; the revision of a general report on nuclear energy in France; the issue of military plutonium management

  4. Energy and environment: a challenge for materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, Ch.; Walle, E.; Hody, St.; Alleau, Th.; Bassat, J.M.; Pourcelly, G.; Aitelli, P.; Crepy, Ch. de; Le Douaron, A.; Moussy, F.; Guibert, A. de; Mogensen, P.C.; Beauvy, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ESIREM (Ecole Superieure d'Ingenieurs de Recherche en Electronique et en Materiaux) has organized its yearly colloquium in Dijon on the 20. of January 2005. The topic was 'energy and environment: a challenge for materials'. Here are presented the summaries of the speeches of Mr C. Marchand: how to conciliate increasing needs in energy, limited resources in hydrocarbons and to control the releases of greenhouse gases: a main challenge for the 21. century; of Mr E. Walle: materials for the future nuclear systems; of Mr S. Hody: which future prospect for the energy production: the point of view of Gaz de France; of Mr T. Alleau: the hydrogen, the energy of the future; of Mr J.M. Bassat: the specificities of the SOFC, new materials for a carrying out at ambient temperature; of Mr G. Pourcelly: the PEMFC; of Mrs A. Le Douaron and F. Moussy: materials, energy and environment in automotive industry; of Ms A. de Guibert: the key role of materials in the lithium-ion accumulators; of Mr P. C. Mogensen: the photovoltaic materials: the key of the solar energy; and of Mr M. Beauvy: the future reactors: challenges for materials. (O.M.)

  5. Energy and markets: a dangerous liaison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauron, M.

    2008-01-01

    At the occasion of a colloquium organised by the Paris-Dauphine university, several economists have discussed the possible impacts that the world financial crisis would have on the energy. The energy crisis and the financial crisis are distinct crises with strong interactions, like the rise of the oil barrel price which follows the dollar drop, but no simple answer can be drawn since no consensus exists on the ins and outs of the crisis

  6. A Comprehensive Review of Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Sarbu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES is a technology that stocks thermal energy by heating or cooling a storage medium so that the stored energy can be used at a later time for heating and cooling applications and power generation. TES systems are used particularly in buildings and in industrial processes. This paper is focused on TES technologies that provide a way of valorizing solar heat and reducing the energy demand of buildings. The principles of several energy storage methods and calculation of storage capacities are described. Sensible heat storage technologies, including water tank, underground, and packed-bed storage methods, are briefly reviewed. Additionally, latent-heat storage systems associated with phase-change materials for use in solar heating/cooling of buildings, solar water heating, heat-pump systems, and concentrating solar power plants as well as thermo-chemical storage are discussed. Finally, cool thermal energy storage is also briefly reviewed and outstanding information on the performance and costs of TES systems are included.

  7. Public opinion about energy: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B.C.; Weis, P.; Unseld, C.T.; Burns, B.A.

    1979-06-01

    A review and analysis of 115 surveys of the general population between 1973 and 1978 (before the Three Mile Island accident, sudden gasoline price increases, and spot gasoline shortages) are presented. The survey data are organized and analyzed according to a set of categories described in Chapter 2. The public's definition of the energy situation is the focus of Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes public opinion concerning energy conservation pertaining to transportation and domestic energy use -- whether it is efficacious, how knowledgeable people are about conservation, whether they favor it, and whether they engage in it. Findings on the solar energy alternative are described in Chapter 5. Public opinion concerning more conventional sources of energy -- oil and natural gas, coal, and nuclear energy -- are discussed in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, a summary of analytical findings by 10 major sociodemographic characteristics is presented. Chapter 8 describes analytical findings using various social-psychological variables. A summary is presented in Chapter 9.

  8. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotevski, Darko

    2003-01-01

    Wind is not only free, it is inexhaustible. Wind energy has come a very long way since the prototypes of just 20 years ago. today's wind turbines are state-of-the-art technology - modular and quick to install anywhere where there is sufficient wind potential to provide secure, centralised or distributed generation. It is a global phenomenon, the world's fastest growing energy sector, a clean and effective modern technology that completely avoids pollution and thus reducing the 'green house' effect. (Original)

  9. Energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-07-01

    The papers on energy storage problems, given to the United Nations Conference on New Sources of Energy, Rome, 1961, are reviewed. Many aspects of the subject are discussed: comparisons between the costs of storing energy in batteries and in fuel cells; the use, efficiency and expected improvement of fuel cells; the principles involved in the chemical conversion of solar energy to chemical energy; the use of metal hydride fuel cells; the chemical conversion and storage of concentrated solar energy for which the solar furnace is used for photochemical reactions. Finally, the general costs of storing energy in any form and delivering it are analyzed with particular reference to storage batteries and fuel cells.

  10. Energy in Mexico: a profile of solar energy activity in its national context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, D.

    1980-04-01

    The geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects of the United States of Mexico are presented. Mexico's energy profile includes the following: energy policy objectives, government energy structure, organizations for implementation, indigeneous energy sources, imported energy sources, solar energy research and development, solar energy organizations and solar energy related legislation and administrative policies. International agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects are listed. (MRH)

  11. Energy Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, James; Bekbenbetov, Marat; Coffman, Katherine; Davies, Kirk; Farrar, Michael R; Fletcher, Scott N; Hall, Robert; Kljajic, Senad; Koprucu, Feza; Leek, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    ... technologies and use of alternative fuels. Specifically, the national energy policy should lead to one air quality standard for automobile emissions, articulate a clear position on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increase the diversity...

  12. Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  13. Cities and Energy Consumption: a Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Gargiulo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cities and energy consumption has been of great interest for the scientific community for over twenty years. Most of the energy consumption, indeed, occurs in cities because of the high concentration of human activities. Thus, cities are responsible for a big share of carbon dioxide emissions (CO2. However, the debate on this topic is still open, mainly because of the heterogeneity of published studies in the selection, definition and measurement of the urban features influencing energy consumption and CO2 emissions, as well as in the choice of the energy sectors to be considered, in the territorial scale of analysis, and in the geographical distribution of the sample. Therefore, the goal of this research is to systematize and compare the approach, methodology and results of the relevant literature on the relationship between cities and energy consumption over the last twenty years. Furthermore, this critical review identifies the knowledge gap between what is known and what is still under debate and, based on that, it proposes a conceptual framework that will help to outline a new direction for future research and support local policy makers in the definition of strategies and actions that can effectively reduce urban energy use and CO2 emissions.

  14. A review of Ghana’s energy sector national energy statistics and policy framework

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Asumadu-Sarkodie; Phebe Asantewaa Owusu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a review of Ghana’s energy sector national energy statistics and policy framework is done to create awareness of the strategic planning and energy policies of Ghana’s energy sector that will serve as an informative tool for both local and foreign investors, help in national decision-making for the efficient development and utilization of energy resources. The review of Ghana’s energy sector policy is to answer the question, what has been done so far? And what is the way forward...

  15. The renewable energies: a topical issue; Les energies renouvelables: un sujet d'actualite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    This document analyzes the situation of the renewable energies in the french energy sector. The first part presents the part of the renewable energies in the energy production and consumption, their interest in the fight against the climatic change and in the employment creation. The second part details for each renewable energy source the government policy in favor their development and the legislative framework. The third part provides data on cost, CO{sub 2} emissions, life cycle and employments to illustrate the analysis. The last part presents the government objectives of the renewable energies development for 2010. (A.L.B.)

  16. Energy crisis? The continuing need for a national energy policy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmy, J.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Centre on the 11th September 2001 on the price of crude oil and petroleum products and the ensuing concentration on security measures in the oil and gas industries. The reasons for the need of a comprehensive energy policy are listed and include ensuring the physical security of energy supplies, helping to diversify oil supplies and reducing the effects of market disruptions, benefiting from additional efforts to increase energy efficiency, promoting conservation, encouraging the use of renewable energy sources, investing in the energy delivery infrastructure, and increasing domestic energy supplies

  17. A National Framework for Energy Audit Ordinances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Cody; Costa, Marc; Long, Nicholas; Antonoff, Jayson

    2016-08-26

    A handful of U.S. cities have begun to incorporate energy audits into their building energy performance policies. Cities are beginning to recognize an opportunity to use several information tools to bring to real estate markets both motivation to improve efficiency and actionable pointers on how to improve. Care is necessary to combine such tools as operational ratings, energy audits, asset ratings, and building retro-commissioning in an effective policy regime that maximizes market impact. In this paper, the authors focus on energy audits and consider both the needs of the policies' implementers in local governments and the emerging standards and federal tools to improve data collection and practitioner engagement. Over the past two years, we have compared several related data formats such as New York City's existing audit reporting spreadsheet, ASHRAE guidance on building energy auditing, and the DOE Building Energy Asset Score, to identify a possible set of required and optional fields for energy audit reporting programs. Doing so revealed tensions between the ease of data collection and the value of more detailed information, which had implications for the effort and qualifications needed to complete the energy audit. The resulting list of data fields is now feeding back into the regulatory process in several cities currently working on implementing or developing audit policies. Using complementary policies and standardized tools for data transmission, the next generation of policies and programs will be tailored to local building stock and can more effectively target improvement opportunities through each building's life.

  18. Energy and Development. A Modelling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ruijven, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid economic growth of developing countries like India and China implies that these countries become important actors in the global energy system. Examples of this impact are the present day oil shortages and rapidly increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. Global energy models are used to explore possible future developments of the global energy system and identify policies to prevent potential problems. Such estimations of future energy use in developing countries are very uncertain. Crucial factors in the future energy use of these regions are electrification, urbanisation and income distribution, issues that are generally not included in present day global energy models. Model simulations in this thesis show that current insight in developments in low-income regions lead to a wide range of expected energy use in 2030 of the residential and transport sectors. This is mainly caused by many different model calibration options that result from the limited data availability for model development and calibration. We developed a method to identify the impact of model calibration uncertainty on future projections. We developed a new model for residential energy use in India, in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science. Experiments with this model show that the impact of electrification and income distribution is less univocal than often assumed. The use of fuelwood, with related health risks, can decrease rapidly if the income of poor groups increases. However, there is a trade off in terms of CO2 emissions because these groups gain access to electricity and the ownership of appliances increases. Another issue is the potential role of new technologies in developing countries: will they use the opportunities of leapfrogging? We explored the potential role of hydrogen, an energy carrier that might play a central role in a sustainable energy system. We found that hydrogen only plays a role before 2050 under very optimistic assumptions. Regional energy

  19. Energy Choices. Energy markets; Vaegval Energi. Energimarknader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damsgaard, Niclas (Econ Poeyry AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    Each of the major energy markets for oil, coal, natural gas, biofuels and electricity has its own character. But markets are dependent on each other in an often complicated way. This interconnection has become even more complex since the market for emissions trading began in Europe in 2005. This report describes the current situation of the different energy markets but also the relationships between them, and some possible future scenarios. The oil market is global, but is dominated by a few producing countries. Coal is traded on the international market with good competition and over time probably a stable price. Other markets are more regional or even local. One example is the natural gas market. In the current situation of natural gas is not particularly important for Sweden's energy supply, but very much so in a European perspective. There may be repercussions also in Sweden. The gas price ups and downs are important for the price of emission rights and electricity. Biofuel markets ranging from global markets, such as ethanol, to regional or local markets, depending on processing. Only with the creation of a single trading venue, Nordpool was a common pricing of electricity possible in the Nordic region. In the near future we will have a common electricity market covering at least the Nordic region and northwestern Europe. This does not mean that prices will become equalized, for that further expansion of the transmission capacity is needed. It is possible to imagine several scenarios for future energy markets, but the interaction between the different markets will persist. To develop appropriate instruments is of great importance to achieve the political objectives in the energy field the next decade

  20. Energy coppice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    One form of renewable energy production involves the growing of energy coppice on agricultural land. It is important as it can be grown on those areas of agricultural land which are surplus to agricultural production. Hence it can be seen as an alternative farm crop, and as such, a possible solution to the problem of agricultural surpluses as well as providing a source of energy. Studies have indicated that up to one million hectares of land surplus to agricultural production may be suitable for growing energy coppice. However, its development as an agricultural crop will only happen if it can be produced at costs competitive with alternative fuels and there is a reliable and long term market offering good returns. (author)