WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy spectrum measurements

  1. Measurements of the energy spectrum of backscattered fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, Y.

    1976-03-01

    Experimental measurements have been made of the energy spectra of neutrons transmitted through slabs of iron, lead and perspex for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 1.8 MeV. The neutron energy measurements were made using a He-3 spectrometer. The dependence of the neutrons energy spectrum as a function of scattering thickness was determined. The neutrons source used was a 3MeV Van de Graaff accelerator with a tritium target using the H 3 (p,n) He 3 reaction. The results obtained by the investigator on energy dependence of transmitted neutrons as a function of thickness of scattering material were compared, where possible, with the results obtained by other workers. The comparisons indicated good agreement. The experiment's results are compared with MORSE Monte Carlo calculated values. It is worthwhile to note that direct comparison between measured cross section values and the recommended ones are very far from satisfactory. In almost all cases the calculated spectrum is harder than the experimental one, a situation common to the penetrating and the back-scattered flux

  2. A method for measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Stout, David B; Thompson, Christopher J

    2010-01-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) system energy response is typically characterized in singles detection mode, yet there are situations in which the energy spectrum of coincidence events might be different than the spectrum measured in singles mode. Examples include imaging with isotopes that emit a prompt gamma in coincidence with a positron emission, imaging with low activity in a LSO/LYSO-based cameras, in which the intrinsic activity is significant, and in high scatter situations where the two 511 keV photons have different scattering probabilities (i.e. off-center line source). The ability to accurately measure the energy spectrum of coincidence events could be used for validating simulation models, optimizing energy discriminator levels and examining scatter models and corrections. For many PET systems operating in coincidence mode, the only method available for estimating the energy spectrum is to step the lower and upper level discriminators (LLD and ULD). Simple measurement techniques such as using a narrow sliding energy window or stepping only the LLD will not yield a spectrum of coincidence events that is accurate for cases where there are different energy components contributing to the spectrum. In this work we propose a new method of measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in PET based on a linear combination of two sets of coincident count measurements: one made by stepping the LLD and one made by stepping the ULD. The method was tested using both Monte Carlo simulations of a Siemens microPET R4 camera and measured data acquired on a Siemens Inveon PET camera. The results show that our energy spectrum calculation method accurately measures the coincident energy spectra for cases including the beta/gamma spectrum of the (176)Lu intrinsic activity present in the LSO scintillator crystals, a (68)Ge source and an (124)I source (in which there are prompt gamma-rays emitted together with the positron).

  3. New layout of time resolved beam energy spectrum measurement for dragon-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shuqing; Zhang Kaizhi; Shi Jinshui

    2010-01-01

    A new layout of time resolved beam energy spectrum measurement is proposed for Dragon-I by a new method named RBS (rotating beams in solenoids). The basic theory of RBS and the new layout are presented and the measuring error is also discussed. The derived time resolved beam energy spectrum is discrete and is determined by measuring the beam's rotating angle and expanding width through a group of solenoids at the export of Dragon-I. (authors)

  4. Direct measurement of the partial decay energy of 7Be inner bremstrahlung spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjeeviah, H.; Sanjeeviah, B.

    1978-01-01

    The inner bremsstrahlung spectrum accompanying orbital electron capture decay of 7 Be to the first excited state of 7 Li was measured in coincidence with 477 keV gamma rays. From the Jauch plot of the spectrum the partial decay energy was found to be 394 +- 16 keV. The shape factor of the inner bremsstrahlung spectrum close to the end point was accurately determined. It was found to be a constant X(1.001 +- 0.002) (author)

  5. Application of thermoluminescence dosimeter on the measurement of hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Zhaohui; Wang Baohui; Wang Kuilu; Hei Dongwei; Sun Fengrong; Li Gang

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) which composed by TLD-3500 reader and GR-100 M chips on the measurement of hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum. The idea using Filter Fluorescence Method (FFM) and TLD to measure hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum (from 10 keV to 100 keV) is discussed in details. Considering all the factors of the measuring surrounding, the measurement system of hard X-ray pulse has been devised. The calibration technique of absolute energy response of TLD is established. This method has been applied successfully on the radiation parameters measurement of the huge pulse radiation device-high-power pulser I. Hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum data of the pulser are acquired

  6. The application of thermoluminescence dosimeter on the measurement of hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Zhaohui; Wang Baohui; Wang Kuilu; Hei Dongwei; Sun Fengrong; Li Gang

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduce the application of thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) which composed by TLD-3500 Reader and TLD-100M chips on the measurement of hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum. The idea, using Filter Fluorescence Method (FFM) and TLD to measure hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum (from 10 keV to 100 keV), is discussed in details. Considering all the factors of the measuring surroundings, the measurement system of hard X-ray pulse has been devised. The calibration technique of absolute energy response of TLD is established. This method has been applied successfully on the radiation parameters measurement of the huge pulse radiation device -high-power pulser I. Hard X-ray pulse energy spectrum data of the pulser are acquired

  7. Earth formation porosity log using measurement of neutron energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for measuring the porosity of subsurface earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole by means of neutron well logging techniques. All the commercial techniques for measuring porosity currently available are not as accurate as desirable due to variations in the borehole wall diameter, in the borehole fluids (e.g. with chlorine content) in the casings of the borehole etc. This invention seeks to improve accuracy by using a measurement of the epithermal neutron population at one detector and the fast neutron population at a second detector, spaced approximately the same distance from a neutron source. The latter can be detected either by a fast neutron detector or indirectly by an inelastic gamma ray detector. Background correction can be made, and special detectors used, to discriminate against the detection of thermal neutrons or their resultant capture gamma rays. These fluctuations affect the measurement of thermal neutron populations. (U.K.)

  8. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M.

    2009-01-01

    The large sample of data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory has led to a significant improvement over previous measurements on the energy spectrum of cosmic rays. We observe a suppression of the flux at the highest energy with a significance of more than 6 standard deviations. The spectral index γ of the flux, J∝E -γ , at energies between 4x10 18 eV and 4x10 19 eV is 2.69±0.02 (stat) ±0.06 (syst), steepening to 4.2±0.4 (stat) ±0.06 (syst) at higher energies, consistent with the prediction by Greisen and by Zatsepin and Kuz'min. Observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less then 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

  9. Measurement of Neutron Energy Spectrum Emitted by Cf-252 Source Using Time-of-Flight Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The techniques proposed to detect the neutrons usually require the detection of a secondary recoiling nucleus in a scintillator (or other type of detector) to indicate the rare collision of a neutron with a nucleus. This is the same basic technique, in this case detection of a recoil proton that was used by Chadwick in the 1930 s to discover and identify the neutron and determine its mass. It is primary technique still used today for detection of fast neutron, which typically involves the use of a hydrogen based organic plastic or liquid scintillator coupled to a photo-multiplier tube. The light output from such scintillators is a function of the cross section and nuclear kinematics of the n + nucleus collision. With the exception of deuterated scintillators, the scintillator signal does not necessarily produce a distinct peak in the scintillator spectrum directly related to the incident neutron energy. Instead neutron time-of-flight (TOF) often must be utilized to determine the neutron energy, which requires generation of a prompt start signal from the nuclear source emitting the neutrons. This method takes advantage of the high number of prompt gamma rays. The Time-of-Flight method was used to measure neutron energy spectrum emitted by the Cf-252 neutron source. Plastic scintillator that has a superior discrimination ability of neutron and gamma-ray was used as a stop signal detector and liquid scintillator was used as a stat signal detector. In experiment, neutron and gamma-ray spectrum was firstly measured and discriminated using the TOF method. Secondly, neutron energy spectrum was obtained through spectrum analysis. Equation of neutron energy spectrum that was emitted by Cf-252 source using the Gaussian fitting was obtained.

  10. An absolute measurement of 252Cf prompt fission neutron spectrum at low energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajtai, A.; Dyachenko, P.P.; Kutzaeva, L.S.; Kononov, V.N.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Prompt neutron energy spectrum at low energies (25 keV 252 Cf spontaneous fission has been measured with a time-of-flight technique on a 30 cm flight-path. Ionization chamber and lithium-glass were used as fission fragment and neutron detectors, respectively. Lithium glasses of NE-912 (containing 6 Li) and of NE-913 (containing 7 Li) 45 mm in diameter and 9.5 mm in thickness have been employed alternatively, for the registration of fission neutrons and gammas. For the correct determination of the multiscattering effects - the main difficulty of the low energy neutron spectrum measurements - a special geometry for the neutron detector was used. Special attention was paid also to the determination of the absolute efficiency of the neutron detector. The real response function of the spectrometer was determined by a Monte-Carlo calculation. The scattering material content of the ionization chamber containing a 252 Cf source was minimized. As a result of this measurement a prompt fission neutron spectrum of Maxwell type with a T=1.42 MeV parameter was obtained at this low energy range. We did not find any neutron excess or irregularities over the Maxwellian. (author)

  11. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  12. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-01-01

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates μ- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k ∼ 4 Mpc –1 . Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of μ and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  13. Measurement of the ν _{μ } energy spectrum with IceCube-79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Bron, S.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vogel, E.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Waza, A.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2017-10-01

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory deployed in the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole. The ν _μ energy unfolding described in this paper is based on data taken with IceCube in its 79-string configuration. A sample of muon neutrino charged-current interactions with a purity of 99.5% was selected by means of a multivariate classification process based on machine learning. The subsequent unfolding was performed using the software Truee. The resulting spectrum covers an E_ν -range of more than four orders of magnitude from 125 GeV to 3.2 PeV. Compared to the Honda atmospheric neutrino flux model, the energy spectrum shows an excess of more than 1.9 σ in four adjacent bins for neutrino energies E_ν ≥ 177.8 {TeV}. The obtained spectrum is fully compatible with previous measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux and recent IceCube measurements of a flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos.

  14. Measurement of the ν{sub μ} energy spectrum with IceCube-79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Kyriacou, A.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bradascio, F.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stasik, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Bagherpour, H. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Rossem, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Al Samarai, I.; Bron, S.; Carver, T.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Geneva (Switzerland); Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Marquette University, Department of Physics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Del Pino Rosendo, E.; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Momente, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, T.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Waza, A.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); BenZvi, S.; Cross, R. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Palczewski, T.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boerner, M.; Fuchs, T.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Pieloth, D.; Rhode, W.; Ruhe, T.; Sandrock, A.; Schlunder, P. [TU Dortmund University, Department of Physics, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2017-10-15

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory deployed in the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole. The ν{sub μ} energy unfolding described in this paper is based on data taken with IceCube in its 79-string configuration. A sample of muon neutrino charged-current interactions with a purity of 99.5% was selected by means of a multivariate classification process based on machine learning. The subsequent unfolding was performed using the software Truee. The resulting spectrum covers an E{sub ν}-range of more than four orders of magnitude from 125 GeV to 3.2 PeV. Compared to the Honda atmospheric neutrino flux model, the energy spectrum shows an excess of more than 1.9σ in four adjacent bins for neutrino energies E{sub ν} ≥ 177.8 TeV. The obtained spectrum is fully compatible with previous measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux and recent IceCube measurements of a flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of the νμ energy spectrum with IceCube-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Kyriacou, A.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J.; Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bradascio, F.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stasik, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Adams, J.; Bagherpour, H.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O'Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C.; Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Rossem, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L.; Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Bron, S.; Carver, T.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J.; Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Del Pino Rosendo, E.; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Momente, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K.; Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M.; Auffenberg, J.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, T.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Waza, A.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G.; Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F.; Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D.; BenZvi, S.; Cross, R.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W.; Besson, D.Z.; Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Palczewski, T.; Tatar, J.; Boerner, M.; Fuchs, T.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Pieloth, D.; Rhode, W.; Ruhe, T.; Sandrock, A.; Schlunder, P.

    2017-01-01

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory deployed in the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole. The ν μ energy unfolding described in this paper is based on data taken with IceCube in its 79-string configuration. A sample of muon neutrino charged-current interactions with a purity of 99.5% was selected by means of a multivariate classification process based on machine learning. The subsequent unfolding was performed using the software Truee. The resulting spectrum covers an E ν -range of more than four orders of magnitude from 125 GeV to 3.2 PeV. Compared to the Honda atmospheric neutrino flux model, the energy spectrum shows an excess of more than 1.9σ in four adjacent bins for neutrino energies E ν ≥ 177.8 TeV. The obtained spectrum is fully compatible with previous measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux and recent IceCube measurements of a flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. (orig.)

  16. Indoor measurement of photovoltaic device characteristics at varying irradiance, temperature and spectrum for energy rating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, M; Betts, T R; Gottschalg, R

    2010-01-01

    The first three-dimensional performance matrix for use in photovoltaic (PV) energy rating is reported utilizing a novel energy rating solar simulator based on LEDs. Device characteristics are measured indoors at varying irradiance (G), temperature (T) and spectrum (E). This opens the possibility for a more accurate measurement system for energy yield prediction of PV devices, especially for devices with high spectral dependence such as wide bandgap solar cells as they take into account spectral changes in the light. The main aspects of the LED-based solar simulator used are briefly described. A measurement method is developed and detailed in the paper, which takes into account the current imperfections in the achievable spectrum. Measurement results for a crystalline silicon solar cell are used to demonstrate the measurement approach. An uncertainty analysis of the measurement system is given, resulting in an overall absolute uncertainty of 4.3% (coverage factor k = 2) in maximum power measurements at 765 W m −2 irradiance with scope for further improvements

  17. Direct measurement of the energy spectrum of an intense proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Lee, J.R.; Kissel, L.; Johnson, D.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Roose, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A time-resolved magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the energy spectrum of an intense (0.5 TW/cm 2 ) proton beam. A thin (2400 A) gold foil placed at the focus of an ion diode Rutherford scattered protons by 90 0 into the spectrometer, reducing the beam intensity to a level suitable for magnetic analysis. The scattered beam was collimated by two 1 mm diameter apertures separated by 12.3 cm. The collimated protons were deflected in a 12.7 cm diameter, 6.65 Kg samarium-cobalt permanent magnet. The deflected protons were recorded simultaneously on CR-39 and eight 1 mm 2 by 35 μm thick PIN diodes. A Monte Carlo computer code was used to calculate the sensitivity and resolution of the spectrometer. Data taken on Proto-I show a 150 keV to 250 keV wide proton energy spectrum at each instant in time

  18. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons measured with H.E.S.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons has so far been measured using balloon and satellite-based instruments. At TeV energies, however, the sensitivity of such instruments is very limited due to the low flux of electrons at very high energies and small detection areas of balloon/satellite based experiments. The very large collection area of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon/ satellite based instruments when detecting very-high-energy electrons (> 300 GeV). By analysing data taken by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), this work extends the known electron spectrum up to 4 TeV - a range that is not accessible to direct measurements. However, in contrast to direct measurements, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. detect air showers that cosmic-ray electrons initiate in the atmosphere rather than the primary particle. Thus, the main challenge is to differentiate between air showers initiated by electrons and those initiated by the hadronic background. A new analysis technique was developed that determines the background with the support of the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest. It is shown that this analysis technique can also be applied in other areas such as the analysis of diffuse γ rays from the Galactic plane. (orig.)

  19. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons measured with H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-03-30

    The spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons has so far been measured using balloon and satellite-based instruments. At TeV energies, however, the sensitivity of such instruments is very limited due to the low flux of electrons at very high energies and small detection areas of balloon/satellite based experiments. The very large collection area of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon/ satellite based instruments when detecting very-high-energy electrons (> 300 GeV). By analysing data taken by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), this work extends the known electron spectrum up to 4 TeV - a range that is not accessible to direct measurements. However, in contrast to direct measurements, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. detect air showers that cosmic-ray electrons initiate in the atmosphere rather than the primary particle. Thus, the main challenge is to differentiate between air showers initiated by electrons and those initiated by the hadronic background. A new analysis technique was developed that determines the background with the support of the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest. It is shown that this analysis technique can also be applied in other areas such as the analysis of diffuse {gamma} rays from the Galactic plane. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of the transverse energy spectrum in proton-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettoni, D.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes a measurement of the transverse energy spectrum in proton-nucleon interactions carried out at the CERN SPS using the HELIOS spectrometer. The measurement is of particular interest in that it is performed in a rapidity region away from central rapidity, where experimental data is scarce. In this rapidity region very interesting physics is anticipated and the measurement of the proton-nucleon collisions is essential as a basis to understand the more complicated proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. Both these topics are part of the experimental program of HELIOS. The measurement was done using a deuterium target enclosed in an iron tube. The contribution to the transverse energy spectrum from the p-Fe events is discriminated against by reconstructing the primary interaction vertex using drift chamber information. The measured spectrum is corrected via Monte Carlo to deconvolute the effect of reinteractions. High spatial resolution and multi-track resolving power are achieved with the use of a cool gas, such that the electron characteristic energy is close to the thermal limit: this implies a small diffusion coefficient and a consequently good positional accuracy. Of vital importance are the low value of the drift velocity, the fast, differentiating electronics and a careful shaping of the electric field configuration to improve the isochrony of the drift collection. The author reports on the design and tests of drift chamber prototypes built along the above lines, with which a spatial accuracy of 0.06 mm and a double track resolution of 0.6 mm were measured. He also describes the final drift chamber system and its operation in HELIOS

  1. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, W.; Leugner, D.; Becker, E.; Flesch, F.; Heinrich, W.; Huentrup, G.; Reitz, G.; Roecher, H.; Streibel, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station

  2. Measuring the low-energy cosmic ray spectrum with the AFIS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy cosmic rays interact with Earth's upper atmosphere and produce antiprotons, which can be trapped in Earth's magnetic field. The Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) Mission will measure the flux of trapped antiprotons with energies less than 100 MeV aboard the nanosatellite MOVE 2. An active-target tracking detector comprised of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers is already under construction at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. As a precursor to the space-bound mission, a prototype version of the detector will be launched aboard a balloon from Kiruna, Sweden as part of the REXUS/BEXUS student program by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Named AFIS-P, it will be used to measure the low-energy part of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies less than 100 MeV-per-nucleon. Spectrometers in previous balloon missions were not sensitive in this low-energy region. Thus AFIS-P will deliver unprecedented data, while simultaneously allowing us to field-test the AFIS detector.

  3. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    distortions caused by Taylor’s hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...... and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method...

  4. The energy spectrum of cosmic rays measured with the HEAT extension at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, Nils Sven Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the calculation of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays, that is the absolute flux of cosmic rays as a function of energy, from data of air showers observed with the HEAT (High Elevation Auger Telescopes) extension and the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory is the largest observatory for the study of cosmic rays. The Pierre Auger Observatory observes air showers, that are cascades of particles that were instigated by cosmic rays hitting the Earth's atmosphere, with two different detection concepts. The surface detector samples the secondary particles of air showers that hit the ground with an array of surface detector stations, whereas the fluorescence detector measures the energy loss profile of air showers by detecting fluorescence light, produced by the air showers when they travel through the atmosphere, with optical telescopes. The properties of the cosmic rays are not directly measurable but have to be reconstructed from the observed air shower parameters. Properties of particular interest are the type of the primary cosmic ray particle, its energy and its arrival direction. HEAT is an extension to the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. It is designed to lower the energy threshold by one order of magnitude down to 10 17 eV or lower. HEAT is taking data since 2010. The calculation of the absolute flux of cosmic rays needs two ingredients: the number of detected air showers as a function of shower energy and the exposure of the detector as a function of energy. The studied air shower class are hybrid events, which are events that have been detected by a fluorescence detector and at least one surface detector station. The used air showers were observed in a time period of fifteen month starting from June 2010. A first step of the analysis is the reconstruction of air showers and cosmic ray parameters from raw data. To calculate the exposure, the uptime, that is the integral

  5. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor's hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects that distinguish these measurements from previous work in the field: (1) The measurements are conducted using laser Doppler anemometry and are therefore not contaminated by directional ambiguity (in contrast to, e.g., frequently employed hot-wire anemometers); (2) the measurement data are extracted using a correctly and transparently functioning processor and are analysed using methods derived from first principles to provide unbiased estimates of the velocity statistics; (3) the exact mapping proposed herein has been applied to the high turbulence intensity flows investigated to avoid the significant distortions caused by Taylor's hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed jet. The proposed mapping is successfully validated using corresponding directly measured spatial statistics in the fully developed jet, even in the difficult outer regions of

  6. Spectrum and network measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Witte, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    This new edition of Spectrum and Network Measurements enables readers to understand the basic theory, relate it to measured results, and apply it when creating new designs. This comprehensive treatment of frequency domain measurements successfully consolidates all the pertinent theory into one text. It covers the theory and practice of spectrum and network measurements in electronic systems. It also provides thorough coverage of Fourier analysis, transmission lines, intermodulation distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and S-parameters.

  7. The measurement of tripartition alpha particle low energy spectrum in 235U fission induced by thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hage Sleiman, F.

    1980-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the α particles emitted in the thermal neutron induced fission of 235 U was measured from 11.5 MeV down to 2 MeV using the parabola mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the ILL high flux reactor. A Monte Carlo program, that simulates the α particle motion to the spectrometer, has been developed. Numerical results of Monte Carlo calculations for differents values of parameter are reported. The overall energy spectrum is slightly asymmetric at low energy. The possible reasons for the existence of this asymmetry are discussed [fr

  8. Measurement of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum - Part 2: Convection record measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Buchhave, Preben; Hodzic, Azur

    2017-01-01

    A novel exact temporal to spatial mapping for point measurements in turbulence has been applied to various flow conditions existing in a round turbulent jet. The conditions range between equilibrium and non-equilibrium as well as mid to high turbulence intensities. The exact mapping applies to all...... flows, including high intensity non-equilibrium flows, since it is based on the instantaneous velocity magnitude, thereby incorporating all relevant aspects of the flow dynamics. Devel-opment of the jet turbulence along the stream, from non-equilibrium to equilibrium, is observed. In the developed...... region of the jet, Taylor’s hypothesis is tested and the spectra using the novel exact mapping is validated with excellent agreement against directly measured spatial spectra in a mapped similarity space using PIV. The method is observed to produce the expected results even at turbulence intensi...

  9. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured by the HAWC experiment from 10 to 500 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Avila Rojas, D.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; Coutiño de León, S.; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; González Muñoz, A.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hinton, J.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Cámara, D.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report on the measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory in the energy range 10 to 500 TeV. HAWC is a ground-based air-shower array deployed on the slopes of Volcan Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico, and is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The data used in this work were taken over 234 days between June 2016 and February 2017. The primary cosmic-ray energy is determined with a maximum likelihood approach using the particle density as a function of distance to the shower core. Introducing quality cuts to isolate events with shower cores landing on the array, the reconstructed energy distribution is unfolded iteratively. The measured all-particle spectrum is consistent with a broken power law with an index of -2.49 ±0.01 prior to a break at (45.7 ±0.1 ) TeV , followed by an index of -2.71 ±0.01 . The spectrum also represents a single measurement that spans the energy range between direct detection and ground-based experiments. As a verification of the detector response, the energy scale and angular resolution are validated by observation of the cosmic ray Moon shadow's dependence on energy.

  10. A preliminary layout and PIC simulations of the time resolved beam energy spectrum measurement for DRAGON-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shuqing; Zhang Kaizhi; Shi Jingshui

    2010-01-01

    The time resolved beam energy spectrum for DRAGON-I can be measured with a new method which is named RBS (Rotating Beam in Solenoid). The beam energy spectrum is determined by measuring the beam rotation angle and its expansion width at the exit of DRAGON-I. The rotation beam is shaped by a slit at the exit of DRAGON-I, then rotated in the magnetic field of the solenoids and the resulted beamlet is measured by the Cherenkov screen. The beam motion in the solenoids is simulated by PARMELA and the relationships between the beam rotation angle's expansion width and the beam energy spread, emittance are discussed. The measurement error is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  11. Portfolio and diversity analysis of energy technologies using full-spectrum risk measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.C.; Beurskens, L.W.M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Awerbuch, S.; Stirling, A.C. [Science and Technology Policy Research SPRU, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    Energy diversity and security have been evaluated using the multi-criteria diversity analysis (MDA) of A. C. Stirling as well as more classical Markowitz mean-variance portfolio (MVP) theory. Each of these approaches is capable of producing an efficient frontier that shows optimal generating portfolio mixes, those that maximize performance (i.e. minimize cost) while minimizing risk or uncertainty (i.e. maximizing diversity). MDA covers the full-spectrum of uncertainty, reaching into areas where little is known about the range of possible outcomes, let alone their probabilities. However, MDA does not exploit statistical information that is available in certain parts of the risk-spectrum where historic means, variances and co-variances of outcomes are known and can be used to make inferences about the future. MVP operates precisely in this space. However, like other capital market models, its prescriptive value rests on the idea that the past is the best guide to the future. As such MVP can be blind to unforeseen events that create future structural change. Used in isolation, therefore, neither model offers a fully satisfying result. An MVP analysis of energy technologies tells us how to create generating portfolios with minimum cost and risk (cost-variance), assuming historic ranges predict the future well enough. If policy makers are confident that past expected values, ranges and variances will continue, then the solutions are fine. But what about so-called unknown risks? Possible future events that may produce outcomes with unknown consequences? This is where MDA becomes a potentially powerful tool. This project seeks to merge the two approaches and to map the space between optimal MVP and MDA solutions using a combined MVP+MDA optimization and weighting scheme. Placing 100% of the emphasis on MVP, for example, produces results based purely on historical trends. These may serve for short planning horizons. On the other hand, giving MDA a 100% weighting produces

  12. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye

    2009-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E∼10 15 eV to 6x10 19 eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10 15 and ∼10 19 eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  13. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye [Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Yakutsk 677980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2009-06-15

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E{approx}10{sup 15} eV to 6x10{sup 19} eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10{sup 15} and {approx}10{sup 19} eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  14. Energy spectrum measurement of high power and high energy(6 and 9 MeV) pulsed x-ray source for industrial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, Ibaraki (Japan); Murata, Isao [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Industrial X-ray CT system is normally applied to non-destructive testing (NDT) for industrial product made from metal. Furthermore there are some special CT systems, which have an ability to inspect nuclear fuel assemblies or rocket motors, using high power and high energy (more than 6 MeV) pulsed X-ray source. In these case, pulsed X-ray are produced by the electron linear accelerator, and a huge number of photons with a wide energy spectrum are produced within a very short period. Consequently, it is difficult to measure the X-ray energy spectrum for such accelerator-based X-ray sources using simple spectrometry. Due to this difficulty, unexpected images and artifacts which lead to incorrect density information and dimensions of specimens cannot be avoided in CT images. For getting highly precise CT images, it is important to know the precise energy spectrum of emitted X-rays. In order to realize it we investigated a new approach utilizing the Bayesian estimation method combined with an attenuation curve measurement using step shaped attenuation material. This method was validated by precise measurement of energy spectrum from a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In this study, to extend the applicable X-ray energy range we tried to measure energy spectra of X-ray sources from 6 and 9 MeV linear accelerators by using the recently developed method. In this study, an attenuation curves are measured by using a step-shaped attenuation materials of aluminum and steel individually, and the each X-ray spectrum is reconstructed from the measured attenuation curve by the spectrum type Bayesian estimation method. The obtained result shows good agreement with simulated spectra, and the presently developed technique is adaptable for high energy X-ray source more than 6 MeV.

  15. Using soft-X-ray energy spectrum to measure electronic temperature Te and primary research with computer data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingyao; Zhang Guangyang

    1993-01-01

    The authors reported the application of SCORPIO--2000 Computer detecting system on a nuclear fusion equipment, to measure the energy spectrum of soft X-ray from which the plasma electronic temperature was calculated. The authors processed systematically the data of the energy area of 1-4 Kev soft X-ray. The program edited was mostly made in FORTRAN, but only one SUBSB was made in assembly language. The program worked normally with convincing operation and easy correction of the data. The result obtained from calculation is the same as what was expected and the diagram obtained is the same as the expected one

  16. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhagen, P E; Kniss, T; Reginatto, M; Singleterry, R C; Van Steveninck, W; Wilson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (t...

  17. Measurement of the top-quark mass from the b jet energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The top-quark mass is measured using the peak position of the energy distribution of b jets produced from top-quark decays. The analysis is based on a recent theoretical proposal. The measurement is carried out selecting $\\mathrm{t\\overline{t}}$ events with one electron and one muon in the final state in proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The fitted peak position of the observed energy distribution is calibrated using simulated events and translated to a top-quark mass measurement using relativistic kinematics, with the result $m_{\\mathrm{t}}=172.29\\pm1.17\\,(\\mathrm{stat.})\\pm2.66\\,(\\mathrm{syst.})~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  18. The Cosmic Ray spectrum in the energy region between 1012 and 1016 eV measured by ARGO–YBJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montini Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in full and stable data taking at the Yangbajing cosmic ray observatory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l. for more than five years. The detector has been designed in order to explore the Cosmic Ray (CR spectrum in an energy range from few TeV up to several PeV. The high segmentation of the detector allows a detailed measurement of the lateral particle distribution which can be exploited on order to identify showers produced by primaries of different mass. The results of the measurement of the all-particle and proton plus helium energy spectra in the energy region between 1012 and 1016 eV are discussed.

  19. Measurement of the time dependent neutron energy spectrum in the 'DENA' plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahzadeh, M [Department of Physics, Imam Husein University, PO Box 16575-347, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadat kiai, S M [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Nuclear Science Research School, A.E.O.I., PO Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babazadeh, A R [Physics Department, Qom University, PO Box 37165, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    An extended time of flight method is used to determine the time dependent neutron energy spectrum in the Filippove type 'Dena' plasma focus (90 kJ, 25 kV, 288 {mu}F), filled with deuterium gas. An array of 5 detectors containing NE-102 plastic scintillators+photomultipliers is used. The number and position of the detectors are determined by a Monte Carlo program and the MCNP code. This paper briefly describes the simulation method and presents the experimental measurements and their results. The mechanisms of neutron production (thermonuclear and non-thermonuclear) and their time variations are discussed.

  20. Measurement of the very-forward energy spectrum in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, Sebastian; Akbiyik, Melike; Baus, Colin; Katkov, Igor; Ulrich, Ralf; Woehrmann, Hauke [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The energy spectrum dN/dE in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=13 TeV is measured with the CASTOR calorimeter of CMS at pseudorapidities -5.2>η>-6.6. The spectrum of the total energy, as well as the hadronic and electromagnetic energy, is presented and compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. The performance also of model used to describe ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers is tested, and the possible impact of the measurement on the air shower development is illustrated.

  1. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  2. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays with the 26 station configuration of the IceTop detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2011-01-01

    IceTop is an instrument at the geographic South Pole designed to detect cosmic ray air showers, particle cascades in the atmosphere initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. It is the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope. Since its completion in December 2010, IceTop consists of 81 detector stations covering an area of one square kilometer on the ice surface above IceCube. Each IceTop station consists of two ice-filled tanks in which the Cherenkov light emitted by charged air shower particles is measured. In this dissertation, an analysis of data taken in 2007 with 26 IceTop stations operational at that time is presented. First, properties of air showers like core position, direction and shower size were reconstructed from the measured signals. The core position can be determined to an accuracy of up to 6m and a direction resolution of up to 0.3 is achieved. The shower size is a measure of the energy of the primary particle and a resolution of up to 10% is achieved at high energies. In the next step the relation between primary energy and shower size, as well as resolution and efficiency are determined from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers and the IceTop detector. Here, an assumption was made about the chemical composition of cosmic rays. The informations obtained in these simulations are then used to unfold the spectrum of measured shower sizes in order to obtain the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum. This is done independently for particles from three different zenith angle intervals. The result of the unfolding depends on the assumed primary composition. Due to the isotropy of cosmic rays, results obtained in different zenith angle intervals must agree. While with the chosen analysis technique a simultaneous determination of primary particle mass and energy is limited due to systematic uncertainties, it has already been shown that the requirement of isotropy can be used to constrain the range of possible assumptions on the chemical

  3. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays with the 26 station configuration of the IceTop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2011-09-27

    IceTop is an instrument at the geographic South Pole designed to detect cosmic ray air showers, particle cascades in the atmosphere initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. It is the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope. Since its completion in December 2010, IceTop consists of 81 detector stations covering an area of one square kilometer on the ice surface above IceCube. Each IceTop station consists of two ice-filled tanks in which the Cherenkov light emitted by charged air shower particles is measured. In this dissertation, an analysis of data taken in 2007 with 26 IceTop stations operational at that time is presented. First, properties of air showers like core position, direction and shower size were reconstructed from the measured signals. The core position can be determined to an accuracy of up to 6m and a direction resolution of up to 0.3 is achieved. The shower size is a measure of the energy of the primary particle and a resolution of up to 10% is achieved at high energies. In the next step the relation between primary energy and shower size, as well as resolution and efficiency are determined from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers and the IceTop detector. Here, an assumption was made about the chemical composition of cosmic rays. The informations obtained in these simulations are then used to unfold the spectrum of measured shower sizes in order to obtain the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum. This is done independently for particles from three different zenith angle intervals. The result of the unfolding depends on the assumed primary composition. Due to the isotropy of cosmic rays, results obtained in different zenith angle intervals must agree. While with the chosen analysis technique a simultaneous determination of primary particle mass and energy is limited due to systematic uncertainties, it has already been shown that the requirement of isotropy can be used to constrain the range of possible assumptions on the chemical

  4. First measurement of the VESUVIO neutron spectrum in the 30–80 MeV energy range using a Proton Recoil Telescope technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Croci, G; Grosso, G; Rebai, M; Gorini, G; Frost, C; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Giacomelli, L; Hjalmarsson, A

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the fast neutron energy spectrum at the ISIS spallation source are reported. The measurements were performed with a Proton Recoil Telescope consisting of a thin plastic foil placed in the neutron beam and two scintillator detectors. Results in the neutron energy range 30 MeV n < 80 MeV are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron spectrum

  5. First measurement of the VESUVIO neutron spectrum in the 30-80 MeV energy range using a Proton Recoil Telescope technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Frost, C.; Giacomelli, L.; Grosso, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Rebai, M.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Gorini, G.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of the fast neutron energy spectrum at the ISIS spallation source are reported. The measurements were performed with a Proton Recoil Telescope consisting of a thin plastic foil placed in the neutron beam and two scintillator detectors. Results in the neutron energy range 30 MeV < En < 80 MeV are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron spectrum.

  6. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  7. Measurement of the energy spectrum from the neutron source p lanned for IGISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Mattera, A; Rakopoulos, V; Lantz, M; Pomp, S; Solders, A; Al-Adili, A; Andersson, P; Hjalmarsson, A; Valldor-Blücher, B; Prokofiev, A; Passoth, E; Gentile, A; Bortot, D; Esposito, A; Introini, M V; Pola, A; Penttilä, H; Gorelov, D; Rinta-Antila, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the characterisation measurements of the energ y spectra from a Be (p,xn) neutron source to be installed at the IGISOL-JYFLTRA P facility for studies of neutron-induced independent fission yields. The measurements were performed at The Svedberg Laboratory (Uppsala, Sweden), during 50 hours of beam-time in June, 2012. A 30 MeV p roton beam impinged on a mock-up of the proton-neutron converter; this was a 5 mm-thick beryllium disc inserted in an aluminium holder, with a 1-cm t hick layer of cool- ing water on the backside. The geometry of the mock-up has bee n chosen to reproduce the one that will be used as the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP so urce. During the experiment, two configurations for the neutron so urce have been used: a fast neutron field, produced using the bare target; an d a moderated field, obtained adding a 10 cm-thick Polyethylene block after the t arget assembly. The neutron fields have been measured using an Extended Range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS), able to simultaneously determine ...

  8. Neutron spectrum measurement by TOF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1982-01-01

    The TOF experiments by using various facilities are described. The steady neutron spectra in light water which contains non-1/V absorbing materials were measured by the TOF method at a LINAC facility. The results were compared with the calculations based on the Koppel-Haywood model and two others. The leakage neutron spectra from a heavy-water assembly were measured and compared with model calculations. The time-dependent energy spectra in a small graphite assembly were measured. For this measurement, a chopper system was also used. The two-region calculation explains the spectrum just after the neutron burst. The time-dependent spectra in a small Be assembly and in an assembly of coolant-moderator containing hydrogen were also measured. The calculations based on various models are in progress. The TOF experiments at the reactor-chopper facility were carried out for measuring the total cross sections of crystalline moderators, the thermal neutron total cross section of high temperature beryllium, the thermal neutron total cross sections of granular lead and high temperature liquid lead, and the angle-dependent scattering spectra. A pseudo-chopper was designed and constructed. The spectra of the neutron field for medical use were measured by the chopper-TOF system. The thermal neutron total cross sections of Fe, Zr, Nb and Mg were measured, and the results were compared with the calculations by THRUSH and UNCLE-TOM codes. The random-trigger TOF experiments were made by using Cf-252. (Kato, T.)

  9. Energy spectrum of lightning gamma emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, A.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karashtin, A.N. [Research Radiophysics Institute, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ryabov, V.A., E-mail: ryabov@x4u.lebedev.r [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shepetov, A.L. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Antonova, V.P.; Kryukov, S.V. [Ionosphere Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mitko, G.G.; Naumov, A.S.; Pavljuchenko, L.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ptitsyn, M.O., E-mail: ptitsyn@lpi.r [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shalamova, S.Ya. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shlyugaev, Yu.V. [Research Radiophysics Institute, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Vildanova, L.I. [Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Zybin, K.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gurevich, A.V., E-mail: alex@lpi.r [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-10

    The results of gamma emission observations obtained during thunderstorms at Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station are presented. The energy spectrum radiation of the stepped leader gamma radiation is measured. The total energy of stepped leader emitted in gamma rays is estimated as 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} J. The experimental results are in an agreement with the runaway breakdown mechanism.

  10. Energy spectrum of lightning gamma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubenko, A.P.; Karashtin, A.N.; Ryabov, V.A.; Shepetov, A.L.; Antonova, V.P.; Kryukov, S.V.; Mitko, G.G.; Naumov, A.S.; Pavljuchenko, L.V.; Ptitsyn, M.O.; Shalamova, S.Ya.; Shlyugaev, Yu.V.; Vildanova, L.I.; Zybin, K.P.; Gurevich, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    The results of gamma emission observations obtained during thunderstorms at Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station are presented. The energy spectrum radiation of the stepped leader gamma radiation is measured. The total energy of stepped leader emitted in gamma rays is estimated as 10 -3 -10 -2 J. The experimental results are in an agreement with the runaway breakdown mechanism.

  11. Measurement and interpretation of moments of the combined hadronic mass and energy spectrum in inclusive semileptonic B-meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, V.

    2007-11-29

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}. The variable n{sub X}{sup 2} is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson m{sub X}, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame E{sub X,BRF}, and a constant {lambda}=0.65 GeV, n{sub X}{sup 2}=m{sub X}{sup 2}c{sup 4}-2{lambda}E{sub X,BRF}+{lambda}{sup 2}. The moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle with k=2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {upsilon}(4S) {yields} B anti B events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}} and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B{yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, we determine the quark-mixing parameter vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction B(B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}), and four non-perturbative heavy quark parameters. Using HQE

  12. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, Verena [Dresden Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic nX2 distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B → Xcℓν. The variable nX2 is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson mX, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame EX;BRF, and a constant ~Λ = 0.65 GeV, nX2 = mX2c4-2~ΛEX,BRF + ~Λ2. The moments Xk> with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e+e- → Υ(4S) {yields} B$\\bar{B}$ events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e--storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the nX2 distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments Xk> up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B → Xcℓν and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B → Xsγ, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |Vcb|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction β(B → Xcℓν), and four non-perturbative heavy quark

  13. Measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Castano, V. M. [UNAM, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Gaso, I. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [UNAM, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    The energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments was measured using nuclear track detectors and digital image analysis system. The detection material was fused silica glass. The detectors were chemically etched in an 8% HF solution. After experimenting with various etching time, it was found that the best resolution of the track diameter distribution was obtained after 30 minutes of etching. Both Gaussian and Lorentzian curves were fit to the track diameter distribution histograms and used to determine the basic parameters of the distribution of the light (N{sub L}) and heavy (N{sub H}) formed peaks and the minimum of the central valley (N{sub V}). Advantages of the method presented here include the fully-automated analysis process, the low cost of the nuclear track detectors and the simplicity of the nuclear track method. The distribution resolution obtained by this method is comparable with the resolution obtained by electronic analysis devices. The descriptive variables calculated were very close to those obtained by other methods based on the use of semiconductor detectors. (Author)

  14. To the measurement of 3γ/2γ ratio for positron annihilation in matter using annihilation energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukhovich, S.K.; Berestov, A.V.; Antovich, N.M.; Metelitsa, O.N.

    2001-01-01

    Processes of the summation of cascade γ-quanta usually neglected, when registering the annihilation energy spectrum for the determination of the three-photon annihilation probability P 3γ of positronium in samples, are studied. The deviations of the actual P 3γ value from that determined without allowance made for the summation processes are 56% and 25% for Na(Tl) and Ge detectors placed at the distance of 3 cm from a positron source respectively. (author)

  15. Measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of a 89Sr beta emitter in the 1–100 keV photon energy regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The internal bremsstrahlung (IB) spectrum of 89 Sr, which is a unique first forbidden beta emitter, is studied in the 1–100 keV photon energy regime. The IB spectrum is experimentally measured using a Si(Li) detector, which is efficient in this photon energy regime, and is compared with the IB distributions that are predicted by the Knipp, Uhlenbeck and Bloch (KUB), Nilsson, and Lewis and Ford theories. In the soft energy regime up to 15 keV, the measured results are in agreement with all the aforementioned theories. However, from 16–30 keV, the experimental results are in agreement with the Lewis and Ford theory, which applies to forbidden transitions, and at higher photon energies, the Nilsson theory best describes the measured results. The differences among the different theories also increase with the photon energy. The effect of the electrostatic Coulomb field on the IB process for beta emitters with different end-point energies is investigated by comparing the ratio of the IB probabilities predicted using the KUB and Nilsson theories for 35 S and 89 Sr, i.e., soft and hard beta emitters, respectively. The Coulomb effect is shown to be significant in the high photon energy regime and for beta emitters with low end-point energies. - Highlights: • Internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 89 Sr, a unique first forbidden beta emitter, is studied. • The measurements are taken in the photon energy regions of 1–100 keV with Si(Li) detector. • The measured results are deviating from Lewis and Ford theory and are close to the Nilsson theory. • The effect of Coulomb field on the IB process for different end point energy sources is investigated. • Effect of Coulomb field is more for low energy beta emitter towards the high energy end

  16. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  17. Design of a nondestructive two-in-one instrument for measuring the polarization and energy spectrum at an X-ray FEL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingmin; Deng, Bangjie; Chen, Yuanmiaoliang; Liu, Bochao; Chen, Shaofei; Fan, Jinquan; Feng, Lie; Deng, Haixiao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2017-10-01

    The free electron laser (FEL), as a next-generation light source, is an attractive tool in scientific frontier research because of its advantages of full coherence, ultra-short pulse duration, and controllable polarization. Owing to the demand of real-time bunch diagnosis during FEL experiments, precise nondestructive measurements of the polarization and X-ray energy spectrum using one instrument are preferred. In this paper, such an instrument based on the electron time-of-flight technique is proposed. By considering the complexity and nonlinearity, a numerical model in the framework of Geant4 has been developed for optimization. Taking the Shanghai Soft X-ray FEL user facility as an example, its measurement performances' dependence on the critical parameters was studied systematically, and, finally, an optimal design was obtained, achieving resolutions of 0.5% for the polarization degree and 0.3 eV for the X-ray energy spectrum.

  18. Development of the MICROMEGAS Detector for Measuring the Energy Spectrum of Alpha Particles by using a 241-Am Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Do Yoon; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting {\\alpha} particles emitted from an 241-Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of {\\alpha} particles from the 241-Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the {\\alpha} particle from the 241 Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the {\\alpha} particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for {\\alpha} particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that {\\alpha} particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGA...

  19. Modeling of the Signal Formation in SiC Sensors for Measurements of the Radiation Spectrum in Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, Igor P.

    2013-06-01

    The modeling methodology of the signal formation in SiC sensors is presented. The modeling uses two approaches: the first one is the integrated approach whereas the second is the analytical approach. The sensor response is obtained from both approaches: this is the usual solution of the forward problem. Moreover, the response function of the sensor is evaluated by means of the analytical approach and it can be used to solve the inverse problem: recovering the primary radiation spectrum using the response of the sensor. Additionally, the response function returns information about the signal formation in the sensor such as the shape of the response formed by particles with a specific energy. Results obtained by simulations are then compared with experimental data. (authors)

  20. FACT. Energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temme, Fabian; Einecke, Sabrina; Buss, Jens [TU Dortmund, Experimental Physics 5, Otto-Hahn-Str.4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: FACT-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope is the first Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope which uses silicon photon detectors (G-APDs aka SiPM) as photo sensors. With more than four years of operation, FACT proved an application of SiPMs is suitable for the field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. Due to the stable flux at TeV energies, the Crab Nebula is handled as a ''standard candle'' in Cherenkov astronomy. The analysis of its energy spectrum and comparison with other experiments, allows to evaluate the performance of FACT. A modern analysis chain, based on data stream handling and multivariate analysis methods was developed in close cooperation with the department of computer science at the TU Dortmund. In this talk, this analysis chain and its application are presented. Further to this, results, including the energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula, measured with FACT, are shown.

  1. A contribution for the problematic of measurements of fast-neutron-energy spectrum in thermal reactor-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, H.

    1978-06-01

    The aims of this work are to check the experimental conditions for using of a 6 Li-semiconductor-spectrometer at thermal reactor-systems and to measure the neutron-energy-spectra at the critical experiment KAHTER comparing with the theory. Using the spectrometer at thermal-neutraon-experiments questions will be attended as resolution, statistic and selection of usable nuclear data. The nuclear data will be gauged by qualified measurements, the statistic will be estimated by simulated calculations and the resolution will be improved by using the Fredholm-equation in the calculations. The calculated spectra show a good agreement with the measured spectra. Only in the energy region of maximum distribution of fission-neutrons there are little difference. The measurements show the using of the spectrometer is recommended at systems with preponderant thermal neutron-spectra, although the resolution and statistic are optimized for the spectrometer by measurements at experiments with fast neutron-spectra. (orig.) 891 RW [de

  2. Measurement of continuum spectrum from {sup 12}C(p,p`x) at energy of 392 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Konishi, Daisuke; Uozumi, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Sakae, Takeji; Matoba, Masaru [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Nohtomi, Akihiro; Maki, Takashi; Koori, Norihiko

    1998-03-01

    Continuum spectra from {sup 12}C(p,p`x) reaction at 392 MeV were measured by using plastic and GSO(Ce) scintillators. The spectra of energy-angle double differential cross sections are compared with that of Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) simulation. Significant differences were found in the results at the forward angles. (author)

  3. Beryllium phonon spectrum from cold neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inelastic coherent scattering of neutrons with the initial energy E 0 =4.65 MeV on the spectrometer according to the time of flight is studied in polycrystalline beryllium. The measurements are made for the scattering angles THETA=15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg at 293 K. The phonon spectrum of beryllium, i-e. g(w) is reestablished from the experimental data. The data obtained are compared with the data of model calculations. It is pointed out that the phonon spectrum of beryllium has a bit excessive state density in the energy range from 10 to 30 MeV. It is caused by the insufficient statistical accuracy of the experiment at low energy transfer

  4. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G.; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4

  5. First β-ν correlation measurement from the recoil-energy spectrum of Penning trapped Ar35 ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Tandecki, M.; Beck, M.; Finlay, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Kozlov, V.; Porobic, T.; Soti, G.; Traykov, E.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel method to search for physics beyond the standard model by determining the β-ν angular correlation from the recoil-ion energy distribution after β decay of ions stored in a Penning trap. This recoil-ion energy distribution is measured with a retardation spectrometer. The unique combination of the spectrometer with a Penning trap provides a number of advantages, e.g., a high recoil-ion count rate and low sensitivity to the initial position and velocity distribution of the ions and completely different sources of systematic errors compared to other state-of-the-art experiments. Results of a first measurement with the isotope Ar35 are presented. Although currently at limited precision, we show that a statistical precision of about 0.5% is achievable with this unique method, thereby opening up the possibility of contributing to state-of-the-art searches for exotic currents in weak interactions.

  6. First beta-nu correlation measurement from the recoil-energy spectrum of Penning trapped Ar-35 ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Van Gorp, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Tandecki, M.; Beck, M.; Finlay, P.; Friedag, P.; Gluck, F.; Herlert, A.; Kozlov, V.; Porobic, T.; Soti, G.; Traykov, E.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, Dalibor; Severijns, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 2 (2014), č. článku 025502. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : correlation measurements * spectrometers * ISOLDE Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 3.733, year: 2014

  7. Measurement of the atmospheric νμ energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C.; Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M.; Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S.; Anvar, S.; Louis, F.; Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E.; Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van; Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J.; Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E.; Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M.; Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de; Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F.; Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V.; Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G.; Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y.; Circella, M.; Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C.; Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H.; Flaminio, V.; Giordano, V.; Haren, H. van; Kadler, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Pradier, T.; Rostovtsev, A.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric ν μ + anti ν μ energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is ∝25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index γ meas =3.58±0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Louis, F. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Geoazur, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Circella, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Donzaud, C. [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands); Flaminio, V. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje (Texel) (Netherlands); Kadler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (IT); Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Montaruli, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Geneva (CH); Morganti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Rostovtsev, A. [ITEP - Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (NL); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (NL); Taiuti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genova (IT); Tayalati, Y. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, B.P. 717, Oujda (MA)

    2013-10-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} + anti {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is {proportional_to}25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index {gamma}{sub meas}=3.58{+-}0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  9. Fast neutron spectrum measurement in the JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, K.; Mizuho, M.

    1980-01-01

    Fast neutron spectrum measurement at positions of K-10 (fuel region), J-11 (first beryllium reflector region) and I-12 (second beryllium reflector region) in the JMTRC has been performed with the threshold detectors such as 107 Ag(n,n')sup(107m)Ag, 103 Rh(n,n')sup(103m)Rh, 115 In(n,n')sup(115m)In and 238 U(n,f)F.P. above 0.1 MeV energy region. The activity data have been analyzed by the unfolding code SAND-II using ANISN spectrum for initial spectrum. An effective cross section of 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn is calculated with Fabry's cross section data and SAND-II spectrum for K-10, J-11 and I-12. They are 76.7 mb, 69.0 mb and 68.2 mb for K-10, J-11 and I-12 respectively. These values agree with the effective cross sections (calculated by Fabry's cross section data and ANISN spectrum) within +-6%

  10. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.T.; Schramm, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of the ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray spectrum upon traversing the 2.7 0 K microwave background with respect to pion photoproduction, pair-production reactions, and cosmological effects. Our approach employs exact transport equations which manifestly conserve nucleon number and embody the laboratory details of these reactions. A spectrum enhancement appears around 6 x 10 19 eV due to the ''pile-up'' of energy-degraded nucleons, and a ''dip'' occurs around 10 19 eV due to combined effects. Both of these features appear in the observational spectrum. We analyze the resulting neutrino spectrum and the effects of cosmological source distributions. We present a complete model of the ultrahigh-energy spectrum and anisotropy in reasonable agreement with observation and which predicts an observable electron-neutrino spectrum

  11. Charmed muons in ice. Measurement of the high-energetic atmospheric energy spectrum with IceCube in the detector configuration IC86-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis the flux of high-energy muons in the energy regime from 10 TeV to 1 PeV is reconstructed and analyzed using data collected with the IceCube detector in the time span 13.05.2011 to 15.05.2012. From a data set containing muon bundles only those events are selected which contain a muon that is energetically dominating the others in the bundle. For the separation a Random Forest model is applied, resulting in a data set of high-energy muons with an efficiency of (40.8±0.6) % and a purity of (93.1±0.4) %. Attributes considered in the separation are selected by the mRMR algorithm. The energy spectrum of muons is reconstructed with a regularized unfolding using the software TRUEE. The hypothesis of a prompt and a conventional component of atmospheric muons results in flux normalizations of N conv. =1.03±0.06 and N prompt =1.59±1.57. Due to the large uncertainty of the prompt component, the hypothesis of a pure conventional flux cannot be excluded. Using these normalizations, it is possible to determine if the measured high-energy neutrino flux above 60 TeV is of atmospheric origin. The p-value for this hypothesis is found to be 0.045, which indicates the need of an astrophysical component to explain the excess at high energies.

  12. Energy detection for spectrum sensing in cognitive radio

    CERN Document Server

    Atapattu, Saman; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on the current state-of-the-art research on spectrum sensing by using energy detection, a low-complexity and low-cost technique. It includes a comprehensive summary of recent research, fundamental theories, possible architectures, useful performance measurements of energy detection and applications of energy detection. Concise, practical chapters explore conventional energy detectors, alternative forms of energy detectors, performance measurements, diversity techniques and cooperative networks. The careful analysis enables reader to identify the most efficient techn

  13. TH-CD-201-02: A Monte Carlo Investigation of a Novel Detector Arrangement for the Energy Spectrum Measurement of a 6MV Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, S; Bartol, L; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Direct measurement of the energy spectrum of a 6MV linear accelerator has not been successful due to the high fluence rate, high energy nature of these photon beams. Previous work used a Compton Scattering (CS) spectrometry setup with a shielded spectrometer for spectrum measurements. Despite substantial lead shielding, excessive pulse pile-up was seen. MCNP6 transport code was used to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of performing measurements using a novel detector setup. Methods: Simulations were performed with a shielded high-purity germanium (HPGe) semiconductor detector placed in the accelerator vault’s maze, with a 2 cm diameter collimator through a 92 cm thick concrete wall. The detector was positioned 660 cm from a scattering rod (placed at isocenter) at an angle of 45° relative to the central axis. This setup was compared with the shielded detector positioned in the room, 200 cm from the scattering rod at the same CS angle. Simulations were used to determine fluence contributions from three sources: (1) CS photons traveling through the collimator aperture, the intended signal, (2) CS scatter photons penetrating the detector shield, and (3) room-scattered photons penetrating the detector shield. Variance reduction techniques including weight windows, DXTRAN spheres, forced collisions, and energy cutoffs were used. Results: Simulations showed that the number of pulses per starting particle from an F8 detector tally for the intended signal decreased by a factor of 10{sup 2} when moving the detector out of the vault. This reduction in signal was amplified for the unwanted scatter signal which decreased by up to a factor of 10{sup 9}. Conclusion: This work used MCNP6 to show that using a vault wall to shield unwanted scatter and increasing isocenter-to-detector distance reduces unwanted fluence to the detector. This study aimed to provide motivation for future experimental work using the proposed setup.

  14. Analytical energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Honghua; Xie, Qiongtao; Lee, Chaohong; Guan, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Batchelor, Murray T

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems described by non-parity-symmetric quantum Rabi models. A set of analytical solutions in terms of the confluent Heun functions and their analytical energy spectrum is obtained. The analytical energy spectrum includes regular and exceptional parts, which are both confirmed by direct numerical simulation. The regular part is determined by the zeros of the Wronskian for a pair of analytical solutions. The exceptional part is relevant to the isolated exact solutions and its energy eigenvalues are obtained by analyzing the truncation conditions for the confluent Heun functions. By analyzing the energy eigenvalues for exceptional points, we obtain the analytical conditions for the energy-level crossings, which correspond to two-fold energy degeneracy. (paper)

  15. An experiment to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons from 100 to 1000 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, M. H.; Price, P. B.; Barwick, S. W.; Lowder, D. M.; Ahlen, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Production models were developed and the confirmation of each one had significant astrophysical impact. These include radical modifications of propagation models, cosmic ray antiprotons injection from neighboring domains of antimatter, p production by evaporating primordial black holes, and cosmic ray p's as annihilation products of supersymmetry particles that might make up the dark dynamical mass of the Galaxy. It is that p's originating from supersymmetric parents might have distinct spectral features that would survive solar modulation; in one model, higgsino annihilation proceeds through the bb quark-antiquark channel, producing a spectral bump at approx. 0.3 GeV in the p spectrum.

  16. ATW neutron spectrum measurements at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Littleton, P.E.; Morgan, G.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) is a proposal to use a high flux of accelerator-produced thermalized neutrons to transmute both fission product and higher actinide commercial nuclear waste into stable or short-lived radioactive species in order to avoid long-term storage of nuclear waste. At LAMPF the authors recently performed experiments that were designed to measure the spectrum of neutrons produced per incident proton for full-scale proposed ATW targets of lead and lithium. The neutrons produced in such targets have a spectrum of energies that extends up to the energy of the incident proton beam, but the distribution peaks between 1 and 5 MeV. Transmutation reactions and fission of actinides are most efficient when the neutron energy is below a few eV, so the target must be surrounded by a non-absorbing material (blanket) to produce additional neutrons and reduce the energy of high energy neutrons without loss. The experiments with the lead target, 25 cm diameter by 40 cm long, were conducted with 800 MeV protons, while those with the lithium target, 25 cm diameter by 175 cm long, were conducted with 400 MeV protons. The blanket in both sets of experiments was a 60 cm diameter by 200 cm long annulus of lead that surrounded the target. Surrounding the blanket was a steel water tank with dimensions of 250 cm diameter by 300 cm long that simulated the transmutation region. A small sample pipe penetrated the length of the lead blanket and other sample pipes penetrated the length of the water tank at different radii from the beam axis so that the neutron spectra at different locations could be measured by foil activation. After irradiation the activated foil sets were extracted and counted with calibrated high resolution germanium gamma ray detectors at the Los Alamos nuclear chemistry counting facility.

  17. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons measured on an airplane over a wide range of altitude and latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Wilson, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    Crews of high-altitude aircraft are exposed to radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). To help determine such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude airplane. The primary instrument was a sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer. Its detector responses were calculated for energies up to 100 GeV using the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.5.d with improved nuclear models and including the effects of the airplane structure. New calculations of GCR-induced particle spectra in the atmosphere were used to correct for spectrometer counts produced by protons, pions and light nuclear ions. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the corrected measured count rates using the deconvolution code MAXED 3.1. The results for the measured cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron dose equivalent and effective dose rates, and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cut-off agree well with results from recent calculations of GCR-induced neutron spectra. (authors)

  18. A technique of measuring neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Kirthi, K.N.; Ganguly, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic scintillators have been used to measure fast neutron spectrum from various sources. Gamma background discrimination has been done by selecting thin scintillators and thereby achieving near 100% transmission of Compton-edge electrons. The measured distribution has been unfolded by using an iterative least square technique. This gives minimum variance and maximum likelihood estimate with error minimised. Smoothening of the observed distribution has been done by Fourier and time series analyses. The method developed is applicable in principle for the determination of spectra of high energy neutrons ranging from 1 MeV to 70 MeV and beyond. However, practical application of the method is limited by the non-availability of cross-section data for various neutron induced reactions with carbon and hydrogen present in the polymerised polystyrene scintillator. This procedure has been adopted in the present work for spectral determination up to 14 MeV neutrons using the published value of reaction and scattering cross-sections. The spectra of Po-Be, Pu-Be, Am-Be and Ra-Be arrived at agree well with the published spectra obtained by other methods. Spectrum from spontaneous fission of Cf-252 have also been measured and fitted to the expression N(E)=Esup(1/2)exp(-E/T). The fitted parameter T and spectral details agree well with those in published literature

  19. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum above 1016 eV measured with the LOFAR radboud air shower array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoudam, S.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; Ter Veen, S.; Trinh, T. N G; Van Kessel, L.

    2015-01-01

    The LOFAR Radboud Air Shower Array (LORA) is an array of 20 plastic scintillation detectors installed in the center of the LOFAR radio telescope in the Netherlands to measure extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere. The primary goals of LORA are to trigger the read-out

  20. Partial decay energy of 51Cr from inner bremsstrahlung spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjeeviah, H.; Sanjeevaiah, B.

    1980-01-01

    The inner bremsstrahlung spectrum accompanying orbital electron capture decay of 51 Cr to the first excited state in 51 V was measured in coincidence with 320 keV gamma rays. From the Jauch plot of the spectrum the partial decay energy was deduced to be 433 +- 18 keV in good agreement with the previously measured value and the accepted mass difference. The overall shape factor of the inner bremsstrahlung spectrum was found to be a constant X(1.1 +- 0.1). (author)

  1. An Application of the Direct Coulomb Electron Pair Production Process to the Energy Measurement of the "VH-Group" in the "Knee" Region of the "All-Particle" Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Wu, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The "all-particle" cosmic ray energy spectrum appears to be exhibiting a significant change in the spectral index just above approximately 3000 TeV. This could indicate (1) a change in the propagation of the cosmic rays in the galactic medium, and/or (2) the upper limit of the supernova shock wave acceleration mechanism, and/or (3) a new source of high-energy cosmic rays. Air shower and JACEE data indicate the spectral change is associated with a composition change to a heavier element mixture whereas DICE does not indicate this. A detector concept will be presented that utilizes the energy dependence of the production of direct Coulomb electron-positron pairs by energetic heavy ions. Monte Carlo simulations of a direct electron pair detector consisting of Pb target foils interleaved with planes of 1-mm square scintillating optical fibers will be discussed. The goal is to design a large area, non-saturating instrument to measure the energy spectrum of the individual cosmic ray elements in the "VH-group" for energies greater than 10 TeV/nucleon.

  2. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  3. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  4. Neutron spectrum measurement in D + Be reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi-Davani, F; Aslani, G R; Etaati, G R; Koohi-Fayegh, R

    2002-01-01

    In this project the neutron spectra from the reaction of deuteron on beryllium nuclei is measured. The energies of deuterons were 7, 10, 13 and 15 MeV, and these measurements are performed at 10,30 and 50 degrees relative to the beam of deuterons. The detector used is 76 by 76 mm right circular cylinder of N E-213 liquid scintillator. The zero crossing technique is used for gamma discrimination. For the elimination of the background radiation, a Polyethylene block, 40 cm in thickness, with inserted cadmium sheets, and a lead block, 5 cm in thickness, were used. In order to obtain the background radiation spectrum, the latter blocks were placed between the target and the detector to eliminate neutron and gamma radiations reaching the detector directly. sup F ORIST sup c ode is used to unfold the neutron spectra from the measured pulse high t spectra and sup O 5S sup a nd sup R ESPMG sup c odes are used to obtain the detector response matrix.

  5. Measurement of the energy spectrum with proportional counters with spherical cathodes between 20 keV and 2.5 MeV with the propagation of 14 MeV neutrons in liquid nitrogen and liquid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider-Kuehnle, P.

    1974-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement of the energy spectrum of a 14 MeV neutron source in liquid nitrogen and liquid air in the energy region of 20 keV to 2.5 MeV as a function of the distance from the source. The measured results together with those of a scintispectrometer which measures the energies between 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, are to serve as experimentally-supported input data for shielding calculations and are to enable the checking of transport theoretical calculations. (orig./LH) [de

  6. Cortisol Measures Across the Weight Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Melanie; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Dichtel, Laura E; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K

    2015-09-01

    There are conflicting reports of increased vs decreased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activation in obesity; the most consistent finding is an inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and morning cortisol. In anorexia nervosa (AN), a low-BMI state, cortisol measures are elevated. This study aimed to investigate cortisol measures across the weight spectrum. This was a cross-sectional study at a clinical research center. This study included 60 women, 18-45 years of age: overweight/obese (OB; N = 21); AN (N = 18); and normal-weight controls (HC; N = 21). HPA dynamics were assessed by urinary free cortisol, mean overnight serum cortisol obtained by pooled frequent sampling every 20 minutes from 2000-0800 h, 0800 h serum cortisol and cortisol-binding globulin, morning and late-night salivary cortisol, and dexamethasone-CRH testing. Body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Cortisol measures demonstrated a U-shaped relationship with BMI, nadiring in the overweight-class I obese range, and were similarly associated with visceral adipose tissue and total fat mass. Mean cortisol levels were higher in AN than OB. There were weak negative linear relationships between lean mass and some cortisol measures. Most cortisol measures were negatively associated with postero-anterior spine and total hip BMD. Cortisol measures are lowest in overweight-class I obese women-lower than in lean women. With more significant obesity, cortisol levels increase, although not to as high as in AN. Therefore, extreme underweight and overweight states may activate the HPA axis, and hypercortisolemia may contribute to increased adiposity in the setting of caloric excess. Hypercortisolemia may also contribute to decreased BMD and muscle wasting in the setting of both caloric restriction and excess.

  7. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 10.sup.18./sup. eV using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Kárová, Tatiana; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Nožka, Libor; Nyklíček, Michal; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Schovánek, Petr; Šmída, Radomír; Trávníček, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 685, 4-5 (2010), s. 239-246 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA AV ČR KJB100100904; GA AV ČR KJB300100801; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : cosmic rays * energy spectrum * Pierre Auger Observatory Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.255, year: 2010

  8. Interference Energy Spectrum of the Infinite Square Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordecai Waegell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain superposition states of the 1-D infinite square well have transient zeros at locations other than the nodes of the eigenstates that comprise them. It is shown that if an infinite potential barrier is suddenly raised at some or all of these zeros, the well can be split into multiple adjacent infinite square wells without affecting the wavefunction. This effects a change of the energy eigenbasis of the state to a basis that does not commute with the original, and a subsequent measurement of the energy now reveals a completely different spectrum, which we call the interference energy spectrum of the state. This name is appropriate because the same splitting procedure applied at the stationary nodes of any eigenstate does not change the measurable energy of the state. Of particular interest, this procedure can result in measurable energies that are greater than the energy of the highest mode in the original superposition, raising questions about the conservation of energy akin to those that have been raised in the study of superoscillations. An analytic derivation is given for the interference spectrum of a given wavefunction Ψ ( x , t with N known zeros located at points s i = ( x i , t i . Numerical simulations were used to verify that a barrier can be rapidly raised at a zero of the wavefunction without significantly affecting it. The interpretation of this result with respect to the conservation of energy and the energy-time uncertainty relation is discussed, and the idea of alternate energy eigenbases is fleshed out. The question of whether or not a preferred discrete energy spectrum is an inherent feature of a particle’s quantum state is examined.

  9. Decay energy of 55Fe from its inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshava, S. L.; Gopala, K.; Venkataramaiah, P.

    2001-06-01

    Several measurements of decay energy using the inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum (IB) due to radiative electron capture in 55Fe has been made. But the results are not uniform. Hence another attempt has been made at the same. Experimental data was obtained with a 4.445 cm. dia ' 5.08 cm thick NaI (Tl) detector. It was subjected to suitable statistical treatment and various corrections using Liden and Starfelt procedure. The corrected spectrum agrees well with the Glauber and Martin theory for 1s electron capture beyond 100 keV. From the Jauch plot, the decay energy of 232.36 +/-0.64 keV was obtained.

  10. UMTS signal measurements with digital spectrum analysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licitra, G.; Palazzuoli, D.; Ricci, A. S.; Silvi, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The launch of the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UNITS), the most recent mobile telecommunications standard has imposed the requirement of updating measurement instrumentation and methodologies. In order to define the most reliable measurement procedure, which is aimed at assessing the exposure to electromagnetic fields, modern spectrum analysers' features for correct signal characterisation has been reviewed. (authors)

  11. Activation method for measurement of neutron spectrum parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, B.V.; Demidov, A.M.; Ionov, V.S.; Konjaev, S.I.; Marin, S.V.; Bryzgalov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental researches of spectrum parameters of neutrons at nuclear installations RRC KI are submitted. The installations have different designs of the cores, reflector, parameters and types of fuel elements. Measurements were carried out with use of the technique developed in RRC KI for irradiation resonance detectors UKD. The arrangement of detectors in the cores ensured possibility of measurement of neutron spectra with distinguished values of parameters. The spectrum parameters which are introduced by parametrical representation of a neutrons spectrum in the form corresponding to formalism Westcott. On experimental data were determinate absolute values of density neutron flux (DNF) in thermal and epithermal area of a spectrum (F t , f epi ), empirical dependence of temperature of neutron gas (Tn) on parameter of a rigidity of a spectrum (z), density neutron flux in transitional energy area of the spectrum. Dependences of spectral indexes of nuclides (UDy/UX), included in UKD, from a rigidity z and-or temperatures of neutron gas Tn are obtained.B Tools of mathematical processing of results are used for activation data and estimation of parameters of a spectrum (F t , f epi , z, Tn, UDy/UX). In the paper are presented some results of researches of neutron spectrum parameters of the nuclear installations (Authors)

  12. Reconstruction of extensive air showers and measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 - 80 PeV at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-06-24

    IceTop is a km{sup 2} scale detector array for highly energetic cosmic radiation. It is a part of the IceCube Observatory that is presently being built at the geographic South Pole. It aims for the detection of huge particle cascades induced by PeV cosmic rays in the atmosphere. These extensive air showers are detected by cylindrical ice tanks that collect the Cherenkov light produced by penetrating particles. The main goal of IceTop is the investigation of the energy distribution and chemical composition of PeV to EeV cosmic rays. This thesis presents the first analysis of highly energetic cosmic ray data taken with IceTop. First, the light response of the IceTop tanks is parametrised as a function of energy and particle type. An expectation function for the distribution of shower signals in the detector plane is developed. The likelihood fit based on that can reconstruct the recorded shower events with resolutions of 1.5 in direction, 9m in location of the shower center, and 12% in energy. This is well competitive with other experiments. The resulting energy response of the array is studied to set up response matrices for different primary nuclei and inclinations. These allow for a deconvolution of the distribution of reconstructed energies to derive the real energy spectrum. Two unfolding algorithms are implemented and studied, and response matrices are modeled for four different composition assumptions. With each assumption, energy spectra are unfolded for three different bins in inclination, using a data sample with an exposure of 3.86.10{sup 11} m{sup 2} s sr, taken in August 2007. The range of the spectrum is 1-80 PeV. Finally, a new analysis method is developed that uses the fact that cosmic rays in the PeV range are expected to be isotropic. It is shown that this requirement can be used for a likelihood estimation that is sensitive to composition without using additional information from other detector components. The analysis shows a clear preference of

  13. Reconstruction of extensive air showers and measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 - 80 PeV at the South Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    IceTop is a km 2 scale detector array for highly energetic cosmic radiation. It is a part of the IceCube Observatory that is presently being built at the geographic South Pole. It aims for the detection of huge particle cascades induced by PeV cosmic rays in the atmosphere. These extensive air showers are detected by cylindrical ice tanks that collect the Cherenkov light produced by penetrating particles. The main goal of IceTop is the investigation of the energy distribution and chemical composition of PeV to EeV cosmic rays. This thesis presents the first analysis of highly energetic cosmic ray data taken with IceTop. First, the light response of the IceTop tanks is parametrised as a function of energy and particle type. An expectation function for the distribution of shower signals in the detector plane is developed. The likelihood fit based on that can reconstruct the recorded shower events with resolutions of 1.5 in direction, 9m in location of the shower center, and 12% in energy. This is well competitive with other experiments. The resulting energy response of the array is studied to set up response matrices for different primary nuclei and inclinations. These allow for a deconvolution of the distribution of reconstructed energies to derive the real energy spectrum. Two unfolding algorithms are implemented and studied, and response matrices are modeled for four different composition assumptions. With each assumption, energy spectra are unfolded for three different bins in inclination, using a data sample with an exposure of 3.86.10 11 m 2 s sr, taken in August 2007. The range of the spectrum is 1-80 PeV. Finally, a new analysis method is developed that uses the fact that cosmic rays in the PeV range are expected to be isotropic. It is shown that this requirement can be used for a likelihood estimation that is sensitive to composition without using additional information from other detector components. The analysis shows a clear preference of the mixed

  14. Quantifying creativity: can measures span the spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-03-01

    Because the cognitive neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon of creativity, the issue arises of how creativity is to be optimally measured. Unlike intelligence, which can be assessed across the full range of intellectual ability creativity measures tend to concentrate on different sections of the overall spectrum. After first defining creativity in terms of the three criteria of novelty, usefulness, and surprise, this article provides an overview of the available measures. Not only do these instruments vary according to whether they focus on the creative process, person, or product, but they differ regarding whether they tap into "little-c" versus "Big-C" creativity; only productivity and eminence measures reach into genius-level manifestations of the phenomenon. The article closes by discussing whether various alternative assessment techniques can be integrated into a single measure that quantifies creativity across the full spectrum.

  15. Neutron spectrum measurement using rise-time discrimination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Zhiping; Suzuki, C.; Kosako, T.; Ma Jizeng

    2009-01-01

    PSD method can be used to measure the fast neutron spectrum in n/γ mixed field. A set of assemblies for measuring the pulse height distribution of neutrons is built up,based on a large volume NE213 liquid scintillator and standard NIM circuits,through the rise-time discrimination method. After that,the response matrix is calculated using Monte Carlo method. The energy calibration of the pulse height distribution is accomplished using 60 Co radioisotope. The neutron spectrum of the mono-energetic accelerator neutron source is achieved by unfolding process. Suggestions for further improvement of the system are presented at last. (authors)

  16. Measurement of the inclusive energy spectrum in the very forward direction in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Zykunov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Ruan, Manqi; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Chistov, Ruslan; Polikarpov, Sergey; Rusinov, Vladimir; Zhemchugov, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Seitz, Claudia; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; 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Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Yujun; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kumar, Ajay; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Rupprecht, Nathaniel; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-08-11

    The differential cross section for inclusive particle production as a function of energy in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV is measured in the very forward region of the CMS detector. The measurement is based on data collected with the CMS apparatus at the LHC, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.35 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$. The energy is measured in the CASTOR calorimeter, which covers the pseudorapidity region $-6.6<\\eta<-5.2$. The results are given as a function of the total energy deposited in CASTOR, as well as of its electromagnetic and hadronic components. The spectra are sensitive to the modeling of multiparton interactions in pp collisions, and provide new constraints for hadronic interaction models used in collider and in high energy cosmic ray physics.

  17. Spectrum and energy levels of four-times-ionized niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, D.T.; Conway, J.G.; Meinders, E.

    1981-01-01

    The 4p 6 nl spectrum of Nb 4+ was measured and analyzed. The spectrum was excited in a vacuum sliding spark source with a peak current of 800 A and a pulse width of 70 μsec. The analysis of the spectrum has extended the 12 known lines to 84 and the 10 known levels to 30. The ionization energy was calculated to be 407897 +- 40 cm -1 . There is strong evidence that the 4p 5 4d 2 configurations interacts strongly with the 4p 6 nf configuration. In addition, the hyperfine splitting of the 4p 6 6s level has been observed and measured to be 1.1 cm -1

  18. Resource management for energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Deyu; Zhou, Haibo; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2017-01-01

    This SpringerBrief offers a comprehensive review and in-depth discussion of the current research on resource management. The authors explain how to best utilize harvested energy and temporally available licensed spectrum. Throughout the brief, the primary focus is energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks (ESHNs) including energy harvesting (EH)-powered spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access. To efficiently collect data through the available licensed spectrum, this brief examines the joint management of energy and spectrum. An EH-powered spectrum sensing and management scheme for Heterogeneous Spectrum Harvesting Sensor Networks (HSHSNs) is presented in this brief. The scheme dynamically schedules the data sensing and spectrum access of sensors in ESHSNs to optimize the network utility, while considering the stochastic nature of EH process, PU activities and channel conditions. This brief also provides useful insights for the practical resource management scheme design for ESHSNs and motivates a ne...

  19. Probing dark energy using convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinda, Bikash R., E-mail: bikash@ctp-jamia.res.in [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2017-09-01

    Weak lensing convergence statistics is a powerful tool to probe dark energy. Dark energy plays an important role to the structure formation and the effects can be detected through the convergence power spectrum, bi-spectrum etc. One of the most promising and simplest dark energy model is the ΛCDM . However, it is worth investigating different dark energy models with evolving equation of state of the dark energy. In this work, detectability of different dark energy models from ΛCDM model has been explored through convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum.

  20. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  1. Measurement of the energy spectrum of the neutrons inside the neutron flux trap assembled in the center of the reactor core IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Jerez, Rogerio; Mura, Luis Felipe Liamos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the neutron energy spectrum in the central position of a neutron flux trap assembled in the core center of the research nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01 obtained by an unfolding method. To this end, have been used several different types of activation foils (Au, Sc, Ti, Ni, and plates) which have been irradiated in the central position of the reactor core (setting number 203) at a reactor power level of 64.57 ±2.91 watts . The activation foils were counted by solid-state detector HPGe (gamma spectrometry). The experimental data of nuclear reaction rates (saturated activity per target nucleus) and a neutron spectrum estimated by a reactor physics computer code are the main input data to get the most suitable neutron spectrum in the irradiation position obtained through SANDBP code: a neutron spectra unfolding code that use an iterative adjustment method. The adjustment resulted in 3.85 ± 0.14 10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the integral neutron flux, 2.41 ± 0.01 10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the thermal neutron flux, 1.09 ± 0.02 10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for intermediate neutron flux and 3.41± 0.02 10{sup 8} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the fast neutrons flux. These results can be used to verify and validate the nuclear reactor codes and its associated nuclear data libraries, besides show how much is effective the use of a neutron flux trap in the nuclear reactor core to increase the thermal neutron flux without increase the operation reactor power level. The thermal neutral flux increased 4.04 ± 0.21 times compared with the standard configuration of the reactor core. (author)

  2. SLC energy spectrum monitor using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.; Brunk, W.; Early, R.; Ross, M.; Tillmann, E.; Walz, D.

    1986-01-01

    The SLAC linac is being upgraded for the use in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The improved linac must accelerate electron and positron bunches from 1.2 GeV to 50 GeV while producing output energy spectra of about 0.2%. The energy spectra must be maintained during operation to provide for good beam transmission and to minimize chromatic effects in the SLC ARCs and Final Focus. The energy spectra of these beams are determined by the bunch length and intensity, the RF phase and waveform and the intra-bunch longitudinal wakefields. A non-destructive energy spectrum monitor has been designed using a vertical wiggler magnet located downstream of the horizontal beam splitter at the end of the SLC linac. It produces synchrotron radiation which is viewed in an off-axis x-ray position sensitive detector. The expected resolution is 0.08 %. The design considerations of this monitor are presented. A pair of these monitors is under construction with an installation data set for late summer 1986

  3. SLC energy spectrum monitor using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.; Brunk, W.; Early, R.; Ross, M.; Tillmann, E.; Walz, D.

    1986-04-01

    The SLAC Linac is being upgraded for the use in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The improved Linac must accelerate electron and positron bunches from 1.2 GeV to 50 GeV while producing output energy spectra of about 0.2%. The energy spectra must be maintained during operation to provide for good beam transmission and to minimize chromatic effects in the SLC ARCs and Final Focus. the energy spectra of these beams are determined by the bunch length and intensity, the RF phase and waveform and the intra-bunch longitudinal wakefields. A non-destructive energy spectrum monitor has been designed using a vertical wiggler magnet located downstream of the horizontal beam splitter at the end of the SLC Linac. It produces synchrotron radiation which is viewed in an off-axis x-ray position sensitive detector. The expected resolution is 0.08%. The design considerations of this monitor are presented in this paper. A pair of these monitors is under construction with an installation date set for late summer 1986. 5 refs., 6 figs

  4. Energy efficient cross layer design for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbasi, AbdulRahman; Shihada, Basem

    2016-01-01

    We propose a cross layer design that optimizes the energy efficiency of spectrum sharing systems. The energy per good bit (EPG) is considered as an energy efficiency metric. We optimize the secondary user's transmission power and media access frame

  5. Measurement of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum above 1016 eV with the LOFAR Radboud Air Shower Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoudam, S.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Trinh, T.N.G.; van Kessel, L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy reconstruction of extensive air showers measured with the LOFAR Radboud Air Shower Array (LORA) is presented in detail. LORA is a particle detector array located in the center of the LOFAR radio telescope in the Netherlands. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate and independent

  6. Noninvasive hemoglobin measurement using dynamic spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaoqing; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopy methods for noninvasive hemoglobin (Hgb) measurement are interfered by individual difference and particular weak signal. In order to address these problems, we have put forward a series of improvement methods based on dynamic spectrum (DS), including instrument design, spectrum extraction algorithm, and modeling approach. The instrument adopts light sources composed of eight laser diodes with the wavelength range from 600 nm to 1100 nm and records photoplethysmography signals at eight wavelengths synchronously. In order to simplify the optical design, we modulate the light sources with orthogonal square waves and design the corresponding demodulation algorithm, instead of adopting a beam-splitting system. A newly designed algorithm named difference accumulation has been proved to be effective in improving the accuracy of dynamic spectrum extraction. 220 subjects are involved in the clinical experiment. An extreme learning machine calibration model between the DS data and the Hgb levels is established. Correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error of prediction sets are 0.8645 and 8.48 g/l, respectively. The results indicate that the Hgb level can be derived by this approach noninvasively with acceptable precision and accuracy. It is expected to achieve a clinic application in the future.

  7. Spectrum and energy levels of Y VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, W.; Reader, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the five-times-ionized yttrium atom (Y VI), excited in a sliding-spark discharge, was studied in the 160--2500 A-circle range. About 900 Y VI lines were classified as transitions between 101 odd and 69 even energy levels.The energy-level system established includes almost all levels of the 4s 2 4p 4 , 4s4p 5 , 4s 2 4p 3 4d, 5d, 5s, 6s, and 5p configurations and a number of levels of the 7s, 4f, and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. The observed level system has been theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree--Fock calculations and least-squares parametric fits. Strong configuration mixings are found between the 4s4p 5 and 4s 2 4p 3 4d configurations, between the 4s 2 4p 3 5p and 4s4p 4 4d configurations, and between the 4s 2 4p 3 4f and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. From the optimized energy-level values, a system of Ritz-type wavelength standards with accuracies varying from 0.0003 to 0.003 A-circle in the range 179--500 A-circle has been determined. The ionization energy as determined from 4s 2 4p 3 ns levels (n = 5-7) is 737 110 +- 200 cm/sup -1/ (91.390 +- 0.025 eV)

  8. Decay energy of 55Fe from its inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshava, S.L.; Gopala, K.; Venkataramaiah, P.

    2001-01-01

    Several measurements of decay energy using the inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum (IB) due to radiative electron capture in 55 Fe has been made. But the results are not uniform. Hence another attempt has been made at the same. Experimental data was obtained with a 4.445 cm dia x 5.08 cm thick NaI (Tl) detector. It was subjected to suitable statistical treatment and various corrections using Liden and Starfelt procedure. The corrected spectrum agrees well with the Glauber and Martin theory for l s electron capture beyond 100 keV. From the Jauch plot, the decay energy of 232.36±0.64 keV was obtained. (author)

  9. NEUTRON SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS USING MULTIPLE THRESHOLD DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, William W.; Duffey, Dick

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. The use of threshold detectors, which simultaneously undergo reactions with thermal neutrons and two or more fast neutron threshold reactions, was applied to measurements of the neutron spectrum in a reactor. A number of different materials were irradiated to determine the most practical ones for use as multiple threshold detectors. These results, as well as counting techniques and corrections, are presented. Some materials used include aluminum, alloys of Al -Ni, aluminum-- nickel oxides, and magesium orthophosphates. (auth)

  10. On the Energy Spectrum of Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Perez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^{3} mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state magnetohydrodynamics turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfvén modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^{+}(k_{⊥} and E^{-}(k_{⊥}, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, which is consistent with phenomenological models that include scale-dependent dynamic alignment. For the imbalanced case, with E^{+}>E^{-}, the simulations show that E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2} for all Reynolds numbers considered, while E^{+} has a slightly steeper spectrum at small Re. As the Reynolds number increases, E^{+} flattens. Since E^{±} are pinned at the dissipation scale and anchored at the driving scales, we postulate that at sufficiently high Re the spectra will become parallel in the inertial range and scale as E^{+}∝E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2}. Questions regarding the universality of the spectrum and the value of the “Kolmogorov constant” are discussed.

  11. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125 I and 103 Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S K ) standard for 125 I seeds and has also established an S K standard for 103 Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (Λ) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of Λ and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of Λ. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that Λ may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S K and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for Λ was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of Λ as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated Λ for 125 I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192 Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within ±1%. For the 103 Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the ±7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for Λ proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known

  12. Measurement of Gamma-ray Energy Spectrum According to Temperature Variation Using a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Based on YSO:Ce Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H.; Yoo, W. J.; Shin, S. H.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Kwon, G.; Lee, D. E.; Jang, K. W.; Lee, B. [BK21 Plus Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As an alternative to conventional radiation detectors, various fiber-optic radiation sensors (FORSs) have been investigated for gamma-ray monitoring because of their various desirable advantages, such as their small sensing volume, substantial flexibility, remote operation, ability to make real-time measurement, and immunity to high electromagnetic interference. In general, the basic principle of a radiation detection using scintillators is to measure the scintillating light signals generated from the interactions between the scintillators and the radiations. To measure gamma-ray, the inorganic scintillators used in the FORS should have some properties, such as high atomic material, high light yields, fast decay time, high density, and high stopping power. For these reasons, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal has been introduced as a promising scintillator in various radiation sensor applications. According to the recent studies, however, LYSO:Ce crystal is impossible to be applied in high-temperature conditions because it serves the fluctuations of its light yields with the temperature variation (i.e., thermosluminescence). In this study, to obtain gamma-ray energy spectra by measuring scintillating light signals emitted from the scintillators in high-temperature conditions, we first fabricated an FORS system using various inorganic scintillator crystals and then evaluated the light yields of each inorganic scintillator. As a promising scintillator for use in high-temperature conditions, a cerium-doped yttrium orthosilicate (YSO:Ce) crystal was selected and evaluated its thermal property according to the elevated temperature up to 300 .deg. C. We fabricated an FORS using inorganic scintillator and an optical fiber bundle. To select an adequate scintillator to apply in high-temperature conditions, the gamma-ray energy spectra were obtained by using four kinds of inorganic scintillators. From the experimental results, we selected YSO

  13. Evaluation of spectrum measurement devices for operational use

    CERN Document Server

    Devine, R T; Gray, D W; Seagraves, D T; Olsher, R H; Johnson, J P

    2002-01-01

    Several neutron spectrometers manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) were tested and evaluated in a variety of neutron fields. Findings and conclusions are presented for the following BTI instruments: a modification of the Rotational Spectrometer (ROSPEC) that includes a thermal and epithermal capability, the Simple Scintillation Spectrometer that is used in conjunction with the ROSPEC to extend its high-energy range, and the MICROSPEC N-Probe which is capable of providing a crude spectrum over the energy range from thermal to 18 MeV. The main objective of these measurements was to determine the accuracy of both the energy spectrum and dose equivalent information generated by these devices. In addition, the dose response of the Wide-Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI-II) was measured in all neutron fields relative to a bare sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf calibration. The performance of the WENDI-II rem meter was compared to the dose information generated by the neutron spectrometers. The instruments...

  14. Determination of the CKM-matrix element |Vub| from the electron energy spectrum measured in inclusive B→Xueν decay with the BABAR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This document presents a measurement of the CKM matrix-element vertical stroke V ub vertical stroke in inclusive semileptonic B→X u eν events on a dataset of 471 million B anti B events recorded by the BABAR detector. Inclusive B→X u eν decays are selected by reconstructing a high energetic electron (positron). Background suppression is achieved by selecting events with electron (positron) energies near the kinematical allowed endpoint of B→X u eν decays. A B→D * eν veto is applied to further suppress background. This veto uses D * mesons which have been reconstructed with a partial reconstruction technique.

  15. Formation of a superhigh energy electron spectrum in the Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaronyan, F.A.; Ambartsumyan, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of superhigh energy electron spectrum in the disk of the galaxy and halo is considered. A different behaviour of the electron spectrum within the framework of capture models in disk or halo, in the energy region E> or approximately 10 5 GeV is revealed due to the account of relativistic corrections ir the energy losses of electrons during the inverse Compton scattering. A comparison with the existing experimental data is carried out

  16. Characterization of the Photon Energy Spectrum of a 6 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Bojorquez, M.; Larraga, J. M.; Garcia, A.; Celis, M. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we study the influence of the purity of the materials used in experimental transmission measurements to obtain data to reconstruct the photon energy spectrum of a 6 MV Linac. We also evaluate the contribution to PDDs due to electron contamination in the reconstructed spectrum

  17. The high energy x-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula observed from OSO 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, J.F.; Crannell, L.J.; Dennis, B.R.; Orwig, L.E.; Maurer, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The total emission of the X-ray source shows no long term variability. The spectrum itself can be described by a single power law out to energies of at least 500 keV

  18. Neutron energy spectrum in graphite blankets of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsechanski, A.

    1981-09-01

    Neutron flux measurements were performed in a graphite stack and compared with calculations made with a two dimensional transport computer code. In the present work it is observed that the calculated spectrum in the elastic and inelastic scattering ranges (the first collision range in both cases), is sensitive to details of the angular distribution of these neutrons. Regarding the discrepancies in the elastic scattering range it is concluded that the microscopic cross section library ENDF/B-IV overestimates the large angle scattering (back scattering) as can be seen from comparison of measured and calculated spectra. The two most important conclusions of the present work are: 1. Inelastic scattering interaction of D-T neutrons in graphite cannot be calculated without a proper account of energy-angle correlation. 2. An experimental setup supplying monoenergetic collimated D-T neutrons constitutes a sensitive although indirect means for measuring angular distributions in inelastic and elastic scattering

  19. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Kevin Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hutchens, Gregory Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  20. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  1. Dark Energy Constraints from the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Power Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliet, Boris; Comis, Barbara; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Macías-Pérez, Juan Francisco

    2018-03-01

    We constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using the power spectrum of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect. We improve upon previous analyses by taking into account the trispectrum in the covariance matrix and marginalising over the foreground parameters, the correlated noise, the mass bias B in the Planck universal pressure profile, and all the relevant cosmological parameters (i.e., not just Ωm and σ8). We find that the amplitude of the tSZ power spectrum at ℓ ≲ 103 depends primarily on F ≡ σ8(Ωm/B)0.40h-0.21, where B is related to more commonly used variable b by B = (1 - b)-1. We measure this parameter with 2.6% precision, F = 0.460 ± 0.012 (68% CL). By fixing the bias to B = 1.25 and adding the local determination of the Hubble constant H0 and the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum constrained by the Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data, we find w = -1.10 ± 0.12, σ8 = 0.802 ± 0.037, and Ωm = 0.265 ± 0.022 (68% CL). Our limit on w is consistent with and is as tight as that from the distance-alone constraint from the CMB and H0. Finally, by combining the tSZ power spectrum and the CMB data we find, in the Λ Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model, the mass bias of B = 1.71 ± 0.17, i.e., 1 - b = 0.58 ± 0.06 (68% CL).

  2. Measuring industrial energy savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly Kissock, J.; Eger, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Accurate measurement of energy savings from industrial energy efficiency projects can reduce uncertainty about the efficacy of the projects, guide the selection of future projects, improve future estimates of expected savings, promote financing of energy efficiency projects through shared-savings agreements, and improve utilization of capital resources. Many efforts to measure industrial energy savings, or simply track progress toward efficiency goals, have had difficulty incorporating changing weather and production, which are frequently major drivers of plant energy use. This paper presents a general method for measuring plant-wide industrial energy savings that takes into account changing weather and production between the pre and post-retrofit periods. In addition, the method can disaggregate savings into components, which provides additional resolution for understanding the effectiveness of individual projects when several projects are implemented together. The method uses multivariable piece-wise regression models to characterize baseline energy use, and disaggregates savings by taking the total derivative of the energy use equation. Although the method incorporates search techniques, multi-variable least-squares regression and calculus, it is easily implemented using data analysis software, and can use readily available temperature, production and utility billing data. This is important, since more complicated methods may be too complex for widespread use. The method is demonstrated using case studies of actual energy assessments. The case studies demonstrate the importance of adjusting for weather and production between the pre- and post-retrofit periods, how plant-wide savings can be disaggregated to evaluate the effectiveness of individual retrofits, how the method can identify the time-dependence of savings, and limitations of engineering models when used to estimate future savings

  3. Gamma spectrum measurement in a swimming-pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, E.

    1969-01-01

    After recalling the various modes of interaction of gamma rays with matter, the authors describe the design of a spectrometer for gamma energies of between 0.3 and 10 MeV. This spectrometer makes use of the Compton and pair-production effects without eliminating them. The collimator, the crystals and the electronics have been studied in detail and are described in their final form. The problem of calibrating the apparatus is then considered ; numerous graphs are given. The sensitivity of the spectrometer for different energies is determined mainly for the 'Compton effect' group. Finally, in the last part of the report, are given results of an experimental measurement of the gamma spectrum of a swimming-pool type reactor with new elements. (author) [fr

  4. [A new measurement method of time-resolved spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi-gang; Huang, Shi-hua; Liang, Chun-jun; Lei, Quan-sheng

    2007-02-01

    A new method for measuring time-resolved spectrum (TRS) is brought forward. Programming with assemble language controlled the micro-control-processor (AT89C51), and a kind of peripheral circuit constituted the drive circuit, which drived the stepping motor to run the monochromator. So the light of different kinds of expected wavelength could be obtained. The optical signal was transformed to electrical signal by optical-to-electrical transform with the help of photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu 1P28). The electrical signal of spectrum data was transmitted to the oscillograph. Connecting the two serial interfaces of RS232 between the oscillograph and computer, the electrical signal of spectrum data could be transmitted to computer for programming to draw the attenuation curve and time-resolved spectrum (TRS) of the swatch. The method for measuring time-resolved spectrum (TRS) features parallel measurement in time scale but serial measurement in wavelength scale. Time-resolved spectrum (TRS) and integrated emission spectrum of Tb3+ in swatch Tb(o-BBA)3 phen were measured using this method. Compared with the real time-resolved spectrum (TRS). It was validated to be feasible, credible and convenient. The 3D spectra of fluorescence intensity-wavelength-time, and the integrated spectrum of the swatch Tb(o-BBA)3 phen are given.

  5. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  6. Research on influence of energy spectrum response of ICT detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Gao Fuqiang; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum response is important characteristic for X-ray ICT detector. But there exist many difficulties to measure these parameters by experiments. The energy spectrum response of CdWO 4 detector was simulated by using the EGSnrc code. Meanwhile the effect of detection efficiency was analyzed by the distribution of accelerator bremsstrahlung spectra and the X-ray spectrum hardening, and some theoretic parameters were offered for the consistent and no-linearity correction of detector arrays. It was applied to ICT image correction, and a satisfying result was obtained. (authors)

  7. Results of measurements of a proton spectrum in the energy range more then 1 TeV at satellites by the SOKOL instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Proton spectra measured by SOKOL instrument at KOSMOS-1543 and KOSMOS-1713 satellites and published by the auther and independently by experiment preparation group are presented. Methods of experimental data application and their substantiation degree that caused differences in spectra and conclusions are analysed. 10 refs.; 7 figs.; 6 tabs

  8. Multislot Simultaneous Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in Cognitive Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive radio (CR, the spectrum sensing of the primary user (PU may consume some electrical power from the battery capacity of the secondary user (SU, resulting in a decrease in the transmission power of the SU. In this paper, a multislot simultaneous spectrum sensing and energy harvesting model is proposed, which uses the harvested radio frequency (RF energy of the PU signal to supply the spectrum sensing. In the proposed model, the sensing duration is divided into multiple sensing slots consisting of one local-sensing subslot and one energy-harvesting subslot. If the PU is detected to be present in the local-sensing subslot, the SU will harvest RF energy of the PU signal in the energy-harvesting slot, otherwise, the SU will continue spectrum sensing. The global decision on the presence of the PU is obtained through combining local sensing results from all the sensing slots by adopting “Or-logic Rule”. A joint optimization problem of sensing time and time splitter factor is proposed to maximize the throughput of the SU under the constraints of probabilities of false alarm and detection and energy harvesting. The simulation results have shown that the proposed model can clearly improve the maximal throughput of the SU compared to the traditional sensing-throughput tradeoff model.

  9. Measurements of neutron spectrum from uranium converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Sotic, O.; Marinkovic, S.

    1978-01-01

    The procedure for determination of energetic distribution of neutrons by the multisphere technique is given. The theoretical basis and features of the method are explained. The spectral distribution of neutrons emerging from the neutron converter constructed at the bare reactor assembly RB, has been determined applying the existing computer programme and literature data for the energetic dependence functions of spheres of various diameters. The obtained spectral distribution has a specific maximum in the domain of fast neutrons, justifying thus the reacton for the construction of the converter. The neutron spectrum data obtained and given in this report are very important for the use of the converter in neutron dosimetry and radiation protection, as well as in the radiobiology, shielding, reactor physics etc. (author)

  10. CHANDRA HIGH-ENERGY TRANSMISSION GRATING SPECTRUM OF AE AQUARII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    The nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr, which is currently understood to be a former supersoft X-ray binary and current magnetic propeller, was observed for over two binary orbits (78 ks) in 2005 August with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The long, uninterrupted Chandra observation provides a wealth of details concerning the X-ray emission of AE Aqr, many of which are new and unique to the HETG. First, the X-ray spectrum is that of an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma; the X-ray emission lines are broad, with widths that increase with the line energy from σ ∼ 1 eV (510 km s -1 ) for O VIII to σ ∼ 5.5 eV (820 km s -1 ) for Si XIV; the X-ray spectrum is reasonably well fit by a plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T(K) = 7.16, has a width σ = 0.48, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, and other metal (primarily Ne, Mg, and Si) abundances equal to 0.76 times solar; and for a distance d = 100 pc, the total emission measure EM = 8.0 x 10 53 cm -3 and the 0.5-10 keV luminosity L X = 1.1 x 10 31 erg s -1 . Second, based on the f/(i + r) flux ratios of the forbidden (f), intercombination (i), and recombination (r) lines of the Heα triplets of N VI, O VII, and Ne IX measured by Itoh et al. in the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectrum and those of O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII in the Chandra HETG spectrum, either the electron density of the plasma increases with temperature by over three orders of magnitude, from n e ∼ 6 x 10 10 cm -3 for N VI [log T(K) ∼ 6] to n e ∼ 1 x 10 14 cm -3 for Si XIII [log T(K) ∼ 7], and/or the plasma is significantly affected by photoexcitation. Third, the radial velocity of the X-ray emission lines varies on the white dwarf spin phase, with two oscillations per spin cycle and an amplitude K ∼ 160 km s -1 . These results appear to be inconsistent with the recent models of Itoh et al., Ikhsanov, and

  11. High frequency energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotlar, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described

  12. The measurement of prompt neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of {sup 244}Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batenkov, O.I.; Boykov, G.S.; Drapchinsky, L.V.; Majorov, M.Ju.; Trenkin, V.A. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    Under the Program of Measurements of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Minor Actinides for Transmutation Purposes the integral neutron spectrum in spontaneous fission of {sup 244}Cm has been measured by the time-of-flight method in the energy range of 0.1-15 MeV relative to the standard neutron spectrum in {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission. Essential attention was paid to revealing of possible systematic errors. It is shown, that the {sup 244}Cm spectrum shape may be well described by using Mannhart evaluation with appropriate parameter of Maxwell temperature T{sub M} = 1.37 MeV. (author)

  13. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy

  14. Prompt neutron fission spectrum mean energies for the fissile nuclides and 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, 233 U, 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. The average neutron energies of these spectra are tabulated. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Also tabulated are the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. 75 refs., 9 tabs

  15. Measures with locally finite support and spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The goal of this paper is the construction of measures μ on R(n)enjoying three conflicting but fortunately compatible properties: (i) μ is a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, (ii) the Fourier transform μ f μ is also a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, and (iii) μ is not a generalized Dirac comb. We give surprisingly simple examples of such measures. These unexpected patterns strongly differ from quasicrystals, they provide us with unusual Poisson's formulas, and they might give us an unconventional insight into aperiodic order.

  16. Using activation method to measure neutron spectrum in an irradiation chamber of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuemei; Liu Guimin; Wang Xiaohe; Li Da; Meng Lingjie

    2014-01-01

    Neutron spectrum should be measured before test samples are irradiated. Neutron spectrum in an irradiation chamber of a research reactor was measured by using activation method when the reactor is in normal operation under 2 MW. Sixteen kinds of non-fission foils (19 reaction channels) were selected, of which 10 were sensitive to thermal and intermediate energy regions, while the others were of different threshold energy and sensitive to fast energy regions. By measuring the foil radioactivity, the neutron spectrum was unfolded with the iterative methods SAND-II and MSIT. Finally, shielding corrections of group cross-section and main factors affecting the calculation accuracy were studied and the uncertainty of solution was analyzed using the Monte Carlo method in the process of SAND-II. (authors)

  17. Unfolding measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum using IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, Mathis; Ruhe, Tim; Meier, Maximilian; Schlunder, Philipp; Menne, Thorben; Fuchs, Tomasz [Dept. of Physics, Technical University of Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino observatory located at the geographic South Pole. With its huge volume, the detector is well suited for measurements of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum. Over the last years, several unfolding analyses for single years were able to provide model independent measurements for the northern hemisphere in an energy region between 200 GeV and 3.2 PeV. In this talk, the extension of the analyses to four additional years of data is presented. With this significant enlargement of the data basis, it is possible to reanalyze the full northern hemisphere with smaller statistical errors. Moreover, the spectrum can be unfolded in several small zenith bands. Measurements of the energy spectrum for different zenith regions provide further information on the composition and the shape of the flux.

  18. Energy spectrum of tearing mode turbulence in sheared background field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Di; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Huang, Yi-Min

    2018-06-01

    The energy spectrum of tearing mode turbulence in a sheared background magnetic field is studied in this work. We consider the scenario where the nonlinear interaction of overlapping large-scale modes excites a broad spectrum of small-scale modes, generating tearing mode turbulence. The spectrum of such turbulence is of interest since it is relevant to the small-scale back-reaction on the large-scale field. The turbulence we discuss here differs from traditional MHD turbulence mainly in two aspects. One is the existence of many linearly stable small-scale modes which cause an effective damping during the energy cascade. The other is the scale-independent anisotropy induced by the large-scale modes tilting the sheared background field, as opposed to the scale-dependent anisotropy frequently encountered in traditional critically balanced turbulence theories. Due to these two differences, the energy spectrum deviates from a simple power law and takes the form of a power law multiplied by an exponential falloff. Numerical simulations are carried out using visco-resistive MHD equations to verify our theoretical predictions, and a reasonable agreement is found between the numerical results and our model.

  19. Application of real time spectrum measurement to radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, K.; Watanabe, M.; Sakamaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer (MCA) and two realtime spectrum monitoring methods have been developed for use in radiation monitors. The new MCA was designed to be installed at a local site as a component of a radiation monitor. The MCA repeats spectrum measurement at short intervals (Δt) and, after each measurement, transmits a spectrum datum to the operation console. The authors applied two methods to process Δt spectrum counts for each channel for longer time interval. One method of processing counts is the 'running average (RA) method'. The other method is the 'exponential smoothing (ES) method', which simulates RC rate meters by subtracting a fraction corresponding to the accumulated counts. Relative standard deviations for each channel can be made the same by selecting an appropriate value. The response with the 'ES' method is initially faster than that with the 'RA' method, but the 'RA' method allows a full response to be reached at a predictable time. (author)

  20. Dynamic energy spectrum and energy deposition in solid target by intense pulsed ion beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yu; Xiao-Yun Le; Zheng Liu; Jie Shen; Yu I.Isakova; Hao-Wen Zhong; Jie Zhang; Sha Yan; Gao-Long Zhang; Xiao-Fu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    A method for analyzing the dynamic energy spectrum of intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) was proposed.Its influence on beam energy deposition in metal target was studied with IPIB produced by two types of magnetically insulated diodes (MID).The emission of IPIB was described with space charge limitation model,and the dynamic energy spectrum was further analyzed with time-of-flight method.IPIBs generated by pulsed accelerators of BIPPAB-450 (active MID) and TEMP-4M (passive MID) were studied.The dynamic energy spectrum was used to deduce the power density distribution of IPIB in the target with Monte Carlo simulation and infrared imaging diagnostics.The effect on the distribution and evolution of thermal field induced by the characteristics of IPIB dynamic energy spectrum was discussed.

  1. Program controlled system for measuring and monitoring the electron coherent radiation spectrum of Yerevan synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamyan, F.V.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Galumyan, P.I.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic system for measurement, processing and control of energy spectrum of polarized photons realized at the Yerevan electron synchrotron is described. For measuring energy spectra of intensive high energy photon beams a pair spectrometer is used which comprises an aluminium target-converter, an analizing magnet and 2 telescopes of scintillation counters for electron-positron pairs registration. the procedure of spectra measurement by the pair spectrometer is reduced to determining the converted e + e - pairs yield at certain values of the H field intensity of the analizing magnet. An algorithm of the data express-processing for operative monitoring of peak energy stability of electron coherent radiation spectrum is given. The spectra measurement results obtained under real experimental conditions are presented

  2. Energy balance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhurandhar, N V; Schoeller, D; Brown, A W

    2015-01-01

    Energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) are key modifiable determinants of energy balance, traditionally assessed by self-report despite its repeated demonstration of considerable inaccuracies. We argue here that it is time to move from the common view that self......-reports of EI and PAEE are imperfect, but nevertheless deserving of use, to a view commensurate with the evidence that self-reports of EI and PAEE are so poor that they are wholly unacceptable for scientific research on EI and PAEE. While new strategies for objectively determining energy balance...... of energy balance....

  3. Ground level enhancement (GLE) energy spectrum parameters model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G.; Wu, S.

    2017-12-01

    We study the ground level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23 with the four energy spectra parameters, the normalization parameter C, low-energy power-law slope γ 1, high-energy power-law slope γ 2, and break energy E0, obtained by Mewaldt et al. 2012 who fit the observations to the double power-law equation. we divide the GLEs into two groups, one with strong acceleration by interplanetary (IP) shocks and another one without strong acceleration according to the condition of solar eruptions. We next fit the four parameters with solar event conditions to get models of the parameters for the two groups of GLEs separately. So that we would establish a model of energy spectrum for GLEs for the future space weather prediction.

  4. Spectrum-energy Correlations in GRBs: Update, Reliability, and the Long/Short Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Zhang, C. T.; Zhao, Y. X.; Luo, J. J.; Jiang, L. Y.; Wang, X. L.; Han, X. L.; Terheide, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    Spectrum-energy correlations of peak energy with total prompt γ-ray emission energies, namely {E}p,i-{E}{iso}, {E}p,i-{E}γ , and {E}p,i-{L}p, had been studied for long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) previously by many authors. These energy correlations were proposed to measure the universe and classify GRBs as useful probes. However, most of these relations were built by non-Swift bursts. The spectrum-energy correlations of short bursts have not been systematically established yet; in particular, how the newly found GRB170817A matches these energy relations is unknown to date. We will first refresh the three spectrum-energy relations of Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM long bursts and build the corresponding relations of short bursts. Then, we confirm whether they are commonly available as a discriminator of short and long GRBs. Some potential violators to these relations will be investigated. Combining with the plane of peak energy versus fluence, we select 31 short and 252 long GRBs with well-measured peak energy and redshift to study the issue of GRB classifications connected with the above energy relations statistically. We find that the three energy relations do exist in our new GRB samples and they are marginally consistent with some previous results. We report for the first time that short GRBs hold the three corresponding energy relations having the consistent power-law indices with long GRBs. It is found that these energy relations can be adopted to discriminate GRBs successfully if they are put in the peak energy versus fluence plane. Excitingly, we point out that GRB090510 matches the energy relations of {E}p,i-{E}{iso} and {E}p,i-{L}p, but violates the {E}p,i-{E}γ relation. More excitingly, we find that GRB170817A is an outlier to all the three energy correlations.

  5. Gamma ray energy spectrum of a buried radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, N B

    1957-07-01

    Because of current attempts to utilize airborne gamma-ray scintillation spectrometers as a means of detecting and identifying buried radioactive mineral deposits, it has become important to study the effects of multiple scattering on the gamma-ray energy spectrum of a source buried in a semi-infinite medium. A series of ten experiments was made. First a scintillation detector was located in air at a fixed distance above a 250 microcurie cobalt-60 source suspended in a large tank. The level of water was raised from 25 cm below the source to 50 cm above, and the gamma-ray energy spectrum was observed. It was found that the high energy portion of the cobalt-60 spectrum remained identifiable even when the source was submerged more than five half-lengths. Further, the ratio of the counting rate of the total incident gamma radiation to the counting rate of the primary 1.33 MeV radiation was found to be very nearly linearly proportional to the depth of water cover. This leads to an empirical method for determining the depth of burial of a cobalt-60 point source. (author)

  6. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  7. [Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Emission Spectrum Measurement and Particle Analysis of Discharge Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuang-yan; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The emission spectrum detection and diagnosis is one of the most common methods of application to the plasma. It provides wealth of information of the chemical and physical process of the plasma. The analysis of discharge plasma dynamic behavior plays an important role in the study of gas discharge mechanism and application. An air dielectric discharge spectrum measuring device was designed and the emission spectrum data was measured under the experimental condition. The plasma particles evolution was analyzed from the emission spectrum. The numerical calculation model was established and the density equation, energy transfer equation and the Boltzmann equation was coupled to analyze the change of the particle density to explain the emission spectrum characteristics. The results are that the particle density is growing with the increasing of reduced electric field. The particle density is one or two orders of magnitude difference for the same particle at the same moment for the reduced electric field of 40, 60 or 80 Td. A lot of N₂ (A³), N₂ (A³) and N₂ (C³) particles are generated by the electric field excitation. However, it transforms quickly due to the higher energy level. The transformation returns to the balance after the discharge of 10⁻⁶ s. The emission spectrometer measured in the experiments is mostly generated by the transition of excited nitrogen. The peak concentration of O₂ (A¹), O₂ (B¹) and O₂ (A³ ∑⁺u) is not low compared to the excited nitrogen molecules. These particles energy is relatively low and the transition spectral is longer. The spectrometer does not capture the oxygen emission spectrum. And the peak concentration of O particles is small, so the transition emission spectrum is weak. The calculation results of the stabled model can well explain the emission spectrum data.

  8. New measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.B.; Richards, P.L.; Bonomo, J.L.; Timusk, T.

    1984-06-01

    Accurate measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can provide useful tests of cosmological theories. The data set existing in 1982 has been summarized on a number of occasions and is shown. To first approximation the CMB is characterized by a single temperature and thus has a blackbody spectrum over the frequency range from 0.02 to 24 cm -1 . The error limits given for these experiments are dominated by systematic errors and are often very subjective. Consequently, it is not clear how to analyze the data set in a valid way. The general impression, however, is of a scatter in the high frequency data that is somewhat larger than would be expected from the given error limits. We have designed a new apparatus to measure the spectrum of the CMB in the frequency range from 3 to 10 cm -1 . 13 references, 5 figures

  9. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosin V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014. The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ⋅ 1015–1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  10. Combined fit of spectrum and composition data as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G.A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined fit of a simple astrophysical model of UHECR sources to both the energy spectrum and mass composition data measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The fit has been performed for energies above $5 \\cdot 10^{18}$ eV, i.e.~the region of the all-particle spectrum above the so-called "ankle" feature. The astrophysical model we adopted consists of identical sources uniformly distributed in a comoving volume, where nuclei are accelerated through a rigidity-dependent mechanism...

  11. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the Big Ten critical assembly by lithium-6 spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leeuw-Gierts, G.; De Leeuw, S.; Hansen, G.E.; Helmick, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The central neutron-flux spectrum of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's critical assembly, Big Ten, was measured with a 6 Li spectrometer and techniques developed at the Centre d'Etude de L'Energie Nucleaire, Mol, as part of an experimental program to establish the characteristics of Big Ten

  12. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the Big Ten critical assembly by lithium-6 spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw-Gierts, G. de; Leeuw, S. de

    1980-01-01

    The central neutron-flux spectrum of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's critical assembly, Big Ten, was measured with a 6 Li spectrometer and techniques developed at the Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire, Mol, as part of an experimental program to establish the characteristics of Big Ten

  13. Measuring Theory of Mind in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn L.; Barnett, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in Theory of Mind (ToM)--the ability to interpret others' beliefs, intentions and emotions--undermine the ability of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to interact in socially normative ways. This study provides psychometric data for the Adult-Theory of Mind (A-ToM) measure using video-scenarios based in part on Happé's…

  14. Geant4 simulations of the absorption of photons in CsI and NaI produced by electrons with energies up to 4 MeV and their application to precision measurements of the β-energy spectrum with a calorimetric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, X.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Voytas, P.; Chandavar, S.; Hughes, M.; Minamisono, K.; Paulauskas, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The yield of photons produced by electrons slowing down in CsI and NaI was studied with four electromagnetic physics constructors included in the Geant4 toolkit. The subsequent absorption of photons in detector geometries used for measurements of the β spectrum shape was also studied with a focus on the determination of the absorption fraction. For electrons with energies in the range 0.5-4 MeV, the relative photon yields determined with the four Geant4 constructors differ at the level of 10-2 in amplitude and the relative absorption fractions differ at the level of 10-4 in amplitude. The differences among constructors enabled the estimation of the sensitivity to Geant4 simulations for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape in 6He decay using a calorimetric technique with ions implanted in the active volume of detectors. The size of the effect associated with photons escaping the detectors was quantified in terms of a slope which, on average, is respectively - 5 . 4 %/MeV and - 4 . 8 %/MeV for the CsI and NaI geometries. The corresponding relative uncertainties as determined from the spread of results obtained with the four Geant4 constructors are 0.0067 and 0.0058.

  15. CREAM for high energy composition measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, E S; Allison, P S; Beatty, J J; Choi, M J; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; DuVernois, M A; Ganel, O; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Liu, L; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S A; Min, K W; Mognet, S I; Nutter, S; Park, H; Schindhelm, E; Song, C; Swordy, S; Wu, J; Yang, J

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based indirect measurements have shown that the cosmic-ray allparticle spectrum extends many orders of magnitude beyond the energy thought possible for supernova acceleration. Our balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is capable of extending direct measurements of cosmic-rays to the supernova energy scale of 1015 eV in a series of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights. Identification of Z = 1 - 26 particles will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector. Energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector and a tungsten/scintillating fiber calorimeter. The instrument has been tested with various particles in accelerated beams at the CERN SPS. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004.

  16. Evaluation of the Neutron Detector Response for Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum by Monte Carlo Transport Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio T.; Carlson, Brett V.; Federico, Claudio A.; Gonzalez, Odair L.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons generated by the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere make an important contribution to the dose accumulated in electronic circuits and aircraft crew members at flight altitude. High-energy neutrons are produced in spallation reactions and intranuclear cascade processes by primary cosmic-ray particle interactions with atoms in the atmosphere. These neutrons can produce secondary neutrons and also undergo a moderation process due to atmosphere interactions, resulting in a wider energy spectrum, ranging from thermal energies (0.025 eV) to energies of several hundreds of MeV. The Long-Counter (LC) detector is a widely used neutron detector designed to measure the directional flux of neutrons with about constant response over a wide energy range (thermal to 20 MeV). ). Its calibration process and the determination of its energy response for the wide-energy of cosmic ray induced neutron spectrum is a very difficult process due to the lack of installations with these capabilities. The goal of this study is to assess the behavior of the response of a Long Counter using the Monte Carlo (MC) computational code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended). The dependence of the Long Counter response on the angle of incidence, as well as on the neutron energy, will be carefully investigated, compared with the experimental data previously obtained with 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf neutron sources and extended to the neutron spectrum produced by cosmic rays. (Author)

  17. Measurements of radio frequent cavity volt ages by X-ray spectrum measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with X-ray spectrum measurement as a method for the measurement of radio frequent cavity voltage and the theory of X-ray spectrum calculation. Experimental results at 72 MHz for three different values of the radio frequent power of ACCEL K250 super conducting cyclotron are being presented.

  18. Energy efficient cross layer design for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbasi, Abdulrahman

    2016-10-06

    We propose a cross layer design that optimizes the energy efficiency of spectrum sharing systems. The energy per good bit (EPG) is considered as an energy efficiency metric. We optimize the secondary user\\'s transmission power and media access frame length to minimize the EPG metric. We protect the primary user transmission via an outage probability constraint. The non-convex targeted problem is optimized by utilizing the generalized convexity theory and verifying the strictly pseudo-convex structure of the problem. Analytical results of the optimal power and frame length are derived. We also used these results in proposing an algorithm, which guarantees the existence of a global optimal solution. Selected numerical results show the improvement of the proposed system compared to other systems. © 2016 IEEE.

  19. Energy spectrum and angular distribution of prompt cosmic-ray muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnoli, C; Picchi, P [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale); Castellina, A; D' Ettorre Piazzoli, B; Mannocchi, G; Vernetto, S [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1984-07-01

    The energy spectrum and angular distribution of atmospheric prompt muons are calculated by using an integral solution for production of charmed particles, their decay and muon transport in the atmosphere. Current experimental information from accelerator and theoretical ideas about charm cross-section and semi-leptonic decay are used to give a reference prompt muon spectrum to compare with that from conventional sources (..pi.. and K decay). The obtained differential spectrum has an energy dependence which approaches that of the primary cosmic rays. The integral intensity of prompt muons is equal to the conventional one at about 250 TeV. The angular distribution is found to be practically flat in the range (0/80)/sup 0/ irrespective of the muon energy. On the basis of this analysis we estimate that accurate measurements of muon energy spectrum and angular distribution at energies greater than 10 TeV should allow one to obtain useful information regarding charm hadroproduction cross-section in the 100 TeV region.

  20. Spectrum and energy levels of kryptonlike ion Nb VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, J.; Ekberg, J.O.

    1993-01-01

    The spectrum of five-times ionized niobium, Nb, VI, was observed from 238 to 2700 angstrom with sliding spark discharges on 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. Experimental energies were determined for all levels of the 4s 2 4p 6 , 4s 2 4p 6 , 4s 2 4p 5 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5g, 6s, and 4s4p 6 4d configurations as well as some levels of 4p 5 6g. A total of 291 lines were classified as transitions between 88 observed levels. A previous analysis of this spectrum was found to be totally erroneous. Large hyperfine splittings were found for several levels of the 4p 5 5s and 5p configurations. The observed configurations were theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree-Fock calculations and least squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. A revised value of the ionization energy was obtained from the 4p 5 5g and 6g configurations

  1. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Makoto, E-mail: makoto.fukuda@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Kiran Kumar, N.A.P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90–∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten. - Highlights: • The microstructure and irradiation hardening of single crystal pure W irradiated in HFIR was investigated. • The neutron energy spectrum influence was evaluated by comparing the HFIR results with previous work in Joyo and JMTR. • In the dose range up to ∼1 dpa, the neutron energy spectrum influence of irradiation hardening was not clear. • In the dose range above 1 dpa, the neutron energy influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development was clearly observed. • The irradiation induced precipitates caused significant irradiation hardening of pure W irradiated in HFIR.

  2. The vacuum profile of the energy spectrum compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijsten, W.J.

    1988-12-01

    A finite element model has been made of the vacuum system of the Energy Spectrum Compressor. It gives the possibility to calculate the average pressure profile of the system in a fast way. It is required that the average pressure in the system does not influence the present performance of the linac nor the performance of the beam switch yard. Calculations show that with standard pumps of 60 l/s an average pressure of -5 Pa can be obtained. 7 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Search for the end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, John

    1998-01-01

    The title I was asked to speak about expresses an idea that occurred rather recently in the history of cosmic ray studies. I argue that the idea of a possible end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum came into being after a sequence of three rapid advances in knowledge which I describe, calling them 'breakthroughs'. I suggest that the present workshop be regarded as a step toward a fourth breakthrough. I argue that this may occur through application of the Space Airwatch concept--the earth atmosphere as target and signal generator--as embodied in the NASA OWL project

  4. Effects of fault heterogeneity on seismic energy and spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Michele; Santini, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    We study the effects of friction heterogeneity on the dynamics of a seismogenic fault. To this aim, we consider a fault model containing two asperities with different static frictions and a rate-dependent dynamic friction. We consider the seismic events produced by the consecutive failure of the two asperities and study their properties as functions of the ratio between static frictions. In particular, we calculate the moment rate, the stress evolution during fault slip, the average stress drop, the partitioning of energy release, the seismic energy, the far-field waveforms and the spectrum of seismic waves. These quantities depend to various extent on the friction distribution on the fault. In particular, the stress distribution on the fault is always strongly heterogeneous at the beginning of the seismic event. Seismic energy and frictional heat decrease with increasing friction heterogeneity, while seismic efficiency is constant. We obtain an equation relating seismic efficiency to the parameters of the friction law, showing that the efficiency is maximum for smaller values of dynamic friction. The seismic spectrum depends on the friction distribution as to the positions and the values of the minima. However, under the model assumption that the slip durations are the same for both asperities, the corner frequency is independent of the friction distribution, but it depends on the friction law and on the coupling between asperities. The model provides a relation between the total radiated energy and the seismic moment that is consistent with the empirical relation between the two quantities. The fault model with one asperity is also considered as a particular case. The model is applied to the 1965 Rat Islands (Alaska) earthquake and shows the role of fault heterogeneity in controlling the spatial distribution of stress drop as well as the time dependence and the final amount of radiated energy.

  5. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  6. Explanation of the Knee-like Feature in the DAMPE Cosmic {e}^{-}+{e}^{+} Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2018-02-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer, a space-based high precision cosmic-ray detector, has just reported the new measurement of the total electron plus positron energy spectrum up to 4.6 TeV. A notable feature in the spectrum is the spectral break at ∼0.9 TeV, with the spectral index softening from ‑3.1 to ‑3.9. Such a feature is very similar to the knee at the cosmic nuclei energy spectrum. In this work, we propose that the knee-like feature can be explained naturally by assuming that the electrons are accelerated at the supernova remnants (SNRs) and released when the SNRs die out with lifetimes around 105 years. The cut-off energy of those electrons have already decreased to several TeV due to radiative cooling, which may induce the observed TeV spectral break. Another possibility is that the break is induced by a single nearby old SNR. Such a scenario may bring a large electron flux anisotropy that may be observable by the future detectors. We also show that a minor part of electrons escaping during the acceleration in young and nearby SNRs is able to contribute to a several TeV or higher energy region of the spectrum.

  7. Chromaticity measurement via the fourier spectrum of transverse oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Yang

    2004-01-01

    Turn-by-turn data from a single BPM includes information on the chromaticity in sidebands displaced above and below the betatron frequency by an amount of the synchrotron frequency. It may be necessary to induce small amplitude synchrotron oscillation by giving the beam a small kick. Power spectrum of the BPM data gives clear chromatic sidebands, and they can be applied to the chromaticity measurement in the Fermilab Booster

  8. Coherent radiation spectrum measurements at KEK LUCX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, M., E-mail: mishe@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Aryshev, A., E-mail: alar@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Araki, S.; Fukuda, M. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Karataev, P. [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates the detailed design concept, alignment, and initial testing of a Michelson interferometer for the THz spectral range. We present the first results on the measurement of a coherent transition radiation spectrum and describe the performance of a pair of ultra-fast broadband room temperature Schottky barrier diode detectors. We discuss the main criteria of interferometer beam splitter optimization, the alignment technique, the high-precision calibration and linearity check of the motion system.

  9. Determination of the Spectral Index in the Fission Spectrum Energy Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Amy Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Neutron reaction cross sections play a vital role in tracking the production and destruction of isotopes exposed to neutron fluence. They are central to the process of reconciling the initial and final atom inventories. Measurements of irradiated samples by radiochemical methods in tangent with an algorithm are used to evaluate the fluence a sample is exposed to over the course of the irradiation. This algorithm is the Isotope Production Code (IPC) created and used by the radiochemistry data assessment team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An integral result is calculated by varying the total neutron fluence seen by a sample. A sample, irradiated in a critical assembly, will be exposed to a unique neutron flux defined by the neutron source and distance of the sample from the source. Neutron cross sections utilized are a function of the hardness of the neutron spectrum at the location of irradiation. A spectral index is used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum. Cross sections fit forms applied in IPC are collapsed from a LANL 30-group energy structure. Several decades of research and development have been performed to formalize the current IPC cross section library. Basis of the current fission spectrum neutron reaction cross section library is rooted in critical assembly experiments performed from the 1950’s through the early 1970’s at LANL. The focus of this report is development of the spectral index used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum in the fission spectrum energy regime.

  10. Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum.......The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum....

  11. The 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum measured by the Chi-Nu project at LANSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chi-Nu experiment aims to accurately measure the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the major actinides. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, fission can be induced with neutrons ranging from 0.7 MeV and above. Using a two arm time-of-flight (TOF technique, the fission neutrons are measured in one of two arrays: a 22-6Li glass array for lower energies, or a 54-liquid scintillator array for outgoing energies of 0.5 MeV and greater. Presented here are the collaboration's preliminary efforts at measuring the 235U PFNS.

  12. Energy spectrum structure and ''trap'' effects in a three-particle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenog, I.V.; Sitnichenko, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Investigation is made of the threshold energy spectrum structure in a system of three spinless particles depending on the form of two-particle interaction. The correlation dependence of the spectrum and low-energy scattering parameters are shown. A new phenomenon of ''traps'' for the spectrum in a three-particle system with interaction involving components of considerably different ranges is established

  13. Sequential measurements of spectrum and dose for cosmic-ray neutrons on the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.

    2002-01-01

    The earth is continually bathed in high-energy particles that come from outside the solar system, known as galactic cosmic rays. When these particles penetrate the magnetic fields of the solar system and the Earth and reach the Earth's atmosphere, they collide with atomic nuclei in air and secondary cosmic rays of every kind. On the other hand, levels of accumulation of the semiconductor increase recently, and the soft error that the cosmic-ray neutrons cause has been regarded as questionable. There have been long-term measurements of cosmic-ray neutron fluence at several places in the world, but no systematic study on cosmic-ray neutron spectrum measurements. This study aimed to measure the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum and dose on the ground during the solar maximum period of 2000 to 2002. Measurements have been continuing in a cabin of Tohoku University Kawauchi campus, by using five multi-moderator spectrometers (Bonner sphere), 12.7 cm diam by 12.7 cm long NE213 scintillator, and rem counter. The Bonner sphere uses a 5.08 cm diam spherical 3 He gas proportional counter and the rem counter uses a 12.7 cm diam 3 He gas counter. The neutron spectra were obtained by unfolding from the count rates measured with the Bonner sphere using the SAND code and the pulse height spectra measured with the NE213 scintillator using the FORIST code . The cosmic- ray neutron spectrum and ambient dose rates have been measured sequentially from April 2001. Furthermore, the correlation between ambient dose rate and the atmospheric pressure was investigated with a barometer. We are also very much interested in the variation of neutron spectrum following big solar flares. From the sequential measurements, we found that the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum has two peaks at around 1 MeV and at around 100 MeV, and the higher energy peak increases with a big solar flare

  14. Composition and energy spectrum variations of auroral ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, J.; Leach, R.; Pulliam, D.; Scherb, F.

    1977-01-01

    We have detected H + ,O + , and He ++ ions with E/q up to 20 keV/charge in a hydrogen aurora over Churchill, Manitoba, during the flight of a Javelin sounding rocket on February 11, 1975, We observed several examples of different types of ion events. One type consisted of bursts of H + and O + ions which arrived simultaneously at all energies within the range of the E/q analyzer. These events were apparently of local origin (distance + ions (O + /H + approximately-greater-than30%). A second type of event consisted of bursts of enhanced H + counting rates but no O + ions. The dispersion in time of the energy spectrum was consistent with an injection and acceleration site located at about 20 R/sub E/ from the earth. An enhancement of the He ++ counting rates was associated with these events, but the He ++ data are of limited statistical significance. A third type of event, consisting of short bursts of H + ions with wide energy spreads, was observed in association with an event in which the energy of the H + ions showed time dispersion. We interpret these short H + bursts as due to ions trapped in traveling waves generated by an explosive injection of plasma in the earth's magnetotail

  15. Measuring transformers in energy measurement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vock, E.

    2009-01-01

    This article takes a look at the use of measurement transformers in energy measurement installations in the light of electricity market liberalisation. Such equipment is quoted as being long living and capital-intensive. Increasing requirements on the installation of measurement equipment between partners in a liberalised market are examined. The requirements placed by electricity market legislation on the systems for the various grid voltage levels are discussed. Both current and voltage measurement transformers are looked at and the requirements placed on their accuracy are discussed in detail.

  16. Solar Energy Measurement Using Arduino

    OpenAIRE

    Jumaat Siti Amely; Othman Mohamad Hilmi

    2018-01-01

    This project aims to develop a measurement of solar energy using Arduino Board technology. In this research, four parameters that been measured are temperature, light intensity, voltage and current. The temperature was measured using temperature sensor. The light intensity was measured using light dependent resistor (LDR) sensor. The voltage was measured using the voltage divider because the voltage generated by the solar panel are large for the Arduino as receiver. Lastly for the current was...

  17. Method to deduce the energy spectrum by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, I.; Roth, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schuessler, F.; Unger, M. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Taken into account the great advantage of having a hybrid detector it has been developed a method, simulation independent, to determine the energy of the comic rays recorded by the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The method assumes that the cosmic ray flux has the same distribution in zenith angle for all energy ranges. Therefore one can relate the calorimetric measurement of the fluorescence detector of the CR energy with a SD quantity, e.g. shower size at 1000m distance from the core, corrected for the different attenuations in the atmosphere. The method of measuring and calibrating the primary energy and the influence of reconstruction uncertainties on the energy spectrum are presented. (orig.)

  18. Photoneutron spectrum measured with Bonner Spheres in Planetary method mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calz. de la Cruz 118 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Velazquez F, J., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Posgrado en Ciencias Biologico Agropecuarias, Carretera Tepic-Compostela Km 9, 63780 Jalisco-Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    We measured the spectrum of photoneutrons at 100 cm isocenter linear accelerator (Linac) Varian ix operating at 15 MV Bremsstrahlung mode. In this process was used a radiation field of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} at a depth of 5 cm in a solid water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}. The measurement was performed with a system using it Bonner Spheres spectrometric method Planetary mode. As neutron detector of the spectrometer is used thermoluminescent dosimeters pairs of type 600 and 700. (Author)

  19. Photoneutron spectrum measured with Bonner Spheres in Planetary method mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J.; Vega C, H. R.; Velazquez F, J.

    2012-10-01

    We measured the spectrum of photoneutrons at 100 cm isocenter linear accelerator (Linac) Varian ix operating at 15 MV Bremsstrahlung mode. In this process was used a radiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 at a depth of 5 cm in a solid water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 . The measurement was performed with a system using it Bonner Spheres spectrometric method Planetary mode. As neutron detector of the spectrometer is used thermoluminescent dosimeters pairs of type 600 and 700. (Author)

  20. New measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.B.; Richards, P.L.; Bonomo, J.L.; Timusk, T.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can provide useful tests of cosmological theories. The data set existing in 1982 has been summarized on a number of occasions. To first approximation the CMB is characterized by a single temperature and thus has a blackbody spectrum over the frequency range from 0.02 to 24 cm/sup -1/. The error limits given for these experiments are dominated by systematic errors and are often very subjective. Consequently, it is not clear how to analyze the data set in a valid way. The general impression, however, is of a scatter in the high frequency data that is somewhat larger than would be expected from the given error limits

  1. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  2. Measurement of 235U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections and neutron spectrum adjusted with the activation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Kobayashi, Tooru

    1992-01-01

    The 235 U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for 13 threshold reactions were measured with the fission plate (27 cm in diameter and 1.1 cm thick) at the heavy water thermal neutron facility of the Kyoto University Reactor. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was applied to check the deviation from the 235 U fission neutron spectrum due to the room-scattered neutrons, and it was found that the resultant spectrum was close to that of 235 U fission neutrons. Supplementally, the relations to derive the absorbed dose rates with the fission plate were also given using the calculated neutron spectra and the neutron Kerma factors. Finally, the present values of the fission spectrum-averaged cross sections were employed to adjust the 235 U fission neutron spectrum with the NEUPAC code. The adjusted spectrum showed a good agreement with the Watt-type fission neutron spectrum. (author)

  3. Wavelet Spatial Energy Spectrums Studies on Drag Reduction by Micro-bubble Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Zhen; Yassin Hassan

    2006-01-01

    In this study, continuous wavelet transforms and spatial correlation techniques are employed to determine the space-localized wavenumber energy spectrum of the velocity signals in turbulent channel flow. The flow conditions correspond to single phase flow and micro-bubbles injected two phase flow. The wavelet energy spectrums demonstrate that the wavenumber (eddy size) content of the velocity signals is not only space-dependent but also micro-bubbles can impact the eddy size content. Visual observations of the wavelet energy spectrum spatial distribution was realized by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement technique. The two phase flow condition corresponds to a drag reduction of 38.4% with void fraction of 4.9%. The present results provide evidence that micro-bubbles in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow can help adjust the eddy size distributions near the wall. This can assist in explaining that micro-bubbles are performing as buffers to keep the energy of fluid particles going in stream-wise direction and reducing the energy of fluid particles going in normal direction. (authors)

  4. A Simple Method of Spectrum Processing for β-ray Measurement without Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Radioactivity analysis of β-emitting radionuclide is important because of its dangerousness of overexposure. γ-ray has been measured by conventional detector such as NaI(Tl) or high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. But β-ray is hard to detect by those detectors because of its short range. Therefore, liquid scintillation counter (LSC) has been used to measure the radioactivity of pure beta emitter but there is huge problem of organic waste production, though LSC has high efficiency for detection of low energy β-ray. To solve this problem, characterization of β-ray measurement in a plastic scintillator was carried out in this study. There have been some studies about plastic scintillator to measure the β-rays without liquid scintillation method. Plastic scintillator has benefits for detection of β-ray because it has relative low effective atomic number. β-ray and γ-ray spectra in cylindrical plastic scintillator was analyzed and a method of separation of β-ray spectrum was suggested. A simple method of β-ray spectrum separation was suggested. The method was verified by chi-square method to estimate the difference between calculated and measured spectrum. This method was successfully applied by using disc source. For future works, practical radioactive source will be used to acquire the pulse height spectrum. The method can be used for measurement of pure β emitter without pretreatment if this method is verified for practical purpose.

  5. Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum in very anisothermal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Sylvain; Toutant, Adrien; Bataille, Françoise; Zhou, Ye

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, we find that the Kolmogorov scaling law is no longer valid when the flow is submitted to strong dilatational effects caused by high temperature gradients. As a result, in addition to the nonlinear time scale, there is a much shorter “temperature gradients” time scale. We propose a model that estimates the time scale of the triple decorrelation incorporating the influences of the temperature gradient. The model agrees with the results from the thermal large-eddy simulations of different Reynolds numbers and temperature gradients. This Letter provides a better understanding of the very anisothermal turbulent flow. -- Highlights: ► Turbulent flows subject to high temperature gradients are considered. ► The new “temperature gradients” time scale is determined. ► A generalized energy spectrum is developed to incorporate the effects of temperature gradient.

  6. Energy efficiency policies and measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document makes a review of the energy efficiency and demand side management (DSM) policies and measures in European Union countries and Norway in 1999: institutional changes, measures and programmes, budget, taxation, existence of a national DSM programme, national budgets for DSM programmes, electricity pricing: energy/environment tax, national efficiency standards and regulation for new electrical appliances, implementation of Commission directives, efficiency requirements, labelling, fiscal and economic incentives. (J.S.)

  7. Uncertainty in relative energy resolution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovitsky, P.; Yen, J.; Cumberland, L.

    2007-01-01

    We suggest a new method for the determination of the detector relative energy resolution and its uncertainty based on spline approximation of experimental spectra and a statistical bootstrapping procedure. The proposed method is applied to the spectra obtained with NaI(Tl) scintillating detectors and 137 Cs sources. The spectrum histogram with background subtracted channel-by-channel is modeled by cubic spline approximation. The relative energy resolution (which is also known as pulse height resolution and energy resolution), defined as the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) divided by the value of peak centroid, is calculated using the intercepts of the spline curve with the line of the half peak height. The value of the peak height is determined as the point where the value of the derivative goes to zero. The residuals, which are normalized over the square root of counts in a given bin (y-coordinate), obey the standard Gaussian distribution. The values of these residuals are randomly re-assigned to a different set of y-coordinates where a new 'pseudo-experimental' data set is obtained after 'de-normalization' of the old values. For this new data set a new spline approximation is found and the whole procedure is repeated several hundred times, until the standard deviation of relative energy resolution becomes stabilized. The standard deviation of relative energy resolutions calculated for each 'pseudo-experimental' data set (bootstrap uncertainty) is considered to be an estimate for relative energy resolution uncertainty. It is also shown that the relative bootstrap uncertainty is proportional to, and generally only two to three times bigger than, 1/√(N tot ), which is the relative statistical count uncertainty (N tot is the total number of counts under the peak). The newly suggested method is also applicable to other radiation and particle detectors, not only for relative energy resolution, but also for any of the other parameters in a measured spectrum, like

  8. [Measurement of plasma parameters in slot microplasma by optical emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Fang; Lü, Ying-Hui; Liu, Wei-Yuan; Yue, Han; Lu, Ning; Li, Xin-Chun

    2010-12-01

    Slot microplasma was generated in argon and air mixture by using dielectric barrier discharge device with two parallel water electrodes. The molecular vibrational temperature, molecular rotational temperature and average electron energy of the slot plasma were studied by optical emission spectrum. The molecular vibrational temperature was calculated using the second positive system of nitrogen molecules ( C3 pi(u) --> B3 pi(g)). The molecular rotational temperature was calculated using the first negative system of nitrogen molecular ions ( B 2sigma(u)+ --> X sigma(g)+). The relative intensities of the first negative system of nitrogen molecular ions (391.4 nm) and nitrogen molecules in the excitation level (337.1 nm) emission spectrum line were measured for studying the variations of electron energy. It was found that the molecular vibrational temperature, molecular rotational temperature and average electron energy decrease with gas pressure increasing.

  9. Combined fit of spectrum and composition data as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A. [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP), Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas—LIP and Instituto Superior Técnico—IST, Universidade de Lisboa—UL (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (INAF), Torino (Italy); Samarai, I. Al [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Universités Paris 6 et Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3 (France); Albuquerque, I.F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Inst. de Física, São Paulo (Brazil); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET) (Argentina); Almela, A.; Andrada, B. [Instituto de Tecnologías en Detección y Astropartículas (CNEA, CONICET, UNSAM), Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México (Mexico); Alvarez-Muñiz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Anastasi, G.A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), L' Aquila (Italy); Anchordoqui, L., E-mail: auger_spokespersons@fnal.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    We present a combined fit of a simple astrophysical model of UHECR sources to both the energy spectrum and mass composition data measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The fit has been performed for energies above 5 ⋅ 10{sup 18} eV, i.e. the region of the all-particle spectrum above the so-called 'ankle' feature. The astrophysical model we adopted consists of identical sources uniformly distributed in a comoving volume, where nuclei are accelerated through a rigidity-dependent mechanism. The fit results suggest sources characterized by relatively low maximum injection energies, hard spectra and heavy chemical composition. We also show that uncertainties about physical quantities relevant to UHECR propagation and shower development have a non-negligible impact on the fit results.

  10. Linearized spectrum correlation analysis for line emission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, T; Nornberg, M D; Den Hartog, D J; Sarff, J S

    2017-08-01

    A new spectral analysis method, Linearized Spectrum Correlation Analysis (LSCA), for charge exchange and passive ion Doppler spectroscopy is introduced to provide a means of measuring fast spectral line shape changes associated with ion-scale micro-instabilities. This analysis method is designed to resolve the fluctuations in the emission line shape from a stationary ion-scale wave. The method linearizes the fluctuations around a time-averaged line shape (e.g., Gaussian) and subdivides the spectral output channels into two sets to reduce contributions from uncorrelated fluctuations without averaging over the fast time dynamics. In principle, small fluctuations in the parameters used for a line shape model can be measured by evaluating the cross spectrum between different channel groupings to isolate a particular fluctuating quantity. High-frequency ion velocity measurements (100-200 kHz) were made by using this method. We also conducted simulations to compare LSCA with a moment analysis technique under a low photon count condition. Both experimental and synthetic measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of LSCA.

  11. Relative ultrasound energy measurement circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, E.Martin I.; Johansson, Jonny; Delsing, Jerker

    2005-01-01

    A relative ultrasound energy estimation circuit has been designed in a standard 0.35-μm CMOS process, to be a part of a thumb size internet connected wireless ultrasound measurement system. This circuit measures the relative energy between received ultrasound pulses, and presents an output signal that is linear to the received energy. Post-layout simulations indicate 7 bit linearity for 500 mV input signals, 5 μsec startup and stop times, 2.6 mW power consumption during active state. The acti...

  12. Improving Quality Of Spectrum Measurement By Event - Event Coincidence Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Dinh Khang; Doan Trong Thu; Nguyen Duc Hoa; Nguyen An Son; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Ho Huu Thang

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of measurement data for the research levels density and gamma strength function in intermediate energy region below the neutron binding energy (B n ), a new method was developed at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This method improve the ratio of the count of peak per compton background more times. This results are evaluated, compared with other methods. (author)

  13. Possible dark energy imprints in the gravitational wave spectrum of mixed neutron-dark-energy stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, James Bourchier Blvd. 5, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Doneva, Daniela D., E-mail: yazad@phys.uni-sofia.bg, E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de [Theoretical Astrophysics, IAAT, Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2012-03-01

    In the present paper we study the oscillation spectrum of neutron stars containing both ordinary matter and dark energy in different proportions. Within the model we consider, the equilibrium configurations are numerically constructed and the results show that the properties of the mixed neuron-dark-energy star can differ significantly when the amount of dark energy in the stars is varied. The oscillations of the mixed neuron-dark-energy stars are studied in the Cowling approximation. As a result we find that the frequencies of the fundamental mode and the higher overtones are strongly affected by the dark energy content. This can be used in the future to detect the presence of dark energy in the neutron stars and to constrain the dark-energy models.

  14. Photon energy spectrum in B →Xs + γ and comparison with data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Greub, C.

    1995-06-01

    A comparison of the inclusive photon energy spectrum in the radiative decay B→X s +γ; measured recently by the CLEO collaboration, with the standard model is presented, using a B-meson wave function model and improving earlier perturbative QCD-based computations of the same. The dependence of the photon energy spectrum on the non-perturbative model parameters, p F , the b-quark Fermi momentum in the B hadron, and m q , the spectator quark mass, is explicitly shown, allowing a comparison of these parameters with the ones obtained from the analysis of the lepton energy spectrum in semileptonic B decays. Taking into account present uncertainties, we estimate BR(B→X s +γ)=(2.55±1.28)x10 -4 in the standard model, assuming vertical stroke V ts vertical stroke /vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =1.0. Comparing this with CLEO measurement BR(B→X s +γ)=(2.32±0.67)x10 -4 implies vertical stroke V ts vertical stroke /vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =1.1±0.43, in agreement with the CKM unitarity. (orig.)

  15. Peak creation in the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons by phase rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Akira; Nakamura, Shu; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Tongu, Hiromu; Ito, Hiroyuki; Souda, Hikaru; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tanabe, Mikio; Daido, Hiroyuki; Mori, Michiaki; Kado, Masataka; Sagisaka, Akito; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Yogo, Akifumi; Bulanov, Sergei; Esirkepov, Timur; Nagashima, Akira; Kimura, Toyoaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    In collaboration between JAEA, Kansai Photon Science Institute and Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, proton generation from a thin foil target (Ti 3 or 5 μm in thickness) with use of 10 TW laser (JLITEX) has been performed. Proton production is optimized by real time proton energy measurement with use of TOF method. Phase rotation with use of an RF electric field phase-synchronized to the pulse laser enabled the creation of peaks with the spread of ∼7% in the energy spectrum of the produced protons, which resulted in the increase of the intensity ∼4 times at peak position. (author)

  16. Energy measurements from betatron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Thompson, K.

    1989-03-01

    In the Stanford Linear Collider the electron beam is accelerated from 1--50 GeV in a distance of 3 km. The energy is measured and corrected at the end with an energy feedback loop. There are no bends within the linear accelerator itself, so no intermediate energy measurements are made. Errors in the energy profile due to mis-phasing of the rf, or due to calibration errors in the klystrons' rf outputs are difficult to detect. As the total betatron phase advance down the accelerator is about 30 /times/ 2π, an energy error of a few percent can cause a large error in the total phase advance. This in turn degrades the performance of auto-steering programs. We have developed a diagnostic program which generates and measures several betatron oscillations in the accelerator. It then analyzes this oscillation, looking for frequency changes which indicate energy errors. One can then compensate for or correct these energy errors. 6 refs., 1 fig

  17. First Calorimetric Measurement of OI-line in the Electron Capture Spectrum of $^{163}$Ho

    CERN Document Server

    Ranitzsch, P. C. -O.; Wegner, M.; Kempf, S.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.; Gastaldo, L.; Herlert, A.; Johnston, K.

    2014-01-01

    The isotope $^{163}$Ho undergoes an electron capture process with a recommended value for the energy available to the decay, $Q_{\\rm EC}$, of about 2.5 keV. According to the present knowledge, this is the lowest $Q_{\\rm EC}$ value for electron capture processes. Because of that, $^{163}$Ho is the best candidate to perform experiments to investigate the value of the electron neutrino mass based on the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We present for the first time the calorimetric measurement of the atomic de-excitation of the $^{163}$Dy daughter atom upon the capture of an electron from the 5s shell in $^{163}$Ho, OI-line. The measured peak energy is 48 eV. This measurement was performed using low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters with the $^{163}$Ho ion implanted in the absorber. We demonstrate that the calorimetric spectrum of $^{163}$Ho can be measured with high precision and that the parameters describing the spectrum can be learned from the analysis of the data. Finally, we dis...

  18. Comparative study on γ energy spectrum denoise by fourier and wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Dongsheng; Di Yuming; Zhou Chunlin

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the basic principle of wavelet and Fourier transforms, applies wavelet transform method to denoise γ energy spectrum of 60 Co and compares it with Fourier transform method. The result of simulation with MATLAB software tool showed that as compared with traditional Fourier transform, wavelet transform has comparatively higher accuracy for γ energy spectrum denoising and is more feasible to γ energy spectrum denoising. (authors)

  19. Effects of synchrotron radiation spectrum energy on polymethyl methacrylate photosensitivity to deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Utsumi, Yuichi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    Since X-ray lithography requires a high photon flux to achieve deep resist exposure, a synchrotron radiation beam, which is not monochromatized, is generally used as a light source. If the synchrotron radiation beam is monochromatized, photon flux will decrease rapidly. Because of this reason, the wavelength dependence of the resist sensitivity has not been investigated for deep X-ray lithography. Measuring the spectrum of a white beam with a Si solid-state detector (SSD) is difficult because a white beam has a high intensity and an SSD has a high sensitivity. We were able to measure the spectrum and the photocurrent of a white beam from a beam line used for deep X-ray lithography by keeping the ring current below 0.05 mA. We evaluated the characteristics of the output beam based on the measured spectrum and photocurrent, and used them to investigate the relationship between the total exposure energy and the dose-processing depth with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). We found that it is possible to guess the processing depth of PMMA from the total exposure energy in deep X-ray lithography. (author)

  20. Measuring and teaching light spectrum using Tracker as a spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Marques, M. B.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present a simple and low cost setup that allows obtaining the light spectra and measuring the wavelength of its features. It is based on a cheap transmission diffraction grating, an ordinary digital camera and using Tracker software to increase measuring accuracy. This equipment can easily be found in most schools. The experimental setup is easy to implement (the typical setup for a pocket spectroscope) replacing the eye with the camera. The calibration is done using a light source with a well-known spectrum. The acquired images are analyzed with Tracker (freeware software frequently used for motion studies). With this system, we have analyzed several light sources. As an example, the analysis of the spectra obtained with compact fluorescent lamp allowed to recognize the spectrum of mercury in the lamp, as expected. This spectral analysis is therefore useful in schools, among other topics, to enable the recognition of chemical elements through spectroscopy, and to alert students to the different spectra of illuminating light sources used in houses and public places.

  1. Unbiased contaminant removal for 3D galaxy power spectrum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalus, B.; Percival, W. J.; Bacon, D. J.; Samushia, L.

    2016-11-01

    We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (I) removing the contaminant signal, (II) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum and (III) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (I), we show that removing the best-fitting contaminant (mode subtraction) and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (II), performing a quadratic maximum likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large N_mode^2 matrices (Nmode being the total number of modes), which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (II) as proposed by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (FKP) is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants, is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.

  2. Measuring resilience to energy shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Molyneaux, Lynette; Brown, Colin; Foster, John; Wagner, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Measuring energy security or resilience in energy is, in the main, confined to indicators which are used for comparative purposes or to show trends rather than provide empirical evidence of resilience to unpredicted crises. In this paper, the electricity systems of the individual states within the United States of America are analysed for their response to the 1973-1982 and the 2003-2012 oil price shocks. Empirical evidence is sought for elements which are present in systems that experience r...

  3. Forward energy measurement with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kheyn, Lev

    2016-01-01

    Energy flow is measured in the forward region of CMS at pseudorapidities up to 6.6 in pp interactions at 13 TeV with forward (HF) and very forward (CASTOR) calorimeters. The results are compared to model predictions. The CMS results at different center-of-mass energies are intercompared using pseudorapidity variable shifted by beam rapidity, thus studying applicability of hypothesis of limiting fragmentation.

  4. THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

    2013-05-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  5. The energy spectrum of 662 keV photons in a water equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Ozmutlu, E.N.; Yalcin, S.; Gundogdu, O.; Sharaf, J.M.; Bradley, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation is made on the energy spectrum of photons originating from interactions of 662 keV primary gamma-ray photons emitted by a point source positioned at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom of dimensions 19 cm×19 cm×24 cm. Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering have been observed using a 51 mm×51 mm NaI(Tl) detector; good agreement being found between the measured and simulated response functions. The energy spectrum of the gamma photons obtained through the Monte Carlo simulation reveals local maxima at about 100 keV and 210 keV, being also observed in the experimental response function. Such spectra can be used as a method of testing the water equivalence of solid phantom media before their use for dosimetry measurements. - Highlights: ► Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering were observed. ► Energy distribution of γ-ray photons from a point source at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom. ► The method can be applied to various detector geometries.

  6. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  7. Measurement of the pulse night spectrum Cerenkov flashes in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlemmer, G.

    1981-03-01

    The determination of the energy spectrum of Cosmic Rays is difficult because of the low particle density at high energies. Normally such observations would require detectors with large collecting areas and long measurement periods. However the difficulty can be overcome by measuring shower induced Cerenkov radiation, the photon density of which is proportional to the shower energy. The Cerenkov radiation measurements reported here were made using two photomultipliers connected to a coincidence counter unit. The shower energy was deduced from measurements of the height of the pulses observed at the multiplier output,which should be proportional to the number of Cerenkov photons arriving at the photocathode. In order to make meaningful statements about the shower energy the statistical response of the photomultiplier system had to be standardized. This calibration was carried out by illuminating the photomultiplier cathode with a pulsed LED of pulsewidth 5 ns. For different light intensities of the LED a pulse-height spectrum was taken at the multiplier output. In addition to the Cerenkov photons counted by the photomultipliers, there exists a strong constant background light intensity. This background can be eliminated by employing a coincidence amplifier with a resolution time of 10 ns. To reduce background induced accidental coincidences the apparatus was equipped with a variable trigger level. To test the apparatus the Cerenkov radiation induced by cosmic rays in a water basin and in the photomultiplier window itself was measured and compared to theoretical estimates. The agreement was good. The pulse height spectrum of atmospheric Cerenkov radiation was obtained at the Cosmic Ray Physics Laboratory at the Hafelekar Observatory near Innsbruck. The measurements obtained there allowed the exponnent $delta in the differential energy spectrum N(E) dE c.Esup(-$delta)dE of the primary Cosmic Radiation to be evaluated. The value of $delta in the energy range 2,5 x 10 14

  8. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray primary spectrum with ARGO-YBJ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, B; Iuppa, R; Di Sciascio, G

    2013-01-01

    The study of cosmic ray physic of 10 12 – 10 15 primary cosmic energy is one of the main goals of ARGO-YBJ experiment. The detector, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm 2 ), is an EAS array consisting of a continuous carpet of RPCs. The low energy threshold of the detector allows to study an energy region characterized by the transition from the direct to the indirect measurements. In this talk we will report on the measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at different zenith angles. The phenomenology of horizontal air shower (θ > 70°) will be described and discussed.

  9. Interpretation of cosmic ray spectrum above the knee measured by the Tunka-133 array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sveshnikova, Lyubov, E-mail: tfl10@mail.ru [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics MSU, Leninskie Gory GSP 1, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Kuzmichev, Leonid; Korosteleva, Elena; Prosin, Vasiliy [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics MSU, Leninskie Gory GSP 1, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Ptuskin, V.S. [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propogation (IZMIRAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow region 142092 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    A probable interpretation of the fine structure of all particle energy spectrum between the knee and the ankle (the sharp first knee at 3–4 PeV, the spectrum hardening at 20–30 PeV, the second knee at 200–300 PeV) as well as a (E) dependence measured recently by the Tunka-133 experiment, is presented. We show that these features are compatible with the combined model where cosmic rays around the knee are produced by the group of dedicated sources and the extragalactic light component appears in the energy region of 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} eV and reaches about 50% of all particles around (2–3)×10{sup 17} eV.

  10. Outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system using diffractive spectrum-splitting and concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a single-bandgap absorber, photons having energy less than the bandgap are not absorbed, while those having energy larger than the bandgap lose the excess energy via thermalization. We present outdoor measurements of a photovoltaic system that overcomes these losses via spectrum splitting and concentration using a planar diffractive optic. The system was comprised of the diffractive optic coupled with GaInP and CIGS solar cells. The optic provides a geometric concentration of 3X for each solar cell. It is easily fabricated by single-step grayscale lithography and it is ultra-thin with a maximum thickness of only 2.5μm. Electrical measurements under direct sunlight demonstrated an increase of ∼25% in total output power compared to the reference case without spectrum splitting and concentration. Since different bandgaps are in the same plane, the proposed photovoltaic system successfully circumvents the lattice-matching and current-matching issues in conventional tandem multi-junction solar cells. This system is also tolerant to solar spectrum variation and fill-factor degradation of constitutive solar cells.

  11. Experimental measurement of neutron spectrum in the reflector of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brethe, P.

    1963-09-01

    1. Thermal neutrons: The temperature of the thermal neutron spectrum was calculated using Au-Lu foils. This temperature varies from 300 deg. K (temperature of the moderator) at 30 cm of the core to 350 deg. K in a hole of the core. 2. Slowing down of neutron: Four resonance detectors have been used (Au, In, Co, Mn). We can write a 1/E form of the spectrum. The linking up energy E M between thermal neutron spectrum and slowing down spectrum is about 0.23 eV and is free from the Maxwell spectrum temperature. The decrease of slowing down flux regarding thermal flux, farther from the core, has been showed. 3. Fast neutrons: We used 3 threshold detectors (Ni, Al, Mg). We supposed a E 1/2 e -βE from of the spectrum above 3 MeV. The values of β are in a range from 0.775, at the centre of the core and in a loop-hole, to 0,64 at about 30 cm of the core. 4. Continuous shape of the spectrum: The following interpolations give useful informations between the field where measurements have been made: between 340 eV and 10 keV: 1/E form between 10 keV and 330 keV: 1/(E σ S (E)) form (σ S (E) elastic scattering section on hydrogen) between 330 keV and 3 MeV: calculated form by the moments method (ref. BSR). (author) [fr

  12. {sup 252}Cf spontaneous prompt fission neutron spectrum measured at 0 degree and 180 degree relative to the fragment motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanglian, Bao; Jinquan, Liu [Beijing Univ., BJ (China); Batenkov, O I; Blinov, M V; Smirnov, S N [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, ST. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf spontaneous prompt fission neutron spectrum at 0 degree and 180 degree relative to the motion direction of corresponding fission fragments was measured. High angular resolution for fragment measurements and high energy resolution for neutron measurements were obtained using multi-parameter TOF spectrometer. The results showed that there is a symmetric distribution of `forward` and `backward` for low energy in C.M.S. neutrons, which was an evidence of nonequilibrium neutrons existed in fission process.

  13. Energy spectrum of 208Pb(n,x) reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Kavun, Y.; Özdoǧan, H.; Kaplan, A.

    2018-02-01

    Fission and fusion reactor technologies have been investigated since 1950's on the world. For reactor technology, fission and fusion reaction investigations are play important role for improve new generation technologies. Especially, neutron reaction studies have an important place in the development of nuclear materials. So neutron effects on materials should study as theoretically and experimentally for improve reactor design. For this reason, Nuclear reaction codes are very useful tools when experimental data are unavailable. For such circumstances scientists created many nuclear reaction codes such as ALICE/ASH, CEM95, PCROSS, TALYS, GEANT, FLUKA. In this study we used ALICE/ASH, PCROSS and CEM95 codes for energy spectrum calculation of outgoing particles from Pb bombardment by neutron. While Weisskopf-Ewing model has been used for the equilibrium process in the calculations, full exciton, hybrid and geometry dependent hybrid nuclear reaction models have been used for the pre-equilibrium process. The calculated results have been discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR.

  14. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; di Giovanni, G P; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-03-17

    We measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872)--> J/psipi(+) pi(-) decays using 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root s= 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ((3)S(1), (1)P(1), and (3)D(J)) charmonia decaying to J/psipi(+) pi(-), as well as even C-parity states in which the pions are from rho(0) decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D(0)D(*0) molecule. Only the (3)S(1) and J/psirho hypotheses are compatible with our data. Since (3)S(1) is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/psirho is favored, which implies C= +1 for the X(3872). Models for J/psi - rho different angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of rho - omega interference, enables good descriptions of our data for both L = 0 and 1.

  15. Measuring and Comparing Energy Flexibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2015-01-01

    induced by time and amount individually, and by their com- bination. To this end, we introduce several flexibility measures that take into account the combined effect of time and energy on flex-offer flexibility and discuss their respective pros and cons through a number of realistic examples....

  16. Measuring and monitoring energy poverty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachauri, Shonali; Spreng, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This article undertakes a review of alternative measures and indicators of energy poverty targeted to specific audiences and for particular purposes. At the national and international scales there have been some efforts for constructing measures of energy poverty. However, much more needs to be done to develop an internationally consistent measurement framework and to put in place data collection systems that will enable regular reporting. At the programme and project level, indicator systems by necessity need to be designed for specific purposes. Nevertheless, the article proposes that in many instances it is desirable to widen the scope of metrics used for designing and evaluating policies and programmes. In the past, monitoring and evaluation indicators have focused largely on outputs, service delivery or dissemination. Central to the recommendations laid out in the paper is the call for widening the focus of evaluation and necessity to design indicators that adequately assess the needs of beneficiaries and describe the living conditions of families and communities, who are targeted by such programmes and initiatives. - Highlights: ► Consistent measurement frameworks and regular data collection systems on energy poverty are needed. ► Metrics used for designing and evaluating energy access programmes should be widened. ► Indicators that adequately assess needs and describe living conditions of targeted beneficiaries are required.

  17. Time-resolved energy spectrum of a pseudospark-produced high-brightness electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Ding, B.N.; Rhee, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The pseudospark, a fast low-pressure gas discharge between a hollow cathode and a planar anode, is found to be an interesting high-brightness electron beam source. Typically, all electron beam produced in the pseudospark has the peak current of ∼1 kA, pulse duration of ∼50 ns, and effective emittance of ∼100 mm-mrad. The energy information of this electron beam, however, is least understood due to the difficulty of measuring a high-current-density beam that is partially space-charge neutralized by the background ions produced in the gas. In this paper, an experimental study of the time-resolved energy spectrum is presented. The pseudospark produced electron beam is injected into a vacuum through a small pinhole so that the electrons without background ions follow single particle motion; the beam is sent through a negative biased electrode and the only portion of beam whose energy is greater than the bias voltage can pass through the electrode and the current is measured by a Faraday cup. The Faraday cup signals with various bias voltage are recorded in a digital oscilloscope. The recorded waveforms are then numerically analyzed to construct a time-resolved energy spectrum. Preliminary results are presented

  18. Measuring Intermolecular Binding Energies by Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard; Maity, Surajit; Féraud, Géraldine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-02-22

    The ground-state dissociation energy, D0(S0), of isolated intermolecular complexes in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of the interaction strength between the molecules. We have developed a three-laser, triply resonant pump-dump-probe technique to measure dissociation energies of jet-cooled M•S complexes, where M is an aromatic chromophore and S is a closed-shell 'solvent' molecule. Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) via the S0→S1 electronic transition is used to precisely 'warm' the complex by populating high vibrational levels v" of the S0 state. If the deposited energy E(v") is less than D0(S0), the complex remains intact, and is then mass- and isomer-selectively detected by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) with a third (probe) laser. If the pumped level is above D0(S0), the hot complex dissociates and the probe signal disappears. Combining the fluorescence or SEP spectrum of the cold complex with the SEP breakoff of the hot complex brackets D0(S0). The UV chromophores 1-naphthol and carbazole were employed; these bind either dispersively via the aromatic rings, or form a hydrogen bond via the -OH or -NH group. Dissociation energies have been measured for dispersively bound complexes with noble gases (Ne, Kr, Ar, Xe), diatomics (N2, CO), alkanes (methane to n-butane), cycloalkanes (cyclopropane to cycloheptane), and unsaturated compounds (ethene, benzene). Hydrogen-bond dissociation energies have been measured for H2O, D2O, methanol, ethanol, ethers (oxirane, oxetane), NH3 and ND3.

  19. Hofstadter's butterfly energy spectrum of ultracold fermions on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin; Lu Qingqing

    2009-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of ultracold fermionic atoms on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice subjected to a perpendicular effective magnetic field, which can be realized with laser beams. We derive the generalized Harper's equations and numerically solve them, then we obtain the Hofstadter's butterfly-like energy spectrum, which has a novel fractal structure. The observability of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum is also discussed

  20. New Measurements and Calculations to Characterize the Caliban Pulsed Reactor Cavity Neutron Spectrum by the Foil Activation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, X.; Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Rousseau, G. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Barsu, C. [Pl. de la fontaine, 25410 Corcelles-Ferrieres (France)

    2011-07-01

    Caliban is a cylindrical metallic core reactor mainly composed of uranium 235. It is operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Laboratory located at the French Atomic Energy Commission research center in Valduc. As with other fast burst reactors, Caliban is used extensively for determining the responses of electronic parts or other objects and materials to neutron-induced displacements. Therefore, Caliban's irradiation characteristics, and especially its central cavity neutron spectrum, have to be very accurately evaluated. The foil activation method has been used in the past by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Laboratory to evaluate the neutron spectrum of the different facilities it operated, and in particular to characterize the Caliban cavity spectrum. In order to strengthen and to improve our knowledge of the Caliban cavity neutron spectrum and to reduce the uncertainties associated with the available evaluations, new measurements have been performed on the reactor and interpreted by the foil activation method. A sensor set has been selected to sample adequately the studied spectrum. Experimental measured reaction rates have been compared to the results from UMG spectrum unfolding software and to values obtained with the activation code Fispact. Experimental and simulation results are overall in good agreement, although gaps exist for some sensors. UMG software has also been used to rebuild the Caliban cavity neutron spectrum from activation measurements. For this purpose, a default spectrum is needed, and one has been calculated with the Monte-Carlo transport code Tripoli 4 using the benchmarked Caliban description. (authors)

  1. Measurement of Gamma Spectrum at domestic Nuclear Power Plant with CZT Semiconductor Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kon, Kang Seo; Yoon, Kang Hwa; Lee, Byoung Il; Kim, Jeong In [KHNP, Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study we monitored gamma spectrum for young S/G to see difference of the detected nuclides between old and young S/G. The detected source terms were the same for all measurement points. There is not comparison of quantity among the nuclides. The program which analyzes gamma spectrum to calculate activity and dose rate is under developing. We expect it will be done by end of this year. In this study we could see the difference of detected nuclides between old and new S/G for the first time whereas last measurement has significant meaning in that the measurement was taken for the first time all over country. Monitoring sources terms at Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) is important to aggressive ALARA activities and evaluation of exposure of workers. EDF (Electricite de France) and AEP (American Electric Power) conduct monitoring source terms using by CZT semiconductor detector. CZT is different from HPGe in that it does not need any cooling system at room temperature, it has good energy resolution and it can be made portable type easily. For these reason CZT is used in various fields commercially to measure gamma ray and therefore KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD) RHRI(Radiation Health Research Institute) has been measuring gamma spectrum at domestic NPP last spring. We had have presented the first result through the last Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Spring Meeting for old S/G(Steam Generator)

  2. Energy and spectrum efficiency in rural areas based on cognitive radio technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available spectrum scarcity in the most energy efficient manner. In this paper, researchers present the proposed work to be carried out as part of a doctoral thesis to address the spectrum scarcity and transmission power in energy constrained rural areas....

  3. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-07-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time).

  4. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoya, Kaoru; Chen, Pisin

    1989-03-01

    The final electron energy spectrum under multi-photon beamstrahlung process is derived analytically in the classical and the intermediate regimes. The maximum disruption angle from the low energy tail of the spectrum is also estimated. The results are then applied to the TLC and the CLIC parameters. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  6. Source Energy Spectrum of the 17 May 2012 GLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge; Márquez-Adame, Juan C.; Miroshnichenko, Leonty; Velasco-Herrera, Victor

    2018-05-01

    Among the several GLEs (ground level enhancements) that have presumptuously occurred in the period 2012-2015, the 17 May 2012 is that which is more widely accepted to be a GLE, in view of the high number of high-latitude neutron monitor stations that have registered it. In spite of the small amplitude, it was more prominent of the predicted GLE's of the present decade (Pérez-Peraza & Juárez-Zuñiga, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/803/1/27). However, the lack of latitude effect makes it difficult to study the characteristics of this event in the high-energy extreme of the spectrum. Nevertheless, several outstanding works have been able to derive observational spectra at the top of the Earth atmosphere for this peculiar GLE. Some of these works find that the flow of protons is characterized by two components. Quite a great number of works have been published in relation with observational features obtained with different instrumentation, but the source phenomena, regarding the generation processes and source physical parameters, have not been scrutinized. The main goal of this work is to look at such aspects by means of the confrontation of the different approaches of the observational spectra with our analytical theoretical spectra based on stochastic acceleration and electric field acceleration from reconnection processes. In this way, we derive a set of parameters which characterize the sources of these two GLE components, leading us to propose possible scenarios for the generation of particles in this particular GLE event.

  7. Advantages of Real-Time Spectrum Analyzers in High-Energy Physics Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Typically, particles are injected into the ring at low energy levels and then 'ramped up' to higher levels. During ramping, it is important that the horizontal and vertical tune frequencies do not shift, lest they hit upon a resonant combination that causes beam instability or sudden total loss of ring beam current (beam blow up). Beam instabilities can be caused by a number of factors. Non-linearities and/or different response times of independent controls such as beam position monitor (BPM) cables and circuits, magnets for guidance and focusing of the beam, Klystrons or Tetrodes (which provide power to RF cavities that transmit energy to the beam), and vacuum pumps and monitors can all cause beam instabilities. Vibrations and lack of proper shielding are other factors. The challenge for operators and researchers is to correctly identify the factors causing beam instabilities and blow up so that costly accelerator time is not interrupted and experimental results are not compromised. The instrument often used to identify problems in particle accelerator applications is the spectrum analyzer. This paper will discuss the advantages of real time spectrum analyzers (RSA) versus swept frequency spectrum analyzers in HEP applications. The main focus will be on monitoring beam position and stability, especially during ramp-up. Also covered will be use of RSA for chromaticity measurements, Phase Locked Loop (PLL) diagnostics, and vibration analysis

  8. Burning minor actinides in a HTR energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, Christoph; Rütten, H. Jochem

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Burn-up analysis for varying plutonium/minor actinide fuel compositions. ► The influence of varying heavy metal fuel element loads is investigated. ► Significant burn-up via radiative capture and subsequently fission is observed. ► Difference observed between fuel element burn-up and total actinide burning rate. - Abstract: The generation of nuclear energy by means of the existing nuclear reactor systems is based mainly on the fission of U-235. But this comes along with the capture of neutrons by the U-238 faction and results in a build-up of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides as neptunium, americium and curium. These actinides are dominant for the long time assessment of the radiological risk of a final disposal therefore a minimization of the long living isotopes is aspired. Burning the actinides in a high temperature helium cooled graphite moderated reactor (HTR) is one of these options. The use of plutonium isotopes to sustain the criticality of the system is intended to avoid on the one hand highly enriched uranium because of international regulations and on the other hand low enriched uranium because of the build up of new actinides from neutron capture in the U-238 fraction. Because initial minor actinide isotopes are typically not fissionable by thermal neutrons the idea is to fission instead the intermediate isotopes generated by the first neutron capture. This paper comprises calculations for plutonium/minor actinides/thorium fuel compositions and their correlated final burn-up for a generic pebble bed HTR based on the reference design of the 400 MW PBMR. In particular the cross sections and the neutron balance of the different minor actinide isotopes in the higher thermal energy spectrum of a HTR will be discussed. For a fuel mixture of plutonium and minor actinides a significant burn-up of these actinides up to 20% can be achieved but at the expense of a higher residual fraction of plutonium in the burned fuel. Combining

  9. The energy spectrum of delayed neutrons from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U and its analytical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshenko, A.Yu.; Tarasko, M.Z.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the delayed neutrons is the poorest known of all input data required in the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fractions. In addition to delayed neutron spectra based on the aggregate spectrum measurements there are two different approaches for deriving the delayed neutron energy spectra. Both of them are based on the data related to the delayed neutron spectra from individual precursors of delayed neutrons. In present work these two different data sets were compared with the help of an approximation by gamma-function. The choice of this approximation function instead of the Maxwellian or evaporation type of distribution is substantiated. (author)

  10. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF CO iii MEASURED USING FOURIER TRANSFORM AND GRATING SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Nave, G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States); Smith, P. L., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The spectrum of Co iii has been recorded in the region 1562–2564 Å (64,000 cm{sup −1}–39,000 cm{sup −1}) by Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy, and in the region 1317–2500 Å (164,000 cm{sup −1}–40,000 cm{sup −1}) using a 10.7 m grating spectrograph with phosphor image plate detectors. The spectrum was excited in a cobalt–neon Penning discharge lamp. We classified 514 Co iii lines measured using FT spectroscopy, the strongest having wavenumber uncertainties approaching 0.004 cm{sup −1} (approximately 0.2 mÅ at 2000 Å, or 1 part in 10{sup 7}), and 240 lines measured with grating spectroscopy with uncertainties between 5 and 10 mÅ. The wavelength calibration of 790 lines of Raassen and Ortí Ortin and 87 lines from Shenstone has been revised and combined with our measurements to optimize the values of all but one of the 288 previously reported energy levels. Order of magnitude reductions in uncertainty for almost two-thirds of the 3d{sup 6}4s and almost half of the 3d{sup 6}4p revised energy levels are obtained. Ritz wavelengths have been calculated for an additional 100 forbidden lines. Eigenvector percentage compositions for the energy levels and predicted oscillator strengths have been calculated using the Cowan code.

  11. The Spectrum and Term Analysis of Co III Measured Using Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Nave, G.; Smith, P. L.

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of Co III has been recorded in the region 1562-2564 Å (64,000 cm-1-39,000 cm-1) by Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy, and in the region 1317-2500 Å (164,000 cm-1-40,000 cm-1) using a 10.7 m grating spectrograph with phosphor image plate detectors. The spectrum was excited in a cobalt-neon Penning discharge lamp. We classified 514 Co III lines measured using FT spectroscopy, the strongest having wavenumber uncertainties approaching 0.004 cm-1 (approximately 0.2 mÅ at 2000 Å, or 1 part in 107), and 240 lines measured with grating spectroscopy with uncertainties between 5 and 10 mÅ. The wavelength calibration of 790 lines of Raassen & Ortí Ortin and 87 lines from Shenstone has been revised and combined with our measurements to optimize the values of all but one of the 288 previously reported energy levels. Order of magnitude reductions in uncertainty for almost two-thirds of the 3d64s and almost half of the 3d64p revised energy levels are obtained. Ritz wavelengths have been calculated for an additional 100 forbidden lines. Eigenvector percentage compositions for the energy levels and predicted oscillator strengths have been calculated using the Cowan code.

  12. Cosmic ray spectrum, composition, and anisotropy measured with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamburro, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of cosmic ray surface data collected with the IceTop array of Cherenkov detectors at the South Pole provides an accurate measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum and its features in the “knee” region up to energies of about 1 EeV. IceTop is part of the IceCube Observatory that includes a deep-ice cubic kilometer detector that registers signals of penetrating muons and other particles. Surface and in-ice signals detected in coincidence provide clear insights into the nuclear composition of cosmic rays. IceCube already measured an increase of the average primary mass as a function of energy. We present preliminary results on both IceTop-only and coincident events analysis. Furthermore, we review the recent measurement of the cosmic ray anisotropy with IceCube

  13. Cosmic ray spectrum, composition, and anisotropy measured with IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburro, Alessio

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of cosmic ray surface data collected with the IceTop array of Cherenkov detectors at the South Pole provides an accurate measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum and its features in the "knee" region up to energies of about 1 EeV. IceTop is part of the IceCube Observatory that includes a deep-ice cubic kilometer detector that registers signals of penetrating muons and other particles. Surface and in-ice signals detected in coincidence provide clear insights into the nuclear composition of cosmic rays. IceCube already measured an increase of the average primary mass as a function of energy. We present preliminary results on both IceTop-only and coincident events analysis. Furthermore, we review the recent measurement of the cosmic ray anisotropy with IceCube.

  14. A Method to Reconstruct the Solar-Induced Canopy Fluorescence Spectrum from Hyperspectral Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A method for canopy Fluorescence Spectrum Reconstruction (FSR is proposed in this study, which can be used to retrieve the solar-induced canopy fluorescence spectrum over the whole chlorophyll fluorescence emission region from 640–850 nm. Firstly, the radiance of the solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs at five absorption lines of the solar spectrum was retrieved by a Spectral Fitting Method (SFM. The Singular Vector Decomposition (SVD technique was then used to extract three basis spectra from a training dataset simulated by the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes. Finally, these basis spectra were linearly combined to reconstruct the Fs spectrum, and the coefficients of them were determined by Weighted Linear Least Squares (WLLS fitting with the five retrieved Fs values. Results for simulated datasets indicate that the FSR method could accurately reconstruct the Fs spectra from hyperspectral measurements acquired by instruments of high Spectral Resolution (SR and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR. The FSR method was also applied to an experimental dataset acquired in a diurnal experiment. The diurnal change of the reconstructed Fs spectra shows that the Fs radiance around noon was higher than that in the morning and afternoon, which is consistent with former studies. Finally, the potential and limitations of this method are discussed.

  15. Empirical wind retrieval model based on SAR spectrum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilova, Maria; Karaev, Vladimir; Balandina, Galina; Kanevsky, Mikhail; Portabella, Marcos; Stoffelen, Ad

    The present paper considers polarimetric SAR wind vector applications. Remote-sensing measurements of the near-surface wind over the ocean are of great importance for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interaction. In recent years investigations for wind vector retrieval using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have been performed. In contrast with scatterometers, a SAR has a finer spatial resolution that makes it a more suitable microwave instrument to explore wind conditions in the marginal ice zones, coastal regions and lakes. The wind speed retrieval procedure from scatterometer data matches the measured radar backscattering signal with the geophysical model function (GMF). The GMF determines the radar cross section dependence on the wind speed and direction with respect to the azimuthal angle of the radar beam. Scatterometers provide information on wind speed and direction simultaneously due to the fact that each wind vector cell (WVC) is observed at several azimuth angles. However, SAR is not designed to be used as a high resolution scatterometer. In this case, each WVC is observed at only one single azimuth angle. That is why for wind vector determination additional information such as wind streak orientation over the sea surface is required. It is shown that the wind vector can be obtained using polarimetric SAR without additional information. The main idea is to analyze the spectrum of a homogeneous SAR image area instead of the backscattering normalized radar cross section. Preliminary numerical simulations revealed that SAR image spectral maxima positions depend on the wind vector. Thus the following method for wind speed retrieval is proposed. In the first stage of the algorithm, the SAR spectrum maxima are determined. This procedure is carried out to estimate the wind speed and direction with ambiguities separated by 180 degrees due to the SAR spectrum symmetry. The second stage of the algorithm allows us to select the correct wind direction

  16. Determination of the CKM-matrix element |V{sub ub}| from the electron energy spectrum measured in inclusive B→X{sub u}eν decay with the BABAR detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueck, Thomas

    2013-01-30

    This document presents a measurement of the CKM matrix-element vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke in inclusive semileptonic B→X{sub u}eν events on a dataset of 471 million B anti B events recorded by the BABAR detector. Inclusive B→X{sub u}eν decays are selected by reconstructing a high energetic electron (positron). Background suppression is achieved by selecting events with electron (positron) energies near the kinematical allowed endpoint of B→X{sub u}eν decays. A B→D{sup *}eν veto is applied to further suppress background. This veto uses D{sup *} mesons which have been reconstructed with a partial reconstruction technique.

  17. Solar Energy Measurement Using Arduino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumaat Siti Amely

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This project aims to develop a measurement of solar energy using Arduino Board technology. In this research, four parameters that been measured are temperature, light intensity, voltage and current. The temperature was measured using temperature sensor. The light intensity was measured using light dependent resistor (LDR sensor. The voltage was measured using the voltage divider because the voltage generated by the solar panel are large for the Arduino as receiver. Lastly for the current was measured using the current sensor module that can sense the current generated by the solar panel. These parameters as the input value for the Arduino and the output was display at the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD screen. The LCD screen display output of the temperature, the light intensity, the voltage and the current value. The purpose of Arduino to convert the analog input of parameter to the digital output and display via LCD screen. Other than that, this project also involve with a design to ensure that device case are easy to be carry around.

  18. Renewable energy: Method and measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Trond Hartvedt

    2003-01-01

    The thesis presents various possibilities for renewable energy in Norway. The wind power would give a practical and economic alternative. The external costs for the wind power would be moderate. In chapter 3 the utility cost analysis for renewable alternatives are studied relative to the macroeconomic efficiency. Some methodical problems and how these analyses are used are reviewed. In the practical utility cost analyses wind power is studied relative to gas power which is the non-renewable alternative present in Norway today. A qualitative part is included. It is not possible to determine whether wind power is preferable to gas power in the macroeconomic perspective. Wind power would be the choice if high environmental and CO2 cleaning costs are expected. The first conclusion to be drawn is that it is difficult to decide whether wind power is the best solution based on cost benefit analysis. However, the alternative seems to be quite robust in the analysis. Due to the central position the energy supplies have in the society this business should be heavily regulated. The sector is also overtaxed as a reduction in consumption is desired. The analysis shows that the system does not function perfectly. The thesis surveys various measures for improving the renewable energy supply and focuses on the wind power. A model for and analysis of the measures are carried out and resulted in a second conclusion. The measures have various properties as to the influence on the market. A subsidy is a fine measure for stimulation production of green power while a tax reduces efficiently the production of black power. A system with green licenses in combination with a subsidy and a tax would be preferable as to increasing the part of renewable energy of the total production. It is therefore necessary to have clearly defined goals and use suitable measures for achieving them. The costs of wind power is falling and it would therefore soon be macroeconomic profitable. It is also

  19. Obtaining the Bunch Shape in a Linac from Beam Spectrum Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, Karl LF

    1999-01-01

    In linacs with high single-bunch charge, and tight tolerances for energy spread and emittance growth, controlling the short-range wakefield effects becomes extremely important. The effects of the wakefields, in turn, depend on the bunch length and also on the bunch shape. It was shown in the linac of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), for example, that by shaping the bunch, the final rms energy spread could be greatly reduced, compared to for the standard Gaussian bunch shape[1]. Therefore, in machines with high single-bunch charge, a method of measuring bunch shape can be an important beam diagnostic. In a linac with low single-bunch charge, the longitudinal bunch shape can be obtained relatively easily from a single measurement of the beam's final energy spectrum, provided that the final to initial energy ratio is large. One merely shifts the average phase of the beam, so that it rides off-crest sufficiently to induce an energy variation that is monotonic with longitudinal position. Then, by knowing the initial and final energies, the rf wave number, and the average beam phase, one can directly map the spectrum into the bunch shape. In a linac with high single-bunch charge, however, due to the effect of the longitudinal wakefield, this method either does not work at all, or it requires such a large shift in beam phase as to become impractical. In earlier work[2],[3] it was shown that, even when wakefields are important, if one measures the final beam spectrum for two different (properly chosen) values of beam phase, then one can again obtain the bunch shape, and--as a by-product--also the form of the wakefield induced voltage; this method was then illustrated using data from the linac of the SLC. These SLC measurements, however, had been performed with the machine in a special configuration, where the current was low; in addition, the noise the data was low and the measured spectra were smooth distributions. Under normal SLC conditions, however, the currents

  20. The x-ray spectrum of the Cygnus Loop measured with Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Manabe, Makoto; Yamashita, Koujun; Koyama, Katsuji.

    1988-01-01

    We report the results of an observation of the whole Cygnus Loop performed with the Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters (GSPC) on board the Tenma satellite. Line emissions around 1.9 keV and 2.5 keV, probably originating from silicon and sulfur Kα line blends, were detected. The continuum spectrum in the energy range 1-3 keV can be represented by a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of 7 x 10 6 K. This is the highest value for the Cygnus Loop reported so far. The Tenma data were also combined with those from a sounding rocket flight performed previously, in which a similar detector system was employed. Thus, we obtain a wide-band X-ray spectrum for the whole Cygnus Loop with the best energy resolution reported so far. The combined data could not be fitted by a single temperature component in the thermal collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) model or a single-temperature nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) model. A good fit is obtained if at least two temperature components are included in both the CIE and NEI models. However, only the NEI model allows a self consistent interpretation. Taking into account the emission measures for both components, we can conclude that the low-temperature, high-density component arises mainly from the shell region and that the high-temperature, low-density component arises from the interior of the shell. (author)

  1. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  2. Algorithm for removing the noise from γ energy spectrum by analyzing the evolution of the wavelet transform maxima across scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianduo; Xiao Gang; Di Yuming; Han Feng; Qiu Xiaoling

    1999-01-01

    The γ energy spectrum is expanded in allied energy-frequency space. By the different characterization of the evolution of wavelet transform modulus maxima across scales between energy spectrum and noise, the algorithm for removing the noise from γ energy spectrum by analyzing the evolution of the wavelet transform maxima across scales is presented. The results show, in contrast to the methods in energy space or in frequency space, the method has the advantages that the peak of energy spectrum can be indicated accurately and the energy spectrum can be reconstructed with a good approximation

  3. Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; /Kyushu U.; Sanami, Toshiya; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; /Kyushu U.; Iwamoto, Yosuke; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Saito, Kiwamu; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ishibashi, Kenji; /Kyushu U.; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yukio; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Lee, Hee-Seock; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Ramberg, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target was measured at the Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The data allows for evaluation of neutron production process implemented in theoretical simulation codes. It also helps exploring the reasons for some disagreement between calculation results and shielding benchmark data taken at high energy accelerator facilities, since it is evaluated separately from neutron transport. The experiment was carried out using a 120 GeV proton beam of 3E5 protons/spill. Since the spill duration was 4 seconds, protoninduced events were counted pulse by pulse. The intensity was maintained using diffusers and collimators installed in the beam line to MTBF. The protons hit a copper block target the size of which is 5cm x 5cm x 60 cm long. The neutrons produced in the target were measured using NE213 liquid scintillator detectors, placed about 5.5 m away from the target at 30{sup o} and 5 m 90{sup o} with respect to the proton beam axis. The neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique using timing difference between the NE213 and a plastic scintillator located just before the target. Neutron detection efficiency of NE213 was determined on basis of experimental data from the high energy neutron beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum was compared with the results of multiparticle transport codes to validate the implemented theoretical models. The apparatus would be applied to future measurements to obtain a systematic data set for secondary particle production on various target materials.

  4. Prediction of background in low-energy spectrum of phoswich detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, B.; Manohari, M.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of actinides in occupational workers is done using Phoswich detector by measuring the low-energy X ray and gamma rays. Quantification of actinides like plutonium and americium in the lungs is extremely difficult due to higher background in the low-energy regions, which is from ambient background as well as from the subject. In the latter case, it is mainly due to the Compton scattering of body potassium, which varies person-to-person. Hence, an accurate prediction of subject-specific background counts in the lower-energy regions is an essential element in the in vivo measurement of plutonium and americium. Empirical equations are established for the prediction of background count rate in 239 Pu and 241 Am lower-energy regions, called 'target regions', as a function of count rate in the monitoring region (97-130 keV)/ 40 K region in the high-energy spectrum, weight-to-height ratio of the subject (scattering parameter) and the gender. (authors)

  5. Alternative Explanations for Extreme Supersolar Iron Abundances Inferred from the Energy Spectrum of Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Parker, Michael L.; García, Javier A.; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Barret, Didier; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Fabian, Andrew; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grinberg, Victoria; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Walton, Dominic J.

    2018-03-01

    Here we study a 1–200 keV energy spectrum of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 taken with NuSTAR and Suzaku. This is the first report of a NuSTAR observation of Cyg X-1 in the intermediate state, and the observation was taken during the part of the binary orbit where absorption due to the companion’s stellar wind is minimal. The spectrum includes a multi-temperature thermal disk component, a cutoff power-law component, and relativistic and nonrelativistic reflection components. Our initial fits with publicly available constant density reflection models (relxill and reflionx) lead to extremely high iron abundances (>9.96 and {10.6}-0.9+1.6 times solar, respectively). Although supersolar iron abundances have been reported previously for Cyg X-1, our measurements are much higher and such variability is almost certainly unphysical. Using a new version of reflionx that we modified to make the electron density a free parameter, we obtain better fits to the spectrum even with solar iron abundances. We report on how the higher density ({n}e=({3.98}-0.25+0.12)× {10}20 cm‑3) impacts other parameters such as the inner radius and inclination of the disk.

  6. Implications of the cosmic ray electron spectrum and anisotropy measured with Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Fisica; INFN, Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Mazziotta, Mario Nicola [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration recently released the updated results of the measurement of the cosmic ray electron (CRE) spectrum and published its first constraints on the CRE anisotropy. With respect to the previous Fermi-LAT results, the CRE spectrum measurement was extended down from 20 to 7 GeV, thus providing a better lever arm to discriminate theoretical models. Here we show that the new data strengthen the evidence for the presence of two distinct electron and positron spectral components. Furthermore, we show that under such hypothesis most relevant CRE and positron data sets are remarkably well reproduced. Consistent fits of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton data, which are crucial to validate the adopted propagation setup(s) and to fix the solar modulation potential, are obtained for the Kraichnan and plain-diffusion propagation setups, while the Kolmogorov one is disfavored. We then confirm that nearby pulsars are viable source candidates of the required e{sup {+-}} extra-component. In that case, we show that the predicted CRE anisotropy is compatible with Fermi-LAT constraints and that a positive detection should be at hand of that observatory. Models assuming that only nearby supernova remnants contribute to the high energy tail of the observed CRE spectrum are in contrast with anisotropy limits. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of photoneutron spectrum at Pohang Neutron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.N.; Kovalchuk, V.; Lee, Y.S.; Skoy, V.; Cho, M.H.; Ko, I.S.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Pohang Neutron Facility, which is the pulsed neutron facility based on the 100-MeV electron linear accelerator, was constructed for nuclear data production in Korea. The Pohang Neutron Facility consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator and a time-of-flight path with an 11 m length. The neutron energy spectra are measured for different water levels inside the moderator and compared with the MCNP calculation. The optimum size of the water moderator is determined on the base of this result. The time dependent spectra of neutrons in the water moderator are investigated with the MCNP calculation. (author)

  8. A wavelet-based Gaussian method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wavelet-based Gaussian method (WGM for the peak intensity estimation of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF. The relationship between the parameters of Gaussian curve and the wavelet coefficients of Gaussian peak point is firstly established based on the Mexican hat wavelet. It is found that the Gaussian parameters can be accurately calculated by any two wavelet coefficients at the peak point which has to be known. This fact leads to a local Gaussian estimation method for spectral peaks, which estimates the Gaussian parameters based on the detail wavelet coefficients of Gaussian peak point. The proposed method is tested via simulated and measured spectra from an energy X-ray spectrometer, and compared with some existing methods. The results prove that the proposed method can directly estimate the peak intensity of EDXRF free from the background information, and also effectively distinguish overlap peaks in EDXRF spectrum.

  9. Implementation of 252Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yong; Wei Biao; Feng Peng; Li Jiansheng; Ye Cenming

    2012-01-01

    The principle of 252 Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement method is introduced. A measurement system and platform is realized accordingly, which is a combination of hardware and software, for measuring nuclear parameters. The detection method of neutron pulses based on an ultra-high-speed data acquisition card (three channels, 1 GHz sampling rate, 1 ns synchronization) is described, and the data processing process and the power spectrum density algorithm on PC are designed. This 252 Cf-source-driven power spectrum density measurement system can effectively obtain the nuclear tag parameters of nuclear random processes, such as correlation function and power spectrum density. (authors)

  10. Magnetic field effects on the quantum wire energy spectrum and Green's function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the energy spectrum and propagation of electrons in a quantum wire on a 2D host medium in a normal magnetic field, representing the wire by a 1D Dirac delta function potential which would support just a single subband state in the absence of the magnetic field. The associated Schroedinger Green's function for the quantum wire is derived in closed form in terms of known functions and the Landau quantized subband energy spectrum is examined.

  11. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time). (author)

  12. THE DETECTABILITY OF DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION WITH FERMI USING THE ANISOTROPY ENERGY SPECTRUM OF THE GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    The energy dependence of the anisotropy (the anisotropy energy spectrum) of the large-scale diffuse gamma-ray background can reveal the presence of multiple source populations. Annihilating dark matter in the substructure of the Milky Way halo could give rise to a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by Fermi, enabling the detection of a dark matter signal. We determine the detectability of a dark-matter-induced modulation for scenarios in which unresolved blazars are the primary contributor to the measured emission above ∼1 GeV and find that in some scenarios pair-annihilation cross sections on the order of the value expected for thermal relic dark matter can produce a detectable feature. We anticipate that the sensitivity of this technique to specific dark matter models could be improved by tailored likelihood analysis methods.

  13. Measuring energy poverty in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papada, Lefkothea; Kaliampakos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive research in the field of energy poverty is undertaken in this paper, in an attempt to highlight the great vulnerability of Greek households on energy poverty, in the middle of a severe economic crisis. Till now, Greek energy policy has been considered insufficient to tackle energy poverty issues, as focusing mainly on short-term rather than permanent solutions. A primary survey has been conducted, recording objective data of energy expenses as well as subjective perceptions about housing conditions. The findings showed that, under the objective expenditure-based method, 58% of Greek households are energy poor. Among households under the poverty threshold, the energy poverty rate exceeds 90%. Existing and new subjective indicators shed light on other aspects of energy poverty, such as the level of thermal comfort at home, damp problems detected, restriction of other essential needs in order to manage energy payments, etc. Some interesting conclusions are also drawn by exploring the relationship between various indicators. It appears that households considered energy poor are not identical when examined by objective and subjective indicators. However, different indicators complement each other by capturing different aspects of the problem and provide a broader overview of the issue. - Highlights: •58% of Greek households are energy poor. •75% of Greek households have reduced other essentials in favor of energy needs. •Combination of objective and subjective indicators captures better energy poverty. •Greek energy policy has failed to tackle energy poverty issues.

  14. Could dark energy be measured in the lab?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian; Mackey, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The experimentally measured spectral density of current noise in Josephson junctions provides direct evidence for the existence of zero-point fluctuations. Assuming that the total vacuum energy associated with these fluctuations cannot exceed the presently measured dark energy of the universe, we predict an upper cutoff frequency of ν c =(1.69+/-0.05)x10 12 Hz for the measured frequency spectrum of zero-point fluctuations in the Josephson junction. The largest frequencies that have been reached in the experiments are of the same order of magnitude as ν c and provide a lower bound on the dark energy density of the universe. It is shown that suppressed zero-point fluctuations above a given cutoff frequency can lead to 1/f noise. We propose an experiment which may help to measure some of the properties of dark energy in the lab

  15. Energy spectrum of Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroaki; Yoneda, Yasuharu

    1976-01-01

    The high energy photons in gamma-ray region are obtainable by the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. But the motion of the electrons in the storage ring is not necessarily uniform. In the study of the uneven effect, the energy distribution of scattered photons is derived from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. It is generally impossible to derive the momentum distribution of incident electrons from the energy spectrum of scattered photons. The additional conditions which make this possible in a special case are considered. A calculational method is examined for deriving the energy spectrum of scattered photons from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. (Mori, K.)

  16. Measurements of the cosmic-ray electron and positron spectrum and anisotropies with the Fermi LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loparco, F.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite is a pair-conversion telescope for high-energy gamma rays of astrophysical origin. Although it was designed to be a high-sensitivity gamma-ray telescope, the LAT has proved to be an excellent electron/positron detector. It has been operating in low Earth orbit since June 2008 and has collected more than 16 million cosmic-ray electron and positron (CRE) events in its first seven years of operation. The huge data sample collected by the LAT enables a precise measurement of the CRE energy spectrum up to the TeV region. A search for anisotropies in the arrival directions of CREs was also performed. The upper limits on the dipole anisotropy probe the presence of nearby young and middle-aged CRE sources.

  17. Measure for Measure: Urban Water and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, C.; Stillwell, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Urban environments in the United States account for a majority of the population and, as such, require large volumes of treated drinking water supply and wastewater removal, both of which need energy. Despite the large share of water that urban environments demand, there is limited accounting of these water resources outside of the city itself. In this study, we provide and analyze a database of drinking water and wastewater utility flows and energy that comprise anthropogenic fluxes of water through the urban environment. We present statistical analyses of the database at an annual, spatial, and intra-annual scale. The average daily per person water flux is estimated as 563 liters of drinking water and 496 liters of wastewater, requiring 340 kWh/1000 m3 and 430 kWh/1000 m3 of energy, respectively, to treat these resources. This energy demand accounts for 1% of the total annual electricity production of the United States. Additionally, the water and embedded energy loss associated with non-revenue water (estimated at 15.8% annually) accounts for 9.1 km3of water and 3600 GWh, enough electricity to power 300,000 U.S. households annually. Through the analysis and benchmarking of the current state of urban water fluxes, we propose the term `blue city,' which promotes urban sustainability and conservation policy focusing on water resources. As the nation's water resources become scarcer and more unpredictable, it is essential to include water resources in urban sustainability planning and continue data collection of these vital resources.

  18. Determination of the neutrons energy spectrum in the central thimble of the reactor core TRIGA Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra M, M. A.; Luis L, M. A.; Raya A, R.; Cruz G, H. S.

    2013-10-01

    This work presents the measurement of the neutrons spectrum in energies in the central thimble of the reactor TRIGA Mark III to a power of 1 MW in stationary state, with the core in the center of the pool. To achieve this objective, several thin sheets were irradiated (one at the time) in the same position of the core. The activation probes were selected in such a way that covered the energy range (1 x 10 -10 to 20 MeV) of the neutrons spectrum in the reactor core, for this purpose thin sheets were used of 197 Au, 58 Ni, 115 In, 24 Mg, 27 Al, 58 Fe, 59 Co and 63 Cu. After the irradiation, the high energy gamma emissions of the activated thin sheets were measured by means of gamma spectrometry, in a counting system of high resolution, with a Hyper pure Germanium detector, obtaining this way the activity induced in the thin sheets whose magnitude is proportional to the intensity of the neutrons flow, this activity together to a theoretical initial spectrum are the main entrance data of the computational code SANDBP (Hungarian version of the code Sand-II) that uses the unfolding method for the calculation of the spectrum. (Author)

  19. Reflection of the energy structure of a tungsten monocrystal nearsurface area in the secondary electron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Smirnov, O.M.; Terekhov, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Formation of secondary electron energy spectrum during emission from the crystal layer near the surface has been considered, at that layer energy structure can be different from volumetric energy structure. Its thickness depends on the predominant mechanism of electron scattering and is determined by corresponding phenomenological parameters. It is shown that the structure in the secondary electron spectrum appears in the case when energy structure of emitting monocrystal layer can not be described in the approximation of almost free electron gas and, as experimental investigations show, approaches energy zone structure of its volume. It is also show that in the case when the energy structure of the emitting layer is satisfactorily described with the model of almost free electron gas, the SE spectrum is characterized with traditional cascade minimum. Experimental investigation of SE energy distribution was carried out for the W monocrystalline face (110). It was established that distinct structure in the SE spectrum appears only after electrochemical polishing of the specimen surface. It is related to the appearance of ''far'' order in the monocrystal emission layer on initially disturbed tungsten surface during such treatment. Disturbance of tungsten monocrystal surface structure on its oxidation in O 2 atmosphere results in the appearance of the cascade maximum and disappearance of distinct peculiarities in the SE spectrum

  20. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n) 3 He and D(d,n) 3 He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9 Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  1. Prompt neutron energy spectrum for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Boykov, G.S.; Vitenko, V.A.

    1985-06-01

    The prompt neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 has been measured in 0.01-10 MeV region by the time-of-flight technique using a fast ionization chamber with U-235 layers as the neutron detector. Numerical data for the spectrum are presented, with an error file. (author)

  2. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  3. Energy spectrums of bilayer triangular phosphorene quantum dots and antidots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate the confined states of the bilayer triangular phosphorene dots and antidots by means of the tight-binding approach. The dependence of the energy levels on the size, the type of the boundary edges, and the orientation of the dots and antidots, and the influences of the electric and magnetic fields on the energy levels, are all completely analyzed. It is found that the energy level numbers of the bilayer dots and antidots are determined by the energy levels in two layers. The external electric field can effectively tune the energy levels of the edge states in both layers to move in opposite directions. With the increase of the magnetic field, the magnetic energy levels can approach the Landau levels of the phosphorene monolayer, the phosphorene bilayer, or both, depending on the specific geometry of the monolayer-bilayer hybrid phosphorene quantum dots. This research should be helpful for the overall understanding of the electronic properties of the multilayer hybrid phosphorene nanostructures and designing the corresponding phosphorene devices.

  4. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  5. Search for new physics in a precise 20F beta spectrum shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Elizabeth; Voytas, Paul; Chuna, Thomas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Gade, Alexandra; Hughes, Max; Huyan, Xueying; Liddick, Sean; Minamisono, Kei; Paulauskas, Stanley; Weisshaar, Dirk; Ban, Gilles; Flechard, Xavier; Lienard, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We are carrying out a measurement of the shape of the energy spectrum of β particles from 20F decay. We aim to achieve a relative precision below 3%, representing an order of magnitude improvement compared to previous experiments. This level of precision will enable a test of the so-called strong form of the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis, and should also enable us to place competitive limits on the contributions of exotic tensor couplings in beta decay. In order to control systematic effects, we are using a technique that takes advantage of high energy radioactive beams at the NSCL to implant the decaying nuclei in a scintillation detector deep enough that the emitted beta particles cannot escape. The β-particle energy is measured with the implantation detector after switching off the beam implantation. Ancillary detectors are used to tag the 1.633-MeV γ-rays following the β decay for coincidence measurements in order to reduce backgrounds. We will give an overview and report on the status of the experiment.

  6. Optimization of the wavelength shifter ratio in a polystyrene based plastic scintillator through energy spectrum analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Myung Soo; Yoo, Hyun Jun; Lee, Dae Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook [Neutron Instrumentation Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The scintillation efficiency of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator depends on the ratio of the wavelength shifters, organic fluors (PPO and POPOP). Thus, 24 samples of the plastic scintillator were fabricated in order to find out the optimum ratio of the wavelength shifters in the plastic scintillator. The fabricated plastic scintillators were trimmed through a cutting and polishing process. They were used in gamma energy spectrum measurement with the {sup 137}Cs emitting monoenergy photon with 662 keV for the comparison of the scintillation efficiency. As a result, it was found out that the scintillator sample with 1.00 g of PPO (2,5-Diphenyloxazole) and 0.50 g of POPOP (1,4-Bis(5-phnyl-2oxidazolyl)benzene) dissolved in 100 g of styrene solution has the optimum ratio in terms of the light yield of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator.

  7. Energy spectrum inverse problem of q -deformed harmonic oscillator and WBK approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, Nguyen Anh; Thuy, Do Thi Thu; Loan, Nguyen Thi Ha; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-01-01

    Using the connection between q-deformed harmonic oscillator and Morse-like anharmonic potential we investigate the energy spectrum inverse problem. Consider some energy levels of energy spectrum of q -deformed harmonic oscillator are known, we construct the corresponding Morse-like potential then find out the deform parameter q . The application possibility of using the WKB approximation in the energy spectrum inverse problem was discussed for the cases of parabolic potential (harmonic oscillator), Morse-like potential ( q -deformed harmonic oscillator). so we consider our deformed-three-levels simple model, where the set-parameters of Morse potential and the corresponding set-parameters of level deformations are easily and explicitly defined. For practical problems, we propose the deformed- three-levels simple model, where the set-parameters of Morse potential and the corresponding set-parameters of level deformations are easily and explicitly defined. (paper)

  8. Energy and spectrum of BeO molecule under the electric field from different directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, M.; Guo, F. J.; Yan, A. Y.; Zhang, C. W.; Miao, F.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory DFT/ B3LYP at 6-311g level, the ground states of BeO molecule are optimized. The effects of electric field on the bond length, the system energy, the charge distribution, the energy levels, the HOMO-LUMO gaps and the infrared spectrum of BeO molecule are

  9. The energy-momentum spectrum in local field theories with broken Lorentz-symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchers, H.J.; Buchholz, D.

    1984-05-01

    Assuming locality of the observables and positivity of the energy it is shown that the joint spectrum of the energy-momentum operators has a Lorentz-invariant lower boundary in all superselection sectors. This result is of interest if the Lorentz-symmetry is (spontaneously) broken, such as in the charged sectors of quantum electrodynamics. (orig.)

  10. Energy spectrum, dissipation, and spatial structures in reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gomez, D. O. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-05-15

    We analyze the effect of the Hall term in the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under a strong externally supported magnetic field, seeing how this changes the energy cascade, the characteristic scales of the flow, and the dynamics of global magnitudes, with particular interest in the dissipation. Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics are performed, for different values of the Hall parameter (the ratio of the ion skin depth to the macroscopic scale of the turbulence) controlling the impact of the Hall term. The Hall effect modifies the transfer of energy across scales, slowing down the transfer of energy from the large scales up to the Hall scale (ion skin depth) and carrying faster the energy from the Hall scale to smaller scales. The final outcome is an effective shift of the dissipation scale to larger scales but also a development of smaller scales. Current sheets (fundamental structures for energy dissipation) are affected in two ways by increasing the Hall effect, with a widening but at the same time generating an internal structure within them. In the case where the Hall term is sufficiently intense, the current sheet is fully delocalized. The effect appears to reduce impulsive effects in the flow, making it less intermittent.

  11. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at a pneumatic rabbit station of a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkawi, S.R.; Ahmad, N.

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiple foil activation was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum, experimentally, at a rabbit station of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor. The computer codes MSITER and SANDBP were used to adjust the spectrum. The pre-information required by the adjustment codes was obtained by modelling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions by using the one dimensional transport theory code WIMS-D/4 and the multidimensional finite difference diffusion theory code CITATION. The input spectrum covariance information required by MSITER code was also calculated from the CITATION output. A comparison between calculated and adjusted spectra shows a good agreement

  12. Energy spectrum of neutrals formed in an ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This work presents an estimate of the energy distribution of the neutrals formed in the ion beam accelerator. However it does not determine the fraction of those neutrals which leave the neutral beam injector and go on into the reactor. To do that, more details of the beam line performance are needed

  13. Measurement and model of the infrared two-photon emission spectrum of GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Alex; Ginzburg, Pavel; Orenstein, Meir

    2009-07-10

    Two-photon emission from semiconductors was recently observed, but not fully interpreted. We develop a dressed-state model incorporating intraband scattering-related level broadening, yielding nondivergent emission rates. The spectrum calculations for high carrier concentrations including the time dependence of the screening buildup correspond well to our measured two-photon emission spectrum from GaAs.

  14. Measuring Social Communication Behaviors as a Treatment Endpoint in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Evdokia; Jones, Nancy; Huerta, Marisela; Halladay, Alycia K.; Wang, Paul; Scahill, Lawrence; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Kasari, Connie; Lord, Cathy; Choi, Dennis; Sullivan, Katherine; Dawson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Social communication impairments are a core deficit in autism spectrum disorder. Social communication deficit is also an early indicator of autism spectrum disorder and a factor in long-term outcomes. Thus, this symptom domain represents a critical treatment target. Identifying reliable and valid outcome measures for social communication across a…

  15. An angle-dependent estimation of CT x-ray spectrum from rotational transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Stierstorfer, Karl

    2014-01-01

    spectra from the clinical system across a range of angular trajectories [−15°, 15°] and spectrum settings (80, 100, 120, 140 kVp). Results: At 140 kVp, the proposed technique was comparable to the conventional technique in terms of the mean energy difference (MED, −0.29 keV) and the normalized root mean square difference (NRMSD, 0.84%) from the comparison standard compared to 0.64 keV and 1.56%, respectively, with the conventional technique. The average absolute MEDs and NRMSDs across kVp settings and angular trajectories were less than 0.61 keV and 3.41%, respectively, which indicates a high level of estimation accuracy and stability. Conclusions: An angle-dependent estimation technique of CT x-ray spectra from rotational transmission measurements was proposed. Compared with the conventional technique, the proposed method simplifies the measurement procedures and enables incident spectral estimation for a wide range of angular trajectories. The proposed technique is suitable for rigorous research objectives as well as routine clinical quality control procedures

  16. On the groundstate energy spectrum of magnetic knots and links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricca, Renzo L; Maggioni, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    By using analytical results for the constrained minimum energy of magnetic knots we determine the influence of internal twist on the minimum magnetic energy levels of knots and links, and by using ropelength data from the RIDGERUNNER tightening algorithm (Ashton et al 2011 Exp. Math. 20 57–90) we obtain the groundstate energy spectra of the first 250 prime knots and 130 prime links. The two spectra are found to follow an almost identical logarithmic law. By assuming that the number of knot types grows exponentially with the topological crossing number, we show that this generic behavior can be justified by a general relationship between ropelength and crossing number, which is in good agreement with former analytical estimates (Buck and Simon 1999 Topol. Appl. 91 245–57, Diao 2003 J. Knot Theory Ramifications 12 1–16). Moreover, by considering the ropelength averaged over a given knot family, we establish a new connection between the averaged ropelength and the topological crossing number of magnetic knots. (paper)

  17. Measuring energy efficiency: Is energy intensity a good evidence base?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakova, L.; Kovalev, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy intensity measure reflects consumption, not energy efficiency. • Thermodynamic indicators should describe energy efficiency at all levels. • These indicators should have no reference to economic or financial parameters. • A set of energy efficiency indicators should satisfy several basic principles. • There are trade-offs between energy efficiency, power and costs. - Abstract: There is a widespread assumption in energy statistics and econometrics that energy intensity and energy efficiency are equivalent measures of energy performance of economies. The paper points to the discrepancy between the engineering concept of energy efficiency and the energy intensity as it is understood in macroeconomic statistics. This double discrepancy concerns definitions (while engineering concept of energy efficiency is based on the thermodynamic definition, energy intensity includes economic measures) and use. With regard to the latter, the authors conclude that energy intensity can only provide indirect and delayed evidence of technological and engineering energy efficiency of energy conversion processes, which entails shortcomings for management and policymaking. Therefore, we suggest to stop considering subsectoral, sectoral and other levels of energy intensities as aggregates of lower-level energy efficiency. It is suggested that the insufficiency of energy intensity indicators can be compensated with the introduction of thermodynamic indicators describing energy efficiency at the physical, technological, enterprise, sub-sector, sectoral and national levels without references to any economic or financial parameters. Structured statistical data on thermodynamic efficiency is offered as a better option for identifying break-through technologies and technological bottle-necks that constrain efficiency advancements. It is also suggested that macro-level thermodynamic indicators should be based on the thermodynamic first law efficiency and the energy

  18. Cross Section Measurements for Some Elements Suited as Thermal Spectrum indicators: Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, E; Pekarek, H; Jonsson, E

    1964-05-15

    The effective cross sections of Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu have been measured by the oscillator technique in the spectrum of the central channel of the Swedish reactor R1. For Cd, Sm and Gd the 2200 m/s cross sections were deduced on the basis of Westcott's g and s factors. The values obtained were generally in agreement with other recent values obtained by integral methods, although a systematic trend indicated that the value T{sub n} - T{sub m} = 29 {+-} 10 deg C for the neutron spectrum, measured with a fast chopper, was slightly too high. A new value of T{sub n} - T{sub m} = 22.5 {+-} 3.5 deg C was deduced and new 2200 m/s cross sections were obtained by iteration. For natural Lu, the energy dependence of the cross section is not well known. Certain assumptions about the cross section function led to unreasonably high values for the 2200 m/s cross section. Complementary differential measurements of the cross sections of Cd, Sm and Gd were made with the Rl fast chopper. For Cd and Sm the 2200 m/s cross section thus obtained agreed within experimental error with those obtained from the integral measurements. For Gd, the chopper measured value was higher, confirming earlier findings and indicating that the Westcott g factor for Gd is too high. Cd: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 2,390 {+-} 45 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 2,445 {+-} 25 b; Sm: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 5,880 {+-} 90 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 5,740 {+-} 150 b; Gd: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 46,470 {+-} 550 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 47,900 {+-} 700 b.

  19. Cross Section Measurements for Some Elements Suited as Thermal Spectrum indicators: Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, E.; Pekarek, H.; Jonsson, E.

    1964-05-15

    The effective cross sections of Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu have been measured by the oscillator technique in the spectrum of the central channel of the Swedish reactor R1. For Cd, Sm and Gd the 2200 m/s cross sections were deduced on the basis of Westcott's g and s factors. The values obtained were generally in agreement with other recent values obtained by integral methods, although a systematic trend indicated that the value T{sub n} - T{sub m} = 29 {+-} 10 deg C for the neutron spectrum, measured with a fast chopper, was slightly too high. A new value of T{sub n} - T{sub m} = 22.5 {+-} 3.5 deg C was deduced and new 2200 m/s cross sections were obtained by iteration. For natural Lu, the energy dependence of the cross section is not well known. Certain assumptions about the cross section function led to unreasonably high values for the 2200 m/s cross section. Complementary differential measurements of the cross sections of Cd, Sm and Gd were made with the Rl fast chopper. For Cd and Sm the 2200 m/s cross section thus obtained agreed within experimental error with those obtained from the integral measurements. For Gd, the chopper measured value was higher, confirming earlier findings and indicating that the Westcott g factor for Gd is too high. Cd: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 2,390 {+-} 45 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 2,445 {+-} 25 b; Sm: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 5,880 {+-} 90 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 5,740 {+-} 150 b; Gd: Integral meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 46,470 {+-} 550 b; Differential meas. : {sigma}(2200) = 47,900 {+-} 700 b.

  20. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  1. Measurement of Missing Tranverse Energy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    This note discusses the overall ATLAS detector performance for the reconstruction of the missing transverse energy, ETmiss. Two reconstruction algorithms are discussed and their performance is evaluated for a variety of simulated physics processes which probe different topologies and different total transverse energy regimes. In addition, effects of fake ETmiss, resulting from instrumental effects and from false reconstructions are investigated. Finally, studies with first data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 100 pb-1, are suggested which can be used to assess and calibrate the ETmiss performance at the startup of data taking.

  2. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  3. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... Abstract. Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in ... the experimental point of view, there are multiple ways to shed light among the different .... compared to the two metallicity expectations [16]. ..... from the Earth; solar neutrinos; indirect dark matter searches) and GeV physics (pro-.

  4. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in understanding both solar astrophysics and particle physics. After introducing the open questions on both fields, we review here the major results of the last two years and expectations for the near future from Borexino, Super-Kamiokande, SNO and KamLAND ...

  5. Thermostatistic properties of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas with a general energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shukuan; Su, Guozhen; Chen, Jincan

    2007-01-01

    The thermostatistic problems of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas in any dimensional space and with a general energy spectrum are studied, based on the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution. The effects of the deformation parameter q on the properties of the system are revealed. It is shown that q-deformation results in some novel characteristics different from those of an ordinary system. Besides, it is found that the effects of the q-deformation on the properties of the Fermi systems are very different for different dimensional spaces and different energy spectrums

  6. Measures for energy efficiency improvement of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in energy consumption in buildings causes the need to propose energy efficiency improvement measures. Urban planning in accordance with micro location conditions can lead to energy consumption reduction in buildings through the passive solar design. While satisfying the thermal comfort to the user space purpose, energy efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the architectural and construction parameters such as shape of the building, envelope structure and the percentage of glazing. The improvement of the proposed measures, including the use of renewable energy sources, can meet requirements of Directive 2010/31 / EU of 'nearly zero energy buildings'.

  7. Spectrum of density turbulence measured by microwave reflectometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xuantong; Cao Janyong; Xu Deming; Zhang Hongying; Yang Qinwei

    1993-01-01

    The principle of measuring lower frequency density turbulence with microwave reflectometer is presented. Preliminary results from the HL-1 tokamak have been obtained and compared with the results measured by means of electrostatic probe

  8. Operation of buildings: Energy supply and energy conservation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, H

    1985-01-01

    Energy saving in public administration. A list-like collection of the measures to monitor the consumption, the measures of saving energy at existing buildings, new systems and by new techniques. Examples with figures for the savings achieved in the region of Marburg-Biedenkopf (Hesse). Guidelines are set up which are mainly based on energy saving, heat recovery, use of new technologies and renewable energy sources, fluidized-bed combustion also in smaller plants of ca. 2 MW, waste management separating wastes into burnable/unburnable, information of the public administration and the people and the setting up of energy concepts. (PJH).

  9. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    OpenAIRE

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Tjus, Julia Becker; Desiati, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to...

  10. Prompt γ energy spectrum by associated particle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Li; He Tie; Guo Haiping; Yang Jian; Zheng Pu; Wang Xinhua; Chen Yuan; Mou Yunfeng; Zhu Chuanxin; Yang Xiaofei

    2010-01-01

    The basic principle of associated alpha particle technique and the measurement system were introduced. The characteristic prompt gamma-rays coming from water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, ammonium nitrate, melamine and simulated samples induced by D-T neutron from generator were gained by single alpha particle detector and gamma-ray detector. The complex gamma-ray spectra were deconvolved. The element ratio between the experiment and chemic molecular formula is agreement in 10%. (authors)

  11. Classical and modern power spectrum estimation for tune measurement in CSNS RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoyu; Xu Taoguang; Fu Shinian; Zeng Lei; Bian Xiaojuan

    2013-01-01

    Precise measurement of betatron tune is required for good operating condition of CSNS RCS. The fractional part of betatron tune is important and it can be measured by analyzing the signals of beam position from the appointed BPM. Usually these signals are contaminated during the acquisition process, therefore several power spectrum methods are used to improve the frequency resolution. In this article classical and modern power spectrum methods are used. In order to compare their performance, the results of simulation data and IQT data from J-PARC RCS are discussed. It is shown that modern power spectrum estimation has better performance than the classical ones, though the calculation is more complex. (authors)

  12. Labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Three papers are presented discussing the labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures, namely: Generation of the Industry/Occupation Wage Matrix and Related Matters, by Carole Green; Job Shifts from Energy Conservation (Salary Distribution Effects), by Robert A. Herendeen; and Energy and Labor Implication of Improving Thermal Integrity of New Houses, by John Joseph Nangle. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  13. Energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of Monte Carlo electron photon cascade calculations for propagation of gamma rays through regions of extragalactic space containing no magnetic field are given. These calculations then provide upper limits to the expected flux from extragalactic sources. Since gamma rays in the 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV energy range are of interest, interactions of electrons and photons with the 3 K microwave background radiation are considered. To obtain an upper limit to the expected gamma ray flux from sources, the intergalactic field is assumed to be so low that it can be ignored. Interactions with photons of the near-infrared background radiation are not considered here although these will have important implications for gamma rays below 10 to the 14th power eV if the near infrared background radiation is universal. Interaction lengths of electrons and photons in the microwave background radiation at a temperature of 2.96 K were calculated and are given.

  14. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman

    2016-06-30

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD) scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  15. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Salim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  16. Spectrum sensing algorithm based on autocorrelation energy in cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shengwei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shibing

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive radio networks have wide applications in the smart home, personal communications and other wireless communication. Spectrum sensing is the main challenge in cognitive radios. This paper proposes a new spectrum sensing algorithm which is based on the autocorrelation energy of signal received. By taking the autocorrelation energy of the received signal as the statistics of spectrum sensing, the effect of the channel noise on the detection performance is reduced. Simulation results show that the algorithm is effective and performs well in low signal-to-noise ratio. Compared with the maximum generalized eigenvalue detection (MGED) algorithm, function of covariance matrix based detection (FMD) algorithm and autocorrelation-based detection (AD) algorithm, the proposed algorithm has 2 11 dB advantage.

  17. Energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation in elastic optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanxia; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-07-01

    With tremendous growth in bandwidth demand, energy consumption problem in elastic optical networks (EONs) becomes a hot topic with wide concern. The sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder in EON, which can transmit/receive multiple optical flows, was recently proposed to improve a transponder's flexibility and save energy. In this paper, energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation (EE-RMSA) in EONs with sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder is studied. To decrease the energy consumption, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model with corresponding EE-RMSA algorithm for EONs. The MILP model jointly considers the modulation format and optical grooming in the process of routing and spectrum allocation with the objective of minimizing the energy consumption. With the help of genetic operators, the EE-RMSA algorithm iteratively optimizes the feasible routing path, modulation format and spectrum resources solutions by explore the whole search space. In order to save energy, the optical-layer grooming strategy is designed to transmit the lightpath requests. Finally, simulation results verify that the proposed scheme is able to reduce the energy consumption of the network while maintaining the blocking probability (BP) performance compare with the existing First-Fit-KSP algorithm, Iterative Flipping algorithm and EAMGSP algorithm especially in large network topology. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed EE-RMSA algorithm achieves almost the same performance as MILP on an 8-node network.

  18. An Evaluation of Neutron Energy Spectrum Effects in Iron Based on Molecular Dynamics Displacement Cascade Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Stoller, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics (MD) displacement cascade simulations in bcc iron have been used to obtain effective cross sections for two measures of primary damage production: (1) the number of surviving point defects expressed as a fraction of the displacements calculated using the standard secondary displacement model of Norgett, Robinson, and Torrens (NRT), and (2) the fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters that formed during the cascade event. Primary knockon atom spectra for iron obtained from the SPECTER code have been used to weight these MD-based damage production cross sections in order to obtain spectrally-averaged values for several locations in commercial fission reactors and materials test reactors. An evaluation of these results indicates that neutron energy spectrum differences between the various enviromnents do not lead to significant differences between the average primary damage formation parameters. In particular, the defect production cross sections obtained for PWR and BWR neutron spectra were not significantly different. The variation of the defect production cross sections as a function of depth into the reactor pressure vessel wall is used as a sample application of the cross sections. A slight difference between the attenuation behavior of the PWR and BWR was noted; this difference could be explained by a subtle difference in the energy dependence of the neutron spectra. Overall, the simulations support the continued use of dpa as a damage correlation parameter

  19. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Carl Edward; DeWitt, Joel M.; Benton, Eric R.; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (∼< 10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (∼< 1 μm) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  20. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; De Witt, Joel M [OSU, PHYSICS; Benton, Eric R [OSU, PHYSICS; Yasuda, Nakahiro [NIRS, HIMAC; Benton, Eugene V [UNIV OF SAN FRANCISCO

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  1. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the Primordial Power Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlozek, Renee; Dunkley, Joanna; Addison, Graeme; Appel, John William; Bond, J. Richard; Carvalho, C. Sofia; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present constraints on the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations using data from the 2008 Southern Survey of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The angular resolution of ACT provides sensitivity to scales beyond l = 1000 for resolution of multiple peaks in the primordial temperature power spectrum, which enables us to probe the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations with wavenumbers up to k approx. = 0.2 Mp/c. We find no evidence for deviation from power-law fluctuations over two decades in scale. Matter fluctuations inferred from the primordial temperature power spectrum evolve over cosmic time and can be used to predict the matter power spectrum at late times; we illustrate the overlap of the matter power inferred from CMB measurements (which probe the power spectrum in thc linear regime) with existing probes of galaxy clustering, cluster abundances and weak lensing constraints on the primordial power. This highlights the range of scales probed by current measurement.s of the matter power spectrum.

  2. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: A MEASUREMENT OF THE PRIMORDIAL POWER SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlozek, Renee; Dunkley, Joanna; Addison, Graeme [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Appel, John William; Das, Sudeep; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Carvalho, C. Sofia [IPFN, IST, Av. RoviscoPais, 1049-001Lisboa, Portugal and RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efessiou 4, 11-527 Athens (Greece); Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Duenner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Irwin, Kent D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); and others

    2012-04-10

    We present constraints on the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations using data from the 2008 Southern Survey of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in combination with measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and a prior on the Hubble constant. The angular resolution of ACT provides sensitivity to scales beyond l = 1000 for resolution of multiple peaks in the primordial temperature power spectrum, which enables us to probe the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations with wavenumbers up to k {approx_equal} 0.2 Mpc{sup -1}. We find no evidence for deviation from power-law fluctuations over two decades in scale. Matter fluctuations inferred from the primordial temperature power spectrum evolve over cosmic time and can be used to predict the matter power spectrum at late times; we illustrate the overlap of the matter power inferred from cosmic microwave background measurements (which probe the power spectrum in the linear regime) with existing probes of galaxy clustering, cluster abundances, and weak-lensing constraints on the primordial power. This highlights the range of scales probed by current measurements of the matter power spectrum.

  3. Hard x-ray to low energy gamma ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the Crab Nebula has been determined in the energy range 10 keV to 5 MeV from the data of the UCSD/MIT Hard-X-ray and Low Energy Gamma Ray Experiment on the first High Energy Astronomy Observatory, HEAO-1. The x-ray to γ-ray portion of the continuous emission from the Crab is indicative of the electron spectrum, its transport through the nebula, and the physical conditions near the shocked interface between the nebular region and the wind which is the physical link between the nebula and the pulsar, NP0532. The power-law dependence of the spectrum found in the lower-energy decade of this observation (10 to 100 keV) is not continued without modification to higher energies. Evidence for this has been accumulating from previous observations in the γ-ray ranges of 1-10 MeV and above 35 MeV. The observations on which this dissertation is based further characterize the spectral change in the 100 keV to 1 MeV region. These observations provide a crucial connection between the x-ray and γ-ray spectrum of the non-pulsed emission of the Crab Nebula. The continuity of this spectrum suggests that the emission mechanism responsible for the non-pulsed γ-rays observed above 35 MeV is of the same origin as the emission at lower energies, i.e. that of synchrotron radiation in the magnetic field of the nebula

  4. Extended defect related energy loss in CVD diamond revealed by spectrum imaging in a dedicated STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, U.; Harvey, A.J.; Schreck, M.; Hoermann, F.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at investigations of the low EEL region in the wide band gap system diamond. The advent of the UHV Enfina electron energy loss spectrometer combined with Digital Micrograph acquisition and processing software has made reliable detection of absorption losses below 10 eV possible. Incorporated into a dedicated STEM this instrumentation allows the acquisition of spectral information via spectrum maps (spectrum imaging) of sample areas hundreds of nanometers across, with nanometers pixel sizes, adequate spectrum statistics and 0.3 eV energy resolution, in direct correlation with microstructural features in the mapping area. We aim at discerning defect related losses at band gap energies, and discuss different routes to simultaneously process and analyse the spectra in a map. This involves extracting the zero loss peak from each spectrum and constructing ratio maps from the intensities in two energy windows, one defect related and one at a higher, crystal bandstructure dominated energy. This was applied to the residual spectrum maps and their first derivatives. Secondly, guided by theoretical EEL spectra calculations, the low loss spectra were fitted by a series of gaussian distributions. Pixel maps were constructed from amplitude ratios of gaussians, situated in the defect and the unaffected energy regime. The results demonstrate the existence of sp 2 -bonded carbon in the vicinity of stacking faults and partial dislocations in CVD diamond as well as additional states below conduction band, tailing deep into the band gap, at a node in a perfect dislocation. Calculated EEL spectra of shuffle dislocations give similar absorption features at 5-8 eV, and it is thought that this common feature is due to sp 2 -type bonding

  5. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiuyan; Li Hong; Chen Zhipeng; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnostics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron temperature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method. (low temperature plasma)

  6. The information spectrum as a measure of radiographic image quality and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, H.; Matsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    The spectrum (spatial-frequency component) of the information capacity of a radiograph, here called the information spectrum, is offered as a measure of image quality and system performance. The information spectrum is a much more practical expression than information capacity by itself: it combines synthetically the contrast, the latitude, the sharpness and the granularity, and is expressed as a function of spatial frequency. The information spectrum can be readily calculated by using the dynamic density range and the MTF and noise Wiener spectrum at medium density range. A practical example is given. The appropriate system for each object can be selected by comparing the information spectral values of various imaging systems at the significant spatial frequency range predetermined for each object. (author)

  7. Use of orthonormal polynomials to fit energy spectrum data for water transported through membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, N.; Todorova, L.

    2001-01-01

    A new application of our approach with orthonormal polynomials to curve fitting is given when both variables have errors. We approximate and describe data of a new effect due to change of water energy spectrum as a result of water transport in a porous membrane

  8. On the infimum of the energy-momentum spectrum of a homogeneous Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Derezinski, J.; Zin, P.

    2009-01-01

    We consider second-quantized homogeneous Bose gas in a large cubic box with periodic boundary conditions at zero temperature. We discuss the energy-momentum spectrum of the Bose gas and its physical significance. We review various rigorous and heuristic results as well as open conjectures about its...

  9. Neutron energy measurement for practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, M. V.; Sadeghi, H.; Ghasabian, M.; Mazandarani, A.

    2018-03-01

    Industrial demand for neutrons constrains careful energy measurements. Elastic scattering of monoenergetic α -particles from neutron collision enables neutron energy measurement by calculating the amount of deviation from the position where collision takes place. The neutron numbers with specific energy is obtained by counting the number of α -particles in the corresponding location on the charged particle detector. Monte Carlo simulation and COMSOL Multiphysics5.2 are used to account for one-to-one collision of neutrons with α -particles.

  10. The high-energy pulsed X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 as observed with OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, G. S.; Dennis, B. R.; Coe, M. J.; Crannell, C. J.; Dolan, J. F.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Cutler, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed from August 30 to September 10, 1977, by using the high-energy X-ray scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO 8 satellite. The observation, during which the source was monitored continually for nearly an entire ON-state, covered the energy range from 16 to 280 keV. Pulsed-flux measurements as a function of binary orbit and binary phase are presented for energies between 16 and 98 keV. The pulsed flux between 16 and 33 keV exhibited a sharp decrease following the fourth binary orbit and was consistent with zero pulsed flux thereafter. Only weak evidence was found for temporal variation in the pulsed flux between 33 and 98 keV. The pulsed spectrum has been fitted with a power law, a thermal spectrum without features, and a thermal spectrum with a superposed Gaussian centered at 55 keV. The latter fit has the smallest value of chi-square per degree of freedom, and the resulting integrated line intensity is approximately 0.0015 photon/sec per sq cm for a width of 3.1 (+9.1, -2.6) keV. This result, while of low statistical significance, agrees with the value observed by Truemper (1978) during the same ON-state.

  11. Detecting Energy Spectrum Of The Products Of Reaction 6Li(n,alpha)3H By The Home-Made Gaseous Detectors In Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong Huu Phuoc; Phung Van Duan; Le Van Mien; Nguyen Tat Thang; Tran Hoai Nam

    2008-01-01

    There are shown some of results of study in designing and making first gaseous detectors of big sizes in Vietnam. The detectors were used for test measurement of detecting energy spectrum of the products of reaction 6 Li(n,alpha) 3 H caused by thermal neutrons. On the spectrum there were observed two energy peaks of tritons and alpha particles separately. In the test measurement there were used two neutron isotopic sources with total output 2x1.1x10 7 n/s. The study was implemented at Hanoi University of Technology. (author)

  12. Laboratory Measurements of Single-Particle Polarimetric Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttila, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring scattering properties of different targets is important for material characterization, remote sensing applications, and for verifying theoretical results. Furthermore, there are usually simplifications made when we model targets and compute the scattering properties, e.g., ideal shape or constant optical parameters throughout the target material. Experimental studies help in understanding the link between the observed properties and computed results. Experimentally derived Mueller matrices of studied particles can be used as input for larger-scale scattering simulations, e.g., radiative transfer computations. This method allows to bypass the problem of using an idealized model for single-particle optical properties. While existing approaches offer ensemble- and orientation-averaged particle properties, our aim is to measure individual particles with controlled or known orientation. With the newly developed scatterometer, we aim to offer novel possibility to measure single, small (down to μm-scale) targets and their polarimetric spectra. This work presents an experimental setup that measures light scattered by a fixed small particle with dimensions ranging between micrometer and millimeter sizes. The goal of our setup is nondestructive characterization of such particles by measuring light of multiple wavelengths scattered in 360° in a horizontal plane by an ultrasonically levitating sample, whilst simultaneously controlling its 3D position and orientation. We describe the principles and design of our instrument and its calibration. We also present example measurements of real samples. This study was conducted under the support from the European Research Council, in the frame of the Advanced Grant project No. 320773 `Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media' (SAEMPL).

  13. Direct measurements of the spectrum of the near-millimeter cosmic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The spectrum of the cosmic background radiation peaks at 6 cm -1 and falls rapidly at higher frequencies. The experimental determination of this simple but important fact has had a long and troubled history. It remained in doubt long after the nature of the Rayleigh-Jeans region of the spectrum was firmly established. In this review the author describes the experimental difficulties which have plagued cosmic background measurements at and beyond the peak in the spectrum. A critical evaluation of the present status of the field is then given. (Auth.)

  14. A Measurement of the Angular Power Spectrum of the CMB from l = 100 to 400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. D.; Caldwell, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dorwart, W. B.; Herbig, T.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J.; Torbet, E.; Tran, H. T.

    2000-05-01

    We report on a measurement of the angular spectrum of the CMB between l 100 and l 400 made at 144 GHz from Cerro Toco in the Chilean altiplano. When the new data are combined with previous data at 30 and 40 GHz, taken with the same instrument observing the same section of sky, we find: 1) a rise in the angular spectrum to a maximum with δ Tl 85 μ K at l 200 and a fall at l>300, thereby localizing the peak near l 200; and 2) that the anisotropy at l 200 has the spectrum of the CMB. Cosmological implications are discussed.

  15. In vivo measurement of phosphorus energy metabolites by topical magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Hiroshi [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki Aichi (Japan); Koizuka, Izumi; Takada, Muneharu; Naruse, Shoji

    1982-12-01

    An apparatus of TMR (topical magnetic resonance) was briefly described, and the technique to use it was shown. The effect of digital filter was demonstrated and measurement of a pulse width was shown using a phantom. Pulse width and /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum measured in a rat head were shown. The /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum well revealed the phosphorus energy metabolites such as creatine phosphoric acid, ATP, and ADP.

  16. Experimental measurement of energy harvesting with backpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelkova, Radka; Vala, David; Suranek, Pavel; Mahdal, Miroslav

    2017-08-01

    This article deals with the energy harvesting systems, especially the energy harvesting backpack, which appears as a convenient means for energy harvesting for mobile sensors power. Before starting the experiment, it was necessary to verify whether this energy will be sufficient to get acquainted with the human kinematics and analyze problematics itself. For this purpose there was used motion capture technology from Xsens. Measured data on the position of a particle moving man and back when walking, these data were then used for experimental realization of energy harvesting backpack and as input data to the simulation in Simulink, which brought us a comparison between theoretical assumptions and practical implementation. When measuring characteristics of energy harvesting system we have a problem with measurements on backpack solved when redoing of the hydraulic cylinder as a source of a suitable movement corresponding to the amplitude and frequency of human walk.

  17. Measured and Predicted Variations in Fast Neutron Spectrum when Penetrating Laminated Fe-D2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, E.; Sandlin, R.; Fraeki, R.

    1965-09-01

    Variations of the fast neutron spectrum in thin regions of alternating Fe and D O have been studied using threshold detectors (ln(n, n' ), S(n, p), Al(n, α)). The results have been compared to those calculated by two shielding codes (NRN and RASH D) of multigroup removal-diffusion type. The absolute fast spectrum calculated in our rather complicated configurations was found to agree with measurements within the same accuracy (a factor of two) as did the thermal flux. The calculated spectrum is slightly harder than the measured one, but the detailed variations (covering the range 1:5) in the form of the spectrum when penetrating Fe agree with observations to within 15-20 %. In and Al activities were found to be proportional to the integrated flux over 1 MeV throughout the whole configuration, while S showed the least proportionality

  18. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H 2 gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10 4 in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter η = (P beam /F rev )·(dF rev /dP beam ). These two measurement techniques are described in this report

  19. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center_dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  20. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies

  1. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ˜420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s24p45d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ˜135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm-1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV).

  3. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ∼420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s 2 4p 5 , 4s4p 6 , 4s 2 4p 4 4d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s 2 4p 4 5d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ∼135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree–Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm −1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV). (paper)

  4. Light and energy - daylight measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoffersen, Jens; Logadottir, A.; Traberg-Borup, S.; Barrie-Nielsen, K.

    2009-07-01

    All measurements where conducted in the spring of 2007, except the Interpane panel. The solar cell panels have been evaluated by three performance indicators to assess the daylight quantity within the room and the systems ability to maintain view to the outside. In the study, we used two performance indicators to assess the daylight quantity within the room: 1. the daylight factor (overcast sky) 2. the relative work plane illuminance (clear sky condition) Overcast sky: In general, all panels provided less daylight than the recommended requirement in the Danish Building Regulation of 2% on the work plane. This will most likely result in additional need for electric lighting. However, larger window areas and more parts of the facade with clear unobstructed glass may be one solution. Clear sky: In general, all panels provided less interior light levels than the two reference systems in the back of the room. Almost all systems aloud more or less direct sunlight in the window perimeter through the clear openings and additional needs for some kind of shading device is to be expected. Some systems blocked a large portion of the light in the majority of the room, and additional electric light in this part of the room may be needed. Only one performance indicator where used to describe the quality of the panels. View: In general, all panels, except two, obstruct the view significantly and cause figure/background confusion for a view position close to the window and the discrepancies of colour judgements. Only two systems provided a fairly clear view to the outside without to much distortion of the view. (au)

  5. Measurements of Man-Made Spectrum Noise Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Do, Juyong; Simoneau, Joel B.; Pearson, L. Wilson; Seetharam, Venkatesh; Oria, A. J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This report consolidates research carried out at Clemson University and Stanford University where a series of measurements were undertaken to identify the man-made radiation present in four bands used by rather different services, namely, L1 Band (1563.42 1587.42 MHz), the Unified S-Band (2025 2110 MHz), the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) Band (2400 2482.50 MHz), and the 23.6-24.0 GHz Passive Sensing Band. Results show that there were distinctive differences in the measurement data in the frequency bands, which should be expected based on the function/regulation associated with each. The GPS L1 Band had little to none terrestrial man-made sources, but the ISM 2.4 GHz Band had a large number of man-made sources regardless of the site and the time. The Unified S Band showed mixed results depending on the sites. The Passive Sensing Band does not contain appreciable man-made radiation.

  6. The puzzle of the ankle in the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum, and composition indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Glennys

    2015-08-01

    The sharp change in slope of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum around 10^18.6 eV (the ankle), combined with evidence of a light but extragalactic component near and below the ankle and intermediate composition above, has proved exceedingly challenging to understand theoretically. In this talk I discuss two possible solutions to the puzzle and how they can be (in)validated.First, I present a new mechanism whereby photo-disintegration of ultra-high energy nuclei in the region surrounding a UHECR accelerator naturally accounts for the observed spectrum and inferred composition (using LHC-tuned models extrapolated to UHE) at Earth. We discuss the conditions required to reproduce the spectrum above 10^17.5 eV and the composition, which -- in our model -- consists below the ankle of extragalactic protons and the high energy tail of Galactic Cosmic Rays, and above the ankle of surviving nuclei from the extended source. Predictions for the spectrum and flavors of neutrinos resulting from this process will be presented, and also implications for candidate sources.The other possible explanation is that in actuality UHECRs are entirely or almost entirely protons, and the cross-section for p-Air scattering increases more rapidly above center-of-mass energy of 70 TeV (10 times the current LHC cm energy) than predicted in conventional models. This gives an equally good fit to the depth-of-shower maximum behavior obverved by Auger, while being an intriguing sign of new state in QCD at extremely high energy density.

  7. Continuous energy Neutron Transport Monte Carlo Simulator Project: Decomposition of the neutron energy spectrum by target nuclei tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos, Luiz Felipe F.C.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Vilhena, Marco T.M.B., E-mail: luizfelipe.fcb@gmail.com, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos Nucleares; Leite, Sergio Q. Bogado, E-mail: sbogado@ibest.com.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this work a Monte Carlo simulator with continuous energy is used. This simulator distinguishes itself by using the sum of three probability distributions to represent the neutron spectrum. Two distributions have known shape, but have varying population of neutrons in time, and these are the fission neutron spectrum (for high energy neutrons) and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (for thermal neutrons). The third distribution has an a priori unknown and possibly variable shape with time and is determined from parametrizations of Monte Carlo simulation. It is common practice in neutron transport calculations, e.g. multi-group transport, to consider that the neutrons only lose energy with each scattering reaction and then to use a thermal group with a Maxwellian distribution. Such an approximation is valid due to the fact that for fast neutrons up-scattering occurrence is irrelevant, being only appreciable at low energies, i.e. in the thermal energy region, in which it can be regarded as a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for thermal equilibrium. In this work the possible neutron-matter interactions are simulated with exception of the up-scattering of neutrons. In order to preserve the thermal spectrum, neutrons are selected stochastically as being part of the thermal population and have an energy attributed to them taken from a Maxwellian distribution. It is then shown how this procedure can emulate the up-scattering effect by the increase in the neutron population kinetic energy. Since the simulator uses tags to identify the reactions it is possible not only to plot the distributions by neutron energy, but also by the type of interaction with matter and with the identification of the target nuclei involved in the process. This work contains some preliminary results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulator for neutron transport that is being developed at Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. (author)

  8. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1981-01-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time). (author)

  9. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-07-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time).

  10. Measurement of charge and energy spectra of heavy nuclei aboard Cosmos-936 artificial Earth satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashin, S.A.; Marennyy, A.M.; Gertsen, G.P.

    1982-07-01

    Charge and energy spectra of heavy charged particles were measured. Measurements were performed by a package of dielectric track detectors mounted behind the shield of 60-80 kg m to the minus second power thick. The charge of nuclei was determined from the complete track length. A group of 1915 tracks of nuclei with Z 6 in the energy range 100-450 MeV/nuclon were identified. The differential charge spectrum of nuclei with 6 Z 28 and the energy spectrum of nuclei of the iron group were built

  11. Single event upset and charge collection measurements using high energy protons and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Ness, J.D.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.; Gavron, A.

    1994-01-01

    RAMs, microcontrollers and surface barrier detectors were exposed to beams of high energy protons and neutrons to measure the induced number of upsets as well as energy deposition. The WNR facility at Los Alamos provided a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atmospheric neutrons. Its effect on devices was compared to that of protons with energies of 200, 400, 500, and 800 MeV. Measurements indicate that SEU cross sections for 400 MeV protons are similar to those induced by the atmospheric neutron spectrum

  12. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  13. TPC spectrometer for measuring the e+ spectrum in μ decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) being used at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) for a high-statistics normal muon-decay experiment is described. It is shown how the experiment will improve upon the limits of the weak-interaction coupling constants by a factor of 5 through the measurement of the positron momentum and direction of emission with respect to the muon-polarization vector for 10 8 decays of stopped, polarized, positive muons. The TPC apparatus is described, and it is shown that even though more work is to be done to improve the detector acceptance and individual coordinate resolutions, for certain track topologies, the TPC already has a momentum resolution of 0.7% (sigma)

  14. Corrections on energy spectrum and scattering for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuquan; Thomas, Boucherl; Li Hang; Zou Yubin; Lu Yuanrong; Guo Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM-Ⅱ in Technische Universitaet Mounchen (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections. (authors)

  15. Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

  16. Evolution of the Deep-space Galactic Cosmic Ray Lineal Energy Transfer Spectrum through Tissue Equivalent Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Townsend, L.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation is an energetic particle telescope that resides on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, currently in a 50 km circular lunar polar orbit. The telescope consists of 6 silicon semi-conductor detectors placed in pairs that surround two pieces of Tissue Equivalent Plastic (TEP), which serve to absorb energy from particles as they transit through the instrument. Particles with energies greater than 12 MeV/nucleon can penetrate the outermost shield and be measured by the instrument. The primary measurement made by the instrument is of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of energetic particles as they transit through the telescope. CRaTER measures the LET spectrum with unprecedented energy resolution and has done so during a period of historically low solar activity that led to record high intensities of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). These LET spectra are used to study changes in the properties of the incoming particles, and to make detailed measurements of the radiation doses human explorers will experience in deep space on missions to the moon, to asteroids, or to Mars. We present LET spectra accumulated during 2009 and 2010. We show how the LET spectrum evolves through the instrument as the GCR interact with the TEP. Due to the importance of these measurements for human effects, our extensive absolute calibration procedures are presented. Of particular note is a significant reduction in the flux of particles with LET greater than 10 keV/um for detectors that lie deeper within the telescope stack, due to the attenuation of high LET particles within the TEP. By measuring this attenuation we can estimate the depth in human tissue where the highest LET particles that are most likely to cause genetic damage pose the greatest threat to humans in space.

  17. Response function measurement of plastic scintillator for high energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Ban, Syuichi; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Takada, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    The response function and detection efficiency of 2''φ x 2''L plastic (PilotU) and NE213 liquid (2''NE213) scintillators, which were used for the measurement of secondary neutrons from high energy electron induced reactions, were measured at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). High energy neutrons were produced via 400 MeV/n C beam bombardment on a thick graphite target. The detectors were placed at 15 deg with respect to C beam axis, 5 m away from the target. As standard, a 5''φ x 5''L NE213 liquid scintillator (5''NE213) was also placed at same position. Neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method with the beam pickup scintillator in front of the target. In front of the detectors, veto scintillators were placed to remove charged particle events. All detector signals were corrected with list mode event by event. We deduce neutron spectrum for each detectors. The efficiency curves for pilotU and 2''NE213 were determined on the bases of 5 N E213 neutron spectrum and its efficiency calculated by CECIL code. (author)

  18. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedrati, R.; Attallah, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data

  19. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedrati, R., E-mail: rafik.sedrati@univ-annaba.org; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  20. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  1. Measuring and evaluating the soft energy efficiency measures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvilehto, H.-M.; Solid, D. [AaF-Industry Ltd, Solna (Sweden); Rouhiainen, V. [Adato Energia Ltd, Helsinki (Finland); Honkasalo, N.; Sarvaranta, A. [AaF-Consult Ltd, Solna (Sweden)

    2012-07-15

    This study discusses how to quantify the energy savings related to the companies' aims to enhance their customers' energy efficiency which is one target in the Action Plan for Energy Services in the Energy Efficiency Agreement for the Industries. In Finland, a majority of the energy utilities have signed this action plan and are providing their customers services to improve their energy efficiency. Dissemination of information is the most widely used service to the customers and it is provided in a number of ways including printed material, annual energy report, and an internet tool to access and report hourly measurements. Some of the internet tools cover electricity, district heat and water. The focus of the study is in the evaluation of 'soft' measures; in other words, those measures given by energy utilities that principally rely on communication instruments. However, monitoring the impact of information and communication is far from easy. Carrying out a properly designed evaluation of programmes aiming on enhanced energy efficiency is difficult. Evaluation of the impact of a magazine article on energy efficiency is even more challenging, costly and therefore also rare. Distribution of information as measure to enhance energy efficiency is an important part of EU.s energy policy but what are the ways and even more so, are there ways to actually quantify these savings? There has been excessive work by the member states and research institutes to find a common and robust methodology within the EU to evaluate and quantify energy savings from technical measures. The ex-ante and ex-post results from these evaluations can however differ considerably, e.g. the expected energy savings from installing air to air heat pumps in Denmark did not deliver the expected energy savings. The problems with finding a common robust methodology become even more visible when the 'soft' measures are put under the evaluation loop. The &apos

  2. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vins, M. [Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vinsmiro@seznam.cz

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  3. Extension of the calibration of an NE-213 liquid scintillator based pulse height response spectrometer up to 18 MeV neutron energy and leakage spectrum measurements on bismuth at 8 MeV and 18 MeV neutron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenyvesi, A.; Valastyan, I.; Olah, L.; Csikai, J.; Plompen, A.; Jaime, R.; Loevestam, G.; Semkova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Monoenergetic neutrons were produced at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, Geel, Belgium). An air-jet cooled D_2-gas target (1.2 bar, ΔE_d = 448 keV) was bombarded with E_d =4976 keV deuterons to produce neutrons up to E_n = 8 MeV energy via the D(d,n)"3He reaction. Higher energy neutrons up to E_n = 18 MeV were produced via the T(d,n)"4He reaction by bombarding a TiT target with E_d =1968 keV deuterons. Pulse height spectra were measured at different neutron energies from E_n = 8 MeV up to E_n = 18 MeV with the NE-213 liquid scintillator based Pulse Height Response Spectrometer (PHRS) of UD-IEP. The energy calibration of the PHRS system has been extended up to E_n = 18 MeV. Pulse height spectra induced by gamma photons have been simulated by the GRESP7 code. Neutron induced pulse height spectra have been simulated by the NRESP7 and MCNP-POLIMI codes. Comparison of the results of measurements and simulations enables the improvement of the parameter set of the function used by us to describe the light output dependence of the resolution of the PHRS system at light outputs of L > 2 light units. Also, it has been shown that the derivation method for unfolding neutron spectra from measured pulse height spectra performs well when relative measurements are done up to E_n = 18 MeV neutron energy. For matrix unfolding purposes, the NRESP7 code has to be preferred to calculate the pulse height response matrix of the PHRS system. Leakage spectra of neutrons behind bismuth slabs of different thicknesses have been measured with the PHRS system by using monoenergetic neutrons. The maximum slab thickness was d = 14 cm. Simulations of the measurements have been carried out with the MCNP-4c code. The necessary nuclear cross-sections were taken from the from the ENDF/B-VII and JEFF.3.1 data libraries. For both libraries, the agreement of measured and simulated neutron spectra is good for the 5 MeV ≤ En ≤ 18 Me

  4. Measurement of cross sections of threshold detectors with spectrum average technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus, Y.; Celenk, I.; Oezmen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections of the reactions 103 Rh(n, n') 103m Rh, 115 In(n, n') 115m In, 232 Th(n, f), 47 Ti(n, p) 47 Sc, 64 Zn(n, p) 64 Cu, 58 Ni(n, p) 58 Co, 54 Fe(n, p) 54 Mn, 46 Ti(n, p) 46 Sc, 27 Al(n, p) 27 Mg, 56 Fe(n, p) 56 Mn, 24 Mg(n, p) 24 Na, 59 Co(n, α) 56 Mn, 27 Al(n, α) 24 Na and 48 Ti(n, p) 48 Sc were measured with average neutron energies above effective threshold by using the activation method through usage of spectrum average technique in an irradiation system where there are three equivalent Am/Be sources, each of which has 592 GBq activity. The cross sections were determined with reference to the fast neutron fission cross section of 238 U. The measured values and published values are generally in agreement. (orig.)

  5. Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecavalier, Luc; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Halladay, Alycia K.; Jones, Nancy E.; Aman, Michael G.; Cook, Edwin H.; Handen, Benjamin L.; King, Bryan H.; Pearson, Deborah A.; Hallett, Victoria; Sullivan, Katherine Anne; Grondhuis, Sabrina; Bishop, Somer L.; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Dawson, Geraldine; Scahill, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in…

  6. On the importance of considering the incident spectrum when measuring the outdoor performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalg, R.; Betts, T.R.; Infield, D.G. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology; Kearney, M.J. [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, Advanced Technology Institute

    2004-02-01

    Conventional measurement practice for the outdoor performance evaluation of solar cells does not make use of the complete spectrum, relying instead on the total irradiance as measured, say, with a pyranometer. In this paper it is shown that this can result in significant errors for solar cells having wide band gaps, in particular, for amorphous silicon solar cells. Two effects are investigated. The first relates to quantifying the typical errors associated with instantaneous measurements; what one might term the calibration of devices. The second relates to quantifying the impact of neglecting variations in the spectrum on the estimation of the annual energy production. It is observed that the fraction of the spectrum falling in the spectrally useful range for amorphous silicon can vary by as much as +10% to -15% with respect to standard test conditions at the test site used in this study, which translates directly into performance variations of similar magnitude. The relationship between changes due to spectral variations as opposed to variations in device temperature is also investigated. The results show that there is a strong case for investigating spectral effects more thoroughly, and explicitly including the measurement of the spectral distribution in all outdoor performance testing. (author)

  7. Neutron energy measurement for practical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M V Roshan

    2018-02-07

    . Elastic scattering of monoenergetic α-particles from neutron collision enables neutron energy measurement by calculating the amount of deviation from the position where collision takes place. The neutron numbers with ...

  8. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers, 3 He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs

  9. Priorities for energy efficiency measures in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides research gaps and priorities for energy efficiency measures in agriculture across Europe, based on the analysis of the Coordination and Support Action AGREE (Agriculture & Energy Efficiency) funded by the 7th research framework of the EU (www.agree.aua.gr). The analysis from

  10. Neutron energy response measurement of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongqiong; Peng Taiping; Yang Jianlun; Tang Zhengyuan; Yang Gaozhao; Li Linbo; Hu Mengchun; Wang Zhentong; Zhang Jianhua; Li Zhongbao; Wang Lizong

    2004-01-01

    Neutron sensitivities of detectors composed of plastic scintillator ST401, ST1422, ST1423 and phyotomultiplier tube in primary energy range of fission neutron are calibrated by direct current. The energy response curve of the detectors is obtained in this experiment. The experimental result has been compared with the theoretical calculation and they are in agreement within measuring uncertainty. (authors)

  11. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-01-01

    Background and objective: It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The

  12. Research on multi-spectrum detector in high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qinghua; Wang Xuewu; Li Jianmin; Kang Kejun; Li Yuanjing; Zhong Huaqiang

    2008-01-01

    The high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system can discriminate the material of the objects inspected, but when the objects are too thin, the discrimination becomes very difficult. This paper proposes the use of multi-spectrum detector to improve the ability to discriminate thin material, and a series of simulation were done with the Monte Carlo method. Firstly the X-ray depositions in the detectors with different thickness were calculated, and then the discrimination effects with different detector structure and parameters were calculated. The simulation results validated that using appropriate multi-spectrum detector can improve the discrimination accuracy of thin material, particularly thin high-Z material. (authors)

  13. Dynamic properties of energy affordability measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindl, Peter; Schuessler, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Measures of affordability and of fuel poverty are applied in practice to assess the affordability of energy services, for example, or of water or housing. The extensive body of literature on affordability measures has little overlap with the existing literature on poverty measurement. A comprehensive assessment of the response of affordability measures as a result of changes in the distribution of income or expenditure (the dynamic properties) is missing. This paper aims to fill this gap by providing a conceptual discussion on the ‘dynamics’ of both energy affordability measures and fuel poverty measures. Several types of measures are examined in a microsimulation framework. Our results indicate that some measures exhibit odd dynamic behavior. This includes measures used in practice, such as the low income/high cost measure and the double median of expenditure share indicator. Odd dynamic behavior causes the risk of drawing false policy recommendations from the measures. Thus, an appropriate response of affordability measures to changes in relevant variables is a prerequisite for defining meaningful measures that inform about affordability or deprivation in certain domains of consumption. - Highlights: • We investigate changes in fuel poverty measures as result from changes in income and expenditure. • More generally, we investigate dynamic behavior of affordability measures using microsimulation. • We propose axioms regarding dynamic behavior of affordability measures. • Some measures which are used in practice show unintuitive dynamic behavior. • Inappropriate dynamic behavior causes a risk of false policy implications.

  14. 10 CFR Appendix Y to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Battery Chargers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements,” append this sentence to the end: “The test equipment must be capable of accounting for crest factor and frequency spectrum in its measurement of the UUT input current.” 4. Test Measurement: (a) Inactive Mode Energy Consumption Measurement. The measurement of the battery charger energy ratio shall...

  15. The high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS determined from ground-based solar irradiance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gröbner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been determined from ground-based measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance (SSI over the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm using the Langley-plot technique. The measurements were obtained at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre from the Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, Tenerife, Spain, during the period 12 to 24 September 2016. This solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS was combined from medium-resolution (bandpass of 0.86 nm measurements of the QASUME (Quality Assurance of Spectral Ultraviolet Measurements in Europe spectroradiometer in the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm and high-resolution measurements (0.025 nm from a Fourier transform spectroradiometer (FTS over the wavelength range from 305 to 380 nm. The Kitt Peak solar flux atlas was used to extend this high-resolution solar spectrum to 500 nm. The expanded uncertainties of this solar spectrum are 2 % between 310 and 500 nm and 4 % at 300 nm. The comparison of this solar spectrum with solar spectra measured in space (top of the atmosphere gave very good agreements in some cases, while in some other cases discrepancies of up to 5 % were observed. The QASUMEFTS solar spectrum represents a benchmark dataset with uncertainties lower than anything previously published. The metrological traceability of the measurements to the International System of Units (SI is assured by an unbroken chain of calibrations leading to the primary spectral irradiance standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany.

  16. Automatic segmentation of low-visibility moving objects through energy analyis of the local 3D spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestares, Oscar; Miravet, Carlos; Santamaria, Javier; Fonolla Navarro, Rafael

    1999-05-01

    Automatic object segmentation in highly noisy image sequences, composed by a translating object over a background having a different motion, is achieved through joint motion-texture analysis. Local motion and/or texture is characterized by the energy of the local spatio-temporal spectrum, as different textures undergoing different translational motions display distinctive features in their 3D (x,y,t) spectra. Measurements of local spectrum energy are obtained using a bank of directional 3rd order Gaussian derivative filters in a multiresolution pyramid in space- time (10 directions, 3 resolution levels). These 30 energy measurements form a feature vector describing texture-motion for every pixel in the sequence. To improve discrimination capability and reduce computational cost, we automatically select those 4 features (channels) that best discriminate object from background, under the assumptions that the object is smaller than the background and has a different velocity or texture. In this way we reject features irrelevant or dominated by noise, that could yield wrong segmentation results. This method has been successfully applied to sequences with extremely low visibility and for objects that are even invisible for the eye in absence of motion.

  17. The double beta decay spectrum of 100Mo as measured with a TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Moe, M.K.; Nelson, M.A.; Vient, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A time projection chamber with 8.3 grams of enriched 100 MoO 3 as the central electrode has been operating approximately five months in an underground laboratory. A preliminary analysis of the two-electron sum energy spectrum, the spectrum of those same electrons taken singly, and the opening angle distribution yields a half life of 1.16 -0.08 +0.34 x10 19 y at the 68% confidence level for two-neutrino double beta decay of 100 Mo. (author)

  18. Sequential measurements of cosmic-ray neutron spectrum and dose rate at sea level in Sendai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nunomiya, Tomoya; Abe, Shigeru; Terunuma, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron energy spectrum and dose rate were measured sequentially for two years from April 2001 up to March 2003 by using three neutron detectors, a 3 He-loaded multi-moderator detector (Bonner ball), 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm long NE213 organic liquid scintillator, and high-sensitivity rem (dose equivalent) counter at the Kawauchi campus of Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan of geomagnetic latitude, 29degN, and cutoff rigidity, 10.43 GV. The neutron spectrum has three major peaks, thermal energy peak, evaporation peak around 1 MeV and cascade peak around 100 MeV. The ambient neutron dose equivalent rates measured by the rem counter, and the Bonner ball keep almost constant values of 4.0 and 6.5 (nSv/h), respectively, throughout this time period, after atmospheric pressure correction, and it often decreased about 30% after a large Solar Flare, that is called as the Forbush decrease. The total neutron flux was also obtained by the Bonner ball measurements to be 7.5x10 -3 (ncm -2 ·s -1 ) in average. The altitude variation of neutron flux and dose was also investigated by comparing the measured results with other results measured at Mt. Fuji area and aboard an airplane, where the cutoff rigidities are similar. (author)

  19. High-Resolution Energy and Intensity Measurements with CVD Diamond at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Wenander, F; Bergoz, J; Bayle, H; Frais-Kölbl, H; Leinweber, J; Aumeyr, T; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    A novel beam instrumentation device for the HIE-REX (High In-tensity and Energy REX) upgrade has been developed and tested at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE, located at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This device is based on CVD diamond detector technology and is used for measuring the beam intensity, particle counting and measuring the energy spectrum of the beam. An energy resolution of 0.6% was measured at a carbon ion energy of 22.8 MeV. This corresponds to an energy spread of ± 140 keV.

  20. Energy spectrum of two-dimensional tight-binding electrons in a spatially varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, G.Y.; Lee, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy spectrum of a two-dimensional lattice in a spatially varying magnetic field is studied within the framework of the tight-binding model by using the scheme of the transfer matrix. It is found that, in comparison with the case of a uniform magnetic field, the energy spectrum exhibits more complicated behavior; band broadening (or gap closing) and band splitting (or gap opening) occur depending on characteristic parameters of the lattice. The origin of these phenomena lies in the existence of direct touching and indirect overlapping between neighboring subbands. Dependence of direct touching and indirect overlapping, and thus the electronic band structure together with the density of states, on characteristic parameters of the lattice is elucidated in detail. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Microstructural evolution of pure tungsten neutron irradiated with a mixed energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki, E-mail: koyanagit@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kumar, N.A.P. Kiran [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hwang, Taehyun [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Garrison, Lauren M.; Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Microstructures of single-crystal bulk tungsten (W) and polycrystalline W foil with a strong grain texture were investigated using transmission electron microscopy following neutron irradiation at ∼90–800 °C to 0.03–4.6 displacements per atom (dpa) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a mixed energy spectrum. The dominant irradiation defects were dislocation loops and small clusters at ∼90 °C. Additional voids were formed in W irradiated at above 460 °C. Voids and precipitates involving transmutation rhenium and osmium were the dominant defects at more than ∼1 dpa. We found a new phenomenon of microstructural evolution in irradiated polycrystalline W: Re- and Os-rich precipitation along grain boundaries. Comparison of results between this study and previous studies using different irradiation facilities revealed that the microstructural evolution of pure W is highly dependent on the neutron energy spectrum in addition to the irradiation temperature and dose.

  2. The energy spectrum of electromagnetic normal modes in dissipative media: modes between two metal half spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sernelius, Bo E

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum of electromagnetic normal modes plays a central role in the theory of the van der Waals and Casimir interaction. Here we study the modes in connection with the van der Waals interaction between two metal half spaces. Neglecting dissipation leads to distinct normal modes with real-valued frequencies. Including dissipation seems to have the effect that these distinct modes move away from the real axis into the complex frequency plane. The summation of the zero-point energies of these modes render a complex-valued result. Using the contour integration, resulting from the use of the generalized argument principle, gives a real-valued and different result. We resolve this contradiction and show that the spectrum of true normal modes forms a continuum with real frequencies

  3. Neutron fluence rate and energy spectrum in SPRR-300 reactor thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Haifeng; Dai Junlong

    2006-01-01

    In order to modify the simple one-dimension model, the neutron fluence rate distribution calculated with ANISN code ws checked with that calculated with MCNP code. To modify the error caused by ignoring the neutron landscape orientation leaking, the reflector that can't be modeled in a simple one-dimension model was dealt by extending landscape orientation scale. On this condition the neutron fluence rate distribution and the energy spectrum in the thermal column of SPRR-300 reactor were calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN, and the results of Cd ratio are well accorded with the experimental results. The deviation between them is less than 5% and it isn't above 10% in one or two special positions. It indicates that neutron fluence rate distribution and energy spectrum in the thermal column can be well calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN. (authors)

  4. Understanding the spectrum of domestic energy consumption: Empirical evidence from France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaïd, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on residential energy consumption in France. Using a bottom-up statistical approach, this analysis explores determinants of household energy consumption using data from the most recent National Housing Survey. The primary objective is to tease out the impacts of various factors on the domestic energy consumption spectrum across different population groups. The aim of this approach is to neutralize conventional factors affecting energy consumption (age of house, total area, etc.) to finely analyze the impact of other determinants including those relating to household characteristics and other control variables. First, we define homogeneous consumption groups of households by using multivariate statistical techniques, namely the Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Ascending Hierarchical Classification. Second, we use standard OLS regression to explore the effects of various factors on domestic energy consumption among homogeneous groups of households. This multivariate analysis exercise has led us to identify four main consumption typologies. Results revealed that energy prices were the most important factors determining domestic energy consumption. In addition, this study showed that occupant characteristics significantly affect domestic energy use. Results of this research call for combine all efforts, multiple strategies and smart policies, to incorporate household and consumption behaviors in managing domestic energy consumption. - Highlights: •Survey data of 36,000 occupiers from France is analyzed. •Bottom-up statistical approach is used to analyze domestic energy consumption. •Occupant characteristics significantly affect domestic energy use. •The impact of households attributes varies markedly across consumption groups.

  5. Magnetic diffusion effects on the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban, E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: roulet@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500 (8400) (Argentina)

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the effects of diffusion of high energy cosmic rays in turbulent extra-galactic magnetic fields. We find an approximate expression for the low energy suppression of the spectrum of the different mass components (with charge Z) in the case in which this suppression happens at energies below ∼ Z EeV, so that energy losses are dominated by the adiabatic ones. The low energy suppression appears when cosmic rays from the closest sources take a time comparable to the age of the Universe to reach the Earth. This occurs for energies E < Z EeV (B/nG)√(l{sub c}/Mpc)(d{sub s}/70Mpc) in terms of the magnetic field RMS strength B, its coherence length l{sub c} and the typical separation between sources d{sub s}. We apply this to scenarios in which the sources produce a mixed composition and have a relatively low maximum rigidity (E{sub max} ∼ (2–10)Z EeV), finding that diffusion has a significant effect on the resulting spectrum, the average mass and on its spread, in particular reducing this last one. For reasonable values of B and l{sub c} these effects can help to reproduce the composition trends observed by the Auger Collaboration for source spectra compatible with Fermi acceleration.

  6. Energy Efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Using Distributed Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukkumar R.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio (CR is a promising and potential technique to enable secondary users (SUs or unlicenced users to exploit the unused spectrum resources effectively possessed by primary users (PUs or licenced users. The proven clustering approach is used to organize nodes in the network into the logical groups to attain energy efficiency, network scalability, and stability for improving the sensing accuracy in CR through cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS. In this paper, a distributed dynamic load balanced clustering (DDLBC algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, each member in the cluster is to calculate the cooperative gain, residual energy, distance, and sensing cost from the neighboring clusters to perform the optimal decision. Each member in a cluster participates in selecting a cluster head (CH through cooperative gain, and residual energy that minimises network energy consumption and enhances the channel sensing. First, we form the number of clusters using the Markov decision process (MDP model to reduce the energy consumption in a network. In this algorithm, CR users effectively utilize the PUs reporting time slots of unavailability. The simulation results reveal that the clusters convergence, energy efficiency, and accuracy of channel sensing increased considerably by using the proposed algorithm.

  7. Energy Efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Using Distributed Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukkumar R.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio (CR is a promising and potential technique to enable secondary users (SUs or unlicenced users to exploit the unused spectrum resources effectively possessed by primary users (PUs or licenced users. The proven clustering approach is used to organize nodes in the network into the logical groups to attain energy efficiency, network scalability, and stability for improving the sensing accuracy in CR through cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS. In this paper, a distributed dynamic load balanced clustering (DDLBC algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, each member in the cluster is to calculate the cooperative gain, residual energy, distance, and sensing cost from the neighboring clusters to perform the optimal decision. Each member in a cluster participates in selecting a cluster head (CH through cooperative gain, and residual energy that minimises network energy consumption and enhances the channel sensing. First, we form the number of clusters using the Markov decision process (MDP model to reduce the energy consumption in a network. In this algorithm, CR users effectively utilize the PUs reporting time slots of unavailability. The simulation results reveal that the clusters convergence, energy efficiency, and accuracy of channel sensing increased considerably by using the proposed algorithm.

  8. Energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and searches for new physics (Resent developments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopejkin, V.I.; Sinev, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The study of the electron neutrino properties - its mass, mixing, magnetic moment - is the main goal of the present reactor antineutrino experiments. We consider the time evolution of the reactor ν bar e spectrum during reactor ON and reactor OFF periods. An important role of the time variations of the reactor ν bar e spectrum in searches for neutrino magnetic moment is discussed. Corrections to the predicted earlier theoretical and precise measured inverse beta-decay cross sections are calculated. We found that the residual ν bar e emission during the reactor OFF period can play a non-negligible role in oscillation experiments

  9. Polarimetry of coherent bremsstrahlung by analysis of the photon energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbinyan, S.; Hakobyan, H.; Jones, R.; Sirunyan, A.; Vartapetian, H.

    2005-01-01

    A method of coherent bremsstrahlung (CB) polarimetry based on the analysis of the shape of the photon energy spectrum is presented. The influence of a number of uncertainty sources, including the choice of atomic form-factors, has been analyzed. For a CB source consisting of a diamond radiator and multi-GeV electrons, an absolute accuracy of polarimetry at the level of 0.01-0.02 is attainable

  10. The energy spectrum of the 'runaway' electrons from a high voltage pulsed discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruset, C.

    1985-01-01

    Some experimental results are presented on the influence of the pressure upon the energy spectrum of the runaway electrons generated into a pulsed high voltage argon discharge. These electrons enter a state of continuous acceleration between two collisions with rapidly increasing free path. The applied discharge current varies from 10 to 300 A, the pulse time is about 800 ns. Relativistic effects are taken into consideration. Theoretical explanation is based on the pnenomenon of electron spreading on plasma oscillations. (D.Gy.)

  11. Calculating the energy spectrum of neutrons from tritium target of the NG-150 type generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortash, A.I.; Kuznetsov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Calculation procedure of neutron spectra yielding from the NG-150 generator target chamber with regard to deutron moderation is suggested. Using the suggested procedure, neutron spectra for different escape angles formed in the tritium target are calculated. The spectrum of neutrons scattered in cooling water is calculated. The mean energy of neutrons escaping at the angle of 0 deg equalling 14.5 MeV is obtained

  12. Energy-density spectrum of the vacuum around a cosmic string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, A.; Hacyan, S.

    1988-01-01

    The explicit form of the spectrum of the energy density of the vacuum surrounding a cosmic string as would be seen by an observer at rest is calculated. Spin-0, -half, or -1 massless fields are considered and it is found that the result is independent of the spin value. An interpretation which differs from the one usually found in the literature is also given

  13. Is the primary energy spectrum around the knee a statistical game?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempa, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present state of research of the shape of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic ray nuclei and the chemical composition in the region of the so-called, knee, and beyond is highly unsatisfactory. It was not very successful when using extensive air showers. In the present paper an attempt is made to explain what is the cause of such a situation. The experimental results as to which there is no doubt that they were wrongly interpreted, will be indicated

  14. Analysis of the 3C 445 soft X-ray spectrum as observed by Chandra high-energy gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fu-Tong; Shao, Shu-Hua; Cheng, Yan; Zeng, Jiao-Long

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the soft X-ray emission of 3C 445 using an archival Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectrum. Highly-ionized H- and He-like Mg, Si and S lines, as well as a resolved low-ionized Si Kα line, are detected in the high resolution spectrum. The He-like triplets of Mg and Si are resolved into individual lines, and the calculated R ratios indicate a high density for the emitter. The low values of G ratios indicate the lines originate from collisionally ionized plasmas. However, the detection of a resolved narrow Ne X radiative recombination continua (RRC) feature in the spectrum seems to prefer a photoionized environment. The spectrum is subsequently modeled with a photoionization model, and the results are compared with those of a collisional model. Through a detailed analysis of the spectrum, we exclude a collisional origin for these emission lines. A one-component photoionization model provides a great fit to the emission features. The best-fit parameters are {log} ξ ={3.3}-0.3+0.4 erg cm s‑1, {n}{{H}}={5}-4.5+15× {10}10 cm‑3 and {N}{{H}}={2.5}-1.7+3.8× {10}20 cm‑2. According to the calculated high density for the emitter, the measured velocity widths of the emission lines and the inferred radial distance (6 × 1014 – 8 × 1015 cm), we suggest the emission lines originating from matter are located in the broad line region (BLR).

  15. Measuring Neutron Spectrum at MIT Research Reactor Utilizing He-3 Bonner Cylinder Approach with an Unfolding Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leder, A. [MIT; Anderson, A. J. [Chicago U., KICP; Billard, J. [Lyon, IPN; Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Northwestern U.; Formaggio, J. A. [MIT; Hasselkus, C. [Wisconsin U., Madison; Newman, E. [MIT; Palladino, K. [Wisconsin U., Madison; Phuthi, M. [MIT; Winslow, L. [MIT; Zhang, L. [MIT

    2017-10-02

    The Ricochet experiment seeks to measure Coherent (neutral-current) Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering using dark-matter-style detectors with sub-keV thresholds placed near a neutrino source, such as the MIT (research) Reactor (MITR), which operates at 5.5 MW generating approximately 2.2e18 neutrinos/second at the core. Currently, Ricochet is characterizing the backgrounds at MITR, the main component of which comes in the form of neutrons emitted from the core simultaneous with the neutrino signal. To characterize this background, we wrapped a Bonner cylinder around a He-3 thermal neutron detector, whose data was then unfolded to produce a neutron energy spectrum across several orders of magnitude. We discuss the resulting spectrum and its implications for deploying Ricochet in the future at the MITR site as well as the feasibility of reducing this background level via the addition of polyethylene shielding around the detector setup.

  16. What measurable zero point fluctuations can(not) tell us about dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, M.

    2006-05-01

    We show that laboratory experiments cannot measure the absolute value of dark energy. All known experiments rely on electromagnetic interactions. They are thus insensitive to particles and fields that interact only weakly with ordinary matter. In addition, Josephson junction experiments only measure differences in vacuum energy similar to Casimir force measurements. Gravity, however, couples to the absolute value. Finally we note that Casimir force measurements have tested zero point fluctuations up to energies of ∝ 10 eV, well above the dark energy scale of ∝ 0.01 eV. Hence, the proposed cut-off in the fluctuation spectrum is ruled out experimentally. (Orig.)

  17. Impact of dissipation on the energy spectrum of experimental turbulence of gravity surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Antoine; Hassaini, Roumaissa; Redor, Ivan; Sommeria, Joël; Valran, Thomas; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the impact of dissipation on the development of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of gravity surface waves with emphasis on the effect of surface contamination. We performed experiments in the Coriolis facility, which is a 13-m-diam wave tank. We took care of cleaning surface contamination as well as possible, considering that the surface of water exceeds 100 m2. We observe that for the cleanest condition the frequency energy spectrum shows a power-law decay extending up to the gravity capillary crossover (14 Hz) with a spectral exponent that is increasing with the forcing strength and decaying with surface contamination. Although slightly higher than reported previously in the literature, the exponent for the cleanest water remains significantly below the prediction from the weak turbulence theory. By discussing length and time scales, we show that weak turbulence cannot be expected at frequencies above 3 Hz. We observe with a stereoscopic reconstruction technique that the increase with the forcing strength of energy spectrum beyond 3 Hz is mostly due to the formation and strengthening of bound waves.

  18. Microparticle impact sensor measures energy directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. M.; Berg, O. E.

    1965-01-01

    Construction of a capacitor sensor consisting of a dielectric layer between two conductive surface layers and connected across a potential source through a sensing resistor permits measurement of energy of impinging particles without degradation of sensitivity. A measurable response is produced without penetration of the dielectric layer.

  19. Ground level cosmic ray pulse height spectrum of a 7. 5 cm diameter spherical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for energy region below 5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1988-09-01

    Ground level cosmic ray pulse height spectrum of a 7.5 cm diameter spherical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was evaluated through stripping operation based on a pulse height spectrum measured on the sea and high precision response functions of the detector for U-series, Th-series and /sup 40/K. The exposure rate calculated from the determined cosmic ray pulse height spectrum was 0.21 R/h eq., which agreed well with that obtained from another method. The shape of the pulse height spectrum showed similarity to that measured at the altitude of 16,000 ft, especially in the energy region of 0 to 3 MeV. The principle of the adopted method is rather plain, however, the reliability of the spectrum is satisfactory. As the pulse height spectrum is a common information to any analytical method for environmental gamma ray using NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, it is expected to be used for simple and precise separation of cosmic ray component involved in the enviromental pulse height spectrum.

  20. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99 Mo, 95 Zr, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141,143 Ce, and 147 Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147 Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ∼5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except

  1. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  2. Spectrum and energy levels of the sodiumlike ion Sr/sup 27+/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of Sr/sup 27+/ was observed with a laser-produced plasma and a 2.2-m grazing-incidence spectrograph in the region 12--160 A-circle. From the identification of 37 lines, a system of 27 energy levels of the type 2p 6 nl was determined. The level system includes the configurations ns(n = 3-5), np(n = 3-6), nd(n = 3-7), nf(n = 4-6), and 5g. The ionization energy is determined as 11 188200 +- 1000 cm/sup -1/ (1387.16 +- 0.12 eV)

  3. The persistent current and energy spectrum on a driven mesoscopic LC-circuit with Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanias, Hassan

    2018-03-01

    The quantum theory for a mesoscopic electric circuit including a Josephson junction with charge discreteness is studied. By considering coupling energy of the mesoscopic capacitor in Josephson junction device, a Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of a quantum mesoscopic electric LC-circuit with charge discreteness is introduced. We first calculate the persistent current on a quantum driven ring including Josephson junction. Then we obtain the persistent current and energy spectrum of a quantum mesoscopic electrical circuit which includes capacitor, inductor, time-dependent external source and Josephson junction.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of a solid exhibiting the energy spectrum given by the logistic map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, E.M.F.

    2000-05-01

    We show that the infinite-dimensional representation of the recently introduced Logistic algebra can be interpreted as a non-trivial generalization of the Heisenberg or oscillator algebra. This allows to construct a quantum Hamiltonian having the energy energy spectrum given by the logistic map. We analyze the Hamiltonian of a solid whose collective modes of vibrations are described by this generalized oscillator and compute the thermodynamic properties of the model in the two-cycle and γ3.6785 chaotic region of the logistic map. (author)

  5. Measurements of the Spectrum of Singly Ionized Argon between 320 and 520 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhao-Rui; Yuan Ping; Song Zhang-Yong; Xu Qiu-Mei; Yang Zhi-Hu

    2012-01-01

    We report beam-foil measurements of the spectrum for Ar II. Totally 56 lines are measured. Most of them are mainly ascribed to 3d-4p, 4s-4p, 4p-4d and 4p-5s resonance transitions. These spectral lines are identified, among which 16 lines are new and accurately measured. Analyses of the spectra are based on a comparison with the other experimental results and calculated values. (atomic and molecular physics)

  6. Spectrum resolving power of hearing: measurements, baselines, and influence of maskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ya. Supin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary methods of measurement of frequency tuning in the auditory system are reviewed. Most of them are based on the frequency-selective masking paradigm and require multi-point measurements (a number of masked thresholds should be measured to obtain a single frequency-tuning estimate. Therefore, they are rarely used for practical needs. As an alternative approach, frequency-selective properties of the auditory system may be investigated using probes with complex frequency spectrum patterns, in particular, rippled noise that is characterized by a spectrum with periodically alternating maxima and minima. The maximal ripple density discriminated by the auditory system is  a convenient measure of the spectrum resolving power (SRP. To find the highest resolvable ripple density, a phase-reversal test has been suggested. Using this technique, normal SRP, its dependence on probe center frequency, spectrum contrast, and probe level were measured. The results were not entirely predictable by frequency-tuning data obtained by masking methods. SRP is influenced by maskers, with on- and off-frequency maskers influencing SRP very differently. Dichotic separation of the probe and masker results in almost complete release of SRP from influence of maskers.

  7. Neutron spectrum measurements from a neutron guide tube facility at the ETRR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayouf, R M.A.; El-Sayed, L A.A.; El-Kady, A S.I. [Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The present work deals with measurements of the neutron spectrum emitted from a neutron guide tube (NGT) recently installed at one of the ETRR-1 reactor horizontal channels designed to deliver thermal neutrons, free from fast neutrons and gamma ray background, to a fourier reverse-time-of-flight (RTOF) diffractometer. The measurements were performed using a {sup 6} Li glass scintillation detector combined with a multichannel analyzer set at channel width 4 M sec and installed at 3.4 m from a disc Fermi chopper. Also a theoretical model was specially developed for the neutron spectrum calculations. According to the model developed, the spectrum calculated was found to be in good agreement with the measured one. It was found, both from measurements and calculations, that the spectrum emitted from the NGT covers, after transmission through a fourier chopper, neutron wavelengths from 1-4 A adequate for neutron diffraction measurements at D values between 0.71-2.9 A respectively. 6 FIGS.

  8. Continuous optical measurement system of hemolysis during a photosensitization reaction using absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, R.; Ogawa, E.; Arai, T.

    2018-02-01

    To investigate hemolysis phenomena during a photosensitization reaction with the reaction condition continuously and simultaneously for a safety assessment of hemolysis side effect, we constructed an optical system to measure blood sample absorption spectrum during the reaction. Hemolysis degree might be under estimated in general evaluation methods because there is a constant oxygen pressure assumption in spite of oxygen depression take place. By investigating hemoglobin oxidation and oxygen desorption dynamics obtained from the contribution of the visible absorption spectrum and multiple regression analysis, both the hemolysis phenomena and its oxygen environment might be obtained with time. A 664 nm wavelength laser beam for the reaction excitation and 475-650 nm light beam for measuring the absorbance spectrum were arranged perpendicularly crossing. A quartz glass cuvette with 1×10 mm in dimensions for the spectrum measurement was located at this crossing point. A red blood cells suspension medium was arranged with low hematocrit containing 30 μg/ml talaporfin sodium. This medium was irradiated up to 40 J/cm2 . The met-hemoglobin, oxygenatedhemoglobin, and deoxygenated-hemoglobin concentrations were calculated by a multiple regression analysis from the measured spectra. We confirmed the met-hemoglobin concentration increased and oxygen saturation decreased with the irradiation time, which seems to indicate the hemolysis progression and oxygen consumption, respectively. By using our measuring system, the hemolysis progression seems to be obtained with oxygen environment information.

  9. A framework to characterize energy efficiency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trianni, Andrea; Cagno, Enrico; De Donatis, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel framework to characterize energy efficiency measures is proposed. • It allows a greater knowledge sharing, facilitating the adoption of the best measures. • It supports policy-makers in developing drivers for industrial energy efficiency. - Abstract: The need to increase the diffusion of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) is of crucial importance to achieve a consistent reduction of energy consumption and green house gases (GHG) emissions. A clear comprehension of the characteristics of such EEMs could assist in gathering and capitalizing all the information needed by industrial firms in selecting and adopting technologies, as well as by policy-makers in designing appropriate policies for their diffusion. Therefore, in this study, starting from a literature review of the studies analyzing the attributes of EEMs, we aim at providing an innovative and comprehensive framework to characterize such measures, based on 17 attributes grouped according to six categories, such as: economic, energy, environmental, production-related, implementation-related and the possible interaction with other systems. We applied this scheme to an extensive range of EEMs in cross-cutting technologies, i.e. motors, compressed air, lighting and HVAC systems. The analysis provides a relevant contribution firstly to the structuring and the sharing of knowledge on EEMs and hence to the comprehension of the barriers currently hindering their adoption; secondly, it provides a structured basis for the analysis of the drivers that policy-makers should develop in order to promote industrial energy efficiency

  10. Design and Analysis of Hybrid Solar Lighting and Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhs, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a systems-level design and analysis of a new approach for improving the energy efficiency and affordability of solar energy in buildings, namely, hybrid solar lighting and full-spectrum solar energy systems. By using different portions of the solar spectrum simultaneously for multiple end-use applications in buildings, the proposed system offers unique advantages over other alternatives for using sunlight to displace electricity (conventional topside daylighting and solar technologies). Our preliminary work indicates that hybrid solar lighting, a method of collecting and distributing direct sunlight for lighting purposes, will alleviate many of the problems with passive daylighting systems of today, such as spatial and temporal variability, glare, excess illumination, cost, and energy efficiency. Similarly, our work suggests that the most appropriate use of the visible portion of direct, nondiffuse sunlight from an energy-savings perspective is to displace electric light rather than generate electricity. Early estimates detailed in this paper suggest an anticipated system cost of well under$2.0/Wp and 5-11(cents)/kWh for displaced and generated electricity in single-story commercial building applications. Based on a number of factors discussed in the paper, including sunlight availability, building use scenarios, time-of-day electric utility rates, cost, and efficacy of the displaced electric lights, the simple payback of this approach in many applications could eventually be well under 5 years

  11. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,I of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,I-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,I-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,I ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,I are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,I. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  12. Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2009-01-01

    Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCC's fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

  13. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  14. Ab initio ground state phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Fernandez, Berta; Henriksen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to the axis perpendicular to the phenylacetylene plane and containing the center of mass. The calculated interaction energy is -418.9 cm(-1). To check further the potential, we obtain the rovibrational spectrum of the complex and the results are compared to the available experimental data. (C) 2012 American......We evaluate the phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface by fitting a representative number of ab initio interaction energies to an analytic function. These energies are calculated at a grid of intermolecular geometries, using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set...... extended with a series of 3s3p2d1flg midbond functions. The potential is characterized by two equivalent global minima where the Ar atom is located above and below the phenylacetylene plane at a distance of 3.5781 angstrom from the molecular center of mass and at an angle of 9.08 degrees with respect...

  15. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-05-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  16. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  17. Energy spectrum analysis between single and dual energy source x-ray imaging for PCB non-destructive test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo; Lee, Min Ju; Kang, Dong Uk; Lee, Dae Hee; Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Chan Kyu; Kim, Hyoung Taek; Kim, Gi Yoon; Cho, Gyu Seong

    2015-01-01

    Reliability of printed circuit board (PCB), which is based on high integrated circuit technology, is having been important because of development of electric and self-driving car. In order to answer these demand, automated X-ray inspection (AXI) is best solution for PCB nondestructive test. PCB is consist of plastic, copper, and, lead, which have low to high Z-number materials. By using dual energy X-ray imaging, these materials can be inspected accurately and efficiently. Dual energy X-ray imaging, that have the advantage of separating materials, however, need some solution such as energy separation method and enhancing efficiency because PCB has materials that has wide range of Z-number. In this work, we found out several things by analysis of X-ray energy spectrum. Separating between lead and combination of plastic and copper is only possible with energy range not dose. On the other hand, separating between plastic and copper is only with dose not energy range. Moreover the copper filter of high energy part of dual X-ray imaging and 50 kVp of low energy part of dual X-ray imaging is best for efficiency

  18. Energy spectrum analysis between single and dual energy source x-ray imaging for PCB non-destructive test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo; Lee, Min Ju; Kang, Dong Uk; Lee, Dae Hee; Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Chan Kyu; Kim, Hyoung Taek; Kim, Gi Yoon; Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Reliability of printed circuit board (PCB), which is based on high integrated circuit technology, is having been important because of development of electric and self-driving car. In order to answer these demand, automated X-ray inspection (AXI) is best solution for PCB nondestructive test. PCB is consist of plastic, copper, and, lead, which have low to high Z-number materials. By using dual energy X-ray imaging, these materials can be inspected accurately and efficiently. Dual energy X-ray imaging, that have the advantage of separating materials, however, need some solution such as energy separation method and enhancing efficiency because PCB has materials that has wide range of Z-number. In this work, we found out several things by analysis of X-ray energy spectrum. Separating between lead and combination of plastic and copper is only possible with energy range not dose. On the other hand, separating between plastic and copper is only with dose not energy range. Moreover the copper filter of high energy part of dual X-ray imaging and 50 kVp of low energy part of dual X-ray imaging is best for efficiency.

  19. Determination of the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the central thimble of the reactor core TRIGA Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra M, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the neutron spectrum measurements inside the core of the TRIGA Mark III reactor at 1 MW power in steady-state, with the bridge placed in the center of the swimming pool, using several metallic threshold foils. The activation detectors are inserted in the Central Thimble of the reactor core, all the foils are irradiated in the same position and irradiation conditions (one by one). The threshold detectors are made of different materials such as: Au 197 , Ni 58 , In 115 , Mg 24 , Al 27 , Fe 58 , Co 59 and Cu 63 , they were selected to cover the full range the energies (10 -10 to 20 MeV) of the neutron spectrum in the reactor core. After the irradiation, the activation detectors were measured by means of spectrometry gamma, using a high resolution counting system with a hyper pure Germanium crystal, in order to obtain the saturation activity per target nuclide. The saturation activity is one of the main input data together with the initial spectrum, for the computational code SANDBP (hungarian version of the code SAND-II), which through an iterative adjustment, gives the calculated spectrum. The different saturation activities are necessary for the unfolding method, used by the computational code SANDBP. This research work is very important, since the knowledge of the energetic and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the irradiation facilities, allows to characterize properly the irradiation facilities, just like, to estimate with a good precision various physics parameters of the reactor such as: neutron fluxes (thermal, intermediate and fast), neutronic dose, neutron activation analysis (NAA), spectral indices (cadmium ratio), buckling, fuel burnup, safety parameters (reactivity, temperature distribution, peak factors). In addition, the knowledge of the already mentioned parameters can give a best use of reactor, optimizing the irradiations requested by the users for their production process or research projects. (Author)

  20. Spectrum-averaged cross-section measurement of /sup 103/Rh(n,n)/sup 103m/Rh in the /sup 252/Cf fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamaze, G.P.; Schima, F.J.; Eisenhauer, C.M.; Spiegel, V.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the similarity in energy dependence of the /sup 103/Rh(n,n') differential cross section to the kerma muscle response function for neutrons, rhodium may be useful as a neutron kerma monitor. In support of its use as a neutron monitor, the spectrum-averaged cross section σ-bar has been measured for a /sup 252/Cf fission neutron spectrum. Pairs of thin rhodium samples were irradiated on opposite sides of a thinly encapsulated /sup 252/Cf neutron source. The neutron emission rate of the /sup 252/Cf source was determined by the manganous sulfate (MnSO/sub 4/) bath technique. In this method, the californium source emission rate is determined by comparison to the known emission rate of NBS-I, a standard radium-beryllium neutron source. The neutron fluence incident on the rhodium samples is determined from the californium source strength, average sample-to-source distance, and the duration of the irradiation. Corrections are made for neutron scattering saturation of activity, and attenuation of the X rays by the sample during counting. The X rays were detected with an intrinsic germanium detector designed specifically for low-energy X-ray detection. The activity was not determined by absolute counting so that the final results depend on the value of P/sub Κx/, to total Κ X-ray emission probability. The results of five separate irradiations yield a value of σ-bar . P/sub Κx/ = 62.3 +- 1.9 mb. Using the most recently published value of P/sub Κx/ gives a value of σ-bar = 739 +- 22 mb. A discussion of systematic uncertainties is given

  1. Systematic review of tools to measure outcomes for young children with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McConachie, H.; Parr, J.R.; Glod, M.; Hanratty, J.; Livingstone, N.; Oono, I.P.; Robalino, S.; Baird, G.; Beresford, B.; Charman, T.; Garland, D.; Green, J.; Gringras, P.; Jones, G.; Law, J.; Le Couteur, A.S.; Macdonald, G.; McColl, E.M.; Morris, C.; Rodgers, J.; Simonoff, E.; Terwee, C.B.; Williams, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The needs of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are complex and this is reflected in the number and diversity of outcomes assessed and measurement tools used to collect evidence about children�s progress. Relevant outcomes include improvement in core ASD impairments, such as

  2. Depression and Its Measurement in Verbal Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotham, Katherine; Unruh, Kathryn; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In a sample of 50 verbally fluent adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (age: 16-31 years; verbal IQ: 72-140), we examined the pattern of response and associations between scores on common measures of depressive symptoms, participant characteristics, and clinical diagnosis of depressive disorders. Beck Depression Inventory--Second…

  3. Measuring Reciprocity in High Functioning Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommeren, Tineke Backer; Begeer, Sander; Scheeren, Anke M.; Koot, Hans M.

    2012-01-01

    Few instruments have been developed that measure impairments in reciprocity, a defining feature of autism. We introduce a new test assessing the quality of reciprocal behaviour: the interactive drawing test (IDT). Children and adolescents (n = 49) with and without high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD) were invited to collaborate with…

  4. Measuring light spectrum as a main indicator of artificial sources quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dąbrowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare different artificial light sources in different places where plant breeding is conduced. Methods: Measurements were conducted outdoor, in room, in greenhouse, under four panels with light emitting diodes, in phytotron, in dark room with various light sources and inside Sanyo versatile environmental chamber. The measurements were made by using SpectraPen SP100 (PSI, Czech Republic device. Results: Our result showed that spectrum measured outdoor during sunny day had only one peak at the wavelength of 485 nm (ca. 60000 relative units. On cloudy day, the trend of light spectrum curve was similar, but with lower values. At room conditions, the curve was more flat than outdoor. Under greenhouse conditions, the curve was similar to that measured outdoor. A few additional peaks on the curve appeared by adding high pressure sodium lamp. There were changes of curve under LED panels. Conclusions: It must be underlined that the most similar spectrum curve to daylight light has incandescent bulb and this light source should be preferred as support of daylight in greenhouses and as main source in phytotrons. Using high pressure sodium lamp in greenhouses as support of daylight cause increase in the red/far-red ratio and occurrence of a new peak on spectrum curve. The new possibilities are creating by LED panels with red and blue diodes.

  5. Multiaspect measurement analysis of breaking energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartłomiejczyk, Mikołaj; Połom, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A case study of implementation of eco energy technologies in municipal transport. • The “ready to use” methods are presented. • The “niche” ways of increasing efficiency, e.g. “intelligent heating”. • Novel multi way measurement method using GPS localization system. • Confirmation of the results by means of research and experimental measurement. - Abstract: Nowadays the issue of electric energy saving in public transport is becoming a key area of interest, which is connected both with a growth of environmental awareness in the society and an increase in the prices of fuel and electricity. That is why the reduction of energy consumption by increasing electrified urban transport, such as trams, trolleybuses, light rail and underground is becoming an increasingly important issue. Energy recovery during braking is possible in all modern electric vehicles, but in many cases this possibility is not fully taken advantage of, inter alia, because of an inadequate power supply structure. The aim of this article is to present practical examples of implementation of eco-friendly solutions in urban municipal transport. The article shows a thorough analysis of braking energy dispatch in the urban traction power supply system, which was based on extensive measurement research conducted in Gdynia trolleybus network. The authors applied multi way measurement method using Global Positioning System. The optimal conditions for implementation of several methods of energy recovery (storage energy systems, reconfiguration of supply system, using auxiliaries) have been shown. Great emphasis has been put on the confirmation of the results by means of research and experimental measurement.

  6. Fission cross section measurements at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptev, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The activity in intermediate energy particle induced fission cross-section measurements of Pu, U isotopes, minor actinides and sub-actinides in PNPI of Russia is reviewed. The neutron-induced fission cross-section measurements are under way in the wide energy range of incident neutrons from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV at the GNEIS facility. In number of experiments at the GNEIS facility, the neutron-induced fission cross sections were obtained for many nuclei. In another group of experiments the proton-induced fission cross-section have been measured for proton energies ranging from 200 to 1000 MeV at 100 MeV intervals using the proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron. (author)

  7. Energy Savings Measure Packages. Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the United States. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home; this typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  8. Measurement of 89Y(n,2n) spectral averaged cross section in LR-0 special core reactor spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Losa, Evžen; Baroň, Petr; Šolc, Jaroslav; Švadlenková, Marie; Koleška, Michal; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2017-12-01

    The present paper describes reaction rate measurement of 89Y(n,2n)88Y in a well-defined reactor spectrum of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor and compares this value with results of simulation. The reaction rate is derived from the measurement of activity of 88Y using gamma-ray spectrometry of irradiated Y2O3 sample. The resulting cross section value averaged in spectrum is 43.9 ± 1.5 μb, averaged in the 235U spectrum is 0.172 ± 0.006 mb. This cross-section is important as it is used as high energy neutron monitor and is therefore included in the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File. Calculations of reaction rates were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and IRDFF nuclear data libraries. The agreement with uranium description by CIELO library is very good, while in ENDF/B-VII.0 description of uranium, underprediction about 10% in average can be observed.

  9. On the high energy gamma ray spectrum and the particle production model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Itaru; Tezuka, Ikuo.

    1979-01-01

    A small emulsion chamber, 25 cm x 20 cm in area and 12 radiation lengths in thick, was exposed with JAL jet-cargo at an atmospheric depth of 260 g/cm 2 during 150 hrs. The gamma ray spectrum derived by combining data from X-ray films and nuclear emulsions is well represented by I sub(r) (>=Er) = (3.65 +- 0.30) x 10 -8 [E sub(r)/TeV]sup(-1.89+0.06-0.09)/cm 2 sr sec in the energy range 200 - 3,000 GeV. This result is in good agreement with those of several other groups. We discuss our data in terms of Feynman's and Koba-Nielsen-Olesen's scaling law of high energy particle production model. Interpreted in terms of an assumption of mild violation of the scaling law as x.d delta-s / delta-s indx = AE sup(2a)exp (-BE sup(a)x), our gamma ray spectrum results suggest an existence of a violation parameter of a = 0.18, which is consistent with results from gamma ray spectrum observations at great depth such as the mountain elevations. (author)

  10. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes ion measurements in the energy range 0.1 to 30 keV observed during the campaigns 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine'. For a clear survey of the physical processes during extraordinary events, sometimes ion measurements of higher energies are also taken into account. Generally, the pitch angle distributions were isotropic during all flights except some remarkable events. In general the ion and electron flux intensities correlated, but sometimes revealed a spectral anti-correlation. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field could be identified accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand deceleration of the ions was observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations pointed to energy dispersion and to the location of the source region at 9 Rsub(E). Furthermore, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons were measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. The integral down-going number and energy flux of the ions contributed to the total particle or energy influx between 65% and less than 7% and did not clearly characterize the geophysical launch conditions or auroral activities. (author)

  11. Effects of virtual isobar admixtures on the low-energy spectrum of a complex nucleus - model calculations for 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecksch, E.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of a detailed analysis of the excitation spectrum of a complex nucleus in the framework of the conventional shell model theory, the paper extends this concept by adding nucleonic degrees of freedom (isobars) and by model investigations and a realistic assessment of their effects on the excited states of the low-energy spectrum. (AH) [de

  12. Are Autistic Traits Measured Equivalently in Individuals with and without an Autism Spectrum Disorder? An Invariance Analysis of the Autism Spectrum Quotient Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Aja L.; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen; Kuenssberg, Renate; O'Donnell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It is common to administer measures of autistic traits to those without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with, for example, the aim of understanding autistic personality characteristics in non-autistic individuals. Little research has examined the extent to which measures of autistic traits actually measure the same traits in the same way across…

  13. BONDI-97 A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding tool using a genetic algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, B

    1999-01-01

    The neutron spectrum unfolding procedure using the count rate data obtained from a set of Bonner sphere neutron detectors requires the solution of the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind by using complex mathematical methods. This paper reports a new approach for the unfolding of neutron spectra using the Genetic Algorithm tool BONDI-97 (BOnner sphere Neutron DIfferentiation). The BONDI-97 was used as the input for Genetic Algorithm engine EVOLVER to search for a globally optimised solution vector from a population of randomly generated solutions. This solution vector corresponds to the unfolded neutron energy spectrum. The Genetic Algorithm engine emulates the Darwinian 'Survival of the Fittest' strategy, the key ingredient of the 'Theory of Evolution'. The spectra of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am/Be (alpha,n) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu/Be (alpha,n) neutron sources were unfolded using the BONDI-97 tool. (author)

  14. Planetary method to measure the neutrons spectrum in lineal accelerators of medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Benites R, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    A novel procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum originated in a lineal accelerator of medical use has been developed. The method uses a passive spectrometer of Bonner spheres. The main advantage of the method is that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator. When this is used around a lineal accelerator is necessary to operate it under the same conditions so many times like the spheres that contain the spectrometer, activity that consumes enough time. The developed procedure consists on situating all the spheres of the spectrometer at the same time and to realize the reading making a single shot. With this method the photo neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter was determined, with the spectrum is determined the total flow and the ambient dose equivalent. (Author)

  15. Measurement and analysis of reaction rate distributions of cores with spectrum shifter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shigekazu; Shiroya, Seiji; Unesaki, Hironobu; Takeda, Toshikazu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Kanda, Keiji.

    1995-01-01

    A study for the neutronic characteristics of the spectrum-controlled neutron irradiation fields using various reflector materials was performed. Spectrum shifter regions were constructed in the upper reflector region of the solid moderated core (B-Core) of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Beryllium, graphite and aluminum were selected as the loading materials for the spectrum shifter. Two tight-pitch lattice cores with different moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (V m /V f ) of 0.97 and 0.65 have been used. Axial reaction rate distributions of gold, nickel and indium wires were measured, and the spectrum index was defined as the Cd ratio of the gold wire and the ratio of gold reaction rate to nickel reaction rate. Using the conventional design calculation procedure, the experimental and calculated reaction rate and spectrum index show several disagreements. Detailed treatment of the neutron streaming effect, heterogeneous cell structure and depression factor are shown to be necessary for improving the agreement between experimental and calculated values. (author)

  16. Estimation of sea level muon energy spectrum at high latitude from the latest primary nucleon spectra near the top of the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Haldar, T K; Bhattacharya, D P; 10.1023/A:1024822518795

    2003-01-01

    Vertical muon energy spectra at sea level have been estimated from a directly measured primary cosmic-ray nucleon spectrum. The hadronic energy moments have been calculated from the CERN LEBC EHS data on the Lorentz invariant cross-section results on pp to pi /sup +or-/X and pp to K/sup +or-/X inclusive reactions and are duly corrected for A-A collisions. Finally, the sea level muon energy spectra have been calculated from the decay of conventional mesons, using standard formulation. The estimated muon spectra are found to be in good agreement with the directly measured muon spectra obtained from different experiments. (32 refs).

  17. Measurement of electromagnetic fields generated by air traffic control radar systems with spectrum analysers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barellini, A; Bogi, L; Licitra, G; Silvi, A M; Zari, A

    2009-12-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) primary radars are 'classical' radars that use echoes of radiofrequency (RF) pulses from aircraft to determine their position. High-power RF pulses radiated from radar antennas may produce high electromagnetic field levels in the surrounding area. Measurement of electromagnetic fields produced by RF-pulsed radar by means of a swept-tuned spectrum analyser are investigated here. Measurements have been carried out both in the laboratory and in situ on signals generated by an ATC primary radar.

  18. Enermet in the forefront of energy measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takala, R.; Suonperae, J.; Alatalo-Korpi, H. [ed.

    1997-11-01

    The deregulation of energy markets presents increasing challenges to the traditional measurement business and at the same time puts special demands on system solutions. Power companies are placing emphasis on the remote accessibility of measurement data at customer sites and on a greater variety of rates. Enermet, a member of the IVO Group, is a frontrunner in this business area, investing 8 % of its turnover in product development

  19. Increase of internal energy due to measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daboul, J.

    1991-01-01

    We argue that the internal energy E=(H) of a macroscopic system in thermal equilibrium must increase, if we measure an observable A which does not commute with the Hamiltonian H. We derive an expression for calculating a lower bound for this increase in E. We then generalize the above result, and show that under certain conditions the expectation value (C) of an observable C should increase by the measurement of another observable A, if A and C do not commute. (author)

  20. Time resolved energy spectrum of the axial ion beam generated in plasma focus discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.H.; Kilic, H.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the deuteron beam along the electrode axis (0 (degree) ) in a plasma focus discharge has been determined with a time of flight (TOF) method and with a differential filter method in the ion energy interval E = 0.3-9 MeV. The ion TOF method is applied to single-ion pulse events with an ion emission time t(E) that is only weakly dependent on the ion energy E for E > 0.3 MeV. The correlation of the ion beam intensity with the filling pressure, the neutron yield and the hard X-ray intensity is also reported. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs

  1. Silicon surface barrier detector and study of energy spectrum of alpha particles from radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, S.D.; Sinha, Vijaya

    1986-01-01

    The principles of working of three commonly used radiation detectors, namely ionization chambers, scintillation counters with photomultiplier tube (PMT) systems and semiconductor detectors are briefly discussed. Out of the semiconductor detectors, the silicon surface barrier (SSB) detector has distinct advantages for detection of radiations, alpha particles in particular. The experimental setup to obtain the energy spectrum of alpha particles from 241 Am source using SSB fabricated in the Physics Department of Gujarat University, Ahmedabad is described. Its performance is compared with scintillation counter using PMT. SSB detector shows a sharp peak of #approx # 3 per cent energy resolution. The factors affecting the peak, namely, electronic noise, source dependent factors and detector-dependent factors are discussed. A method of calibrating SSB detectors based on energy loss mechanism of alpha particles in thin absorbers is described. Applications of such detectors are indicated. (M.G.B.)

  2. A multigroup analysis from a continuos energy spectrum approach by a MC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Dayana Q. de; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Vilhena, Marco T. de

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the Monte Carlo method is applied to the energy dependent three- dimensional neutron transport equation, in order to analyze the change in the spectrum energy depending on the Monte Carlo step. The present work is a first step into a new direction where spectral influence on criticality may be analyzed. The method is based on the monitoring of a large number of individual realizations of neutron histories (i.e. microscopic interaction sequence) where the average behavior of neutrons yields an approximate solution for the neutron transport equation. The Monte Carlo is implemented using continuous functions, with respect to energy, for the cross sections of materials, functions which are obtained by parametrizations of the cross sections. The type of interaction that the neutron will suffer and the characteristics of their displacement in the element are estimated randomly following the relevant probability distributions. (author)

  3. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Laitner, John A.; Michael, Ruth; Finman, Hodayah

    2004-08-30

    We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published databases, followed by an analysis of the representation of productivity benefits in energy modeling. We propose a method to include productivity benefits in the economic assessment of the potential for energy efficiency improvement. The case-study review suggests that energy efficiency investments can provide a significant boost to overall productivity within industry. If this relationship holds, the description of energy-efficient technologies as opportunities for larger productivity improvements has significant implications for conventional economic assessments. The paper explores the implications this change in perspective on the evaluation of energy-efficient technologies for a study of the iron and steel industry in the US. This examination shows that including productivity benefits explicitly in the modeling parameters would double the cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement, compared to an analysis excluding those benefits. We provide suggestions for future research in this important area.

  4. Learning Frameworks for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing and Energy-Efficient Data Protection in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh Quang Do

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies learning frameworks for energy-efficient data communications in an energy-harvesting cognitive radio network in which secondary users (SUs harvest energy from solar power while opportunistically accessing a licensed channel for data transmission. The SUs perform spectrum sensing individually, and send local decisions about the presence of the primary user (PU on the channel to a fusion center (FC. We first design a new cooperative spectrum-sensing technique based on a convolutional neural network in which the FC uses historical sensing data to train the network for classification problem. The system is assumed to operate in a time-slotted manner. At the beginning of each time slot, the FC uses the current local decisions as input for the trained network to decide whether the PU is active or not in that time slot. In addition, legitimate transmissions can be vulnerable to a hidden eavesdropper, which always passively listens to the communication. Therefore, we further propose a transfer learning actor–critic algorithm for an SU to decide its operation mode to increase the security level under the constraint of limited energy. In this approach, the SU directly interacts with the environment to learn its dynamics (i.e., an arrival of harvested energy; then, the SU can either stay idle to save energy or transmit to the FC secured data that are encrypted using a suitable private-key encryption method to maximize the long-term effective security level of the network. We finally present numerical simulation results under various configurations to evaluate our proposed schemes.

  5. Calculation of color difference and measurement of the spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mengyan; Liu, Jianghai; Cui, Jianlin; Chen, Chunsheng; Jia, Peng

    2017-10-01

    In order to solve the problem of the quantitative test of spectrum and color of aerosol, the measurement method of spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system was proposed. The spectrum characteristics and color parameters of three different aerosols were tested, and the color differences were calculated according to the CIE1976-L*a*b* color difference formula. Three tested powders (No 1# No 2# and No 3# ) were dispersed in a plexglass box and turned into aerosol. The powder sample was released by an injector with different dosages in each experiment. The spectrum and color of aerosol were measured by the PRO 6500 Fiber Optic Spectrometer. The experimental results showed that the extinction performance of aerosol became stronger and stronger with the increase of concentration of aerosol. While the chromaticity value differences of aerosols in the experiment were so small, luminance was verified to be the main influence factor of human eye visual perception and contributed most in the three factors of the color difference calculation. The extinction effect of No 3# aerosol was the strongest of all and caused the biggest change of luminance and color difference which would arouse the strongest human visual perception. According to the sensation level of chromatic color by Chinese, recognition color difference would be produced when the dosage of No 1# powder was more than 0.10 gram, the dosage of No 2# powder was more than 0.15 gram, and the dosage of No 3# powder was more than 0.05 gram.

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Temperature and Gravitational Lensing Power Spectrum Measurements from Three Seasons of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Nolta, Michael R.; Addison, Graeme E.; Battisetti, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ?CDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6s detection significance.

  7. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: temperature and gravitational lensing power spectrum measurements from three seasons of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Joanna; Nolta, Michael R.; Bond, J Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Halpern, Mark; Battistelli, Elia S.; Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Dünner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hlozek, Renée; Hilton, Matt

    2014-01-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ΛCDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6σ detection significance

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: temperature and gravitational lensing power spectrum measurements from three seasons of data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sudeep [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Joanna [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Nolta, Michael R.; Bond, J Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 Canada (Canada); Addison, Graeme E.; Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 Canada (Canada); Battistelli, Elia S. [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Dünner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificía Universidad Católica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Fowler, Joseph W. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO, 80305 (United States); Hasselfield, Matthew; Hlozek, Renée [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hilton, Matt, E-mail: sudeepphys@gmail.com [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ΛCDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6σ detection significance.

  9. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C.; Benites R, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  10. Energy efficiency policies and measures in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2012-07-01

    This report represents the national case study of Norway for the IEE-project {sup M}onitoring of EU and national energy efficiency targets (ODYSSEE-MURE 2010)'. The Norwegian part of the project is co-funded by Enova. The report presents the recent energy efficiency trends in Norway on the basis of indicators extracted from the ODYSSEE database. The database contains information on energy use in a detailed level of the industry, transport, household and service sectors and other energy use. lt also contains information on energy drivers like heated square meters in the households and services sectors, transported passenger-km and ton-km of gods, value added, production index, production volumes etc. Final energy consumption has increased from 195 TWh in 1990 lo 229 TWh in 2010 The last ten years the energy consumption has varied between 212I Wh (2009) and 229 TWh (2010) with an annual average of 221TfUh. The sector using most energy is the industry, but the share has decreased from 40 % in 1990 to 31 % in 2010. From 1990 to 2010 the growth rate has been highest in the transport sector. Half of the energy end-use was electricity in 20,10, 42 % was fossil fuels and 6 % was biomass. The electricity use has an annual increase of 0.8 % since 1990, but the last decade the annual increase is reduced to 0.14 %. The consumption of oil products has decreased in stationary end-use (heating) and increased in the transport sector. In ODYSSEE, an aggregate bottom-up energy efficiency index, ODEX, is calculated. This energy efficiency index aggregates the trends in the detailed bottom-up indicators in one single indicator. This ODEX has improved by 26 o/o from 1990 to 2010 or by 1.3 o/o per year. This means that energy efficiency policies and measures implemented since 1990 have contributed to a decrease in the energy use of 2010 of approximately 59 TWh. (Author)

  11. Research on neutron energy spectrum of the beryllium, iron and polyethylene shells assemblies injected by D-T neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Li; Guo, Haiping; Wang, Xinhua

    2009-04-01

    To test a simulation code, the multi-shell assemblies were established, which were made of beryllium stainless steel and polyethylene from the interior to the outer. The symmetry axes are all in the line of the D + beam. The neutron energy spectra above 1 MeV were obtained in medium by the detector of stilbene crystal of φ18 min x 20 mm. The distance between source and the spherical surface was 30 cm and 50 cm. The measurement channels are in the angle 0 degree and 120 degree relative to D + beam direction. The measurement positions are 0 cm, 9.7 cm, 12.8 cm and 17.3 cm away from the center of the assembly in both directions. The spectrum in different positions of the multi-shell assemblies in medium were compared and analyzed. (authors)

  12. Quantum control of isomerization by robust navigation in the energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murgida, G. E., E-mail: murgida@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Constituyentes, GIyA, CNEA, San Martín, and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arranz, F. J., E-mail: fj.arranz@upm.es [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Borondo, F., E-mail: f.borondo@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the application of the quantum control technique of navigation in the energy spectrum to chemical isomerization processes, namely, CN–Li⇆ Li–CN. This technique is based on the controlled time variation of a Hamiltonian parameter, an external uniform electric field in our case. The main result of our work establishes that the navigation involved in the method is robust, in the sense that quite sizable deviations from a pre-established control parameter time profile can be introduced and still get good final results. This is specially relevant thinking of a experimental implementation of the method.

  13. Energy spectrum of tau leptons induced by the high energy Earth-skimming neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, J.-J.; Yeh, T.-W.; Lee, F.-F.; Lin, G.-L.; Athar, H.; Huang, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a semianalytic calculation of the tau-lepton flux emerging from the Earth induced by incident high energy neutrinos interacting inside the Earth for 10 5 ≤E ν /GeV≤10 10 . We obtain results for the energy dependence of the tau-lepton flux coming from the Earth-skimming neutrinos, because of the neutrino-nucleon charged-current scattering as well as the resonant ν(bar sign) e e - scattering. We illustrate our results for several anticipated high energy astrophysical neutrino sources such as the active galactic nuclei, the gamma-ray bursts, and the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin neutrino fluxes. The tau-lepton fluxes resulting from rock-skimming and ocean-skimming neutrinos are compared. Such comparisons can render useful information about the spectral indices of incident neutrino fluxes

  14. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2004-08-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of small core or a large core polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the second generation (alpha) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of small-core fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility and commercial viability of this technology. (1) TRNSYS Modeling of a Hybrid Lighting System: Building Energy Loads and Chromaticity Analysis; (2) High Lumens Screening Test Setup for Optical Fibers; (3) Photo-Induced Heating in Plastic Optical Fiber Bundles; (4) Low-Cost Primary Mirror Development; (5) Potential Applications for Hybrid Solar Lighting; (6) Photobioreactor Population Experiments and Productivity Measurements; and (7) Development of a Microalgal CO2-Biofixation Photobioreactor.

  15. New approach to energy loss measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Trzaska, W H; Alanko, T; Mutterer, M; Raeisaenen, J; Tjurin, G; Wojdyr, M

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to energy loss measurements is proposed. In the same experiment electronic stopping force (power) in gold, nickel, carbon, polycarbonate and Havar for sup 4 sup 0 Ar, sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 4 He and sup 1 H ions in the energy range 0.12-11 MeV/u has been measured. In this paper we give the full results for gold, nickel, and carbon and for sup 4 sup 0 Ar, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 4 He and sup 1 H ions. Good agreement of the measured stopping force values for light ions with literature data is interpreted as the positive test of the experimental technique. The same technique used with heavy ions yields agreement with the published data only for energies above 1 MeV/u. At lower energies we observe progressively increasing discrepancy. This discrepancy is removed completely as soon as we neglect pulse height defect compensation. This observation makes us believe that the majority of the published results as well as semi-empirical calculations based on them (like the popular SRIM) may be in er...

  16. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Davenport, David; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems.

  17. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenje, J. A., E-mail: jfrenje@psfc.mit.edu; Wink, C. W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (T{sub i}), yield (Y{sub n}), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10{sup 16}. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  18. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (T i ), yield (Y n ), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10 16 . At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  19. Nuclear data and measurements series: Ratio of the prompt-fission-neutron spectrum of plutonium 239 to that of uranium 235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1986-09-01

    The prompt-fission-neutron spectrum resulting from 239 Pu fission induced by 0.55 MeV incident neutrons is measured from 1.0 to 10.0 MeV relative to that of 235 U fission induced by the same incident-energy neutrons. The measurements employ the time-of-flight technique. Energy-dependent ratios of the two spectra are deduced from the measured values over the energy range 1.0 to 10.0 MeV. The experimentally-derived ratio results are compared with those calculated from ENDF/B-V, revision-2, and with results of recent microscopic measurements. Using the ENDF/B-V 235 U Watt parameters for the 235 U spectrum, the experimental measurements imply a ratio of average fission-spectrum energies of 239 Pu/ 235 U = 1.045 +- 0.003, compared to the value 1.046 calculated from ENDF/B-V, revision 2. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Neutron energy spectrum flux profile of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogbadji, R.B.M.; Abrefah, R.G.; Ampomah-Amoako, E.; Agbemava, S.E.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The total neutron flux spectrum of the compact core of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor was studied. → Using 20,484 energy grids, the thermal, slowing down and fast neutron energy regions were studied. - Abstract: The total neutron flux spectrum of the compact core of Ghana's miniature neutron source reactor was understudied using the Monte Carlo method. To create small energy groups, 20,484 energy grids were used for the three neutron energy regions: thermal, slowing down and fast. The moderator, the inner irradiation channels, the annulus beryllium reflector and the outer irradiation channels were the region monitored. The thermal neutrons recorded their highest flux in the inner irradiation channel with a peak flux of (1.2068 ± 0.0008) x 10 12 n/cm 2 s, followed by the outer irradiation channel with a peak flux of (7.9166 ± 0.0055) x 10 11 n/cm 2 s. The beryllium reflector recorded the lowest flux in the thermal region with a peak flux of (2.3288 ± 0.0004) x 10 11 n/cm 2 s. The peak values of the thermal energy range occurred in the energy range (1.8939-3.7880) x 10 -08 MeV. The inner channel again recorded the highest flux of (1.8745 ± 0.0306) x 10 09 n/cm 2 s at the lower energy end of the slowing down region between 8.2491 x 10 -01 MeV and 8.2680 x 10 -01 MeV, but was over taken by the moderator as the neutron energies increased to 2.0465 MeV. The outer irradiation channel recorded the lowest flux in this region. In the fast region, the core, where the moderator is found, the highest flux was recorded as expected, at a peak flux of (2.9110 ± 0.0198) x 10 08 n/cm 2 s at 6.961 MeV. The inner channel recorded the second highest while the outer channel and annulus beryllium recorded very low flux in this region. The flux values in this region reduce asymptotically to 20 MeV.

  1. HESS J1427−608: AN UNUSUAL HARD, UNBROKEN γ -RAY SPECTRUM IN A VERY WIDE ENERGY RANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Wei-Hong [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Xin, Yu-Liang; Liao, Neng-Hui; Yuan, Qiang; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liu, Si-Ming, E-mail: yuanq@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: gaoweihong@njnu.edu.cn, E-mail: liusm@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-01-20

    We report the detection of a GeV γ -ray source that spatially overlaps and is thus very likely associated with the unidentified very high energy (VHE) γ -ray source HESS J1427−608 with the Pass 8 data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope . The photon spectrum of this source is best described by a power law with an index of 1.85 ± 0.17 in the energy range of 3–500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1427−608 at a few hundred gigaelectronvolts. This source shows no significant extension and time variation. The broadband GeV to TeV emission over four decades of energies can be well fitted by a single power-law function with an index of 2.0, without obvious indication of spectral cutoff toward high energies. Such a result implies that HESS J1427−608 may be a PeV particle accelerator. We discuss the possible nature of HESS J1427−608 according to the multiwavelength spectral fittings. Given the relatively large errors, either a leptonic or a hadronic model can explain the multiwavelength data from radio to VHE γ -rays. The inferred magnetic field strength is a few micro-Gauss, which is smaller than the typical values of supernova remnants (SNRs) and is consistent with some pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). On the other hand, the flat γ -ray spectrum is slightly different from typical PWNe but is similar to that of some known SNRs.

  2. Origin of the ankle in the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum, and of the extragalactic protons below it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Michael; Farrar, Glennys R.; Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2015-12-01

    The sharp change in slope of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) spectrum around 1 018.6 eV (the ankle), combined with evidence of a light but extragalactic component near and below the ankle and intermediate composition above, has proved exceedingly challenging to understand theoretically, without fine-tuning. We propose a mechanism whereby photo-disintegration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in the region surrounding a UHECR accelerator accounts for the observed spectrum and inferred composition at Earth. For suitable source conditions, the model reproduces the spectrum and the composition over the entire extragalactic cosmic ray energy range, i.e. above 1 017.5 eV . Predictions for the spectrum and flavors of neutrinos resulting from this process are also presented.

  3. Measurement of spectrum at the experimental 6.5 MW reactor in Vinca; Merenje spektra na eksperimentalnom 6,5 MW reaktoru u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berovic, N; Boreli, F; Aleksic, N; Dragin, R [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    Since RA reactor is supplied with horizontal experimental channels which lead directly to the core fast neutron spectrum in the channel does not differ much from the neutron spectrum in the core. Spectrum was measured by 'telescope' for detecting scattered protons. Measuring procedure together with the measured spectrum are presented in this paper.

  4. High-SNR spectrum measurement based on Hadamard encoding and sparse reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxin; Yue, Jiang; Han, Jing; Li, Long; Jin, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Li, Baoming

    2017-12-01

    The denoising capabilities of the H-matrix and cyclic S-matrix based on the sparse reconstruction, employed in the Pixel of Focal Plane Coded Visible Spectrometer for spectrum measurement are investigated, where the spectrum is sparse in a known basis. In the measurement process, the digital micromirror device plays an important role, which implements the Hadamard coding. In contrast with Hadamard transform spectrometry, based on the shift invariability, this spectrometer may have the advantage of a high efficiency. Simulations and experiments show that the nonlinear solution with a sparse reconstruction has a better signal-to-noise ratio than the linear solution and the H-matrix outperforms the cyclic S-matrix whether the reconstruction method is nonlinear or linear.

  5. Measurements of actinide transmutation in the hard spectrum of a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Collins, P.J.; Maddison, D.W.; Bunde, K.A.; Pallmtag, S.; Palmiotti, G.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of fission and capture in 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 237 Np and in their product actinides have been made following irradiation in the metal-fuel core of EBR-II. The reactor has a peak flux around 500keV and the data complement measurements in the softer spectrum of an LMFBR. Irradiations were made at the same time for a set of standard dosimeter samples. These provide a test of calculated spectra and are also used for validation of steel activations and calculated atomic displacement rates. Calculation were made with modem transport codes using ENDF/B-5.2 data. Comparisons are made, using a simple homogeneous model, producing a similar spectrum, using ENDF/B-6.2 and JEFF-2 data

  6. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  7. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  8. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed. (paper)

  9. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C W

    2010-01-01

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  10. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high-energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiati Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to derive the inclusive differential spectra (yields of muons, muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos at the surface for energies between 80 GeV and hundreds of PeV. Using these results the differential flux and the flavor ratios of leptons were calculated. The air shower simulator CORSIKA 6.990 was used for showering and propagation of the secondary particles through the atmosphere, employing the established high energy hadronic interaction models SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJet-01 and QGSJet-II-03. We show that the performance of the interaction models allows makes it possible to predict the spectra within experimental uncertainties, while SIBYLL generally yields a higher flux at the surface than the QGSJet models. The calculation of the flavor and charge ratios has lead to inconsistent results, mainly influenced by the different representations of the K/π ratio within the models. The influence of the knee of cosmic rays is reflected in the secondary spectra at energies between 100 and 200 TeV. Furthermore, we could quantify systematic uncertainties of atmospheric muon- and neutrino fluxes, associated to the models of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and the interaction models. For most recent parametrizations of the cosmic ray primary spectrum, atmospheric muons can be determined with an uncertainty smaller than +15/-13% of the average flux. Uncertainties of the muon and electron neutrino fluxes can be calculated within an average error of +32/-22% and +25

  11. Disaggregated seismic hazard and the elastic input energy spectrum: An approach to design earthquake selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Martin Colby

    1998-12-01

    The design earthquake selection problem is fundamentally probabilistic. Disaggregation of a probabilistic model of the seismic hazard offers a rational and objective approach that can identify the most likely earthquake scenario(s) contributing to hazard. An ensemble of time series can be selected on the basis of the modal earthquakes derived from the disaggregation. This gives a useful time-domain realization of the seismic hazard, to the extent that a single motion parameter captures the important time-domain characteristics. A possible limitation to this approach arises because most currently available motion prediction models for peak ground motion or oscillator response are essentially independent of duration, and modal events derived using the peak motions for the analysis may not represent the optimal characterization of the hazard. The elastic input energy spectrum is an alternative to the elastic response spectrum for these types of analyses. The input energy combines the elements of amplitude and duration into a single parameter description of the ground motion that can be readily incorporated into standard probabilistic seismic hazard analysis methodology. This use of the elastic input energy spectrum is examined. Regression analysis is performed using strong motion data from Western North America and consistent data processing procedures for both the absolute input energy equivalent velocity, (Vsbea), and the elastic pseudo-relative velocity response (PSV) in the frequency range 0.5 to 10 Hz. The results show that the two parameters can be successfully fit with identical functional forms. The dependence of Vsbea and PSV upon (NEHRP) site classification is virtually identical. The variance of Vsbea is uniformly less than that of PSV, indicating that Vsbea can be predicted with slightly less uncertainty as a function of magnitude, distance and site classification. The effects of site class are important at frequencies less than a few Hertz. The regression

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric muon spectrum from 20 to 2000 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric muon spectrum between 20 and 2000 GeV was measured with the L3 magnetic muon spectrometer for zenith angles ranging from 0 to 58 degrees. Due to the large data set and the good detector resolution, a precision of 2.6% at 100 GeV was achieved for the absolute normalization of the vertical muon flux. The momentum dependence of the ratio of positive to negative muons was obtained between 20 and 630 GeV.

  13. New measurements in plutonium L X ray emission spectrum using an electron probe micro-analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.; Despres, J.

    1966-01-01

    Further studies by means of an electron-probe micro-analyser, allowed report CEA-R--1798 authors to set up a larger plutonium X ray spectrum table. Measurements of plutonium L II and L III levels excitation potentials have also been achieved. Some remarks about apparatus performance data (such as spectrograph sensibility, resolving power and accuracy) will be found in the appendix. (authors) [fr

  14. Dependence of effective spectrum width of synchrotron radiation on particle energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A.S.; Saprykin, A.D. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    In the classical theory of synchrotron radiation, for the exact quantitative characterization of spectral properties, the concept of effective spectral width is introduced. In the first part of our work, published in EJPC 75 (2015), the effective spectral width as a function of the energy E of the radiating particle was obtained only in the ultra-relativistic approximation. In this article, which can be considered as a natural continuation of this work, a complete investigation is presented of the dependence of the effective width of the synchrotron radiation spectrum on energy for any values of E and for all the polarization components of the radiation. Numerical calculations were carried out for an effective width not exceeding 100 harmonics. (orig.)

  15. Spectrum and energy levels of six-times ionized yttrium (Y VII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    The spectrum of six-times ionized yttrium, Y VII, was photographed with a sliding-spark discharge on 10.7 m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. The region of observation was 157-824 Å. The observations extend the known configurations 4s24p3, 4s4p4, 4p5, 4s24p25s, 4s24p26s to the nearly complete 4s24p24d configuration. Our results for 4s24p24d significantly revise results of Rahimullah et al (1978 Phys. Scr. 18 96); Ateqad et al (1984 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 17 4617). A total of 168 lines and 56 energy levels are now known for this ion. The observed configurations were interpreted with Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. Transition probabilities for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters.

  16. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm 2 ) in the ''core'' (r/a 2 ) in the edge

  17. Measuring the Binary Black Hole Mass Spectrum with an Astrophysically Motivated Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Colm; Thrane, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Gravitational-wave detections have revealed a previously unknown population of stellar mass black holes with masses above 20 M ⊙. These observations provide a new way to test models of stellar evolution for massive stars. By considering the astrophysical processes likely to determine the shape of the binary black hole mass spectrum, we construct a parameterized model to capture key spectral features that relate gravitational-wave data to theoretical stellar astrophysics. In particular, we model the signature of pulsational pair-instability supernovae, which are expected to cause all stars with initial mass 100 M ⊙ ≲ M ≲ 150 M ⊙ to form ∼40 M ⊙ black holes. This would cause a cutoff in the black hole mass spectrum along with an excess of black holes near 40 M ⊙. We carry out a simulated data study to illustrate some of the stellar physics that can be inferred using gravitational-wave measurements of binary black holes and demonstrate several such inferences that might be made in the near future. First, we measure the minimum and maximum stellar black hole mass. Second, we infer the presence of a peak due to pair-instability supernovae. Third, we measure the distribution of black hole mass ratios. Finally, we show how inadequate models of the black hole mass spectrum lead to biased estimates of the merger rate and the amplitude of the stochastic gravitational-wave background.

  18. Understanding the spectrum of residential energy-saving behaviours: French evidence using disaggregated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaïd, Fateh; Garcia, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Analysing household energy-saving behaviours is crucial to improve energy consumption predictions and energy policy making. How should we quantitatively measure them? What are their determinants? This study explores the main factors influencing residential energy-saving behaviours based on a bottom-up multivariate statistical approach using data from the recent French PHEBUS survey. Firstly, we assess energy-saving behaviours on a one-dimension scale using IRT. Secondly, we use linear regression with an innovative variable selection method via adaptive lasso to tease out the effects of both macro and micro factors on the behavioural score. The results highlight the impact of five main attributes incentivizing energy-saving behaviours based on cross-variable analyses: energy price, household income, education level, age of head of household and dwelling energy performance. In addition, our results suggest that the analysis of the inverted U-shape impact of age enables the expansion of the energy consumption life cycle theory to energy-saving behaviours. - Highlights: • We examine the main factors influencing residential energy-saving behaviours. • We use data from the recent French PHEBUS survey. • We use IRT to assess energy-saving behaviours on a one-dimension scale. • We use linear regression with an innovative variable selection method via adaptive lasso. • We highlight the impact of five main attributes incentivizing energy-saving behaviours.

  19. Measurements of europium-152 depth profile of stone embankments exposed the Nagasaki atomic bomb for neutron spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi-Miyajima, Junko; Shimasaki, Tatsuya; Okajima, Shunzo; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Okumura, Yutaka; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of neutron-induced radionuclide of 152 Eu in rocks near the hypocenter (ground center of the atomic bomb explosion) in Nagasaki was performed to obtain the depth profiles and calculate the neutron energy spectrum. Core samples were drilled and taken from the stone embankments on both sides of river within a radius of 500 m from the hypocenter. After cutting each core into about 27 mm-thick sections, each section was measured its gamma-ray spectrum with a pure germanium semiconductor detector and analyzed a content of natural europium by the activation method. The highest value 8.0 x 10 -2 Bq/μg of 152 Eu at the time of the blast was obtained from the surface plates of rock cores collected near the hypocenter. The surface activity of cores was reduced with increasing the slant distances from the hypocenter. The slopes of the depth profiles were similar among samples taken from the same location. In order to analyze the depth profile of 152 Eu activity in rock andesite, experiments using a fast neutron reactor and thermal neutron reactor were carried out. Comparing the measurements on the A-bomb exposure rock with the simulated results at the reactors, among the experiments, the depth profile using the neutron moderator of 10 mm polyethylene was closed to that obtained from the A-bomb exposed samples. The experiment of thermal neutron incidence only could not reproduce the profiles from the A-bomb exposed samples. This fact indicates that the depth profiles of 152 Eu in rock exposed to the A-bomb include valuable information concerning the neutron spectrum and intensity. (author)

  20. A spectrum standardization approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhe, E-mail: zhewang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Lizhi; West, Logan; Li Zheng, E-mail: lz-dte@tsinghua.edu.cn; Ni Weidou

    2012-02-15

    This paper follows and completes a previous presentation of a spectrum normalization method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements by converting the experimentally recorded line intensity at varying operational conditions to the intensity that would be obtained under a 'standard state' condition, characterized by a standard plasma temperature, electron number density, and total number density of the interested species. At first, for each laser shot and corresponding spectrum, the line intensities of the interested species are converted to the intensity at a fixed plasma temperature and electron number density, but with varying total number density. Under this state, if the influence of changing plasma morphology is neglected, the sum of multiple spectral line intensities for the measured element is proportional to the total number density of the specific element. Therefore, the fluctuation of the total number density, or the variation of ablation mass, can be compensated for by applying the proportional relationship. The application of this method to Cu in 29 brass alloy samples, showed an improvement over the commonly applied normalization method with regard to measurement precision and accuracy. The average relative standard deviation (RSD) value, average value of the error bar, R{sup 2}, root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), and average value of the maximum relative error were: 5.29%, 0.68%, 0.98, 2.72%, 16.97%, respectively, while the above parameter values for normalization with the whole spectrum area were: 8.61%, 1.37%, 0.95, 3.28%, 29.19%, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity converted into an ideal standard plasma state for uncertainty reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ablated mass fluctuations compensated by variation of sum of multiple intensities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A spectrum standardization model established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in both uncertainty

  1. Energy-loss measurements with heavy ions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, B.; Gaimard, J.J.; Geissel, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Schmidt, K.H.; Stelzer, H.; Suemmerer; Clerc, H.G.; Hanelt, E.; Steiner, M.; Voss, B.

    1990-03-01

    Using the magnetic spectrometer SPES I at SATURNE, energy-loss measurements have been performed for projectiles of 40 Ar (401 MeV/u), 36 P (362 MeV/u), 15 N (149 MeV/u), 11 Li (131 MeV/u) and 8 Li, 9 Li (130 MeV/u) in carbon, aluminum and lead targets. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on a modified relativistic Bethe formula and to a semi-empirical formula using a Z 2 scaling law for the stopping power and an effective charge parametrization for the heavy ions. (orig.)

  2. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  3. Are Autistic Traits Measured Equivalently in Individuals With and Without An Autism Spectrum Disorder? An Invariance Analysis of the Autism Spectrum Quotient Short Form

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Aja Louise; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen; Kuenssberg, Renate; O’Donnell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It is common to administer measures of autistic traits to those without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with, for example, the aim of understanding autistic personality characteristics in non-autistic individuals. Little research has examined the extent to which measures of autistic traits actually measure the same traits in the same way across those with and without an ASD. We addressed this question using a multi-group confirmatory factor invariance analysis of the Autism Quotient Short Fo...

  4. Composition of medium energy cosmic rays from silicon to nickel measured with nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrnetz, S.; Kristiansson, K.; Lindstam, S.; Soederstroem, K.

    1975-12-01

    The cosmic ray charge spectrum has been studied in three nuclear emulsion stacks exposed in balloon flights from Fort Churchill, Canada, in 1967 and 1970. The charge region is 14 <= Z < E 28 and the energy interval is about 400-800 MeV/Nucleon. The particles are identified by measurements with a nuclear track photometer which is described in some detail. The charge spectrum is extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere and comparisons with other measurements are made. Special emphasis is put on the abundance ratios (Sc-Mn)/Fe, (Sc+Ti)/(V+Cr) and Ni/Fe. (Auth.)

  5. Measurements of integral cross sections in the californium-252 fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Guenther, E.; Matzke, M.; Rassl, G.

    1977-01-01

    In a low-scattering arrangement cross sections averaged over the californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were measured. The reactions 27 Al(n,α) 46 Ti, 47 Ti, 48 Ti(n,p), 54 Fe, 56 Fe(n,p), 58 Ni(n,p), 64 Zn(n,p), 115 In(n,n') were studied in order to obtain a consistent set of threshold detectors used in fast neutron flux density measurements. Overall uncertainties between 2 and 2.5% could be achieved; corrections due to neutron scattering in source and samples are discussed

  6. Measurement of electromagnetic fields generated by air traffic control radar systems with spectrum analysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barellini, A.; Bogi, L.; Licitra, G.; Silvi, A. M.; Zari, A.

    2009-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) primary radars are 'classical' radars that use echoes of radiofrequency (RF) pulses from aircraft to determine their position. High-power RF pulses radiated from radar antennas may produce high electromagnetic field levels in the surrounding area. Measurement of electromagnetic fields produced by RF-pulsed radar by means of a swept-tuned spectrum analyser are investigated here. Measurements have been carried out both in the laboratory and in situ on signals generated by an ATC primary radar. (authors)

  7. A new way of soft X-ray spectrum measurement in the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Min; Chen Liaoyuan; Song Xianying; Li Yongge; Luo Cuiwen; Pan Wei; Pan Li

    2007-01-01

    A soft X-ray spectrum measurement system is newly developed for the real-time acquisition, data processing and display of electron temperature. In this system, a personal computer with high-speed A/D acquisition card is used to obtain the original analog data and processing software is specially developed to calculate the electron temperature. Compared with PHA (Pulse Height Analyzer), the new system provides a way to set channel number and time solution by software. This method has been applied in the HL-2A tokamak experiment, and the result shows a good agreement with the electron temperature tested by other measurements. (authors)

  8. Effects of Cu stress on maize seedlings using X-ray energy spectrum and FTIR spectra methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Lin; Fu Zhaolin; Qiao Chuanying

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Cu 2+ stress on maize seedlings by using scanning electron microscope, X-ray energy spectrum and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectrometry were investigated, and antioxidative enzymes activities such as SOD, CAT, POD, APX were measured. Results showed that, with the increasing of Cu concentration, the content of chlorophyll decreased, and antioxidative enzyme activities increased at first and then decreased at higher concentration stress. High concentration Cu 2+ treatment twisted the cells' shape and increased copper content on leaf surface, and absorption of other nutrients were also affected. The result of FTIR-ATR analysis showed that the organic content of leaf were changed by Cu 2+ stress. (authors)

  9. Measurement Over Large Solid Angle of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, H. F., III; Schwitters, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in portable muon detectors have made cosmic ray imaging practical for many diverse applications. Working muon attenuation detectors have been built at the University of Texas and are already successfully being used to image tunnels, structures, and Mayan pyramids. Most previous studies have focused on energy measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum from of 1 GeV or higher. We have performed an accurate measurement of the ultra-low energy (muon spectrum down to the acceptance level of our detector, around one hundred MeV. Measurements include angular dependence, with acceptance approaching horizontal. Measurements were made underwater using a custom enclosure in Lake Travis, Austin, TX. This measurement will allow more accurate predictions and simulations of attenuation for small (muon tomography.

  10. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-11-14

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail.

  11. Spectrum and energy levels of six-times-ionized molybdenum (Mo VII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, J.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the kryptonlike ion Mo VII was observed from 140 to 2274 A with sliding-spark discharges on 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. Experimental energies were determined for all levels of the 4s 2 4p 6 , 4s 2 4p 5 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5d, 5f, 5g, and 4s4p 6 4d configurations. A few levels of the 4s 2 4p 4 4d 2 configuration were also found. A total of 399 lines were classified as transitions between 86 observed levels. The observed configurations were theoretically interpreted. The energy parameters determined by least-squares fits to the observed levels are compared with Hartree--Fock calculations. A revised value of the ionization energy was obtained by using the energy of the 4p 5 5g configuration together with an isoelectronically extrapolated value of the effective quantum number n(5g). The adopted limit is 1 013 340±200 cm -1 (125.64±0.02 eV)

  12. Third-Order Density Perturbation and One-Loop Power Spectrum in Dark-Energy-Dominated Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the third-order density perturbation and the one-loop correction to the linear power spectrum in the dark-energy cosmological model. Our main interest is to understand the dark-energy effect on baryon acoustic oscillations in a quasi-nonlinear regime ($k \\approx 0.1h$/Mpc). Analytical solutions and simple fitting formulae are presented for the dark-energy model with the general time-varying equation of state $w(a)$. It turns out that the power spectrum coincides with the approx...

  13. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-04-01

    It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The objective of this work is to improve the performance of existing estimation models of energy expenditure by using machine learning algorithms and several data from different sensors and provide this estimation service in a cloud-based platform. In this study, we used input data such as breathe rate, and hearth rate from three sensors. Inputs are received from a web form and sent to the web service which applies a regression model on Azure cloud platform. During the experiments, we assessed several machine learning models based on regression methods. Our experimental results showed that our novel model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression in conjunction with the median aggregation technique provides the best result among other five regression algorithms. This cloud-based energy expenditure system which uses a web service showed that cloud computing technology is a great opportunity to develop estimation systems and the new model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression with the median aggregation provides remarkable results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Outer Measures on a Commutative Ring Induced by Measures on Its Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzik Dariusz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On a commutative ring R we study outer measures induced by measures on Spec(R. The focus is on examples of such outer measures and on subsets of R that satisfy the Carathéodory condition.

  15. Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Tadao; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ohsawa, Toshihiko

    1981-04-01

    The rotational temperature of nitric oxide gas has been measured by means of a single-beam two-photon excitation spectrum method using a pulsed continuously tunable dye laser. The nitric oxide gas was enclosed at about 40 Torr in a quartz cell which was put in an electric oven. The NO γ (0-0) band and R11+Q21 branches were used to obtain the two-photon excitation spectrum. The rotational temperatures were determined using the fact that molecules are distributed in the rotational levels according to the Boltzmann law. The temperature range was from room temperature to about 470 K. Observed temperatures were in good agreement with cell temperatures which were obtained by using a thermocouple.

  16. Cosmic microwave background dipole spectrum measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Isaacman, R. B.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.; Shafer, R. A.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has determined the dipole spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) from 2 to 20/cm. For each frequency the signal is decomposed by fitting to a monopole, a dipole, and a Galactic template for approximately 60% of the sky. The overall dipole spectrum fits the derivative of a Planck function with an amplitude of 3.343 +/- 0.016 mK (95% confidence level), a temperature of 2.714 +/- 0.022 K (95% confidence level), and an rms deviation of 6 x 10(exp -9) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm limited by a detector and cosmic-ray noise. The monopole temperature is consistent with that determined by direct measurement in the accompanying article by Mather et al.

  17. Landau Quasi-energy Spectrum Destruction for an Electron in Both a Static Magnetic Field and a Resonant Electromagnetic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Free nonrelativistic electrons in both a static magnetic field and an electromagnetic wave are considered. A plane-polarized wave propagates along a magnetic field, its frequency is close to the electron rotation frequency in a magnetic field. Electron spin is taken into account. An electron quasi energy spectrum and steady states (quasi energy states) are constructed. 6 refs

  18. Production of photons with a narrow energy spectrum, starting from high energy electrons; Production de photons de spectre etroit a partir d'electrons de grande energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzara, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    A method for the production of photons with a narrow spectrum and of variable energy, based on the properties of the annihilation in flight of positrons, is examined in detail. The spectra of the photons produced and the yield of the process are given for various conditions. (author) [French] Une methode de production de photons de spectre etroit et d'energie variable, basee sur les proprietes de l'annihilation en vol des positons, est examinee en detail. Le spectre des photons produits, le rendement du processus sont donnes pour diverses conditions. (auteur)

  19. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  20. A nanogenerator as a self-powered sensor for measuring the vibration spectrum of a drum membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aifang; Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-02-01

    A nanogenerator (NG) is a device that converts vibration energy into electricity. Here, a flexible, small size and lightweight NG is successfully demonstrated as an active sensor for detecting the vibration spectrum of a drum membrane without the use of an external power source. The output current/voltage signal of the NG is a direct measure of the strain of the local vibrating drum membrane that contains rich informational content, such as, notably, the vibration frequency, vibration speed and vibration amplitude. In comparison to the laser vibrometer, which is excessively complex and expensive, this kind of small and low cost sensor based on an NG is also capable of detecting the local vibration frequency of a drum membrane accurately. A spatial arrangement of the NGs on the membrane can provide position-dependent vibration information on the surface. The measured frequency spectrum can be understood on the basis of the theoretically calculated vibration modes. This work expands the application of NGs and reveals the potential for developing sound wave detection, environmental/infrastructure monitoring and many more applications.

  1. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J; Ehresmann, B; Zeitlin, C; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Hassler, D M; Reitz, G; Brinza, D E; Appel, J; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Lohf, H; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8±1.2 μGy/day and a dose equivalent of 19±5 μSv/day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6±2 μGy/day and the dose equivalent rate is 30±10 μSv/day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11±4 mSv. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  3. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the li...

  4. [Measurement of plasma parameters in cluster hexagon pattern discharge by optical emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Fang; Shen, Zhong-Kai; Li, Xin-Chun; Liu, Liang; Lu, Ning; Shang, Jie

    2012-09-01

    The cluster hexagon pattern was obtained in a dielectric barrier discharge in air/argon for the first time. Three plasma parameters, i. e. the molecular vibrational temperature, the molecular rotational temperature and the average electron energy of individual cluster in cluster hexagon pattern discharge, were studied by changing the air content. The molecular vibrational temperature and the molecular rotational temperature were calculated using the second positive band system of nitrogen molecules (C 3IIu --> B 3IIg) and the first negative band system of nitrogen molecular ions (B 2Sigma(u)+ --> Chi2 Sigma(g)+). The relative intensities of the first negative system of nitrogen molecular ions (391. 4 nm) and nitrogen molecules emission spectrum line (337.1 nm) were analyzed for studying the variations of the electron energy. It was found that the three plasma parameters of individual cluster in cluster hexagon pattern increase with air content increasing from 16% to 24%.

  5. Collective behaviour of linear perturbation waves observed through the energy density spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsoglio, S [Department of Water Engineering, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Santi, F; Tordella, D, E-mail: stefania.scarsoglio@polito.it [Department of Aeronautics and Space Engineering, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2011-12-22

    We consider the collective behaviour of small three-dimensional transient perturbations in sheared flows. In particular, we observe their varied life history through the temporal evolution of the amplification factor. The spectrum of wave vectors considered fills the range from the size of the external flow scale to the size of the very short dissipative waves. We observe that the amplification factor distribution is scale-invariant. In the condition we analyze, the system is subject to all the physical processes included in the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. With the exception of the nonlinear interaction, these features are the same as those characterizing the turbulent state. The linearized perturbative system offers a great variety of different transient behaviours associated to the parameter combination present in the initial conditions. For the energy spectrum computed by freezing each wave at the instant where its asymptotic condition is met, we ask whether this system is able to show a power-law scaling analogous to the Kolmogorov argument. At the moment, for at least two typical shear flows, the bluff-body wake and the plane Poiseuille flow, the answer is yes.

  6. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  7. The Relationship between Autism Symptoms and Arousal Level in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder, as Measured by Electrodermal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Emily Barbara; Kim, Elizabeth S.; Wall, Carla Anne; Gisin, Eugenia; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen; Chawarska, Kaisa; Shic, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Electrodermal activity was examined as a measure of physiological arousal within a naturalistic play context in 2-year-old toddlers (N = 27) with and without autism spectrum disorder. Toddlers with autism spectrum disorder were found to have greater increases in skin conductance level than their typical peers in response to administered play…

  8. A measurement by BOOMERANG of multiple peaks in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netterfield, C. B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Bernardis, P. de; hide

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background from l = 75 to l = 1025 (10' to 5 degrees) from a combined analysis of four 150 GHz channels in the BOOMERANG experiment. The spectrum contains multiple peaks and minima, as predicted by standard adiabatic-inflationary models in which the primordial plasma undergoes acoustic oscillations.

  9. Automatic DGD and GVD compensation at 640 Gb/s based on scalar radio-frequency spectrum measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paquot, Yvan; Schröder, Jochen; Palushani, Evarist

    2013-01-01

    of separate GVD and DGD compensators using an impairment monitor based on an integrated all-optical radio-frequency (RF) spectrum analyzer. We show that low-bandwidth measurement of only a single tone in the RF spectrum is sufficient for automatic compensation for multiple degrees of freedom using...

  10. THE γ-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband γ-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright γ-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of γ-ray pulsars—i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and γ-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with γ-ray peaks—all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  11. Determination of intensity and energy spectrum of neutrons by bombardment of thallium-203 thick target and its copper substrate with 28.5 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiloo, N.; Raisali, Gh.; Hamidi, S.; Aslani, Gh.

    2007-01-01

    In this research we have determined neutrons spectrum and the intensity that produced from thallium target bombardment. We have applied SRIM and ALICE computer codes to thallium target and its copper substrate for 145 μA of 28.5 MeV incident proton beam from cyclotron Cyclone30. Because of the energy degradation of protons while passing through the thallium target and its copper substrate, the average energy of protons in different depths has been calculated by using SRIM computer code. Then, by applying ALICE computer code for each sub-layer, the neutron production cross sections and their energy spectrum have been calculated to determine the total neutron intensity and spectrum. Using the calculated neutron intensity of 1.22x10 13 n/s as the source, the equivalent dose rate at the distance 6 meters from the target has been calculated by MCNP computer code and the result has been compared with the measured value. The Pb 201 activity has also been calculated as 13.5 Curies. The measured Pb 201 activity by Curie meter CAPINTEC CRC-712 is 13.1 Ci which is in reasonable agreement with the calculated value, bearing in mind the uncertainties in the proposed models and the measurements

  12. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the