WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy spectrum effects

  1. Effects of fault heterogeneity on seismic energy and spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Michele; Santini, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    We study the effects of friction heterogeneity on the dynamics of a seismogenic fault. To this aim, we consider a fault model containing two asperities with different static frictions and a rate-dependent dynamic friction. We consider the seismic events produced by the consecutive failure of the two asperities and study their properties as functions of the ratio between static frictions. In particular, we calculate the moment rate, the stress evolution during fault slip, the average stress drop, the partitioning of energy release, the seismic energy, the far-field waveforms and the spectrum of seismic waves. These quantities depend to various extent on the friction distribution on the fault. In particular, the stress distribution on the fault is always strongly heterogeneous at the beginning of the seismic event. Seismic energy and frictional heat decrease with increasing friction heterogeneity, while seismic efficiency is constant. We obtain an equation relating seismic efficiency to the parameters of the friction law, showing that the efficiency is maximum for smaller values of dynamic friction. The seismic spectrum depends on the friction distribution as to the positions and the values of the minima. However, under the model assumption that the slip durations are the same for both asperities, the corner frequency is independent of the friction distribution, but it depends on the friction law and on the coupling between asperities. The model provides a relation between the total radiated energy and the seismic moment that is consistent with the empirical relation between the two quantities. The fault model with one asperity is also considered as a particular case. The model is applied to the 1965 Rat Islands (Alaska) earthquake and shows the role of fault heterogeneity in controlling the spatial distribution of stress drop as well as the time dependence and the final amount of radiated energy.

  2. Dimensionality effect on two-electron energy spectrum: A fractional-dimension-based formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R.; Gutiérrez, W.; Mikhailov, I. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Fulla, M.R. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Marín, J.H., E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.co [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-07-17

    We analyze the spectrum of two-electron quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement by using the fractional-dimension formulation which allows us to reduce the two-particle problem to two equations for independent particles in an effective space with variable dimension, ranging between two and three for ellipsoidal-shaped quantum dots and between one and two for elliptical-shaped quantum disks. The dependencies of energy levels on the heterostructure sizes for quantum dots, disks and wires are presented. - Highlights: • We report the two-electron eigenenergies in a quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement. • Our model is versatile enough to consider changes in the dimension space from 3 to 2 and 2 to 1. • The two-electron structure is calculated in integer and fractional dimensional spaces. • The two-electron energy structure is sensitive to the quantum dot size and morphology changes. • The electron–electron Coulomb interaction is strongly dependent on the space dimensionality.

  3. Dosimetric effects of energy spectrum uncertainties in radiation therapy with laser-driven particle beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, S; Wilkens, J J

    2012-03-07

    Laser-driven particle acceleration is a potentially cost-efficient and compact new technology that might replace synchrotrons or cyclotrons for future proton or heavy-ion radiation therapy. Since the energy spectrum of laser-accelerated particles is rather wide, compared to the monoenergetic beams of conventional machines, studies have proposed the usage of broader spectra for the treatment of at least certain parts of the target volume to make the process more efficient. The thereby introduced additional uncertainty in the applied energy spectrum is analysed in this note. It is shown that the uncertainty can be categorized into a change of the total number of particles, and a change in the energy distribution of the particles. The former one can be monitored by a simple fluence detector and cancels for a high number of statistically fluctuating shots. The latter one, the redistribution of a fixed number of particles to different energy bins in the window of transmitted energies of the energy selection system, only introduces smaller changes to the resulting depth dose curve. Therefore, it might not be necessary to monitor this uncertainty for all applied shots. These findings might enable an easier uncertainty management for particle therapy with broad energy spectra.

  4. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Davenport, David; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems.

  5. Effects of synchrotron radiation spectrum energy on polymethyl methacrylate photosensitivity to deep x-ray lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Mekaru, H; Hattori, T

    2003-01-01

    Since X-ray lithography requires a high photon flux to achieve deep resist exposure, a synchrotron radiation beam, which is not monochromatized, is generally used as a light source. If the synchrotron radiation beam is monochromatized, photon flux will decrease rapidly. Because of this reason, the wavelength dependence of the resist sensitivity has not been investigated for deep X-ray lithography. Measuring the spectrum of a white beam with a Si solid-state detector (SSD) is difficult because a white beam has a high intensity and an SSD has a high sensitivity. We were able to measure the spectrum and the photocurrent of a white beam from a beam line used for deep X-ray lithography by keeping the ring current below 0.05 mA. We evaluated the characteristics of the output beam based on the measured spectrum and photocurrent, and used them to investigate the relationship between the total exposure energy and the dose-processing depth with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). We found that it is possible to guess the p...

  6. Effect of fluctuations of the linear feedback coefficient on the frequency spectrum of averaged temperature in a simple energy balance climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using the stochastic approach, we analyze the effect of fluctuations of the linear feedback coefficient in a simple zero-dimensional energy balance climate model on the frequency spectrum of averaged temperature. An expression is obtained for the model spectrum in the weak noise approximation. Its features are investigated in two cases: when the frequency spectrum of the feedback coefficient is a constant (white noise) and when the spectrum contains one resonant frequency and has a Lorentz form. We consider the issue whether the feedback coefficient fluctuations can be an independent mechanism for a qualitative change in the spectrum of the climate system.

  7. Shallow donor inside core/shell spherical nanodot: Effect of nanostructure size and dielectric environment on energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafai, A.; Dujardin, F.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Ahuja, R.

    2017-11-01

    We have reported the impact of the core and shell radii on the energy spectrum of centered shallow donor confined inside CdSe/ZnTe core/shell quantum dot and ZnTe/CdSe inverted core/shell quantum dot. The dielectric discontinuity between the nanosystems and their surrounding medium was considered. In order to examine the behavior of the donor binding energy as a function of the spatial parameters a variational approach within the framework of the effective-mass approximation was deployed. Our model shows that for a fixed shell radius the increase of the core radius value blue-shifts the binding energy of the donor inside inverted core/shell quantum dot only if the value of the core to shell radii ratio is between 0.9 and 1, otherwise it is red-shifted. By contrast, for core/shell quantum dot system the binding energy is red-shifted by increasing the core radius for a fixed nanostructure size and for all values of the core to shell radii ratio. We have also found that the donor binding energy values are more important in a core/shell nanodot than in an inverted core/shell quantum dot.

  8. Decay energy of Fe from its inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the emission of a continuous spectrum of electromagnetic radiation. ... Coulomb effect. Martin and Glauber (MG) [3] worked out a theory taking into account the relativistic effects and all the electrostatic effects around the nucleus. .... Бib either positive or negative towards the end of the energy spectrum, wherenil counts are.

  9. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40.

  10. Evidence for cluster shape effects on the kinetic energy spectrum in thermionic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Lépine, F; Baguenard, B; Pagliarulo, F; Concina, B; Bordas, C; Parneix, P

    2007-11-28

    Experimental kinetic energy release distributions obtained for the thermionic emission from C(n) (-) clusters, 10< or =n< or =20, exhibit significant non-Boltzmann variations. Using phase space theory, these different features are analyzed and interpreted as the consequence of contrasting shapes in the daughter clusters; linear and nonlinear isomers have clearly distinct signatures. These results provide a novel indirect structural probe for atomic clusters associated with their thermionic emission spectra.

  11. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  12. New calorimetric all-particle energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Both the maximum size N sub m and the sea level muon size N sub mu have been used separately to find the all-particle energy spectrum in the air shower domain. However the conversion required, whether from N sub m to E or from N sub mu to E, has customarily been carried out by means of calculations based on an assumed cascase model. It is shown here that by combining present data on N sub m and N sub mu spectra with data on: (1); the energy spectrum of air shower muons and (2) the average width of the electron profile, one can obtain empirical values of the N sub m to E and N sub mu to E conversion factors, and an empirical calorimetric all-particle spectrum, in the energy range 2 x 10 to the 6th power E 2 x 10 to the 9th power GeV.

  13. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  14. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  15. On the possibility of determining an effective energy spectrum of clinical electron beams from percentage depth dose (PDD) data of broad beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengming, L; Jette, D

    1999-08-01

    Experiments have already shown that obvious differences exist between the dose distribution of electron beams of a clinical accelerator in a water phantom and the dose distribution of monoenergetic electrons of nominal energy of the clinical accelerator in water, because the electron beams which reach the water surface travelling through the collimation system of the accelerator are no longer monoenergetic. It is evident that, while calculating precisely the dose distribution of any incident electron beams, the energy spectrum of the incident electron beam must be taken into consideration. In this note we shall present a method for determining an effective energy spectrum of clinical electron beams from PDD data (percentage depth dose data). It is well known that there is an integral equation of the first kind which links the energy spectrum of an incident electron beam with PDD through the dose distribution of monoenergetic electrons in the medium, as a kernel function in the integral equation. In this note, the integral equation of the first kind will be solved by using the regularization method. The bipartition model of electron transport will be used to calculate the kernel function, namely the energy deposition due to monoenergetic electron beams in the medium.

  16. NOTE: On the possibility of determining an effective energy spectrum of clinical electron beams from percentage depth dose (PDD) data of broad beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengming, Luo; Jette, David

    1999-08-01

    Experiments have already shown that obvious differences exist between the dose distribution of electron beams of a clinical accelerator in a water phantom and the dose distribution of monoenergetic electrons of nominal energy of the clinical accelerator in water, because the electron beams which reach the water surface travelling through the collimation system of the accelerator are no longer monoenergetic. It is evident that, while calculating precisely the dose distribution of any incident electron beams, the energy spectrum of the incident electron beam must be taken into consideration. In this note we shall present a method for determining an effective energy spectrum of clinical electron beams from PDD data (percentage depth dose data). It is well known that there is an integral equation of the first kind which links the energy spectrum of an incident electron beam with PDD through the dose distribution of monoenergetic electrons in the medium, as a kernel function in the integral equation. In this note, the integral equation of the first kind will be solved by using the regularization method. The bipartition model of electron transport will be used to calculate the kernel function, namely the energy deposition due to monoenergetic electron beams in the medium.

  17. FACT. Energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temme, Fabian; Einecke, Sabrina; Buss, Jens [TU Dortmund, Experimental Physics 5, Otto-Hahn-Str.4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: FACT-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope is the first Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope which uses silicon photon detectors (G-APDs aka SiPM) as photo sensors. With more than four years of operation, FACT proved an application of SiPMs is suitable for the field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. Due to the stable flux at TeV energies, the Crab Nebula is handled as a ''standard candle'' in Cherenkov astronomy. The analysis of its energy spectrum and comparison with other experiments, allows to evaluate the performance of FACT. A modern analysis chain, based on data stream handling and multivariate analysis methods was developed in close cooperation with the department of computer science at the TU Dortmund. In this talk, this analysis chain and its application are presented. Further to this, results, including the energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula, measured with FACT, are shown.

  18. Energy Spectrum and Optical Absorption Spectrum of Fullerene C70 Within the Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silant'ev, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The energy spectrum of fullerene C70 is obtained within the framework of the Hubbard model in the static fluctuation approximation. The energy states are classified and the allowed transitions in the energy spectrum of fullerene C70 are determined using the methods of group theory. Assignments of optical absorption bands experimentally observed for C70 fullerene are suggested based on this spectrum.

  19. Measurements of neutron capture effects on Cd, Sm and Gd in lunar samples with implications for the neutron energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, D. G.; De Laeter, J. R.; Rosman, K. J. R.

    2001-04-01

    The bombardment of the lunar surface by cosmic rays produces secondary neutrons, some of which are thermalized by the lunar soil and then interact strongly with the isotopes of Cd, Gd and Sm which have high neutron capture cross sections at thermal energies causing changes in their isotopic compositions. We have measured these changes in samples from the Apollo 14, 16 and 17 missions using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Changes of 114Cd/113Cd of 0.3-0.5% in samples 60501,105, 65701,23 and 72161,73, of 0.4 and 0.8% in 158Gd/157Gd in samples 14163,848 and 60501,105 and of 0.8, 1.2 and 0.06% for 150Sm/149Sm in samples 14163,848 and 60501,105 and 74220,125 respectively, have been observed. This is the first time that neutron capture on Cd has been detected in lunar samples. Thermal neutrons are captured preferentially at resonance energies of 0.03 eV by 155Gd and 157Gd, at 0.09 eV by 149Sm and at 0.178 eV by 113Cd. A comparison of the changes in 114Cd/113Cd, 156Gd/155Gd, 158Gd/157Gd and 150Sm/149Sm due to neutron capture can therefore indicate the energy distribution of the neutrons. Previous work has compared changes in 158Gd/157Gd and 150Sm/149Sm, while this study extends the comparison to 114Cd/113Cd, where the resonance energy is significantly higher. This has enabled us to confirm evidence for a harder neutron energy spectrum in lunar soil than is predicted theoretically. This can be seen in significantly higher capture rates than predicted for 149Sm compared to 157Gd. We also present evidence of enhanced capture rates on 113Cd compared with 149Sm and 157Gd. The concentrations of Cd, Gd and Sm in nine lunar samples have also been measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry with Cd being measured in lunar samples for the first time by this method. While Cd was found to be heterogeneously distributed in some samples, Gd and Sm showed good agreement with previous measurements, except for sample 14163,848 where it was significantly lower.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on energy spectrum and localization of electron in CdS/HgS/CdS/HgS/CdS multilayered spherical nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holovatsky, V.A., E-mail: ktf@chnu.edu.ua; Bernik, I.B.; Yakhnevych, M. Ya.

    2017-03-01

    The theoretical investigation of magnetic field effect on energy spectrum and localization of the electron and oscillator strengths of intraband quantum transitions in the nanostructure CdS/HgS/CdS/HgS/CdS is performed. The calculations are made in the framework of effective mass approximation and rectangular potential barriers model using the method of the expansion of quasi-particle wave functions over the complete basis of functions obtained as the exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for the electron in the nanostructure without the magnetic field. It is shown that the magnetic field violates the spherical symmetry of the system and takes off the degeneration of energy spectrum with respect to the magnetic quantum number. The energy of the electron in the states with m≥0 increases when magnetic field enhances; for the states with m<0 these dependences are non-monotonous (decreasing at first and then increasing). Moreover, the ground state of electron is formed alternately by the states with m=0, −1, −2, …. Magnetic field influences on the distribution of quasi-particle density. It is shown that the electron significantly changes its localization in the nanostructure with two potential wells tunneling through the potential barrier under the effect of magnetic field, changing the oscillator strengths of intraband quantum transitions.

  1. Interference Energy Spectrum of the Infinite Square Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordecai Waegell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain superposition states of the 1-D infinite square well have transient zeros at locations other than the nodes of the eigenstates that comprise them. It is shown that if an infinite potential barrier is suddenly raised at some or all of these zeros, the well can be split into multiple adjacent infinite square wells without affecting the wavefunction. This effects a change of the energy eigenbasis of the state to a basis that does not commute with the original, and a subsequent measurement of the energy now reveals a completely different spectrum, which we call the interference energy spectrum of the state. This name is appropriate because the same splitting procedure applied at the stationary nodes of any eigenstate does not change the measurable energy of the state. Of particular interest, this procedure can result in measurable energies that are greater than the energy of the highest mode in the original superposition, raising questions about the conservation of energy akin to those that have been raised in the study of superoscillations. An analytic derivation is given for the interference spectrum of a given wavefunction Ψ ( x , t with N known zeros located at points s i = ( x i , t i . Numerical simulations were used to verify that a barrier can be rapidly raised at a zero of the wavefunction without significantly affecting it. The interpretation of this result with respect to the conservation of energy and the energy-time uncertainty relation is discussed, and the idea of alternate energy eigenbases is fleshed out. The question of whether or not a preferred discrete energy spectrum is an inherent feature of a particle’s quantum state is examined.

  2. End of the cosmic neutrino energy spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Anchordoqui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There may be a high-energy cutoff of neutrino events in IceCube data. In particular, IceCube does not observe either continuum events above 2 PeV, or the Standard Model Glashow-resonance events expected at 6.3 PeV. There are also no higher energy neutrino signatures in the ANITA and Auger experiments. This absence of high-energy neutrino events motivates a fundamental restriction on neutrino energies above a few PeV. We postulate a simple scenario to terminate the neutrino spectrum that is Lorentz-invariance violating, but with a limiting neutrino velocity that is always smaller than the speed of light. If the limiting velocity of the neutrino applies also to its associated charged lepton, then a significant consequence is that the two-body decay modes of the charged pion are forbidden above two times the maximum neutrino energy, while the radiative decay modes are suppressed at higher energies. Such stabilized pions may serve as cosmic ray primaries.

  3. Resource management for energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Deyu; Zhou, Haibo; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2017-01-01

    This SpringerBrief offers a comprehensive review and in-depth discussion of the current research on resource management. The authors explain how to best utilize harvested energy and temporally available licensed spectrum. Throughout the brief, the primary focus is energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks (ESHNs) including energy harvesting (EH)-powered spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access. To efficiently collect data through the available licensed spectrum, this brief examines the joint management of energy and spectrum. An EH-powered spectrum sensing and management scheme for Heterogeneous Spectrum Harvesting Sensor Networks (HSHSNs) is presented in this brief. The scheme dynamically schedules the data sensing and spectrum access of sensors in ESHSNs to optimize the network utility, while considering the stochastic nature of EH process, PU activities and channel conditions. This brief also provides useful insights for the practical resource management scheme design for ESHSNs and motivates a ne...

  4. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  5. An Investigation into the Accuracy of the Photon Beam Energy Spectrum Modeled by the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and Its Effects on Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Noah D.

    created in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport package and PDD curves were collected for both Pinnacle3 and PSF-MC modeled spectra. The direct effect of beam spectra on dose calculations in realistic patient plans was evaluated as the final step. New photon beam models were created in the Pinnacle3 TPS by replacing the originally modeled spectra with spectra obtained from the Varian PSF and an alternate version of the Edge machine was commissioned using the new photon beam models. A number of previously treated lung and brain patient plans that used 6 and 10 MV FFF beams and the conformal arc modality were identified. These plans were recalculated using the newly commissioned machine and were renormalized before comparing their dose distributions to those found in the original plans. Plans were selected so that tumors were located in areas with high heterogeneities and high dose gradients, increasing the effect that a change in photon spectrum had on the dose distribution. Differences between plan sets were evaluated by comparing maximum doses to targets, dose gradient, target conformity, and maximum doses to local critical structures. The spectral distributions for the PSF MC-modeled spectra and spectra modeled by other TPSs were found to be shifted so that lower energy photons had greater intensities compared to the Pinnacle3 modeled spectrum for both 6 and 10 MV FFF beams. The average photon energies for spectra modeled outside the Pinnacle3 TPS were likewise lower: average photon energy of the 6 MV FFF PSF MC spectrum was EAVG=0.537 MV, down from the Pinnacle3 spectrum value of EAVG=1.224 MV, and for the 10 MV FFF PSF MC spectrum EAVG=0.750 MV, down from the Pinnacle3 spectrum value of EAVG=1.545 MV. The Pinnacle3 calculated PDD curve using the Pinnacle3 modeled spectrum best fit measured commissioning data, although the measured data fell in between PDD curves modeled in MCNP using Pinnacle3 and PSF MC modeled spectra. Modeled PDD curves created in

  6. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  7. Energy detection for spectrum sensing in cognitive radio

    CERN Document Server

    Atapattu, Saman; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on the current state-of-the-art research on spectrum sensing by using energy detection, a low-complexity and low-cost technique. It includes a comprehensive summary of recent research, fundamental theories, possible architectures, useful performance measurements of energy detection and applications of energy detection. Concise, practical chapters explore conventional energy detectors, alternative forms of energy detectors, performance measurements, diversity techniques and cooperative networks. The careful analysis enables reader to identify the most efficient techn

  8. Retrieval of the energy spectrum in neutron TOF measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.; Walker, J.J.

    1977-12-01

    The problem of retrieving the time dependence of the neutron energy spectrum from the detector current data in Faraday-cup experiments is studied. The time-dependent energy spectrum can be retrieved only when the neutron source in question meets a certain criterion. A detailed analytic formulation for the folding process is presented. The method that can be used to unfold the data in the retrievable case is explained in detail. 2 figures.

  9. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  10. Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum in very anisothermal flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain_serra@bbox.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Toutant, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.toutant@univ-Perp.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Bataille, Françoise, E-mail: francoise.bataille@promes.cnrs.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we find that the Kolmogorov scaling law is no longer valid when the flow is submitted to strong dilatational effects caused by high temperature gradients. As a result, in addition to the nonlinear time scale, there is a much shorter “temperature gradients” time scale. We propose a model that estimates the time scale of the triple decorrelation incorporating the influences of the temperature gradient. The model agrees with the results from the thermal large-eddy simulations of different Reynolds numbers and temperature gradients. This Letter provides a better understanding of the very anisothermal turbulent flow. -- Highlights: ► Turbulent flows subject to high temperature gradients are considered. ► The new “temperature gradients” time scale is determined. ► A generalized energy spectrum is developed to incorporate the effects of temperature gradient.

  11. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  12. Hadron intensity and energy spectrum at 4380 m above level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cananov, S. D.; Chadranyan, E. K.; Khizanishvili, L. A.; Ladaria, N. K.; Roinishvili, N. N.

    1985-01-01

    The flux value of hadrons with E (sup gamma) h or = 5 TeV, where E (sup gamma) h or = is the energy transferred into electromagnetic component is presented. It is shown that the energy spectrum slope beta of hadrons with E h or = 20 TeV is equal to 1.9.

  13. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2017-05-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  14. Multislot Simultaneous Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in Cognitive Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive radio (CR, the spectrum sensing of the primary user (PU may consume some electrical power from the battery capacity of the secondary user (SU, resulting in a decrease in the transmission power of the SU. In this paper, a multislot simultaneous spectrum sensing and energy harvesting model is proposed, which uses the harvested radio frequency (RF energy of the PU signal to supply the spectrum sensing. In the proposed model, the sensing duration is divided into multiple sensing slots consisting of one local-sensing subslot and one energy-harvesting subslot. If the PU is detected to be present in the local-sensing subslot, the SU will harvest RF energy of the PU signal in the energy-harvesting slot, otherwise, the SU will continue spectrum sensing. The global decision on the presence of the PU is obtained through combining local sensing results from all the sensing slots by adopting “Or-logic Rule”. A joint optimization problem of sensing time and time splitter factor is proposed to maximize the throughput of the SU under the constraints of probabilities of false alarm and detection and energy harvesting. The simulation results have shown that the proposed model can clearly improve the maximal throughput of the SU compared to the traditional sensing-throughput tradeoff model.

  15. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  16. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  17. Energy and spectrum of BeO molecule under the electric field from different directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, M.; Guo, F. J.; Yan, A. Y.; Zhang, C. W.; Miao, F.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the density functional theory DFT/ B3LYP at 6-311g level, the ground states of BeO molecule are optimized. The effects of electric field on the bond length, the system energy, the charge distribution, the energy levels, the HOMO-LUMO gaps and the infrared spectrum of BeO molecule are

  18. Prime factorization of arbitrary integers with a logarithmic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleisberg, F.; Di Pumpo, F.; Wolff, G.; Schleich, W. P.

    2018-02-01

    We propose an iterative scheme to factor numbers based on the quantum dynamics of an ensemble of interacting bosonic atoms stored in a trap where the single-particle energy spectrum depends logarithmically on the quantum number. When excited by a time-dependent interaction these atoms perform Rabi oscillations between the ground state and an energy state characteristic of the factors. The number to be factored is encoded into the frequency of the sinusoidally modulated interaction. We show that a measurement of the energy of the atoms at a time chosen at random yields the factors with probability one half. We conclude by discussing a protocol to obtain the desired prime factors employing a logarithmic energy spectrum which consists of prime numbers only.

  19. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  20. The invariance of current energy fourier spectrum of discrete real signals on finite intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarev V. A.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Digital spectral analysis of signals based on DFT has a number of advantages. However, the transition from analog to digital methods and techniques is accompanied by a number of undesirable effects. Signals in each subject area usually have their own specifics. Therefore, it is necessary to study these effects in applications of spectral Fourier analysis. Such research is important for three reasons. Firstly, DFT properties are accurate, have their own specificity and significantly differ from the properties of the Fourier transform of continuous signals. Secondly, signals in each subject area have their own specificity. Thirdly, researchers often have prevailing knowledge in some particular domain, rather than in the field of digital signal processing techniques. As a result, in practice, some of the processes and effects arising in applications of digital spectral analysis, unfortunately, escape the attention of researchers which can result in erroneous conclusions. The paper deals with the problems of measuring Fourier spectrum of signals in the base of discrete exponential functions. Methods and algorithms of sliding measurements of energy Fourier spectrum of signals on finite intervals were described. The invariance of current energy Fourier spectrum to moving discrete real signals (which are not periodic were investigated. The authors identify a new effect of digital spectral analysis — the effect of non-invariance of the current energy Fourier spectrum. Theoretical and practical results of analysis of invariance of current energy Fourier spectrum of tonal components are shown. The conducted studies allow us: — to see in a new light the measurement results on finite intervals of current Fourier spectrum and the current energy Fourier spectra of signals; give a numerical estimate of the non-invariance of the current energy Fourier spectrum of real tonal components. — to increase the effectiveness of digital spectral analysis in its

  1. Calculation of energy spectrum of C isotope with modified Yukawa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-12

    Sep 12, 2016 ... Abstract. In this paper, we have calculated the energy spectrum of 12C isotope in two-cluster models, 3α cluster model and 8Be + α cluster model. We use the modified Yukawa potential for interaction between the clusters and solve the Schrödinger equation using Nikiforov–Uvarov method to calculate the ...

  2. Decay energy of 55 Fe from its inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Several measurements of decay energy using the inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum (IB) due to radiative electron capture in 55Fe has been made. But the results are not uniform. Hence another attempt has been made at the same. Experimental data was obtained with a 4.445 cm. dia × 5.08 cm thick NaI (Tl) ...

  3. Calculation of energy spectrum of 12 C isotope with modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cluster models, 3 α cluster model and 8 Be + α cluster model. We use the modified Yukawa potential for interaction between theclusters and solve the Schrödinger equation using Nikiforov–Uvarov method to calculate the energy spectrum. Then, we ...

  4. Fast Two-Step Energy Detection for Spectrum Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum sensing is one of the key tasks in cognitive radio. This paper proposes a fast two-step energy detection (FED algorithm for spectrum sensing via improving the sampling process of conventional energy detection (CED. The algorithm adaptively selects N-point or 2N-point sampling by comparing its observed energy with prefixed double thresholds, and thereby is superior in sampling time and detection speed. Moreover, under the constraint of constant false alarm, this paper optimizes the thresholds from maximizing detection probability point of view. Theoretical analyses and simulation results show that, compared with CED, the proposed FED can achieve significant gain in detection speed at the expense of slight accuracy loss. Specifically, within high signal-to-noise ratio regions, as much as 25% of samples can be reduced.

  5. Analysis of neutron spectrum effects on primary damage in tritium breeding blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Hee, E-mail: cyh871@snu.ac.kr [School of Energy Systems Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Han Gyu [School of Energy Systems Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The effect of neutron spectrum on primary damages in a structural material of a tritium breeding blanket is investigated with a newly established recoil spectrum estimation system. First, a recoil spectrum generation code is developed to obtain the energy spectrum of primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) for a given neutron spectrum utilizing the latest ENDF/B data. Secondly, a method for approximating the high energy tail of the recoil spectrum is introduced to avoid expensive molecular dynamics calculations for high energy PKAs using the concept of recoil energy of the secondary knock-on atoms originated by the INtegration of CAScades (INCAS) model. Thirdly, the modified spectrum is combined with a set of molecular dynamics calculation results to estimate the primary damage parameters such as the number of surviving point defects. Finally, the neutron spectrum is varied by changing the material of the spectral shifter and the result in primary damage parameters is examined.

  6. Analysis of neutron spectrum effects on primary damage in tritium breeding blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Hee; Joo, Han Gyu

    2012-07-01

    The effect of neutron spectrum on primary damages in a structural material of a tritium breeding blanket is investigated with a newly established recoil spectrum estimation system. First, a recoil spectrum generation code is developed to obtain the energy spectrum of primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) for a given neutron spectrum utilizing the latest ENDF/B data. Secondly, a method for approximating the high energy tail of the recoil spectrum is introduced to avoid expensive molecular dynamics calculations for high energy PKAs using the concept of recoil energy of the secondary knock-on atoms originated by the INtegration of CAScades (INCAS) model. Thirdly, the modified spectrum is combined with a set of molecular dynamics calculation results to estimate the primary damage parameters such as the number of surviving point defects. Finally, the neutron spectrum is varied by changing the material of the spectral shifter and the result in primary damage parameters is examined.

  7. On the Energy Spectrum of Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Perez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^{3} mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state magnetohydrodynamics turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfvén modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^{+}(k_{⊥} and E^{-}(k_{⊥}, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, which is consistent with phenomenological models that include scale-dependent dynamic alignment. For the imbalanced case, with E^{+}>E^{-}, the simulations show that E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2} for all Reynolds numbers considered, while E^{+} has a slightly steeper spectrum at small Re. As the Reynolds number increases, E^{+} flattens. Since E^{±} are pinned at the dissipation scale and anchored at the driving scales, we postulate that at sufficiently high Re the spectra will become parallel in the inertial range and scale as E^{+}∝E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2}. Questions regarding the universality of the spectrum and the value of the “Kolmogorov constant” are discussed.

  8. Model-based x-ray energy spectrum estimation algorithm from CT scanning data with spectrum filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of technology, the traditional X-ray CT can't meet the modern medical and industry needs for component distinguish and identification. This is due to the inconsistency of X-ray imaging system and reconstruction algorithm. In the current CT systems, X-ray spectrum produced by X-ray source is continuous in energy range determined by tube voltage and energy filter, and the attenuation coefficient of object is varied with the X-ray energy. So the distribution of X-ray energy spectrum plays an important role for beam-hardening correction, dual energy CT image reconstruction or dose calculation. However, due to high ill-condition and ill-posed feature of system equations of transmission measurement data, statistical fluctuations of X ray quantum and noise pollution, it is very hard to get stable and accurate spectrum estimation using existing methods. In this paper, a model-based X-ray energy spectrum estimation method from CT scanning data with energy spectrum filter is proposed. First, transmission measurement data were accurately acquired by CT scan and measurement using phantoms with different energy spectrum filter. Second, a physical meaningful X-ray tube spectrum model was established with weighted gaussian functions and priori information such as continuity of bremsstrahlung and specificity of characteristic emission and estimation information of average attenuation coefficient. The parameter in model was optimized to get the best estimation result for filtered spectrum. Finally, the original energy spectrum was reconstructed from filtered spectrum estimation with filter priori information. Experimental results demonstrate that the stability and accuracy of X ray energy spectrum estimation using the proposed method are improved significantly.

  9. Energy-Efficient Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum access employing cognitive radios has been proposed, in order to opportunistically use underutilized spectrum portions of a heavily licensed electromagnetic spectrum. Cognitive radios opportunistically share the spectrum, while avoiding any harmful interference to the primary

  10. Statistical Methods for Investigating the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, J.D.; Becker, B.R.; Gold, M.S.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Urbář, J.

    The cosmic ray energy spectrum is well known to follow a power-law over many orders of magnitude. The question of whether the spectrum exhibits a cut-off is of primary importance. Following our Astro. Part. Phys. publication (astro-ph/0610865), we describe two statistical tests and apply them to the AGASA and preliminary (ICRC-2005) Auger Cosmic Ray Energy spectra in an attempt to find deviation from a pure power-law. The first test is constructed from the probability distribution for the maximum event of a sample drawn from a power-law. The second employs the TP-statistic, a function defined to deviate from zero when the sample deviates from the power-law form, regardless of the value of the power index. The AGASA data show no significant deviation from a power-law when subjected to both tests. Applying these tests to the Auger spectrum suggests deviation from a power-law. We also discuss the application of these tests to un-binned data thus showing a statistical advantage in un-binned verses binned analysis.

  11. Spectrum sensing algorithm based on autocorrelation energy in cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shengwei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shibing

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive radio networks have wide applications in the smart home, personal communications and other wireless communication. Spectrum sensing is the main challenge in cognitive radios. This paper proposes a new spectrum sensing algorithm which is based on the autocorrelation energy of signal received. By taking the autocorrelation energy of the received signal as the statistics of spectrum sensing, the effect of the channel noise on the detection performance is reduced. Simulation results show that the algorithm is effective and performs well in low signal-to-noise ratio. Compared with the maximum generalized eigenvalue detection (MGED) algorithm, function of covariance matrix based detection (FMD) algorithm and autocorrelation-based detection (AD) algorithm, the proposed algorithm has 2 11 dB advantage.

  12. Energy efficient cross layer design for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbasi, Abdulrahman

    2016-10-06

    We propose a cross layer design that optimizes the energy efficiency of spectrum sharing systems. The energy per good bit (EPG) is considered as an energy efficiency metric. We optimize the secondary user\\'s transmission power and media access frame length to minimize the EPG metric. We protect the primary user transmission via an outage probability constraint. The non-convex targeted problem is optimized by utilizing the generalized convexity theory and verifying the strictly pseudo-convex structure of the problem. Analytical results of the optimal power and frame length are derived. We also used these results in proposing an algorithm, which guarantees the existence of a global optimal solution. Selected numerical results show the improvement of the proposed system compared to other systems. © 2016 IEEE.

  13. Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices by Marc Litz...MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7082 September 2014 Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN...Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  14. Energy Spectrum Extraction and Optimal Imaging via Dual-Energy Material Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2015-01-01

    Inferior soft-tissue contrast resolution is a major limitation of current CT scanners. The aim of the study is to improve the contrast resolution of CT scanners using dual-energy acquisition. Based on dual-energy material decomposition, the proposed method starts with extracting the outgoing energy spectrum by polychromatic forward projecting the material-selective images. The extracted spectrum is then reweighted to boost the soft-tissue contrast. A simulated water cylinder phantom with inserts that contain a series of six solutions of varying iodine concentration (range, 0-20 mg/mL) is used to evaluate the proposed method. Results show the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean energy difference between the extracted energy spectrum and the spectrum acquired using an energy-resolved photon counting detector(PCD), are 0.044 and 0.01 keV, respectively. Compared to the method using the standard energy-integrating detectors, dose normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) for the proposed method are improved fro...

  15. The energy spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene within the Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silant’ev, A. V., E-mail: kvvant@rambler.ru [Mari State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Anticommutator Green’s functions and the energy spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene are calculated in the approximation of static fluctuations within the Hubbard model. On the basis of this spectrum, an interpretation is proposed for the experimentally observed optical absorption bands of C{sub 60} fullerene. The parameters of C{sub 60} fullerene that characterize it within the Hubbard model are calculated by the optical absorption spectrum.

  16. Advanced Energy Detector Based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing In Cognitive Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu; Seehra Ameeta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive radio is a befitting hopeful technology for future. Spectrum sensing is the most critical function of cognitive radio. Most of the spectrums sensing processes proposed earlier become impractical at lower signal to noise ratio conditions. Paper presents advanced cooperative spectrum sensing technique used in cognitive radio (CR) systems. By spectrum sensing it detects the presence of a primary user (PU) on a concerned spectrum. The accuracy of spectrum sensing depends on both sensing...

  17. Lorentz Invariance Violation and the Observed Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, S. T.; Stecker, F. W.

    2009-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn of photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then compare these results with the experimental UHECR data from Auger and HiRes. Based on these data, we find a best fit amount of LIV of 4.5+1:5 ..4:5 x 10(exp -23),consistent with an upper limit of 6 x 10(exp -23). This possible amount of LIV can lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray spectrum at higher energies than presently observed. Such an LIV recovery effect can be tested observationally using future detectors.

  18. Excitation spectrum and high-energy plasmons in single-layer and multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shengjun; Roldán, Rafael; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we study the excitation spectrum of single-layer and multilayer graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation. The dynamical polarizability of graphene is computed using a full π-band tight-binding model, considering the possibility of interlayer hopping in the calculation. The effect of electron-electron interaction is considered within the random phase approximation. We further discuss the effect of disorder in the spectrum, which leads to a smearing of the absorption peaks. Our results show a redshift of the π-plasmon dispersion of single-layer graphene with respect to graphite, in agreement with experimental results. The inclusion of interlayer hopping in the kinetic Hamiltonian of multilayer graphene is found to be very important to properly capture the low energy region of the excitation spectrum.

  19. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  20. Evaluation of Kolmogorov - Smirnov Test and Energy Detector Techniques for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Real Channel Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lekomtcev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive radio technology allows solving one of the main issues of current wireless communication technologies, namely a deficit of vacant spectrum. A dynamic spectrum access used in the cognitive radio networks (CRN gives an ability to access an unused spectrum in real time. Cooperative spectrum sensing is the most effective method for spectrum holes detecting. It combines sensing information of multiple cognitive radio users. In this paper, an experimental evaluation of spectrum sensing methods based on the Kolmogorov - Smirnov statistical test and Energy Detector using the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP devices synchronized through a MIMO cable and with further processing in the GNU Radio and Matlab software are presented. Three hard decision fusion schemes are analyzed. Simulation comparison between these rules is presented via Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves. The influence of real channel with interferences is compared in contrast to commonly assumed AWGN channel model of vacant channel noise.

  1. Energy Efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Using Distributed Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukkumar R.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio (CR is a promising and potential technique to enable secondary users (SUs or unlicenced users to exploit the unused spectrum resources effectively possessed by primary users (PUs or licenced users. The proven clustering approach is used to organize nodes in the network into the logical groups to attain energy efficiency, network scalability, and stability for improving the sensing accuracy in CR through cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS. In this paper, a distributed dynamic load balanced clustering (DDLBC algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, each member in the cluster is to calculate the cooperative gain, residual energy, distance, and sensing cost from the neighboring clusters to perform the optimal decision. Each member in a cluster participates in selecting a cluster head (CH through cooperative gain, and residual energy that minimises network energy consumption and enhances the channel sensing. First, we form the number of clusters using the Markov decision process (MDP model to reduce the energy consumption in a network. In this algorithm, CR users effectively utilize the PUs reporting time slots of unavailability. The simulation results reveal that the clusters convergence, energy efficiency, and accuracy of channel sensing increased considerably by using the proposed algorithm.

  2. Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum.......The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum....

  3. Combined Pre-Distortion and Censoring for Bandwidth-Efficient and Energy-Efficient Fusion of Spectrum Sensing Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Guilherme Pedro; Guimarães, Dayan Adionel; Mendes, Luciano Leonel; Pimenta, Tales Cleber

    2017-03-22

    This paper describes a novel scheme for the fusion of spectrum sensing information in cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio applications. The scheme combines a spectrum-efficient, pre-distortion-based fusion strategy with an energy-efficient censoring-based fusion strategy to achieve the combined effect of reduction in bandwidth and power consumption during the transmissions of the local decisions to the fusion center. Expressions for computing the key performance metrics of the spectrum sensing of the proposed scheme are derived and validated by means of computer simulations. An extensive analysis of the overall energy efficiency is made, along with comparisons with reference strategies proposed in the literature. It is demonstrated that the proposed fusion scheme can outperform the energy efficiency attained by these reference strategies. Moreover, it attains approximately the same global decision performance of the best among these strategies.

  4. Neutrino Spectrum Distortion Due to Oscillations and its BBN Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilova, Daniela P

    2004-01-01

    We study the distortion of electron neutrino energy spectrum due to oscillations with the sterile neutrino nu_e nu_s, and its influence on BBN for different initial populations of the sterile state delta N_s at the onset of oscillations. Only the case of an initially empty sterile state was studied in previous publications. We obtain the primordial abundance of He-4 in models with electron-sterile neutrino oscillations for all possible delta N_s: 0 <= delta N_s <= 1 and for the model of oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling, for which the spectrum distortion effects on the neutron-proton transitions are the strongest. It is found that the spectrum distortion effect may be the dominant one not only for small delta N_s, but also for big initial population of the sterile state. It was found that in the resonant case it plays a considerable role even for very big delta N_s ~ 0.8. We discuss cosmological constraints on neutrino mixing for small delta N_s.

  5. The Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn off photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then use a chi-squared analysis to compare our results with the experimental UHECR data and thereby place limits on the amount of LIV. We also discuss how a small amount of LIV that is consistent with the experimental data can still lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray flux at higher energies than presently observed.

  6. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye

    2016-01-01

    X-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in imaging and related tasks. Due to the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and are usually suffered from various limitations. The recently proposed indirect transmission measurement-based method requires at least the segmentation of one material, which is insufficient for CT images of highly noisy and with artifacts. To combat for the bottleneck of spectrum estimation using segmented CT images, in this study, we develop a segmentation-free indirect transmission measurement based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of the method is to compare polychromatic forward projection with raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. After applying dual-energy material decomposition using high- and low-energy raw projection data, polychromatic forward projection ...

  7. QUANTUM HALL-EFFECT IN MULTILAYER P-GE/GE1-XSIX HETEROSTRUCTURES AND ENERGY-SPECTRUM OF THE 2D HOLE GAS IN A MAGNETIC-FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARAPOV, YG; GORODILOV, NA; NEVEROV, VN; YAKUNIN, MV; GERMANENKO, AV; MINKOV, GM; KUZNETSOV, OA; RUBTSOVA, RA; CHERNOV, AL; ORLOV, LK

    1994-01-01

    The quantum Hall effect and the structure of magnetoresistance oscillations observed in multilayer p-Ge/Ge1-xSix heterostructure systems are analyzed on the basis of a picture of magnetic levels of the Ge valence band calculated from the model of an infinitely deep square quantum well. The odd

  8. Energy Minimization Approach for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mustapha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative spectrum sensing is a promising method for improving spectrum sensing performance in cognitive radio. Although it yields better spectrum sensing performance, it also incurs additional energy consumption that drains more energy from the sensor nodes and hence shortens the lifetime of sensor networks. This paper proposes energy minimization approach to reduce energy consumption due to spectrum sensing and sensed result reporting in a cooperative spectrum sensing. The approach determines optimal number of cooperative sensing nodes using particle swarm optimization. We derived mathematical lower bound and upper bound for the number of cooperative sensing nodes in the network. Then we formulate a constraint optimization problem and used particle swarm optimization to simultaneously optimize the two mathematical bounds to determine the optimal number of sensing nodes. Simulation results indicate viability of the proposed approach and show that significant amount of energy savings can be achieved by employing optimal number of sensing nodes for cooperative spectrum sensing. Performance comparison with conventional approach shows performance improvement of the proposed approach over the conventional method in minimizing spectrum sensing energy consumption without compromising spectrum sensing performance.

  9. Spectrum sensing with high sensitivity and interferer robustness using cross-correlation energy detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Alink, M.S.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum access relying on spectrum sensing requires reliable detection of signals in negative signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions to prevent harmful interference to licensed users. Energy detection (ED) is a quite general solution, which does not require any knowledge of the signals to

  10. A Modified Energy Detection Based Spectrum Sensing Algorithm for Green Cognitive Radio Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Rajput

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum Sensing is the first and fundamental function of Cognitive Cycle which plays a vital role in the success of CRs (Cognitive Radios. Spectrum Sensing indicate the presence and absence of PUs (Primary Users in RF (Radio Frequency spectrum occupancy measurements. In order to correctly determine the presence and absence of Primary Users, the algorithms in practice include complex mathematics which increases the computational complexity of the algorithm, thus shifted the CRs to operate as ?green? communication systems. In this paper, an energy efficient and computationally less complex, energy detection based Spectrum Sensing algorithm have been proposed. The design goals of the proposed algorithm are to save the processing and sensing energies. At first, by using less MAC (Multiply and Accumulate operation, it saves the processing energy needed to determine the presence and absence of PUs. Secondly, it saves the sensing energy by providing a way to find lowest possible sensing time at which spectrum is to be sensed. Two scenarios have been defined for testing the proposed algorithm i.e. simulate detection capability of Primary Users in ideal and noisy scenarios. Detection of PUs in both of these scenarios have been compared to obtain the probability of detection. Energy Efficiency of the proposed algorithm has been proved by making performance comparison between the proposed (less complex algorithm and the legacy energy detection algorithm. With reduced complexity, the proposed spectrum sensing algorithm can be considered under the paradigm of Green Cognitive Radio Communication

  11. Energy spectrum and optical properties of C60 fullerene within the Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silant'ev, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The anticommutative Green's functions and the energy spectrum of fullerene C60 have been calculated using the Hubbard model in the mean-field approximation. Based on the obtained energy spectrum, the interpretation of the experimentally observed bands of optical absorption has been proposed and the parameters of this fullerene, by which it is characterized in the Hubbard model have been calculated. The results agree fairly well with the experimental data.

  12. Energy spectrum and transport in narrow HgTe quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germanenko, A. V., E-mail: Alexander.Germanenko@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences (Russian Federation); Minkov, G. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Rut, O. E. [Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences (Russian Federation); Sherstobitov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    The results of an experimental study of the transport phenomena and the hole energy spectrum of two-dimensional systems in the quantum well of HgTe zero-gap semiconductor with normal arrangement of quantum-confinement subbands are presented. An analysis of the experimental data allows us to reconstruct the carrier energy spectrum near the hole subband extrema. The results are interpreted using the standard kP model.

  13. Reducing Spectrum Handoffs and Energy Switching Consumption of MADM-Based Decisions in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Aguilar-Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a cognitive radio network (CRN, the number of spectrum handoffs increases energy consumption of cognitive (or secondary users due to the channel switching process. This might limit the operation of the CRN, especially in scenarios where secondary users terminals are battery-powered. Thus, reducing the number of times a cognitive user involved in a transmission switch to different spectrum holes is required to increase battery life-time. In this regard, available spectrum holes possess different attributes (e.g., bandwidth that can be exploited to satisfy specific secondary users requirements (i.e., connection profile for data transmission while saving energy. Here, three multiple attribute decision-making (MADM algorithms for the spectrum decision functionality are evaluated using real spectrum measurements of TV bands. This is performed by proposing six decision parameters, which are extracted from the spectrum data to characterize its suitability. Then, these are used as inputs of the MADM algorithms to select the most suitable spectrum hole for a cognitive user. Thus, an enhanced MADM-based decision process is proposed to reduce the number of handoffs considering energy consumption due to channel switching (ECCS. Results quantify savings from 30% to 90% in ECCS and spectrum handoffs reductions from 47% to 90%.

  14. A wavelet-based Gaussian method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wavelet-based Gaussian method (WGM for the peak intensity estimation of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF. The relationship between the parameters of Gaussian curve and the wavelet coefficients of Gaussian peak point is firstly established based on the Mexican hat wavelet. It is found that the Gaussian parameters can be accurately calculated by any two wavelet coefficients at the peak point which has to be known. This fact leads to a local Gaussian estimation method for spectral peaks, which estimates the Gaussian parameters based on the detail wavelet coefficients of Gaussian peak point. The proposed method is tested via simulated and measured spectra from an energy X-ray spectrometer, and compared with some existing methods. The results prove that the proposed method can directly estimate the peak intensity of EDXRF free from the background information, and also effectively distinguish overlap peaks in EDXRF spectrum.

  15. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  16. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    discussed the radiation belt electron drop outs with respect to their local time, radial and particle-energy dependence. In this paper we present the energy dependence of REDs and REEs at geostationary orbit for electrons at energies 2 MeV, 0.9 MeV, 0.6 MeV with respect to the solar wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field ...

  17. Evaluation of a new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code based on an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl; Esmaili Paeen Afrakoti, Iman

    2018-01-17

    The purpose of the present study was to reconstruct the energy spectrum of a poly-energetic neutron source using an algorithm developed based on an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). ANFIS is a kind of artificial neural network based on the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy inference system. The ANFIS algorithm uses the advantages of both fuzzy inference systems and artificial neural networks to improve the effectiveness of algorithms in various applications such as modeling, control and classification. The neutron pulse height distributions used as input data in the training procedure for the ANFIS algorithm were obtained from the simulations performed by MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). Taking into account the normalization condition of each energy spectrum, 4300 neutron energy spectra were generated randomly. (The value in each bin was generated randomly, and finally a normalization of each generated energy spectrum was performed). The randomly generated neutron energy spectra were considered as output data of the developed ANFIS computational code in the training step. To calculate the neutron energy spectrum using conventional methods, an inverse problem with an approximately singular response matrix (with the determinant of the matrix close to zero) should be solved. The solution of the inverse problem using the conventional methods unfold neutron energy spectrum with low accuracy. Application of the iterative algorithms in the solution of such a problem, or utilizing the intelligent algorithms (in which there is no need to solve the problem), is usually preferred for unfolding of the energy spectrum. Therefore, the main reason for development of intelligent algorithms like ANFIS for unfolding of neutron energy spectra is to avoid solving the inverse problem. In the present study, the unfolded neutron energy spectra of 252Cf and 241Am-9Be neutron sources using the developed computational code were

  18. Energy spectrum of ideal quantum dots controlled by an external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, A. M.; Oshurko, V. B.

    2018-01-01

    We have constructed a theoretical model describing the energy spectrum and autoionisation probability for an ideal quantum dot in the external DC and AC electric fields, free of using the delta-potential approximation and perturbation theory. The wave functions of the electron quasi-stationary states under these conditions are calculated. To this end, we have elaborated a new method for regularising the Gamov wave function used to calculate the complex electron energy, describing both the energy spectrum of the system and the probability of the state decay (autoionisation). The oscillations of the Stark shift and the energy level width due to the DC electric field are found. It is shown that these oscillations essentially affect the energy spectrum of the quantum dot and principally cannot be described within the frameworks of perturbative approaches.

  19. Aggregation effect on absorbance spectrum of laser ablated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni; Irmaniar; Herbani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmon of gold nanoparticles is one of the hot topics nowadays due to various possible applications. The application is determined by plasmon peak in absorbance spectrum. We have fabricated gold nanoparticles using laser ablation technique and studied the influence of CTAB (Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) effect on the optical characterization of fabricated gold nanoparticles. We ablated a gold plate using NdYAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 10 Hz pulse frequency at low energy density. We found there are two distinctive plasmon peaks, i.e., primary and secondary peaks, where the secondary peak is the main interests of this work. Our simulation results have revealed that the secondary plasmon peak is affected by random aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our research leads to good techniques on fabrication of colloidal gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution using laser ablation technique.

  20. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengqin Shi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  1. Valence band energy spectrum of HgTe quantum wells with an inverted band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, G. M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Rut, O. E.; Sherstobitov, A. A.; Germanenko, A. V.; Dvoretski, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2017-07-01

    The energy spectrum of the valence band in HgTe /CdxHg1 -xTe quantum wells of a width (8 -20 ) nm has been studied experimentally by magnetotransport effects and theoretically in the framework of a four-band k P method. Comparison of the Hall density with the density found from a period of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations clearly shows that the degeneracy of states of the top of the valence band is equal to 2 at the hole density p SdH oscillations shows that mh is equal to (0.25 ±0.02 ) m0 and weakly increases with the hole density. Such a value of mh and its dependence on the hole density are in a good agreement with the calculated effective mass.

  2. Possible explanation of the appearance of the knee and the ankle in cosmic ray energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Petrukhin, A A

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to explanation of the knee and the ankle of cosmic ray energy spectrum in the atmosphere is considered. The concept of missing energy, which can be taken away by muons and neutrinos, is introduced. It is shown that in this case a big excess of VHE muons and neutrinos must be produced. Possible experiments on VHE muon investigations are discussed.

  3. Effects-Based Operations: Success Across the Spectrum of Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Logeman, Keith M

    2005-01-01

    Although effects-based operations (EBO) is not a new concept for waging war, it is rarely thought of as a methodology that can be applied across the spectrum of conflict to achieve national security objectives...

  4. Approximation of the energy spectrum of a high-intense Bremsstrahlung source by the moments method using the attenuation curve

    CERN Document Server

    Nedavnij, O I

    2001-01-01

    A method of approximating energy spectrum of high-intensity Bremsstrahlung sources by the method of moments along attenuation curve is suggested. The method is based on preliminary differentiation of dependence of effective factor of radiation attenuation, calculation of random energy value moments and use of orthogonal polynomials. Analysis of results of mathematical experiment suggests that the method is fit for approximating energy spectra. Root-mean-square error of the approximation in the specific example made up 5% at most at initial error of 0.2%

  5. The Energy Spectrum of the Acoustic Emission Signals of Nanoscale Objects

    OpenAIRE

    V.V. Marasanov; A.A. Sharko

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional discrete-continuum model of the energy spectrum of the acoustic emission signal, allowing filter oscillating components of the acoustic emission signals. The mathematical formalism describing the environment, initiating the signals of acoustic emission, in which the problem of spectral analysis and synthesis of acoustic emission signals is solved by the Fourier transform. The dependence of the spectrum of acoustic vibrations on the size of the parameters, microstructure. The...

  6. [Comparative investigation of locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect and phototactic response to spectral illumination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi-Hang; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    To provide theoretical support for determining locust's phototactic spectrum, and explore locust's phototactic mechanism stimulated by light, utilizing AvaSpec fiber-optic spectrometer system and AvaLight-DHS, the investigation of locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect after light energy stimulated locust's vision system was carried out and on this basis, utilizing the investigated device of locust's phototactic response to spectral illumination, the discrepancy of locust's phototactic response to spectral illumination was certificated comparatively. The results show that the degree of locust's vision system absorbing the single spectrum photon of 430, 545 and 610 nm is significant and there exists difference, and the behavioral response to orange, violet, green, and blue spectral light has the difference in selective sensitivity, with the intensity of response to violet light being the strongest. The degree of response to orange light is the maximum, simultaneously, locust's vision system absorbing spectral photon energy has selective difference and requirement of illumination time, moreover, the sensitive degree of locust's visual system to spectrum and the strength of the lighting energy, influencing locust's phototactic response degree, and the micro-response of locust's phototactic vision physiology, led by the photoelectric effect of locust absorbing sensitive photon and converting photon energy, is the reason for locust's phototactic orientation response. In addition, locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect, only when the biological photoelectric effect of locust's visual system is stimulated by spectral illumination, can present the sensitivity of the spectral absorption effect, so, using the stronger ultraviolet stimulation characteristic of violet light, the different sensitive stimulation of orange, green, blue spectral light on locust's phototactic vision, and combining orange, violet, green, blue spectral light field mechanism reasonably, can

  7. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This may give us some insight into how we can safeguard geostationary satellites from functional anomalies of the deep dielectric charging type, which are caused by charge accumulation and subsequent discharge of relativistic electrons. In this study we examine whether there is any energy dependence in relativistic ...

  8. Joint optimization of spectrum and energy efficiency in cognitive radio networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the joint improvement of the energy efficiency (EE and the spectrum efficiency (SE in OFDM-based cognitive radio (CR networks. A multi-objective resource allocation task is formulated to optimize the EE and the SE of the CR system simultaneously with the consideration of the mutual interference and the spectrum sensing errors. We first exploit the EE–SE relations and demonstrate that the EE is a quasiconcave function of the SE, based on which the Pareto optimal set of the multi-objective optimization problem is characterized. To find a unique globally optimal solution, we propose a unified EE–SE tradeoff metric to transform the multi-objective optimization problem into a single-objective one which has a D.C. (difference of two convex functions/sets structure and yields a standard convex optimization problem. We derive a fast method to speed up the time-consuming computation by exploiting the structure of the convex problem. Simulation results validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms, which can produce the unique globally optimal solution of the original multi-objective optimization problem.

  9. Quantum harmonic oscillator: an elementary derivation of the energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2017-03-01

    An elementary treatment of the quantum harmonic oscillator is proposed. No previous knowledge of linear differential equation theory or Fourier analysis are required, but rather only a few basics of elementary calculus. The pivotal role in our analysis is played by the sole particle localization constraint, which implies square integrability of stationary-state wavefunctions. The oscillator ground-state characterization is then achieved in a way that could be grasped, in principle, even by first-year undergraduates. A very elementary approach to build up and to characterize all higher-level energy eigenstates completes our analysis.

  10. Joint Resource Allocation of Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in an Energy-Harvesting-Based Cognitive Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Weidang; Ye, Liang; Li, Feng; Zou, Deyue

    2017-03-16

    The cognitive sensor (CS) can transmit data to the control center in the same spectrum that is licensed to the primary user (PU) when the absence of the PU is detected by spectrum sensing. However, the battery energy of the CS is limited due to its small size, deployment in atrocious environments and long-term working. In this paper, an energy-harvesting-based CS is described, which senses the PU together with collecting the radio frequency energy to supply data transmission. In order to improve the transmission performance of the CS, we have proposed the joint resource allocation of spectrum sensing and energy harvesting in the cases of a single energy-harvesting-based CS and an energy-harvesting-based cognitive sensor network (CSN), respectively. Based on the proposed frame structure, we have formulated the resource allocation as a class of joint optimization problems, which seek to maximize the transmission rate of the CS by jointly optimizing sensing time, harvesting time and the numbers of sensing nodes and harvesting nodes. Using the half searching method and the alternating direction optimization, we have achieved the sub-optimal solution by converting the joint optimization problem into several convex sub-optimization problems. The simulation results have indicated the predominance of the proposed energy-harvesting-based CS and CSN models.

  11. Changes in the energy spectrum of anomalous oxygen and helium during 1977-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Data was used from the cosmic ray experiment on the Voyager spacecraft to measure the energy spectrum of anomalous O and He during the period 1977 to 1985. These spectra are found to change dramatically after the middle of 1980, with the peak of plateau region of the differential spectrum shifting to a higher energy. This change appears to be related to the reversal of the solar magnetic field and could imply that particle drifts are important to the acceleration of propagation of these particles.

  12. Energy spectrum and phase diagrams of two-sublattice hard-core boson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Stasyuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum, spectral density and phase diagrams have been obtained for two-sublattice hard-core boson model in frames of random phase approximation approach. Reconstruction of boson spectrum at the change of temperature, chemical potential and energy difference between local positions in sublattices is studied. The phase diagrams illustrating the regions of existence of a normal phase which can be close to Mott-insulator (MI or charge-density (CDW phase diagrams as well as the phase with the Bose-Einstein condensate (SF phase are built.

  13. All-Particle Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with 26 Icetop Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, thesurface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysiswere taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 square kilometers.The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenithangle ranges between 0 and 46. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectrafrom all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under differentassumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenithangle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. Forzenith angles theta less than 30 deg., where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrumwas observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indicationof a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  14. Energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation in elastic optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanxia; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-07-01

    With tremendous growth in bandwidth demand, energy consumption problem in elastic optical networks (EONs) becomes a hot topic with wide concern. The sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder in EON, which can transmit/receive multiple optical flows, was recently proposed to improve a transponder's flexibility and save energy. In this paper, energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation (EE-RMSA) in EONs with sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder is studied. To decrease the energy consumption, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model with corresponding EE-RMSA algorithm for EONs. The MILP model jointly considers the modulation format and optical grooming in the process of routing and spectrum allocation with the objective of minimizing the energy consumption. With the help of genetic operators, the EE-RMSA algorithm iteratively optimizes the feasible routing path, modulation format and spectrum resources solutions by explore the whole search space. In order to save energy, the optical-layer grooming strategy is designed to transmit the lightpath requests. Finally, simulation results verify that the proposed scheme is able to reduce the energy consumption of the network while maintaining the blocking probability (BP) performance compare with the existing First-Fit-KSP algorithm, Iterative Flipping algorithm and EAMGSP algorithm especially in large network topology. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed EE-RMSA algorithm achieves almost the same performance as MILP on an 8-node network.

  15. Factorization with a logarithmic energy spectrum of a two-dimensional potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, F., E-mail: ferdinand.gleisberg@uni-ulm.de [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, IQ" S" T, Universität Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Volpp, M. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, IQ" S" T, Universität Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Schleich, W.P. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, IQ" S" T, Universität Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Texas A & M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Studies and Engineering (IQSE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States)

    2015-10-23

    We propose a method to factor numbers using a single particle caught in a separable two-dimensional potential with a logarithmic energy spectrum. The particle initially prepared in the ground state is excited with high probability by a sinusoidally time-dependent perturbation into a state whose two quantum numbers represent the factors of a number encoded in the frequency of the perturbation. We discuss the limitations of our method arising from off-resonant transitions and from decoherence. - Highlights: • A new protocol for factorization of an integer into two primes is proposed. • We report an energy spectrum optimally adapted for the factorization. • A potential for our single particle spectrum was calculated numerically. • We determined a Rabi frequency for the transition into the factor state. • An explicit limit caused by decoherence for numbers to be factored is reported.

  16. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman

    2016-06-30

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD) scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  17. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabinejad, H., E-mail: shahabinejad1367@yahoo.com; Hosseini, S.A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  18. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Salim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  19. Excitation spectrum and high energy plasmons in single- and multi-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Shengjun; Roldán, Rafael; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the excitation spectrum of single- and multi-layer graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation. The dynamical polarizability of graphene is computed using a full $\\pi$-band tight-binding model, considering the possibility of inter-layer hopping in the calculation. The effect of electron-electron interaction is considered within the random phase approximation. We further discuss the effect of disorder in the spectrum, which leads to a smearing of the absorption peaks. O...

  20. Energy spectrum of quantum wells in PbTe/PbEuTe type structures based on photoluminescence data

    CERN Document Server

    Zasavitskij, I I; Abramof, E

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the dimensional quantization and temperature on the energy spectrum of structures with the quantum wells of the PbTe/PbEuTe-type is studied. The calculated spectrum is compared with the data on the photoluminescence spectra, measured at 4.2 and 77.4 K. The energies of the emitting transitions are well described within the frames of the two-zone model with an account of the nonparabolicity, anisotropy and PbTe multivalley structure as well as by the uniaxial deformation, available in the heterostructures. It is established, that by decrease in the E sub g forbidden zone width the dE sub g /dT temperature coefficient in the two-dimensional heterostructure decreases, which is explained by weakening the electron-phonon interaction

  1. Explanation of the Knee-like Feature in the DAMPE Cosmic {e}^{-}+{e}^{+} Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2018-02-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer, a space-based high precision cosmic-ray detector, has just reported the new measurement of the total electron plus positron energy spectrum up to 4.6 TeV. A notable feature in the spectrum is the spectral break at ∼0.9 TeV, with the spectral index softening from ‑3.1 to ‑3.9. Such a feature is very similar to the knee at the cosmic nuclei energy spectrum. In this work, we propose that the knee-like feature can be explained naturally by assuming that the electrons are accelerated at the supernova remnants (SNRs) and released when the SNRs die out with lifetimes around 105 years. The cut-off energy of those electrons have already decreased to several TeV due to radiative cooling, which may induce the observed TeV spectral break. Another possibility is that the break is induced by a single nearby old SNR. Such a scenario may bring a large electron flux anisotropy that may be observable by the future detectors. We also show that a minor part of electrons escaping during the acceleration in young and nearby SNRs is able to contribute to a several TeV or higher energy region of the spectrum.

  2. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosin V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014. The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ⋅ 1015–1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  3. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  4. Spectrum-effect relationships between high performance liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the spectrum-effect relationships between high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprints and duodenum contractility of charred areca nut (CAN) on rats. Methods: An HPLC method was used to establish the fingerprint of charred areca nut (CAN). The promoting effect on contractility of ...

  5. Determination of the Spectral Index in the Fission Spectrum Energy Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Amy Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Neutron reaction cross sections play a vital role in tracking the production and destruction of isotopes exposed to neutron fluence. They are central to the process of reconciling the initial and final atom inventories. Measurements of irradiated samples by radiochemical methods in tangent with an algorithm are used to evaluate the fluence a sample is exposed to over the course of the irradiation. This algorithm is the Isotope Production Code (IPC) created and used by the radiochemistry data assessment team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An integral result is calculated by varying the total neutron fluence seen by a sample. A sample, irradiated in a critical assembly, will be exposed to a unique neutron flux defined by the neutron source and distance of the sample from the source. Neutron cross sections utilized are a function of the hardness of the neutron spectrum at the location of irradiation. A spectral index is used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum. Cross sections fit forms applied in IPC are collapsed from a LANL 30-group energy structure. Several decades of research and development have been performed to formalize the current IPC cross section library. Basis of the current fission spectrum neutron reaction cross section library is rooted in critical assembly experiments performed from the 1950’s through the early 1970’s at LANL. The focus of this report is development of the spectral index used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum in the fission spectrum energy regime.

  6. Energy/bandwidth-Saving Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for Two-hopWRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tuo Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A two-hop wireless regional area network (WRAN providing monitoring services operating in Television White Space (TVWS, i.e., IEEE P802.22b, may employ a great number of subscriber customer-premises equipments (S-CPEs possibly without mains power supply, leading to requirement of cost-effective and power-saving design. This paper proposes a framework of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS and an energy/bandwidth saving CSS scheme to P802.22b. In each round of sensing, S-CPEs with SNRs lower than a predefined threshold are excluded from reporting sensing results. Numerical results show that the fused missed-detection probability and false alarmprobability could remainmeeting sensing requirements, and the overall fused error probability changes very little. With 10 S-CPEs, it is possible to save more than 40% of the energy/bandwidth on a Rayleigh channel. The principle proposed can apply to other advanced sensing technologies capable of detecting primary signals with low average SNR.

  7. Spectrum and Energy Levels of Four-Times Ionized Yttrium (Y V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Reader

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the spectrum of four-times-ionized yttrium, Y V, was extended to provide a large number of new spectrum lines and energy levels. The new analysis is based on spectrograms made with sliding-spark discharges on 10.7 m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. The measurements cover the region 184–2549 Å. The results revise levels for this spectrum by Zahid-Ali et al. (1975 and by Ateqad et al. (1984. Five hundred and seventy lines were classified as transitions between 23 odd-parity and 90 even-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5p, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete. Results for the 4s24p46d and 7s configurations are tentative. Ritz-type wavelengths were determined from the optimized energy levels, with uncertainties as low as ±0.0004 Å. The observed configurations were interpreted with Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 607,760 ± 300 cm−1 (75.353 ± 0.037 eV.

  8. Measurement of the Electron Energy Spectrum and its Moments in Inclusive B --> X e nu Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, T

    2004-04-19

    We report a measurement of the inclusive electron energy spectrum for semileptonic decays of B mesons in a data sample of 52 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. We determine the branching fraction, first, second, and third moments of the spectrum for lower cut-offs on the electron energy between 0.6 and 1.5GeV. We measure the partial branching fraction to be {Beta}(B {yields} Xev,E{sub e} > 0.6GeV) = (10.36 {+-} 0.06(stat.) {+-} 0.23(sys.))%.

  9. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  10. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Li, R; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2015-01-01

    For some time, the MILC Collaboration has been studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons. These calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in XPT. That is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. For the photons we use the non-compact formalism. We have new results with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. We consider how well chiral perturbation theory describes these results and the implications for light quark masses

  11. Singular spectrum analysis, Harmonic regression and El-Nino effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    42

    1. Singular spectrum analysis, Harmonic regression and El-Nino effect on total ozone (1979-93) over India and surrounding regions. Chandramadhab Pal cmpmagra@gmail.com. Department of Physics, Ramakrishna Mission Vidyamandira, Belurmath, Howrah 711202, W.B.,. India. Abstract: The Total Ozone Mapping ...

  12. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD): an Approach to Effective Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, Sylvia; Black, Diane; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn; Kok, Gerjo; Townend, David; Nijhuis, Jan; Koek, Ger; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review The objective of the current contribution is to propose an evidence-based, six-step approach to develop effective programs for prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Recent Findings Despite widespread campaigns aimed to reduce prenatal alcohol exposure, the number of

  13. Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N2 NEXAFS spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    We study the relative ability of several models of the X-ray absorption spectrum to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the X-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation. We show that the NEXAFS spectrum can be predicted semiquantiatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. Finally, we show that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum by using constrained DFT in combination with more accurate potentials.

  14. [Effects of noise and music on EEG power spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q; Liu, X H; Li, D C; Wang, H L; Liu, Y S

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To observe the effect of noise and music on EEG power spectrum. Method. 12 healthy male pilots aged 30 +/- 0.58 years served as the subjects. Dynamic EEG from 16 regions was recorded during quiet, under noise or when listening to music using Oxford MR95 Holter recorder. Changes of EEG power spectrum of delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2, frequency components in 16 regions were analyzed. Result. The total alpha1 power was significantly decreased, while the total theta power was significantly increased when listening to music; It implies that the interhemispheric transmission of information in the frontotemporal areas might be involved. Conclusion. The changes of the EEG power spectrum were closely related to man's emotions; relaxation was associated with music; Individual difference exists in the influence of sound on EEG.

  15. Measurement of the ν _{μ } energy spectrum with IceCube-79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Bron, S.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vogel, E.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Waza, A.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2017-10-01

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory deployed in the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole. The ν _μ energy unfolding described in this paper is based on data taken with IceCube in its 79-string configuration. A sample of muon neutrino charged-current interactions with a purity of 99.5% was selected by means of a multivariate classification process based on machine learning. The subsequent unfolding was performed using the software Truee. The resulting spectrum covers an E_ν -range of more than four orders of magnitude from 125 GeV to 3.2 PeV. Compared to the Honda atmospheric neutrino flux model, the energy spectrum shows an excess of more than 1.9 σ in four adjacent bins for neutrino energies E_ν ≥ 177.8 {TeV}. The obtained spectrum is fully compatible with previous measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux and recent IceCube measurements of a flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos.

  16. Weibull thermodynamics: Subexponential decay in the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2017-10-01

    The spectral number density of cosmic-ray nuclei is shown to be a multiply broken power law with subexponential spectral cutoff. To this end, a spectral fit is performed to data sets covering the 1GeV - 1011GeV interval of the all-particle cosmic-ray spectrum. The flux points of the ultra-high energy spectral tail measured with the Telescope Array indicate a Weibull cutoff exp(-(E /(kB T)) σ) and permit a precise determination of the cutoff temperature kB T =(2 . 5 ± 0 . 1) × 1010 GeV and the spectral index σ = 0 . 66 ± 0 . 02. Based on the spectral number density inferred from the least-squares fit, the thermodynamics of this stationary non-equilibrium system, a multi-component mixture of relativistic nuclei, is developed. The derivative of entropy with respect to internal energy defines the effective temperature of the nuclei, S,U = 1 /Teff ,kBTeff ≈ 16 . 1 GeV, and the functional dependence between the cutoff temperature in the Weibull exponential and the effective gas temperature is determined. The equipartition ratio is found to be U /(NkBTeff) ≈ 0 . 30. The isochoric and isobaric heat capacities of the nuclear gas are calculated, as well as the isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities and the isobaric expansion coefficient, and it is shown that this non-equilibrated relativistic gas mixture satisfies the thermodynamic inequalities 0

  17. Kolmogorov argument for the scaling of the energy spectrum in a stratified fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K., E-mail: jayanta.bhattacharjee@gmail.com

    2015-03-20

    In this work we show that the global energy balance part of the Kolmogorov argument for the kinetic energy spectrum in a homogeneous fluid repeated for the stratified fluid will inevitably exhibit a small deviation from perfect scaling. It is shown that an unambiguous scaling with an exponent of 11/5 can be observed only if the fluid is stably stratified in agreement with the original suggestion of Bolgiano. We find that even if the kinetic energy flux shows the predicted fall-off with wave-vector and the thermal energy (entropy) flux is constant, the kinetic energy spectrum will show a small deviation from perfect scaling. - Highlights: • A Kolmogorov argument for global energy balance for turbulence in a stratified fluid is presented. • It is seen that for unstable stratification an unambiguous argument cannot be set up. • For stable stratification there is clear Kolmogorov scenario but the flux is a combination of kinetic and thermal fluxes. • A pure Bolgiano–Obukhov scaling is seen only for wave-numbers greater than a critical wave-number. • The critical wave-number decreases as the Richardson number increases.

  18. Wave Climate Resource Analysis Based on a Revised Gamma Spectrum for Wave Energy Conversion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Pastor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to correctly predict and evaluate the response of wave energy converters (WECs, an accurate representation of wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques and applies a methodology to estimate the naturally available and technically recoverable resource in a given deployment site. The methodology was initially developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, which uses a modified gamma spectrum to interpret sea state hindcast parameter data produced by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s WaveWatch III. This gamma spectrum is dependent on the calibration of two variables relating to the spectral width parameter and spectral peakedness parameter. In this study, this methodology was revised by the authors to increase its accuracy in formulating wavelength. The revised methodology shows how to assess a given geographic area’s wave resource based on its wave power density and total annual wave energy flux.

  19. 77 FR 24192 - Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent System Operator; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent... Federal Power Act and Rule 206 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  20. Combined diversity and improved energy detection in cooperative spectrum sensing with faded reporting channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Nallagonda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the performance of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS where each cognitive radio (CR employs an improved energy detector (IED with multiple antennas and uses selection combining (SC for detecting the primary user (PU in noisy and faded sensing (S channels. We derive an expression for the probability of false alarm and expressions for probability of missed detection in non-faded (AWGN and Rayleigh faded sensing environments in terms of cumulative distribution function (CDF. Each CR transmits its decision about PU via noisy and faded reporting (R channel to fusion center (FC. In this paper we assume that S-channels are noisy and Rayleigh faded while several cases of fading are considered for R-channels such as: (i Hoyt (or Nakagami-q, (ii Rayleigh, (iii Rician (or Nakagami-n, and (iv Weibull. A Binary Symmetric channel (BSC with a fixed error probability (r in the R-channel is also considered. The impact of fading in R-channel, S-channel and several network parameters such as IED parameter, normalized detection threshold, number of CRs, and number of antennas on missed detection and total error probability is assessed. The effects of Hoyt, Rician, and Weibull fading parameters on overall performance of IED-CSS are also highlighted.

  1. An Effective Method for Substance Detection Using the Broad Spectrum THz Signal: A "Terahertz Nose"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav A. Trofimov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an effective method for the detection and identification of dangerous substances by using the broadband THz pulse. This pulse excites, for example, many vibrational or rotational energy levels of molecules simultaneously. By analyzing the time-dependent spectrum of the THz pulse transmitted through or reflected from a substance, we follow the average response spectrum dynamics. Comparing the absorption and emission spectrum dynamics of a substance under analysis with the corresponding data for a standard substance, one can detect and identify the substance under real conditions taking into account the influence of packing material, water vapor and substance surface. For quality assessment of the standard substance detection in the signal under analysis, we propose time-dependent integral correlation criteria. Restrictions of usually used detection and identification methods, based on a comparison between the absorption frequencies of a substance under analysis and a standard substance, are demonstrated using a physical experiment with paper napkins.

  2. Influence of nanorod absorption spectrum width on superluminality effect for laser pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the influence of the finite absorption spectrum width on the soliton formation and superluminality phenomenon at a femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium with noble nanoparticles. These effects take place if a positive phase-amplitude grating is induced by laser radiation. We take into account the two-photon absorption (TPA) of laser radiation by nanorods, and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing due to their melting or reshaping because of laser energy absorption, and the nanorod absorption spectrum width. On the basis of computer simulation we demonstrate these effects in a medium with positive phase-amplitude grating, induced by laser radiation, if a weak laser energy absorption takes place on the laser pulse dispersion length.

  3. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  4. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhagen, P E; Kniss, T; Reginatto, M; Singleterry, R C; Van Steveninck, W; Wilson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (t...

  5. A Shannon entropy approach to the temporal evolution of SEP energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenza, M.; Consolini, G.; Storini, M.; Damiani, A.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of solar energetic particle (SEP) events contain information on the particle acceleration mechanisms. A novel approach is proposed to investigate the time evolution of the spectral shape for the 20 February 2002 SEP event. Proton differential fluxes recorded by the ERNE instrument aboard SOHO, in the energy range 1.67-112 MeV, are analyzed. The solar source is associated with this SEP event by studying solar and interplanetary conditions during the considered time period. The energy spectrum evolution is studied by evaluating the time history of Shannon's differential entropy derived from the SEP fluxes. Our findings suggest that particle acceleration in the considered event is produced by a perpendicular shock in the solar corona. Moreover, dropouts in the particle flux are clearly identified up to energies of at least ~10 MeV.

  6. Two-dimensional semimetal in wide HgTe quantum wells: Charge-carrier energy spectrum and magnetotransport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germanenko, A. V., E-mail: Alexander.Germanenko@usu.ru [Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences (Russian Federation); Minkov, G. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Rut, O. E. [Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences (Russian Federation); Sherstobitov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The magnetoresistivity and the Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas effects in heterostructures with a single 20.2-nm-wide quantum well made from the gapless semiconductor HgTe are studied experimentally. The measurements are performed on gated samples over a wide range of electron and hole densities. The data obtained are used to reconstruct the energy spectrum of electrons and holes in the vicinity of the extrema of the quantum-confinement subbands. It is shown that the charge-carrier dispersion relation in the investigated systems differs from that calculated within the framework of the conventional kp model.

  7. The energy spectrum of delayed neutrons from thermal neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and its analytical approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshenko, A Y; Tarasko, M Z

    2001-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the delayed neutrons is the poorest known of all input data required in the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fractions. In addition to delayed neutron spectra based on the aggregate spectrum measurements there are two different approaches for deriving the delayed neutron energy spectra. Both of them are based on the data related to the delayed neutron spectra from individual precursors of delayed neutrons. In present work these two different data sets were compared with the help of an approximation by gamma-function. The choice of this approximation function instead of the Maxwellian or evaporation type of distribution is substantiated.

  8. Energy-Based Analysis of Mechanisms of Earthquake-Induced Landslide Using Hilbert-Huang Transform and Marginal Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Gang; Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jing; Ouyang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform and its marginal spectrum, an energy-based method is proposed to analyse the dynamics of earthquake-induced landslides and a case study is presented to illustrate the proposed method. The results show that the seismic Hilbert energy in the sliding mass of a landslide is larger than that in the sliding bed when subjected to seismic excitations, causing different dynamic responses between the sliding mass and the sliding bed. The seismic Hilbert energy transits from the high-frequency components to the low-frequency components when the seismic waves propagate through the weak zone, causing a nonuniform seismic Hilbert energy distribution in the frequency domain. Shear failure develops first at the crest and toe of the sliding mass due to resonance effects. Meanwhile, the seismic Hilbert energy in the frequency components of 3-5 Hz, which is close to the natural frequency of the slope, is largely dissipated in the initiation and failure processes of the landslide. With the development of dynamic failure, the peak energy transmission ratios in the weak zone decrease gradually. This study offers an energy-based interpretation for the initiation and progression of earthquake-induced landslides with the shattering-sliding failure type.

  9. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons measured with H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-03-30

    The spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons has so far been measured using balloon and satellite-based instruments. At TeV energies, however, the sensitivity of such instruments is very limited due to the low flux of electrons at very high energies and small detection areas of balloon/satellite based experiments. The very large collection area of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon/ satellite based instruments when detecting very-high-energy electrons (> 300 GeV). By analysing data taken by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), this work extends the known electron spectrum up to 4 TeV - a range that is not accessible to direct measurements. However, in contrast to direct measurements, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. detect air showers that cosmic-ray electrons initiate in the atmosphere rather than the primary particle. Thus, the main challenge is to differentiate between air showers initiated by electrons and those initiated by the hadronic background. A new analysis technique was developed that determines the background with the support of the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest. It is shown that this analysis technique can also be applied in other areas such as the analysis of diffuse {gamma} rays from the Galactic plane. (orig.)

  10. Fault feature extraction of planet gear in wind turbine gearbox based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yun; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Zheng; Chu, Fulei

    2017-09-01

    Planetary transmission plays a vital role in wind turbine drivetrains, and its fault diagnosis has been an important and challenging issue. Owing to the complicated and coupled vibration source, time-variant vibration transfer path, and heavy background noise masking effect, the vibration signal of planet gear in wind turbine gearboxes exhibits several unique characteristics: Complex frequency components, low signal-to-noise ratio, and weak fault feature. In this sense, the periodic impulsive components induced by a localized defect are hard to extract, and the fault detection of planet gear in wind turbines remains to be a challenging research work. Aiming to extract the fault feature of planet gear effectively, we propose a novel feature extraction method based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum (SK-TWES) in the paper. Firstly, the spectral kurtosis (SK) and kurtogram of raw vibration signals are computed and exploited to select the optimal filtering parameter for the subsequent band-pass filtering. Then, the band-pass filtering is applied to extrude periodic transient impulses using the optimal frequency band in which the corresponding SK value is maximal. Finally, the time wavelet energy spectrum analysis is performed on the filtered signal, selecting Morlet wavelet as the mother wavelet which possesses a high similarity to the impulsive components. The experimental signals collected from the wind turbine gearbox test rig demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at the feature extraction and fault diagnosis for the planet gear with a localized defect.

  11. Implementation of spectrum analysis in mesoscale modeling for wind energy assessment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stathopoulos, C.; Barranger, N.; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2012-01-01

    Spectral analysis of wind speed is a key parameter for the characterization of the physical processes generating the fields. Especially, the mesoscale power spectrum is an important measure of accuracy of wind forecasting and extreme wind estimation for modern wind farms, which are of the size...... response to this deviation at different scales. Using simulation of the Iberian Peninsula and data experiments, we first identify the difference in wind kinetic energy spectrum between a hilly region in Spain and an offshore domain nearby the Portuguese coast. A powerful tool to determine the interaction...... between complex terrain and the wind variability is the use of 2D Fast Fourier transform applied to terrain height. From previous studies this analysis proved to be efficient in finding the proper model grid resolution for the representation of the wind variability in highly non homogeneous terrain...

  12. BONDI-97 A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding tool using a genetic algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, B

    1999-01-01

    The neutron spectrum unfolding procedure using the count rate data obtained from a set of Bonner sphere neutron detectors requires the solution of the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind by using complex mathematical methods. This paper reports a new approach for the unfolding of neutron spectra using the Genetic Algorithm tool BONDI-97 (BOnner sphere Neutron DIfferentiation). The BONDI-97 was used as the input for Genetic Algorithm engine EVOLVER to search for a globally optimised solution vector from a population of randomly generated solutions. This solution vector corresponds to the unfolded neutron energy spectrum. The Genetic Algorithm engine emulates the Darwinian 'Survival of the Fittest' strategy, the key ingredient of the 'Theory of Evolution'. The spectra of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am/Be (alpha,n) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu/Be (alpha,n) neutron sources were unfolded using the BONDI-97 tool. (author)

  13. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, W; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huentrup, G; Reitz, G; Roecher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-01-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station.

  14. The H3+ rovibrational spectrum revisited with a global electronic potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velilla, Luis; Lepetit, Bruno; Aguado, Alfredo; Beswick, J. Alberto; Paniagua, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we have computed the rovibrational spectrum of the H3+ molecule using a new global potential energy surface, invariant under all permutations of the nuclei, that includes the long range electrostatic interactions analytically. The energy levels are obtained by a variational calculation using hyperspherical coordinates. From the comparison with available experimental results for low lying levels, we conclude that our accuracy is of the order of 0.1 cm-1 for states localized in the vicinity of equilateral triangular configurations of the nuclei, and changes to the order of 1 cm-1 when the system is distorted away from equilateral configurations. Full rovibrational spectra up to the H++H2 dissociation energy limit have been computed. The statistical properties of this spectrum (nearest neighbor distribution and spectral rigidity) show the quantum signature of classical chaos and are consistent with random matrix theory. On the other hand, the correlation function, even when convoluted with a smoothing function, exhibits oscillations which are not described by random matrix theory. We discuss a possible similarity between these oscillations and the ones observed experimentally.

  15. Quantum control of isomerization by robust navigation in the energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murgida, G. E., E-mail: murgida@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Constituyentes, GIyA, CNEA, San Martín, and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arranz, F. J., E-mail: fj.arranz@upm.es [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Borondo, F., E-mail: f.borondo@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the application of the quantum control technique of navigation in the energy spectrum to chemical isomerization processes, namely, CN–Li⇆ Li–CN. This technique is based on the controlled time variation of a Hamiltonian parameter, an external uniform electric field in our case. The main result of our work establishes that the navigation involved in the method is robust, in the sense that quite sizable deviations from a pre-established control parameter time profile can be introduced and still get good final results. This is specially relevant thinking of a experimental implementation of the method.

  16. Variable low-energy absorption in the X-ray spectrum of ESO 103-G35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, R.S.; Pounds, K.A.; Turner, T.J.

    1988-04-15

    EXOSAT observations of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy, ESO 103-G35, have revealed that this source has a heavily absorbed and variable low-energy X-ray spectrum. Specifically the inferred column density was observed to decrease from approx. 1.7 x 10/sup 23/ to approx. 1.0 x 10/sup 23/ cm/sup -2/ over a 90-day period. This variation is interpreted in terms of an X-ray absorbing screen composed of broad-line clouds moving out of the line-of-sight to the X-ray source.

  17. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...

  18. Triboelectric effect in energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, I.; Vassiliadis, S.; Siores, E.

    2017-10-01

    With the development of wearable technology, much research has been undertaken in the field of flexible and stretchable electronics for use in interactive attire. The challenging problem wearable technology faces is the ability to provide energy whilst keeping the endproduct comfortable, light, ergonomic and nonintrusive. Energy harvesting, or energy scavenging as it is also known, is the process by which ambient energy is captured and converted into electric energy. The triboelectric effect converts mechanical energy into electrical energy based on the coupling effect of triboelectrification and electrostatic induction and is utilized as the basis for triboelectric generators (TEG). TEG’s are promising for energy harvesting due their high output power and efficiency in conjunction with simple and economical production. Due to the wide availability of materials and ease of integration, in order to produce the triboelectric effect such functional materials are effective for wearable energy harvesting systems. Flexible TEG’s can be built and embedded into attire, although a thorough understanding of the underlying principle of how TEG’s operate needs to be comprehended for the development and in incorporation in smart technical textiles. This paper presents results associated with TEG’S and discusses their suitability for energy harvesting in textiles structures.

  19. A study of radio frequency spectrum emitted by high energy air showers with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Laura; Bonardi, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Enriquez, J. Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katie; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg P.; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; Thoudam, Satyendra; Trinh, Gia; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    The high number density of radio antennas at the LOFAR core in Northern Netherlands allows to detect radio signals emitted by cosmic ray induced air showers, and to characterize the geometry of the observed cascade in a detailed way. We present here a study of the radio frequency spectrum in the 30 - 80 MHz regime, and its correlation with some geometrical parameters of the extensive air shower. An important goal of this study is to find a correlation between the frequency spectrum and the primary particle type. Preliminary results on how the frequency spectrum changes as function of distance to the shower axis, and as function of primary particles mass composition are shown. The final aim of this study is to find a method to infer information of primary cosmic rays in an independent way from the well-established fluorescence and surface detector techniques, in view of affirming the radio detection technique as reliable method for the study of high energy cosmic rays.

  20. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  1. Measuring the low-energy cosmic ray spectrum with the AFIS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy cosmic rays interact with Earth's upper atmosphere and produce antiprotons, which can be trapped in Earth's magnetic field. The Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) Mission will measure the flux of trapped antiprotons with energies less than 100 MeV aboard the nanosatellite MOVE 2. An active-target tracking detector comprised of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers is already under construction at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. As a precursor to the space-bound mission, a prototype version of the detector will be launched aboard a balloon from Kiruna, Sweden as part of the REXUS/BEXUS student program by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Named AFIS-P, it will be used to measure the low-energy part of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies less than 100 MeV-per-nucleon. Spectrometers in previous balloon missions were not sensitive in this low-energy region. Thus AFIS-P will deliver unprecedented data, while simultaneously allowing us to field-test the AFIS detector.

  2. First simultaneous fit of the energy spectrum, mass composition and anisotropy of the Auger/telescope array cosmic ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittkowski, David; Kampert, Karl-Heinz [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The first detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR, E > 1 EeV) dates back to Linsley (1963), but only very little is currently known about their sources. To obtain information about the sources of UHECR, the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array have been detecting the UHECR arriving at Earth for about a decade. The collected data can be compared to corresponding results from simulations of the propagation of UHECR allowing to test assumptions regarding the UHECR sources. In this talk we report on sophisticated simulations carried out with the Monte-Carlo Code CRPropa 3 that - in contrast to earlier simulations - take into account deflections of UHECR in cosmic magnetic fields as well as cosmological effects such as the redshift evolution of the photon background and the adiabatic expansion of the universe. We carried out such simulations assuming different properties of the UHECR sources (e.g., the density and mass spectrum of the particles at the sources). Based on these simulations, we present and discuss results from the first simultaneous fit of the energy spectrum, mass composition and anisotropy of the UHECR observed at the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. This includes especially the astrophysical scenario with the closest agreement with the current UHECR data.

  3. The search for a Hamiltonian whose energy spectrum coincides with the Riemann zeta zeroes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschheim, Raymond; Perelman, Carlos Castro; Irwin, Klee

    Inspired by the Hilbert-Polya proposal to prove the Riemann Hypothesis we have studied the Schroedinger QM equation involving a highly nontrivial potential, and whose self-adjoint Hamiltonian operator has for its energy spectrum one which approaches the imaginary parts of the zeta zeroes only in the asymptotic (very large N) region. The ordinates λn are the positive imaginary parts of the nontrivial zeta zeroes in the critical line :sn = 1 2 + iλn. The latter results are consistent with the validity of the Bohr-Sommerfeld semi-classical quantization condition. It is shown how one may modify the parameters which define the potential, and fine tune its values, such that the energy spectrum of the (modified) Hamiltonian matches not only the first two zeroes but the other consecutive zeroes. The highly nontrivial functional form of the potential is found via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization formula using the full-fledged Riemann-von Mangoldt counting formula (without any truncations) for the number N(E) of zeroes in the critical strip with imaginary part greater than 0 and less than or equal to E.

  4. Observation of variations in the T +T neutron spectrum with varying center-of-mass energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, T.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Sayre, D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hatarik, R.; McNabb, D. P.; Pino, J. E.; Bacher, A.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Bourgade, J.-. L.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.

    2014-10-01

    C. BRUNE, Ohio University - The T +T fusion reaction, which produces two neutrons and an alpha particle in a 3-body final state, has been studied in a series of direct-drive, T2-gas-filled thin (~3 μm) glass-capsule implosions at OMEGA. The shapes of the reaction product spectra are dictated by the final-state interactions between n- α (5He in the ground- and excited states) and n-n (di-neutron interaction). The theory behind final-state interactions is not well understood and detailed study of the reaction product spectra can teach us about the intricacies of the nuclear theory involved. In this presentation, measured neutron spectra are interpreted in terms of the sequential decay through 5He in the ground- and excited states. A clear energy dependence in relative reaction-channel strength at low center-of-mass energy (18-55 keV) is observed in the data. The role of the di-neutron interaction could be more clearly deduced through study of the alpha particle spectrum. In the presentation, we also identify steps required to successfully measure the T +T alpha spectrum in future experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  5. Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; /Kyushu U.; Sanami, Toshiya; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; /Kyushu U.; Iwamoto, Yosuke; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Saito, Kiwamu; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ishibashi, Kenji; /Kyushu U.; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yukio; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Lee, Hee-Seock; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Ramberg, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Neutron energy spectrum from 120 GeV protons on a thick copper target was measured at the Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The data allows for evaluation of neutron production process implemented in theoretical simulation codes. It also helps exploring the reasons for some disagreement between calculation results and shielding benchmark data taken at high energy accelerator facilities, since it is evaluated separately from neutron transport. The experiment was carried out using a 120 GeV proton beam of 3E5 protons/spill. Since the spill duration was 4 seconds, protoninduced events were counted pulse by pulse. The intensity was maintained using diffusers and collimators installed in the beam line to MTBF. The protons hit a copper block target the size of which is 5cm x 5cm x 60 cm long. The neutrons produced in the target were measured using NE213 liquid scintillator detectors, placed about 5.5 m away from the target at 30{sup o} and 5 m 90{sup o} with respect to the proton beam axis. The neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique using timing difference between the NE213 and a plastic scintillator located just before the target. Neutron detection efficiency of NE213 was determined on basis of experimental data from the high energy neutron beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron spectrum was compared with the results of multiparticle transport codes to validate the implemented theoretical models. The apparatus would be applied to future measurements to obtain a systematic data set for secondary particle production on various target materials.

  6. Experimental evaluation of the primary damage process: neutron energy effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goland, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the neutron energy dependnece of the primary damage stage depends upon a number of theoretical concepts. This state can only be observed after low- or perhaps ambient-temperature, low-fluence irradiations. The primary recoil energy spectrum, which determines the character of the displacement cascades, can be calculated if dosimetry has provided an accurate neutron spectrum. A review of experimental results relating neutron-energy effects shows that damage energy or damage energy cross section has often been a reliable correlation parameter for primary damage state experiments. However, the forthcoming emphasis on higher irradiation temperatures, more complex alloys and microstructural evolution has fostered a search for additional meaningful correlation parameters.

  7. Hints on the high-energy seesaw mechanism from the low-energy neutrino spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas, J.A.; Jimenez-Alburquerque, F. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). IFT-UAM/CSIC, C-XVI; Ibarra, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    It is an experimental fact that the mass ratio for the two heavier neutrinos, h=m{sub 3}/m{sub 2}energy seesaw parameters and 2) Which choices, among the allowed ones, produce more naturally the observed pattern of neutrino masses. We have studied in particular if starting with hierarchical neutrino Yukawa couplings, as for the other fermions, one can naturally get the observed henergy) basis-independent quantities. Among the main results, we find that in most cases m{sub 3}/m{sub 2} >> m{sub 3}/m{sub 2}, so m{sub 1} should be extremely tiny. Also, the V{sub R} matrix associated to the neutrino Yukawa couplings has a far from random structure, naturally resembling V{sub CKM}. In fact we show that identifying V{sub R} and V{sub CKM}, as well as neutrino and u-quark Yukawa couplings can reproduce h{sup exp} in a highly non-trivial way, which is very suggestive. The physical implications of these results are also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-11-14

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail.

  9. ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF ENERGY POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela ȘTEȚ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights some of the issues raised by the implementation of energy policies and the fiscal measures in the energy sector and it aims to identify the impact of energy policies at regional level. It is emphasized, along with the environmental impact of the use of renewable resources and economic and social effects on sustainable regional development which can generate state intervention through direct and indirect, financial and non-financial instruments. Given the complex energy profile of Romania, the paper reveals also, the problems that have had to face in the last two decades and the impact of energy policies of Romanian governments. The research is based on an analysis of statistics, publications in energy sector, as well as primary and specific legislation.

  10. Efficient full-spectrum utilization, reception and conversion of solar energy by broad-band nanospiral antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaqiao; Gao, Huotao; Cao, Ting; Li, Boya

    2018-01-22

    In this work, the collection of solar energy by a broad-band nanospiral antenna is investigated in order to solve the low efficiency of the solar rectenna based on conventional nanoantennas. The antenna impedance, radiation, polarization and effective area are all considered in the efficiency calculation using the finite integral technique. The wavelength range investigated is 300-3000 nm, which corresponds to more than 98% of the solar radiation energy. It's found that the nanospiral has stronger field enhancement in the gap than a nanodipole counterpart. And a maximum harvesting efficiency about 80% is possible in principle for the nanospiral coupled to a rectifier resistance of 200 Ω, while about 10% for the nanodipole under the same conditions. Moreover, the nanospiral could be coupled to a rectifier diode of high resistance more easily than the nanodipole. These results indicate that the efficient full-spectrum utilization, reception and conversion of solar energy can be achieved by the nanospiral antenna, which is expected to promote the solar rectenna to be a promising technology in the clean, renewable energy application.

  11. Deconvolution of Window Effect in Galaxy Power Spectrum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Hütsi, G.; Yamamoto, K.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new method of deconvolving the smearing effect of the survey window in the analysis of the galaxy multipole power spectra from a redshift survey. This method is based on the deconvolution theorem, and is compatible with the use of the fast Fourier transform. It is possible to measure the multipole power spectra deconvolved from the window effect efficiently. Applying this method to the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 as well as mock catalogues, we demonstrate how the method works properly. By this deconvolution technique, the amplitude of the multipole power spectrum is corrected. Besides, the covariance matrices of the deconvolved power spectra become quite close to the diagonal form. This is also advantageous in the study of the BAO signature.

  12. Energy spectrum measurement of high power and high energy(6 and 9 MeV) pulsed x-ray source for industrial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, Ibaraki (Japan); Murata, Isao [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Industrial X-ray CT system is normally applied to non-destructive testing (NDT) for industrial product made from metal. Furthermore there are some special CT systems, which have an ability to inspect nuclear fuel assemblies or rocket motors, using high power and high energy (more than 6 MeV) pulsed X-ray source. In these case, pulsed X-ray are produced by the electron linear accelerator, and a huge number of photons with a wide energy spectrum are produced within a very short period. Consequently, it is difficult to measure the X-ray energy spectrum for such accelerator-based X-ray sources using simple spectrometry. Due to this difficulty, unexpected images and artifacts which lead to incorrect density information and dimensions of specimens cannot be avoided in CT images. For getting highly precise CT images, it is important to know the precise energy spectrum of emitted X-rays. In order to realize it we investigated a new approach utilizing the Bayesian estimation method combined with an attenuation curve measurement using step shaped attenuation material. This method was validated by precise measurement of energy spectrum from a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In this study, to extend the applicable X-ray energy range we tried to measure energy spectra of X-ray sources from 6 and 9 MeV linear accelerators by using the recently developed method. In this study, an attenuation curves are measured by using a step-shaped attenuation materials of aluminum and steel individually, and the each X-ray spectrum is reconstructed from the measured attenuation curve by the spectrum type Bayesian estimation method. The obtained result shows good agreement with simulated spectra, and the presently developed technique is adaptable for high energy X-ray source more than 6 MeV.

  13. Spread Spectrum Based Energy Efficient Collaborative Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Anwar; Naqvi, Husnain; Sher, Muhammad; Khan, Muazzam Ali; Khan, Imran; Irshad, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks consist of resource limited devices. Most crucial of these resources is battery life, as in most applications like battle field or volcanic area monitoring, it is often impossible to replace or recharge the power source. This article presents an energy efficient collaborative communication system based on spread spectrum to achieve energy efficiency as well as immunity against jamming, natural interference, noise suppression and universal frequency reuse. Performance of the proposed system is evaluated using the received signal power, bit error rate (BER) and energy consumption. The results show a direct proportionality between the power gain and the number of collaborative nodes as well as BER and signal-to-noise ratio (Eb/N0). The analytical and simulation results of the proposed system are compared with SISO system. The comparison reveals that SISO perform better than collaborative communication in case of small distances whereas collaborative communication performs better than SISO in case of long distances. On the basis of these results it is safe to conclude that collaborative communication in wireless sensor networks using wideband systems improves the life time of nodes in the networks thereby prolonging the network's life time.

  14. Optimization of the wavelength shifter ratio in a polystyrene based plastic scintillator through energy spectrum analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Myung Soo; Yoo, Hyun Jun; Lee, Dae Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook [Neutron Instrumentation Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The scintillation efficiency of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator depends on the ratio of the wavelength shifters, organic fluors (PPO and POPOP). Thus, 24 samples of the plastic scintillator were fabricated in order to find out the optimum ratio of the wavelength shifters in the plastic scintillator. The fabricated plastic scintillators were trimmed through a cutting and polishing process. They were used in gamma energy spectrum measurement with the {sup 137}Cs emitting monoenergy photon with 662 keV for the comparison of the scintillation efficiency. As a result, it was found out that the scintillator sample with 1.00 g of PPO (2,5-Diphenyloxazole) and 0.50 g of POPOP (1,4-Bis(5-phnyl-2oxidazolyl)benzene) dissolved in 100 g of styrene solution has the optimum ratio in terms of the light yield of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator.

  15. VAK, vacuum fluctuation and the mass spectrum of high energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    El-Naschie, M S

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a fundamental hypothesis identifying quantum vacuum fluctuation with the vague attractor of Kolmogorov, the so-called VAK. This Hamiltonian conterpart of a dissipative attractor is then modelled by epsilon sup ( supinfinity sup ) , topology as a 'limit set' of a wild dynamics generated by Moebius-like transformation of space. We proceed as follows: First we give an introduction to the epsilon sup ( supinfinity sup ) quantum spacetime theory from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics, complexity, string and KAM theory. Subsequently we give without proof several theorems and conjectures that we consider to be fundamental to the foundation of any general theory for high energy particles interaction. The final picture seems to be a synthesis between compactified Kleinian groups acting on an essentially nonlinear dynamics of a KAM system which enables us to give a very accurate estimation of the mass spectrum of the standard model and further still we are granted a glimpse into the physics of grand ...

  16. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD): an Approach to Effective Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Sylvia; Black, D; Peters, G-J Y; Kok, G; Townend, D; Nijhuis, J G; Koek, G H; Curfs, L M G

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current contribution is to propose an evidence-based, six-step approach to develop effective programs for prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Despite widespread campaigns aimed to reduce prenatal alcohol exposure, the number of affected children continues to be high. Current strategies to reduce prenatal alcohol exposure may be ineffective or counterproductive. However, proven principles of health promotion could be applied to reduce drinking in pregnancy. One such approach is Intervention Mapping (IM), a six-step procedure based on proven principles to change behaviors. FASD affects all communities and is an underestimated problem worldwide. Programs based on proven principles of behavior change are warranted. Program developers can use pre-existing protocols and strategies from evidence-based practice, such as Intervention Mapping. Developers who plan their preventive programs in a systematic and evidence-based manner increase the chances of success in reducing prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD.

  17. Measurement of the gamma-ray energy spectrum of the educational Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Taniguchi, Tatsuro; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Kamada, So; Horiguchi, Tetsuo; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    The gamma-ray energy spectrum of the Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI) was estimated from Ge detector measurements combined with Monte Carlo N-particle transport criticality calculations. The gamma rays mainly originated from prompt fission components, although small amounts of gamma rays from (n,γ) reactions, fission product gamma rays, and activation gamma rays were detected. The averaged gamma-ray tissue kerma rate in the irradiation port during UTR-KINKI operation at 1W was calculated as 10.5cGy/h based on the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. This value is consistent with a previous measurement with paired ionization chambers and a tissue equivalent gas proportional counter. This result demonstrates the reliability of the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of a non-relativistic basis for describing the low energy meson spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Quiroz, D. A.; Yepez-Martinez, T.; Hess, P. O.; Civitarese, O.

    2017-10-01

    We justify the use of harmonic oscillator eigenfunctions for expanding the fermionic fields of an effective field theory and evaluate its utility for solving a Hamiltonian inspired by the QCD formalism in the Coulomb Gauge. Since the functions involved in such expansion are non-relativistic, the Talmi-Moshinsky transformations can be used to recover the translational invariance of the center of mass of the mesonic states. Finally, many-body methods and an a posteriori flavor mixing procedure are used to compute a preliminary spectrum for the mesons below 1 GeV.

  19. Precision measurement of the B → Xs γ photon energy spectrum, branching fraction, and direct CP asymmetry A(CP)((B → X(s+d)γ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Lu, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-09

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B → X(s)γ plus B → X(d)γ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8 ± 4.2) × 10(6)Υ(4S) → BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B → X(s)γ) = (3.21 ± 0.33) × 10(-4) for E(γ) >1.8 GeV and the direct CP asymmetry A(CP) (B → X(s+d)γ) = 0.057 ± 0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  20. Improvement of energy spectrum characteristics of CdZnTe semiconductor detector with a digital-analog fusion method

    CERN Document Server

    Mardiyanto, M P; Sakai, H; Kawarabayashi, J; Iguchi, T

    2000-01-01

    We present a new application of a 'Fusion Method' to improve gamma-ray energy spectrum characteristics of a CdZnTe semiconductor detector. A digital and an analog system are simultaneously applied for the detector output; The digital system digitizes the signal pulse shapes for pattern recognition based on a neural network algorithm. The analog measures the signal pulse heights with a conventional analog system. The digital and the analog output data are fused and then used for improvement of the energy spectrum characteristics, i.e. the photopeak area, the peak-to-valley ratio, and the FWHM of photopeaks.

  1. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured by the HAWC experiment from 10 to 500 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Avila Rojas, D.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; Coutiño de León, S.; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; González Muñoz, A.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hinton, J.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Cámara, D.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report on the measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory in the energy range 10 to 500 TeV. HAWC is a ground-based air-shower array deployed on the slopes of Volcan Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico, and is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The data used in this work were taken over 234 days between June 2016 and February 2017. The primary cosmic-ray energy is determined with a maximum likelihood approach using the particle density as a function of distance to the shower core. Introducing quality cuts to isolate events with shower cores landing on the array, the reconstructed energy distribution is unfolded iteratively. The measured all-particle spectrum is consistent with a broken power law with an index of -2.49 ±0.01 prior to a break at (45.7 ±0.1 ) TeV , followed by an index of -2.71 ±0.01 . The spectrum also represents a single measurement that spans the energy range between direct detection and ground-based experiments. As a verification of the detector response, the energy scale and angular resolution are validated by observation of the cosmic ray Moon shadow's dependence on energy.

  2. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  3. Energy spectrum scaling in an agent-based model for bacterial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2017-11-01

    Numerous models have been developed to examine the behavior of dense bacterial swarms and to explore the visually striking phenomena of bacterial turbulence. Most models directly impose fluid dynamics physics, either by modeling the active matter as a fluid or by including interactions between the bacteria and a fluid. In this work, however, the `turbulence' is solely an emergent property of the collective behavior of the bacterial population, rather than a consequence of imposed fluid dynamics physical modeling. The system is simulated using a two dimensional Vicsek-style model, with the addition of individual repulsion to simulate bacterial collisions and physical interactions, and without the common flocking or sensing behaviors. Initial results indicate the presence of k-1 scaling in a portion of the kinetic energy spectrum that can be considered analogous to the inertial subrange in turbulent energy spectra. This result suggests that the interaction of large numbers of individual active bacteria may also be a contributing factor in the emergence of fluid dynamics phenomena, in addition to the physical interactions between bacteria and their fluid environment.

  4. Spectrum and anisotropy of cosmic rays at TeV-PeV-energies and contribution of nearby sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveshnikova, L. G.; Strelnikova, O. N.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    The role of nearby galactic sources, the supernova remnants, in formation of observed energy spectrum and large-scale anisotropy of high-energy cosmic rays is studied. The list of these sources is made up based on radio, X-ray and gamma-ray catalogues. The distant sources are treated statistically as ensemble of sources with random positions and ages. The source spectra are defined based on the modern theory of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants while the propagation of cosmic rays in the interstellar medium is described in the frameworks of galactic diffusion model. Calculations of dipole component of anisotropy are made to reproduce the experimental procedure of "two-dimensional" anisotropy measurements. The energy dependence of particle escape time in the process of acceleration in supernova remnants and the arm structure of sources defining the significant features of anisotropy are also taken into account. The essential new trait of the model is a decreasing number of core collapse SNRs being able to accelerate cosmic rays up to the given energy, that leads to steeper total cosmic ray source spectrum in comparison with the individual source spectrum. We explained simultaneously the new cosmic ray data on the fine structure of all particle spectrum around the knee and the amplitude and direction of the dipole component of anisotropy in the wide energy range 1 TeV-1 EeV. Suggested assumptions do not look exotic, and they confirm the modern understanding of cosmic ray origin.

  5. Reduced oblique effect in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Sysoeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People are very precise in the discrimination of a line orientation relative to the cardinal (verti-cal and horizontal axes, while their orientation discrimination sensitivity along the oblique ax-es is less refined. This difference in discrimination sensitivity along cardinal and oblique axes is called the oblique effect. Given that the oblique effect is a basic feature of visual pro-cessing with an early developmental origin, its investigation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD may shed light on the nature of visual sensory abnormalities frequently report-ed in this population. We examined line orientation sensitivity along oblique and vertical axes in a sample of 26 boys with ASD (IQ > 68 and 38 typically developing (TD boys aged 7-15 years, as well as in a subsample of carefully IQ-matched ASD and TD participants. Children were asked to detect the direction of tilt of a high-contrast black-and-white grating relative to vertical (90° or oblique (45° templates. The oblique effect was reduced in children with ASD as compared to TD participants, irrespective of their IQ. This reduction was due to poor orien-tation sensitivity along vertical axis in ASD children, while their ability to discriminate line orientation along oblique axis was unaffected. We speculate that this deficit in sensitivity to vertical orientation may reflect disrupted mechanisms of early experience-dependent learning that takes place during the critical period for orientation selectivity.

  6. Reduced Oblique Effect in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Davletshina, Maria A.; Orekhova, Elena V.; Galuta, Ilia A.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    People are very precise in the discrimination of a line orientation relative to the cardinal (vertical and horizontal) axes, while their orientation discrimination sensitivity along the oblique axes is less refined. This difference in discrimination sensitivity along cardinal and oblique axes is called the “oblique effect.” Given that the oblique effect is a basic feature of visual processing with an early developmental origin, its investigation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) may shed light on the nature of visual sensory abnormalities frequently reported in this population. We examined line orientation sensitivity along oblique and vertical axes in a sample of 26 boys with ASD (IQ > 68) and 38 typically developing (TD) boys aged 7–15 years, as well as in a subsample of carefully IQ-matched ASD and TD participants. Children were asked to detect the direction of tilt of a high-contrast black-and-white grating relative to vertical (90°) or oblique (45°) templates. The oblique effect was reduced in children with ASD as compared to TD participants, irrespective of their IQ. This reduction was due to poor orientation sensitivity along the vertical axis in ASD children, while their ability to discriminate line orientation along the oblique axis was unaffected. We speculate that this deficit in sensitivity to vertical orientation may reflect disrupted mechanisms of early experience-dependent learning that takes place during the critical period for orientation selectivity. PMID:26834540

  7. Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of SS Cygni in Outburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C W

    2004-02-20

    We have fitted the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating spectrum of SS Cygni in outburst with a single temperature blackbody suffering the photoelectric opacity of a neutral column density and the scattering opacity of an outflowing wind. We find that this simple model is capable of reproducing the essential features of the observed spectrum with the blackbody temperature T{sub bl} {approx} 250{+-}50 kK, hydrogen column density N{sub H} {approx} 5.0{sup +2.9}{sub -1.5}x10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, fractional emitting area f {approx} 5.6{sup +60}{sub -4.5} x10{sup -3}, boundary layer luminosity Lbl {approx} 5{sup +18}{sub -3} x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}, wind velocity v {approx} 2500 km s{sup -1}, wind mass-loss rate w {approx} 1.1x10{sup 16} g s{sup -1}, and arbitrary values of the wind ionization fractions of 20 ions of O, Ne,Mg, Si, S, and Fe. Given that in outburst the accretion disk luminosity L{sub disk} {approx}1x10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, L{sub bl}/L{sub disk} {approx} 0.05{sup +0.18}{sub -0.03}, which can be explained if the white dwarf (or an equatorial belt thereon) is rotating with an angular velocity {Omega}{sub wd} {approx} 0.7{sup +0.1}{sub -0.2}Hz, hence V{sub rot}sini {approx} 2300 km s{sup -1}.

  8. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaie, Samareh; Vaas, Lea A I; Rosberg, Anna Karin; Windstam, Sofia T; Karlsson, Maria E; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Khalil, Sammar; Wohanka, Walter; Alsanius, Beatrix W

    2017-01-01

    Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm) and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm) LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA). The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  9. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samareh Gharaie

    Full Text Available Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA. The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  10. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  11. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 10(18) eV using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report a measurement of the flux of cosmic rays with unprecedented precision and Statistics using the Pierre Auger Observatory Based on fluorescence observations in coincidence with at least one Surface detector we derive a spectrum for energies above 10(18) eV We also update the previously

  12. Arrhythmogenic effects of energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Andres; Frankel, David S

    2017-06-01

    Energy drinks (ED) are increasingly popular, especially among adolescents and young adults. They are marketed as enhancers of energy, alertness, and physical performance. ED contain high doses of caffeine and other active ingredients. Their safety has come under question due to reports temporally linking ED consumption with serious cardiovascular events, including arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In this article, we report 2 cases of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in young patients after consuming ED. We also review the ingredients of ED, the physiologic effects on the cardiovascular system, and the available evidence suggesting arrhythmogenecity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Light pollution in ultraviolet and visible spectrum: effect on different visual perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    In general terms, lighting research has been focused in the development of artificial light with the purpose of saving energy and having more durable lamps. However, the consequences that artificial night lighting could bring to the human being and living organisms have become an important issue recently. Light pollution represents a significant problem to both the environment and human health causing a disruption of biological rhythms related not only to the visible spectrum, but also to other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the lamps emit across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, all photobiological species may be exposed to another type of light pollution. By comparing five different lamps, the present study attempts to evaluate UV radiative fluxes relative to what humans and two species of insects perceive as sky glow level. We have analyzed three atmospheric situations: clear sky, overcast sky and evolving precipitable water content. One important finding suggests that when a constant illuminance of urban spaces has to be guaranteed the sky glow from the low pressure sodium lamps has the most significant effect to the visual perception of the insects tested. But having the fixed number of luminaires the situation changes and the low pressure sodium lamp would be the best choice for all three species. The sky glow effects can be interpreted correctly only if the lamp types and the required amount of scotopic luxes at the ground are taken into account simultaneously. If these two factors are combined properly, then the ecological consequences of sky glow can be partly reduced. The results of this research may be equally useful for lighting engineers, architects, biologists and researchers who are studying the effects of sky glow on humans and biodiversity.

  14. Light pollution in ultraviolet and visible spectrum: effect on different visual perceptions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Antonio Solano Lamphar

    Full Text Available In general terms, lighting research has been focused in the development of artificial light with the purpose of saving energy and having more durable lamps. However, the consequences that artificial night lighting could bring to the human being and living organisms have become an important issue recently. Light pollution represents a significant problem to both the environment and human health causing a disruption of biological rhythms related not only to the visible spectrum, but also to other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the lamps emit across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, all photobiological species may be exposed to another type of light pollution. By comparing five different lamps, the present study attempts to evaluate UV radiative fluxes relative to what humans and two species of insects perceive as sky glow level. We have analyzed three atmospheric situations: clear sky, overcast sky and evolving precipitable water content. One important finding suggests that when a constant illuminance of urban spaces has to be guaranteed the sky glow from the low pressure sodium lamps has the most significant effect to the visual perception of the insects tested. But having the fixed number of luminaires the situation changes and the low pressure sodium lamp would be the best choice for all three species. The sky glow effects can be interpreted correctly only if the lamp types and the required amount of scotopic luxes at the ground are taken into account simultaneously. If these two factors are combined properly, then the ecological consequences of sky glow can be partly reduced. The results of this research may be equally useful for lighting engineers, architects, biologists and researchers who are studying the effects of sky glow on humans and biodiversity.

  15. Towards the energy spectrum and composition of primary cosmic rays in the knee region: methods and results at KASCADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A. E-mail: haungs@ik3.fzk.de; Antoni, T.; Apel, W.D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bernloehr, K.; Bluemer, H.; Bollmann, E.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Buettner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engler, J.; Fessler, F.; Gils, H.J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haeusler, R.; Hafemann, W.; Heck, D.; Hoerandel, J.R.; Holst, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kempa, J.; Klages, H.O.; Knapp, J.; Martello, D.; Mathes, H.J.; Matussek, P.; Mayer, H.J.; Milke, J.; Muehlenberg, D.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; Vardanyan, A.; Vulpescu, B.; Weber, J.H.; Wentz, J.; Wiegert, T.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zagromski, S

    2001-04-01

    KASCADE (KArlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector) is a multi-detector setup to observe the electromagnetic, muonic and hadronic air shower components simultaneously at primary energies in the region of the 'knee'. A large number of observables per single shower are registered. The main aims of the experiment are the determination of the primary energy spectrum around the 'knee' and the energy variation of the chemical composition. The measurements reveal an increasing mean mass of the primary cosmic rays above the observed kink, and a sharper knee for the light primary component than for the all-particle spectrum, and the absence of a knee for the heavy component between 1 and 10 PeV.

  16. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    -dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within similar to 2......We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability...

  17. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D' Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  18. Pulmonary blood volume imaging with dual-energy computed tomography: Spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagspiel, K.D., E-mail: kdh2n@virginia.edu [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Flors, L.; Housseini, A.M.; Phull, A. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Ali Ahmad, E. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Department of Radiology, Minia University, Minia (Egypt); Bozlar, U.; Norton, P.T. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Bonatti, H.J.R. [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Dual-energy (DE) pulmonary blood volume (PBV) computed tomography (CT) has recently become available on clinical CT systems. The underlying physical principle of DECT is the fact that the photoelectric effect is strongly dependent on the CT energies resulting in different degrees of x-ray attenuation for different materials at different energy levels. DECT thus enables the characterization and quantification of iodine within tissues via imaging at different x-ray energies and analysis of attenuation differences. Technical approaches to DECT include dual-source scanners acquiring two scans with different energy levels simultaneously, and single-source CT scanners using sandwich detectors or rapid voltage switching. DE PBV CT enables the creation of iodine maps of the pulmonary parenchyma. Experience to date shows that these studies can provide additional physiological information in patients with acute or chronic pulmonary embolism beyond the pure morphological assessment a standard CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) provides. It appears also to be promising for the evaluation of patients with obstructive airways disease. This article reviews the physics and technical aspects of DE PBV CT as well as the appearance of normal and abnormal lung tissue on these studies. Special consideration is given to pitfalls and artefacts.

  19. Parametrized energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with kinetic energies down to 1 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new estimation of the interstellar proton spectrum is made in which the source term of primary protons is taken from shock acceleration theory and the cosmic ray propagation calculation is based on a proposed nonuniform galactic disk model.

  20. An Energy-Efficient Spectrum-Aware Reinforcement Learning-Based Clustering Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Ibrahim; Mohd Ali, Borhanuddin; Rasid, Mohd Fadlee A; Sali, Aduwati; Mohamad, Hafizal

    2015-08-13

    It is well-known that clustering partitions network into logical groups of nodes in order to achieve energy efficiency and to enhance dynamic channel access in cognitive radio through cooperative sensing. While the topic of energy efficiency has been well investigated in conventional wireless sensor networks, the latter has not been extensively explored. In this paper, we propose a reinforcement learning-based spectrum-aware clustering algorithm that allows a member node to learn the energy and cooperative sensing costs for neighboring clusters to achieve an optimal solution. Each member node selects an optimal cluster that satisfies pairwise constraints, minimizes network energy consumption and enhances channel sensing performance through an exploration technique. We first model the network energy consumption and then determine the optimal number of clusters for the network. The problem of selecting an optimal cluster is formulated as a Markov Decision Process (MDP) in the algorithm and the obtained simulation results show convergence, learning and adaptability of the algorithm to dynamic environment towards achieving an optimal solution. Performance comparisons of our algorithm with the Groupwise Spectrum Aware (GWSA)-based algorithm in terms of Sum of Square Error (SSE), complexity, network energy consumption and probability of detection indicate improved performance from the proposed approach. The results further reveal that an energy savings of 9% and a significant Primary User (PU) detection improvement can be achieved with the proposed approach.

  1. An Energy-Efficient Spectrum-Aware Reinforcement Learning-Based Clustering Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Ibrahim; Ali, Borhanuddin Mohd; Rasid, Mohd Fadlee A.; Sali, Aduwati; Mohamad, Hafizal

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that clustering partitions network into logical groups of nodes in order to achieve energy efficiency and to enhance dynamic channel access in cognitive radio through cooperative sensing. While the topic of energy efficiency has been well investigated in conventional wireless sensor networks, the latter has not been extensively explored. In this paper, we propose a reinforcement learning-based spectrum-aware clustering algorithm that allows a member node to learn the energy and cooperative sensing costs for neighboring clusters to achieve an optimal solution. Each member node selects an optimal cluster that satisfies pairwise constraints, minimizes network energy consumption and enhances channel sensing performance through an exploration technique. We first model the network energy consumption and then determine the optimal number of clusters for the network. The problem of selecting an optimal cluster is formulated as a Markov Decision Process (MDP) in the algorithm and the obtained simulation results show convergence, learning and adaptability of the algorithm to dynamic environment towards achieving an optimal solution. Performance comparisons of our algorithm with the Groupwise Spectrum Aware (GWSA)-based algorithm in terms of Sum of Square Error (SSE), complexity, network energy consumption and probability of detection indicate improved performance from the proposed approach. The results further reveal that an energy savings of 9% and a significant Primary User (PU) detection improvement can be achieved with the proposed approach. PMID:26287191

  2. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor's hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects that distinguish these measurements from previous work in the field: (1) The measurements are conducted using laser Doppler anemometry and are therefore not contaminated by directional ambiguity (in contrast to, e.g., frequently employed hot-wire anemometers); (2) the measurement data are extracted using a correctly and transparently functioning processor and are analysed using methods derived from first principles to provide unbiased estimates of the velocity statistics; (3) the exact mapping proposed herein has been applied to the high turbulence intensity flows investigated to avoid the significant distortions caused by Taylor's hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed jet. The proposed mapping is successfully validated using corresponding directly measured spatial statistics in the fully developed jet, even in the difficult outer regions of

  3. Characterization of Neutron Energy Spectrum at KIRAMS MC- 50 Cyclotron Using Genetic Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Sy Minh Tuan; Sun, Gwang Min; Beak, Ha Ni; Kim, Ji Seok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The well-established unfolding techniques have been widely used for many years to determination neutron spectra with adopting the interactive recursion method, least-squares fitting techniques, and Tikhonov's regularisation method. These unfolding methods are frameworks to develop the unfolding codes as SAND, STAY' SL, LOUHI-83, etc., which require an initial spectrum to staring up the unfolding procedure of an unknown spectrum. The accuracy and exactness of the resulting spectrum primarily depend on the subjectively chosen guess spectrum. To overcome this drawback, the other approach for unfolding of neutron spectra using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) search process has been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra from a particle accelerator source. The experiment of improving the switch speed of IGBT devices have done based on the generated fast neutron irradiation proving by the MC-50 cyclotron at KIRAMS (Republic of KOREA). The fast neutron spectrum at the irradiated position was necessarily required for the experiments as well as estimations of the radiation damage of fast neutron on the IGBT devices. The GA is a robust problem-solving tool and it can unfold the neutron spectrum successfully without requiring a specific starting parameter as the initial neutron spectrum. This paper validated and demonstrated the GA technique to become a competitive method in unfolding neutron spectra.

  4. Effects of Equine Assisted Activities on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Beth A.; Baier, Margaret E. Matyastik; Ivey-Hatz, Julie; Krenek, Nancy; Tubbs, Jack D.

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life assessments were used in this study to determine the behavioral changes of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in equine assisted activities. Behavioral changes of children with ASD participating in 9 weeks of equines assisted activities (EAA) (N = 10) were compared to behavioral changes of…

  5. The spectrum of subjective effects of antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, HA; Knegtering, R; Wiersma, D; van den Bosch, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background: This study examined the spectrum of subjective experiences which patients attribute to the use of antipsychotic medication. Methods: We collected interview data and answers to structured questions based on a comprehensive checklist in 77 patients using various types of classical or

  6. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  7. A Method for Determining the High Energy Photon Spectrum of a Pulsed Plasma Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    computer program to be used to deconvolute the spectrum will be a modification of the program XSPEC . Scope The scope of this thesis is to be limited to...five areas. They are: filter selection, detector calibration, modification of the program XSPEC , spectrum deconvolution, and revised filter selection...data provided by the manufacturer of the detectors. The program XSPEC is to be modified so that it will accept data in the form of time versus

  8. Epigenetic Effect of Environmental Factors on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Takeo Kubota; Kazuki Mochizuki

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental factors and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Epigenetics, an essential mechanism for gene regulation based on chemical modifications of DNA and histone proteins, is also involved in congenital ASDs. It was recently demonstrated that environmental factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals and mental stress in early life, can change epigenetic status and gene expression, and can cause ASDs. Moreover, environmentally i...

  9. Effects of biasing on the galaxy power spectrum at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Jiménez, José; Durrer, Ruth

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we study the effect of biasing on the power spectrum at large scales. We show that even though nonlinear biasing does introduce a white noise contribution on large scales, the P(k)∝kn behavior of the matter power spectrum on large scales may still be visible and above the white noise for about one decade. We show, that the Kaiser biasing scheme which leads to linear bias of the correlation function on large scales, also generates a linear bias of the power spectrum on rather small scales. This is a consequence of the divergence on small scales of the pure Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. However, biasing becomes k dependent if we damp the underlying power spectrum on small scales. We also discuss the effect of biasing on the baryon acoustic oscillations.

  10. Effective reconstruction of dynamics of medium response spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2008-10-01

    A new algorithm is suggested to visualize the dynamics of medium response spectrum in terahertz diapason by the singly measured set of partially intersected integral characteristics of the signal. The algorithm is based on SVD method and window sliding method. The analysis, we carried out, demonstrates many advantages of the new algorithm in com-parison with the Gabor-Fourier approach, which allows obtaining the dynamics of only one spectral line for one set of measurements. Among which it is necessary to mention the possibility to get the dynamics of many spectral components simultaneously for one set of measurements as well and therefore to get the complete information about the spectrum dynamics. This allows to identify specific materials with known spectral lines and to distinguish materials with similar spectra, which is of great importance for the detection and identification of different chemicals, pharmaceutical substances and explosives. To demonstrate the efficiency of a proposed algorithm, we compare spectrum dynamics of chocolate and soap, which possess the similar spectra. Our investigation shows that their dynamics widely vary in spec-tral lines. The proposed algorithm can be also applied to voice identification and to reconstruction of a laser beam profile with a great number of local maxima. Developed algorithm allows to measure the characteristic time of medium responce. It is very important for various problems of spectroscopy.

  11. Measurement of the very-forward energy spectrum in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, Sebastian; Akbiyik, Melike; Baus, Colin; Katkov, Igor; Ulrich, Ralf; Woehrmann, Hauke [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The energy spectrum dN/dE in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=13 TeV is measured with the CASTOR calorimeter of CMS at pseudorapidities -5.2>η>-6.6. The spectrum of the total energy, as well as the hadronic and electromagnetic energy, is presented and compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. The performance also of model used to describe ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers is tested, and the possible impact of the measurement on the air shower development is illustrated.

  12. Importance of Vibronic Effects in the UV-Vis Spectrum of the 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapavicza, Enrico; Furche, Filipp; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-10-11

    We present a computational method for simulating vibronic absorption spectra in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) range and apply it to the 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane anion (TCNQ(-)), which has been used as a ligand in black absorbers. Gaussian broadening of vertical electronic excitation energies of TCNQ(-) from linear-response time-dependent density functional theory produces only one band, which is qualitatively incorrect. Thus, the harmonic vibrational modes of the two lowest doublet states were computed, and the vibronic UV-vis spectrum was simulated using the displaced harmonic oscillator approximation, the frequency-shifted harmonic oscillator approximation, and the full Duschinsky formalism. An efficient real-time generating function method was implemented to avoid the exponential complexity of conventional Franck-Condon approaches to vibronic spectra. The obtained UV-vis spectra for TCNQ(-) agree well with experiment; the Duschinsky rotation is found to have only a minor effect on the spectrum. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations combined with calculations of the electronic excitation energies for a large number of molecular structures were also used for simulating the UV-vis spectrum. The Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations yield a broadening of the energetically lowest peak in the absorption spectrum, but additional vibrational bands present in the experimental and simulated quantum harmonic oscillator spectra are not observed in the molecular dynamics simulations. Our results underline the importance of vibronic effects for the UV-vis spectrum of TCNQ(-), and they establish an efficient method for obtaining vibronic spectra using a combination of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and a real-time generating function approach.

  13. Energy spectrum of the relativistic prompt component of solar protons in the October 28, 2003 and January 20, 2005 GLE's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peraza, J. A.; Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    As it has been shown in a series of works some solar particle events are composed of two different relativistic populations a Prompt Component PC and a Delayed Component DC each one with different energy spectrum behavior The source spectra of the DC tend to an inverse power law at the steady state situation and have been adequately reproduced in some Ground Level Events GLE by means of stochastic acceleration by MHD turbulence assuming a monoenergetic injection of protons at 1 MeV Spectra of the PC are considerable deviated from such a power law Here we attempt to reproduce the PC spectra in terms of three different scenarios 1 acceleration from magnetic merging in a coronal Magnetic Neutral Current Sheet MNCS 2 stochastic acceleration of an injected population pre-accelerated in a MNCS 3 shock acceleration associated with the Coronal Mass Ejection CME Those three scenarios are based 1 on the spectrum from MNCS model Perez-Peraza et al 1977 1978 2 on the equation 51 of the paper by Gallegos-Cruz and P e rez-Peraza 1995 3 on the scenario of the spectrum formation at the CME-driven shock front nearby the Sun Berezhko and Taneev 2003 We also examine the case of an eventual contamination of both components in the interplanetary spectrum Theoretical results are tested by the data for two large GLEs of October 28 2003 and January 20 2005

  14. A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2017-07-01

    A novel neutron Spectrum Deconvolution using Particle Swarm Optimization (SDPSO) code has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution and a response matrix. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) imitates the bird flocks social behavior to solve complex optimization problems. The results of the SDPSO code have been compared with those of the standard spectra and recently published Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding (TGASU) code. The TGASU code have been previously compared with the other codes such as MAXED, GRAVEL, FERDOR and GAMCD and shown to be more accurate than the previous codes. The results of the SDPSO code have been demonstrated to match well with those of the TGASU code for both under determined and over-determined problems. In addition the SDPSO has been shown to be nearly two times faster than the TGASU code.

  15. Effectiveness of low intensity behavioral treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Scheffer, N.C.; Didden, H.C.M.; Mulders, M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of low intensity behavioral treatment (LIBT) supplementing regular treatment in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) standardized tests of cognition, adaptive behavior, interpersonal relations, play, language,

  16. The Social Effect of “Being Imitated” in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Contaldo, Annarita; Colombi, Costanza; Narzisi, Antonio; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that ‘being imitated’ has social effects, and that the imitation of the child’s actions may be used as a strategy to promote social engagement in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD...

  17. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2004-08-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of small core or a large core polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the second generation (alpha) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of small-core fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility and commercial viability of this technology. (1) TRNSYS Modeling of a Hybrid Lighting System: Building Energy Loads and Chromaticity Analysis; (2) High Lumens Screening Test Setup for Optical Fibers; (3) Photo-Induced Heating in Plastic Optical Fiber Bundles; (4) Low-Cost Primary Mirror Development; (5) Potential Applications for Hybrid Solar Lighting; (6) Photobioreactor Population Experiments and Productivity Measurements; and (7) Development of a Microalgal CO2-Biofixation Photobioreactor.

  18. Shallow water effects on wave energy converters with hydraulic power take-off system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashank Sinha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water depth on the power absorption by a single heaving point absorber wave energy converter, attached to a hydraulic power take-off system, is simulated and analysed. The wave energy flux for changing water depths is presented and the study is carried out at a location in the north-west Portuguese coast, favourable for wave power generation. This analysis is based on a procedure to modify the wave spectrum as the water depth reduces, namely, the TMA spectrum (Transformation spectrum. The present study deals with the effect of water depth on the spectral shape and significant wave heights. The reactive control strategy, which includes an external damping coefficient and a negative spring term, is used to maximize power absorption by the wave energy converter. The presented work can be used for making decisions regarding the best water depth for the installation of point absorber wave energy converters in the Portuguese nearshore.

  19. Health Effects of Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, William; Tatu, Calin; Pavlovic, Nikola; Bunnell, Joseph; Kolker, Allan; Engle, Mark; Stout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Energy resources (coal, oil, and natural gas) are among the cornerstones of modern industrial society. The exploitation of these resources, however, is not without costs. Energy materials may contain harmful chemical substances that, if mobilized into air, water, or soil, can adversely impact human health and environmental quality. In order to address the issue of human exposure to toxic substances derived from energy resources, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Resources Program developed a project entitled 'Impacts of Energy Resources on Human Health and Environmental Quality.' The project is intended to provide policymakers and the public with the scientific information needed to weigh the human health and environmental consequences of meeting our energy needs. This fact sheet discusses several areas where the USGS Energy Resources Program is making scientific advances in this endeavor.

  20. Anelastic deformation processes in metallic glasses and activation energy spectrum model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, [No Value; Csach, K; Kasardova, A; Bengus, VZ; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1997-01-01

    The isothermal kinetics of anelastic deformation below the glass transition temperature (so-called 'stress induced ordering' or 'creep recovery' deformation) was investigated in Ni-Si-B metallic glass. The relaxation time spectrum model and two recently developed methods for its calculation from the

  1. Study of Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Critical-Band Energy Spectrum of Speech as Acoustic Indicators of Laryngeal and Voice Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan U. Cholayya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic analysis of speech signals is a noninvasive technique that has been proved to be an effective tool for the objective support of vocal and voice disease screening. In the present study acoustic analysis of sustained vowels is considered. A simple k-means nearest neighbor classifier is designed to test the efficacy of a harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR measure and the critical-band energy spectrum of the voiced speech signal as tools for the detection of laryngeal pathologies. It groups the given voice signal sample into pathologic and normal. The voiced speech signal is decomposed into harmonic and noise components using an iterative signal extrapolation algorithm. The HNRs at four different frequency bands are estimated and used as features. Voiced speech is also filtered with 21 critical-bandpass filters that mimic the human auditory neurons. Normalized energies of these filter outputs are used as another set of features. The results obtained have shown that the HNR and the critical-band energy spectrum can be used to correlate laryngeal pathology and voice alteration, using previously classified voice samples. This method could be an additional acoustic indicator that supplements the clinical diagnostic features for voice evaluation.

  2. Study of Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Critical-Band Energy Spectrum of Speech as Acoustic Indicators of Laryngeal and Voice Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shama, Kumara; krishna, Anantha; Cholayya, Niranjan U.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic analysis of speech signals is a noninvasive technique that has been proved to be an effective tool for the objective support of vocal and voice disease screening. In the present study acoustic analysis of sustained vowels is considered. A simple[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-means nearest neighbor classifier is designed to test the efficacy of a harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) measure and the critical-band energy spectrum of the voiced speech signal as tools for the detection of laryngeal pathologies. It groups the given voice signal sample into pathologic and normal. The voiced speech signal is decomposed into harmonic and noise components using an iterative signal extrapolation algorithm. The HNRs at four different frequency bands are estimated and used as features. Voiced speech is also filtered with 21 critical-bandpass filters that mimic the human auditory neurons. Normalized energies of these filter outputs are used as another set of features. The results obtained have shown that the HNR and the critical-band energy spectrum can be used to correlate laryngeal pathology and voice alteration, using previously classified voice samples. This method could be an additional acoustic indicator that supplements the clinical diagnostic features for voice evaluation.

  3. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, Verena [Dresden Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic nX2 distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B → Xcℓν. The variable nX2 is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson mX, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame EX;BRF, and a constant ~Λ = 0.65 GeV, nX2 = mX2c4-2~ΛEX,BRF + ~Λ2. The moments Xk> with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e+e- → Υ(4S) {yields} B$\\bar{B}$ events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e--storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the nX2 distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments Xk> up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B → Xcℓν and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B → Xsγ, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |Vcb|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction β(B → Xcℓν), and four non-perturbative heavy quark

  4. Measurement and interpretation of moments of the combined hadronic mass and energy spectrum in inclusive semileptonic B-meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, V.

    2007-11-29

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}. The variable n{sub X}{sup 2} is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson m{sub X}, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame E{sub X,BRF}, and a constant {lambda}=0.65 GeV, n{sub X}{sup 2}=m{sub X}{sup 2}c{sup 4}-2{lambda}E{sub X,BRF}+{lambda}{sup 2}. The moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle with k=2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {upsilon}(4S) {yields} B anti B events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}} and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B{yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, we determine the quark-mixing parameter vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction B(B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}), and four non-perturbative heavy quark parameters. Using HQE

  5. Epigenetic Effect of Environmental Factors on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Kubota

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Both environmental factors and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Epigenetics, an essential mechanism for gene regulation based on chemical modifications of DNA and histone proteins, is also involved in congenital ASDs. It was recently demonstrated that environmental factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals and mental stress in early life, can change epigenetic status and gene expression, and can cause ASDs. Moreover, environmentally induced epigenetic changes are not erased during gametogenesis and are transmitted to subsequent generations, leading to changes in behavior phenotypes. However, epigenetics has a reversible nature since it is based on the addition or removal of chemical residues, and thus the original epigenetic status may be restored. Indeed, several antidepressants and anticonvulsants used for mental disorders including ASDs restore the epigenetic state and gene expression. Therefore, further epigenetic understanding of ASDs is important for the development of new drugs that take advantages of epigenetic reversibility.

  6. Biobehavioral Markers of Adverse Effect in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Sandra W.; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Stanton, Mark E.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.; Molteno, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is difficult because information regarding prenatal exposure is often lacking, a large proportion of affected children do not exhibit facial anomalies, and no distinctive behavioral phenotype has been identified. Castellanos and Tannock have advocated going beyond descriptive symptom-based approaches to diagnosis to identify biomarkers derived from cognitive neuroscience. Classical eyeblink conditioning and magnitude comparison are particularly promising biobehavioral markers of FASD—eyeblink conditioning because a deficit in this elemental form of learning characterizes a very large proportion of alcohol-exposed children; magnitude comparison because it is a domain of higher order cognitive function that is among the most sensitive to fetal alcohol exposure. Because the neural circuitry mediating both these biobehavioral markers is well understood, they have considerable potential for advancing understanding of the pathophysiology of FASD, which can contribute to development of treatments targeted to the specific deficits that characterize this disorder. PMID:21541763

  7. Epigenetic Effect of Environmental Factors on Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takeo; Mochizuki, Kazuki

    2016-05-14

    Both environmental factors and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Epigenetics, an essential mechanism for gene regulation based on chemical modifications of DNA and histone proteins, is also involved in congenital ASDs. It was recently demonstrated that environmental factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals and mental stress in early life, can change epigenetic status and gene expression, and can cause ASDs. Moreover, environmentally induced epigenetic changes are not erased during gametogenesis and are transmitted to subsequent generations, leading to changes in behavior phenotypes. However, epigenetics has a reversible nature since it is based on the addition or removal of chemical residues, and thus the original epigenetic status may be restored. Indeed, several antidepressants and anticonvulsants used for mental disorders including ASDs restore the epigenetic state and gene expression. Therefore, further epigenetic understanding of ASDs is important for the development of new drugs that take advantages of epigenetic reversibility.

  8. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for State-of-Health Assessment of Energy Storage Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch; William H. Morrison

    2012-04-01

    Harmonic compensated synchronous detection (HCSD) is a technique that can be used to measure wideband impedance spectra within seconds based on an input sum-of-sines signal having a frequency spread separated by harmonics. The battery (or other energy storage device) is excited with a sum-of-sines current signal that has a duration of at least one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured and synchronously detected at each frequency of interest to determine the impedance spectra. This technique was successfully simulated using a simplified battery model and then verified with commercially available Sanyo lithium-ion cells. Simulations revealed the presence of a start-up transient effect when only one period of the lowest frequency is included in the excitation signal. This transient effect appears to only influence the low-frequency impedance measurements and can be reduced when a longer input signal is used. Furthermore, lithium-ion cell testing has indicated that the transient effect does not seem to impact the charge transfer resistance in the mid-frequency region. The degradation rates for the charge transfer resistance measured from the HCSD technique were very similar to the changes observed from standardized impedance spectroscopy methods. Results from these studies, therefore, indicate that HCSD is a viable, rapid alternative approach to acquiring impedance spectra.

  9. Ab initio ground state phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Fernandez, Berta; Henriksen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface by fitting a representative number of ab initio interaction energies to an analytic function. These energies are calculated at a grid of intermolecular geometries, using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set ...

  10. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays with the 26 station configuration of the IceTop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2011-09-27

    IceTop is an instrument at the geographic South Pole designed to detect cosmic ray air showers, particle cascades in the atmosphere initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. It is the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope. Since its completion in December 2010, IceTop consists of 81 detector stations covering an area of one square kilometer on the ice surface above IceCube. Each IceTop station consists of two ice-filled tanks in which the Cherenkov light emitted by charged air shower particles is measured. In this dissertation, an analysis of data taken in 2007 with 26 IceTop stations operational at that time is presented. First, properties of air showers like core position, direction and shower size were reconstructed from the measured signals. The core position can be determined to an accuracy of up to 6m and a direction resolution of up to 0.3 is achieved. The shower size is a measure of the energy of the primary particle and a resolution of up to 10% is achieved at high energies. In the next step the relation between primary energy and shower size, as well as resolution and efficiency are determined from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers and the IceTop detector. Here, an assumption was made about the chemical composition of cosmic rays. The informations obtained in these simulations are then used to unfold the spectrum of measured shower sizes in order to obtain the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum. This is done independently for particles from three different zenith angle intervals. The result of the unfolding depends on the assumed primary composition. Due to the isotropy of cosmic rays, results obtained in different zenith angle intervals must agree. While with the chosen analysis technique a simultaneous determination of primary particle mass and energy is limited due to systematic uncertainties, it has already been shown that the requirement of isotropy can be used to constrain the range of possible assumptions on the chemical

  11. Measurements of the neutron dose and energy spectrum on the International Space Station during expeditions ISS-16 to ISS-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M B; Akatov, Yu; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Chernykh, I V; Ing, H; Khoshooniy, N; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Romanenko, R Y; Shurshakov, V; Thirsk, R B; Tomi, L

    2013-01-01

    As part of the international Matroshka-R and Radi-N experiments, bubble detectors have been used on board the ISS in order to characterise the neutron dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons. Experiments using bubble dosemeters inside a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed during the ISS-16, ISS-18 and ISS-19 expeditions. During the ISS-20 and ISS-21 missions, the bubble dosemeters were supplemented by a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors that was used to determine the neutron energy spectrum at various locations inside the ISS. The temperature-compensated spectrometer set used is the first to be developed specifically for space applications and its development is described in this paper. Results of the dose measurements indicate that the dose received at two different depths inside the phantom is not significantly different, suggesting that bubble detectors worn by a person provide an accurate reading of the dose received inside the body. The energy spectra measured using the spectrometer are in good agreement with previous measurements and do not show a strong dependence on the precise location inside the station. To aid the understanding of the bubble-detector response to charged particles in the space environment, calculations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code, together with data collected on the ISS. These calculations indicate that charged particles contribute measurements in space.

  12. Many-body effects in the excitation spectrum of weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in one-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, Raphael; Klaiman, Shachar; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Alon, Ofir E.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study many-body excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in periodic one-dimensional optical lattices. In particular, we investigate the impact of quantum depletion onto the structure of the low-energy spectrum and contrast the findings to the mean-field predictions of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equations. Accurate results for the many-body excited states are obtained by applying a linear-response theory atop the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons equations of motion. We demonstrate for condensates in a triple well that even weak ground-state depletion of around 1 % leads to visible many-body effects in the low-energy spectrum, which deviates substantially from the corresponding BdG spectrum. We further show that these effects also appear in larger systems with more lattice sites and particles, indicating the general necessity of a full many-body treatment.

  13. Exact third-order density perturbation and one-loop power spectrum in general dark energy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokcheon Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Under the standard perturbation theory (SPT, we obtain the fully consistent third-order density fluctuation and kernels for the general dark energy models without using the Einstein–de Sitter (EdS universe assumption for the first time. We also show that even though the temporal and spatial components of the SPT solutions cannot be separable, one can find the exact solutions to any order in general dark energy models. With these exact solutions, we obtain the less than % error correction of one-loop matter power spectrum compared to that obtained from the EdS assumption for k=0.1 hMpc−1 mode at z=0(1,1.5. Thus, the EdS assumption works very well at this scale. However, if one considers the correction for P13, the error is about 6 (9, 11% for the same mode at z=0(1,1.5. One absorbs P13 into the linear power spectrum in the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT and thus one should use the exact solution instead of the approximation one. The error on the resummed propagator N of RPT is about 14 (8, 6% at z=0(1,1.5 for k=0.4 hMpc−1. For k=1 hMpc−1, the error correction of the total matter power spectrum is about 3.6 (4.6, 4.5% at z=0(1,1.5. Upcoming observation is required to archive the sub-percent accuracy to provide the strong constraint on the dark energy and this consistent solution is prerequisite for the model comparison.

  14. Exact third-order density perturbation and one-loop power spectrum in general dark energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seokcheon; Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Heogiro 85, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Biern, Sang Gyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-07

    Under the standard perturbation theory (SPT), we obtain the fully consistent third-order density fluctuation and kernels for the general dark energy models without using the Einstein–de Sitter (EdS) universe assumption for the first time. We also show that even though the temporal and spatial components of the SPT solutions cannot be separable, one can find the exact solutions to any order in general dark energy models. With these exact solutions, we obtain the less than % error correction of one-loop matter power spectrum compared to that obtained from the EdS assumption for k=0.1 hMpc{sup −1} mode at z=0(1,1.5). Thus, the EdS assumption works very well at this scale. However, if one considers the correction for P{sub 13}, the error is about 6 (9, 11)% for the same mode at z=0(1,1.5). One absorbs P{sub 13} into the linear power spectrum in the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT) and thus one should use the exact solution instead of the approximation one. The error on the resummed propagator N of RPT is about 14 (8, 6)% at z=0(1,1.5) for k=0.4 hMpc{sup −1}. For k=1 hMpc{sup −1}, the error correction of the total matter power spectrum is about 3.6 (4.6, 4.5)% at z=0(1,1.5). Upcoming observation is required to archive the sub-percent accuracy to provide the strong constraint on the dark energy and this consistent solution is prerequisite for the model comparison.

  15. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  16. Effect of spatial spectrum overlap on Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulan Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM is a newly developed imaging technique which stands out by virtue of its high-resolution and wide FOV. It improves a microscope’s imaging performance beyond the diffraction limit of the employed optical components by illuminating the sample with oblique waves of different incident angles, similar to the concept of synthetic aperture. We propose to use an objective lens with high-NA to generate oblique illuminating waves in FPM. We demonstrate utilizing an objective lens with higher NA to illuminate the sample leads to better resolution by simulations, in which a resolution of 0.28μm is achieved by using a high-NA illuminating objective lens (NA=1.49 and a low-NA collecting objective lens (NA=0.2 in coherent imaging (λ=488nm. We then deeply study FPM’s exact relevance of convergence speed to spatial spectrum overlap in frequency domain. The simulation results show that an overlap of about 60% is the optimal choice to acquire a high-quality recovery (520*520 pixels with about 2 min’s computing time. In addition, we testify the robustness of the algorithm of FPM to additive noises and its suitability for phase objects, which further proves FPM’s potential application in biomedical imaging.

  17. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  18. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 13. Integration of Renewable Energy Technologies in the national curriculum SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report focuses on the achievements for settling a national curriculum for Renewable Energy Technologies (RET) within the framework of national programme SPECTRUM, which includes all curricula of the medium technical schools in Indonesia.

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  20. Off-axis holographic lens spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system for direct and diffuse solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorndran, Shelby D; Chrysler, Benjamin; Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, Roger; Holman, Zachary; Kostuk, Raymond

    2016-09-20

    This paper describes a high-efficiency, spectrum-splitting photovoltaic module that uses an off-axis volume holographic lens to focus and disperse incident solar illumination to a rectangular shaped high-bandgap indium gallium phosphide cell surrounded by strips of silicon cells. The holographic lens design allows efficient collection of both direct and diffuse illumination to maximize energy yield. We modeled the volume diffraction characteristics using rigorous coupled-wave analysis, and simulated system performance using nonsequential ray tracing and PV cell data from the literature. Under AM 1.5 illumination conditions the simulated module obtained a 30.6% conversion efficiency. This efficiency is a 19.7% relative improvement compared to the more efficient cell in the system (silicon). The module was also simulated under a typical meteorological year of direct and diffuse irradiance in Tucson, Arizona, and Seattle, Washington. Compared to a flat panel silicon module, the holographic spectrum splitting module obtained a relative improvement in energy yield of 17.1% in Tucson and 14.0% in Seattle. An experimental proof-of-concept volume holographic lens was also fabricated in dichromated gelatin to verify the main characteristics of the system. The lens obtained an average first-order diffraction efficiency of 85.4% across the aperture at 532 nm.

  1. HESS J1427-608: An Unusual Hard, Unbroken Gamma-Ray Spectrum in a Very Wide Energy Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Lei; Xin, Yu-Liang; Liao, Neng-Hui; Yuan, Qiang; Gao, Wei-Hong; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liu, Si-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We report the detection of a GeV γ-ray source that spatially overlaps and is thus very likely associated with the unidentified very high energy (VHE) γ-ray source HESS J1427-608 with the Pass 8 data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The photon spectrum of this source is best described by a power law with an index of 1.85 ± 0.17 in the energy range of 3-500 GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1427-608 at a few hundred gigaelectronvolts. This source shows no significant extension and time variation. The broadband GeV to TeV emission over four decades of energies can be well fitted by a single power-law function with an index of 2.0, without obvious indication of spectral cutoff toward high energies. Such a result implies that HESS J1427-608 may be a PeV particle accelerator. We discuss the possible nature of HESS J1427-608 according to the multiwavelength spectral fittings. Given the relatively large errors, either a leptonic or a hadronic model can explain the multiwavelength data from radio to VHE γ-rays. The inferred magnetic field strength is a few micro-Gauss, which is smaller than the typical values of supernova remnants (SNRs) and is consistent with some pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). On the other hand, the flat γ-ray spectrum is slightly different from typical PWNe but is similar to that of some known SNRs.

  2. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  3. Spectrum and angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu deca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Sydorenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu decay was measured. Measurements were carried out in cylindrical geometry, which permits minimum distortions of data. These data confirm existence of angular distribution dependence on the energy of emitted electrons but this dependence somewhat differs from theory predicted. It is noted that the theory predicts too low intensity of near-zero energy electrons e0 (Ee ~ 1 - 2 eV emission; also, the static screening of charge used in theory should not influence the emission of e0-electrons.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on electron spectrum in spherical nano-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Holovatsky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the magnetic field on energy spectrum and wave functions of electron in spherical nano-structures such as single quantum dot and spherical layer is investigated. It is shown that the magnetic field takes off the spectrum degeneration with respect to the magnetic quantum number. Increasing magnetic field induction entails the monotonous character of electron energy for the states with m ≥ 0 and non-monotonous one for the states with m < 0. The electron wave functions of the ground and few excited states are studied considering the influence of the magnetic field. It is shown that 1s and 1p states are degenerated in the spherical layer driven by the strong magnetic field. In the limit case, the series of size-quantized levels produce the Landau levels which are typical for the bulk crystals.

  5. Low-frequency ionospheric sounding with Narrow Bipolar Event lightning radio emissions: energy-reflectivity spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze data on radio-reflection from the D-region of the lower ionosphere, retrieving the energy-reflection coefficient in the frequency range ~5–95 kHz. The data are the same as developed for a recent study of ionospheric-reflection height, and are based on recordings of powerful (multi-Gigawatt radio emissions from a type of narrow (~10 μs lightning discharge known as "Narrow Bipolar Events". The sequential appearance of first the groundwave signal, and then the ionospheric single-hop reflection signal, permits us to construct the energy-reflection ratio. We infer the energy reflection's statistical variation with solar zenith angle, angle-of-incidence, frequency, and propagation azimuth. There is also a marginally-significant response of the energy reflectivity to solar X-ray flux density. Finally, we review the relationship of our results to previous published reports.

  6. Low-frequency ionospheric sounding with Narrow Bipolar Event lightning radio emissions: energy-reflectivity spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze data on radio-reflection from the D-region of the lower ionosphere, retrieving the energy-reflection coefficient in the frequency range ~5–95 kHz. The data are the same as developed for a recent study of ionospheric-reflection height, and are based on recordings of powerful (multi-Gigawatt radio emissions from a type of narrow (~10 μs lightning discharge known as "Narrow Bipolar Events". The sequential appearance of first the groundwave signal, and then the ionospheric single-hop reflection signal, permits us to construct the energy-reflection ratio. We infer the energy reflection's statistical variation with solar zenith angle, angle-of-incidence, frequency, and propagation azimuth. There is also a marginally-significant response of the energy reflectivity to solar X-ray flux density. Finally, we review the relationship of our results to previous published reports.

  7. Quantum Geometry: Relativistic energy approach to cooperative electron-nucleary-transition spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Хецелиус

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An advanced relativistic energy approach is presented and applied to calculating parameters of electron-nuclear 7-transition spectra of nucleus in the atom. The intensities of the spectral satellites are defined in the relativistic version of the energy approach (S-matrix formalism, and gauge-invariant quantum-electrodynamical perturbation theory with the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density-functional zeroth approximation.

  8. Characterization of the Energy Spectrum at the Indiana University Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    gamma emission with a half life of 2.6 days such as the unstable 198Au nucleus , this would be considered a capture process. As in the elastic /inelastic...inelastic scattering at the incident proton energies of interest [25]. The three channels are compound nucleus break-up, direct-charge exchange, and multi...considered in the physics list for the NREP beam line simulation. Uncharged Hadrons Charged Hadrons (Neutrons) (Protons) Elastic Scattering Low Energy

  9. On the effect of pion condensates on the spectrum of neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolevatov, S. S.; Andrianov, A. A. [V. A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Espriu, D. [Departament d’Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-01-22

    There is no precise theory describing the structure of neutron stars. However, inside such objects the baryon density is very high and a pion condensation may occur. These condensates, if they exist, might give a significant effect on a spectrum of neutron stars. We investigate this influence with a help of simplified model to give qualitative picture of the effect.

  10. Effectiveness and Retention of Teaching Memory Strategy Use to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, James M.; Rhee, Thomas; Ncube, Busisiwe L.; Dahary, Hadas

    2017-01-01

    Although low levels of memory strategy use have been found in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), few studies have explored the effectiveness of interventions for improving strategy use with this population. In two studies, we examined the short- and longer term effectiveness of rehearsal strategy training. In Study 1, children with…

  11. Measurement of the atmospheric nu (mu) energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Albert, A.; Al Samarai, I.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. -J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, F.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fusco, L. A.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, E.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Michael, T.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Motz, H.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yatkin, K.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from

  12. Statistical Delay QoS Provisioning for Energy-Efficient Spectrum-Sharing Based Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop the statistical delay quality-of-service (QoS provisioning framework for the energy-efficient spectrum-sharing based wireless ad hoc sensor network (WAHSN, which is characterized by the delay-bound violation probability. Based on the established delay QoS provisioning framework, we formulate the nonconvex optimization problem which aims at maximizing the average energy efficiency of the sensor node in the WAHSN while meeting PU’s statistical delay QoS requirement as well as satisfying sensor node’s average transmission rate, average transmitting power, and peak transmitting power constraints. By employing the theories of fractional programming, convex hull, and probabilistic transmission, we convert the original fractional-structured nonconvex problem to the additively structured parametric convex problem and obtain the optimal power allocation strategy under the given parameter via Lagrangian method. Finally, we derive the optimal average energy efficiency and corresponding optimal power allocation scheme by employing the Dinkelbach method. Simulation results show that our derived optimal power allocation strategy can be dynamically adjusted based on PU’s delay QoS requirement as well as the channel conditions. The impact of PU’s delay QoS requirement on sensor node’s energy efficiency is also illustrated.

  13. Effects of x-ray spectrum on the NPS of a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the effects of various incident x-ray beam spectra on the measured noise power spectrum (NPS) of a computed radiography (CR) image acquisition device. A CR phosphor was uniformly exposed to 1 mR with x-ray beams whose peak tube potentials were 70, 95, and 120 kVp that were filtered by various thicknesses of a 'patient equivalent phantom' (PEP; 2% aluminum, 98% acrylic by thickness), aluminum, and copper. From the uniform exposure images, NPS curves were calculated and their integral values were computed. The integral noise values were found to vary substantially as a function of x-ray beam spectral content. A simple x-ray beam and filter model that accounted for the shape of the filtered x-ray spectra and the mass energy absorption coefficient of the storage phosphor verified the qualitative behavior of the integral NPS values corresponding to changes in the incident x-ray beam used. The x-ray beam and filter combinations of 70 kVp and 10.1 cm of PEP filtration and 120 kVp and 20.2 cm of PEP filtration were chosen as standard techniques for evaluating clinical imaging systems. These two combinations represent a relatively low, clinically relevant CR noise (integral NPS equals 2.6 X 10-6 mm) technique and a relatively high, clinically relevant CR noise (integral NPS equals 3.3 X 10-6 mm) technique.

  14. Energy spectrum inverse problem of q-deformed harmonic oscillator and entanglement of composite bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Nguyen Anh; Thu Thuy, Do Thi; Loan, Nguyen Thi Ha; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2017-06-01

    Using the simple deformed three-level model (D3L model) proposed in our early work, we study the entanglement problem of composite bosons. Consider three first energy levels are known, we can get two energy separations, and can define the level deformation parameter δ. Using connection between q-deformed harmonic oscillator and Morse-like anharmonic potential, the deform parameter q also can be derived explicitly. Like the Einstein’s theory of special relativity, we introduce the observer e˙ects: out side observer (looking from outside the studying system) and inside observer (looking inside the studying system). Corresponding to those observers, the outside entanglement entropy and inside entanglement entropy will be defined.. Like the case of Foucault pendulum in the problem of Earth rotation, our deformation energy level investigation might be useful in prediction the environment e˙ect outside a confined box.

  15. Spectral amplification models for response spectrum addressing the directivity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Saed; Akkar, Sinan

    2017-04-01

    Ground motions with forward directivity effects are known with their significantly large spectral ordinates in medium-to-long periods. The large spectral ordinates stem from the impulsive characteristics of the forward directivity ground motions. The quantification of these spectral amplifications requires the identification of major seismological parameters that play a role in their generation. After running a suite of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, Moghimi and Akkar (2016) have shown that fault slip rate, fault characteristic magnitude, fault-site geometry as well as mean annual exceedance rate are important parameters that determine the level of spectral amplification due to directivity. These parameters are considered to develop two separate spectral amplification equations in this study. The proposed equations rely on Shahi and Baker (SHB11; 2011) and Chiou and Spudich (CHS13; Spudic et al., 2013) narrow-band forward directivity models. The presented equations only focus on the estimation of maximum spectral amplifications that occur at the ends of the fault segments. This way we eliminate the fault-site parameter in our equations for simplification. The proposed equations show different trends due to differences in the narrow-band directivity models of SHB11 and CHS13. The equations given in this study can form bases for describing forward directivity effects in seismic design codes. REFERENCES Shahi. S., Baker, J.W. (2011), "An Empirically Calibrated Framework for Including the Effects of Near-Fault Directivity in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 101(2): 742-755. Spudich, P., Watson-Lamprey, J., Somerville, P., Bayless, J., Shahi, S. K., Baker, J. W., Rowshandel, B., and Chiou, B. (2013), "Final Report of the NGA-West2 Directivity Working Group", PEER Report 2013/09. Moghimi. S., Akkar, S. (2016), "Implications of Forward Directivity Effects on Design Ground Motions", Seismological Society of

  16. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  17. Obscured flat spectrum radio active galactic nuclei as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; de Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Tavares, J. León; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vereecken, M.; Winchen, T.

    2016-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no

  18. "We Dance and Find Each Other"1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malin K Hildebrandt; Sabine C Koch; Thomas Fuchs

    2016-01-01

    .... The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder...

  19. Effective energy storage from a triboelectric nanogenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Wang, Jie; Wang, Sihong; Li, Shengming; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    To sustainably power electronics by harvesting mechanical energy using nanogenerators, energy storage is essential to supply a regulated and stable electric output, which is traditionally realized by a direct connection between the two components through a rectifier. However, this may lead to low energy-storage efficiency. Here, we rationally design a charging cycle to maximize energy-storage efficiency by modulating the charge flow in the system, which is demonstrated on a triboelectric nanogenerator by adding a motion-triggered switch. Both theoretical and experimental comparisons show that the designed charging cycle can enhance the charging rate, improve the maximum energy-storage efficiency by up to 50% and promote the saturation voltage by at least a factor of two. This represents a progress to effectively store the energy harvested by nanogenerators with the aim to utilize ambient mechanical energy to drive portable/wearable/implantable electronics. PMID:26964693

  20. Effective energy storage from a triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Wang, Jie; Wang, Sihong; Li, Shengming; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-03-11

    To sustainably power electronics by harvesting mechanical energy using nanogenerators, energy storage is essential to supply a regulated and stable electric output, which is traditionally realized by a direct connection between the two components through a rectifier. However, this may lead to low energy-storage efficiency. Here, we rationally design a charging cycle to maximize energy-storage efficiency by modulating the charge flow in the system, which is demonstrated on a triboelectric nanogenerator by adding a motion-triggered switch. Both theoretical and experimental comparisons show that the designed charging cycle can enhance the charging rate, improve the maximum energy-storage efficiency by up to 50% and promote the saturation voltage by at least a factor of two. This represents a progress to effectively store the energy harvested by nanogenerators with the aim to utilize ambient mechanical energy to drive portable/wearable/implantable electronics.

  1. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  2. [Effects of LED spectrum combinations on the absorption of mineral elements of hydroponic lettuce].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Guo, Wen-Zhong; Xue, Xu-Zhang; Mmanake Beauty, Morewane

    2014-05-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was hydroponically cultured in a completely enclosed plant factory, in which spectrum proportion-adjustable LED panels were used as sole light source for plant growth. Absorption and content of eleven mineral elements such as K, P, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, B and Mo in Lactuca sativa under different spectral component conditions were studied by ICP -AES technology. The results showed that: (1) Single or combined spectrums corresponding to the absorbing peaks of chlorophyll a and b (450, 660 nm) could enhance the absorbing ability of roots especially for mineral elements Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Mo, the single red spectrum had the most significant promoting effect under which contents of those four elements were respectively 7. 8, 4. 2, 4. 0 and 3. 7 times more than that under FL; (2) Absorption of K and B was the highest under FL which was 10. 309 mg g-1 and 32. 6 microg g-1 while the values decreased significantly under single or combined spectrum of red and blue; (3) Plants grown under single blue spectrum had the lowest absorption of Ca and Mg which respectively decreased by 35% and 33% than FL; (4) Lettuce grown under the spectrum combination of 30% blue and 70% red had the highest accumulations of biomass while those grown under 20% blue and 80% red had the highest accumulations of the following seven elements Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. The results provided theoretical basis for adjusting nutrient solution formula and selecting light spectrum of hydroponic lettuce.

  3. Effective market transformation from energy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chace, J.; Fountain, M.; Hydelman, M.; Grundon, T.; Benton, C.C.

    1998-07-01

    In this decade, several energy centers, such as PG and E's Pacific Energy Center in San Francisco have played a particularly interesting role in educating building professionals and utility customers about energy-efficient design and technologies. Energy centers' upstream and mid-market efforts have evolved as practical, effective, and less expensive adjuncts or alternatives to promoting energy efficiency through downstream financial incentives. The centers' roles fit especially well in the context of a nascent deregulated gas and electric marketplace and its multiple market actors. Although California's centers differ in focus and objectives, they serve the common function of technology transfer and provide access to reliable information that balances the opportunism, and even recidivism, the evolving energy marketplace may create. Energy centers can be well-positioned to influence the flow of information among actors in an inherently chaotic, yet rich, building market. In this market, research institutions will continue to evolve new energy-efficient technologies; manufacturers will continue to search for new applications for their products; ESCO's will search for new energy efficiency services to promote; building design professionals will continue to have a pronounced effect on the market penetration of new technologies by adopting (or not adopting) energy-efficient products and practices. Equally important, end-users will continue to want unbiased information about energy-efficiency. This paper summarizes six year's experience with an energy center centered on a public good/energy conservation mission strategically targeted to building professionals. This approach facilitates and rationalizes the movement of information among market actors to transform the marketplace and accelerate implementation of energy efficiency.

  4. Hyperspectral imaging of UVR effects on fungal spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Zuzana; Yao, Haibo; DiCrispino, Kevin; Brabham, Kori; Lewis, David; Beach, Jim; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2005-08-01

    The present report evaluated ultraviolet radiation (UVR) effects on the spectral signature of mycotoxin producing fungus Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Ultraviolet radiation has long been used to reduce microbe contamination and to inactivate mold spores. In view of the known effects of UVR on microorganisms, and because certain spectral bands in the signature of some fungi may be in the UV range, it is important to know the maximum acceptable limit of UVR exposure that does not significantly alter the fungal spectral signature and affect detection accuracy. A visible-near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging system using focal plane pushbroom scanning for high spatial and spectral resolution imaging was utilized to detect any changes. A. flavus cultures were grown for 5 days and imaged after intermittent or continuous UVR treatment. The intermittent group was treated at 1-minute intervals for 10 minutes, and VNIR images were taken after each UVR treatment. The continuous group was irradiated for 10 minutes and imaged before and after treatment. A control sample group did not undergo UVR treatment, but was also imaged at 1-minute intervals for 10 minutes in the same manner as the intermittent group. Before and after UVR treatment, mean fungal sample reflectance was obtained through spatial subset of the image along with standard deviation and pre- and post-treatment reflectance was compared for each sample. Results show significant difference between the reflectances of treated and control A. flavus cultures after 10 min of UV radiation. Aditionally, the results demonstrate that even lethal doses of UVR do not immediately affect the spectral signature of A. flavus cultures suggesting that the excitation UV light source used in the present experiment may be safe to use with the UV hyperspectral imaging system when exposure time falls below 10 min.

  5. The Energy Spectrum of Carriers between Two Concentric Spheres of Kane-Type Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Turkoz

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The electronic states of carriers between two concentric spheres of Kane-type semiconductor are theoretically investigated and compared with the results of the parabolic band approximation. Calculations are performed for a hard-wall confinement potential and the eigenstates and the eigenvalues of the Kane Hamiltonian are obtained. Taking into account the real band structure (strong spin-orbital interaction, narrow band gap, the size dependence of the energy of electrons, light holes, and spin-orbital splitting holes in InSb semiconductor concentric spheres are calculated. According to the obtained results both in parabolic and nonparabolic (Kane model cases, the electron energy levels come close to each other with the increasing of the radius.

  6. The Energy Spectrum of Carriers between Two Concentric Spheres of Kane-Type Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic states of carriers between two concentric spheres of Kane-type semiconductor are theoretically investigated and compared with the results of the parabolic band approximation. Calculations are performed for a hard-wall confinement potential and the eigenstates and the eigenvalues of the Kane Hamiltonian are obtained. Taking into account the real band structure (strong spin-orbital interaction, narrow band gap, the size dependence of the energy of electrons, light holes, and spin-orbital splitting holes in InSb semiconductor concentric spheres are calculated. According to the obtained results both in parabolic and nonparabolic (Kane model cases, the electron energy levels come close to each other with the increasing of the radius.

  7. Effectiveness of a Standardized Equine-Assisted Therapy Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Loliva, Dafne; Cerino, Stefania; Chiarotti, Flavia; Venerosi, Aldina; Bramini, Maria; Nonnis, Enrico; Marcelli, Marco; Vinti, Claudia; De Santis, Chiara; Bisacco, Francesca; Fagerlie, Monica; Frascarelli, Massimo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effectiveness of an equine-assisted therapy (EAT) in improving adaptive and executive functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was examined (children attending EAT, n = 15, control group n = 13; inclusion criteria: IQ > 70). Therapeutic sessions consisted in structured activities involving horses and…

  8. Effects of Spectrum Teaching Styles on College Students' Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Self-Determined Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie; Byra, Mark; Readdy, Tucker; Wallhead, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of two landmark spectrum styles, practice and inclusion, on students' basic psychological needs satisfaction and self-determined motivation. Twelve classes of college-aged students (n = 149) participated in two badminton lessons taught under the conditions of the practice and inclusion styles.…

  9. The Real-World Effectiveness of Early Teaching Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Osborne, Lisa A.; Corness, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of 3 early teaching interventions (applied behavior analysis [ABA], special nursery placement, and portage) for children with autism spectrum disorder was studied in a community-based sample over 10 months. Measures of autism severity as well as intellectual, educational, and adaptive behavioral function were administered. In…

  10. The Effect of Karate Techniques Training on Communication Deficit of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Fatimah; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Marandi, Sayed Mohammad; Sorensen, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examined the long term effect of Karate techniques training on communication of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thirty school aged children with ASD were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Participants in the exercise group were engaged in 14 weeks of Karate techniques training.…

  11. The Effects of Video Modeling on Skill Acquisition in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffer, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the effectiveness of a video modeling procedure on a basic math skill acquisition in students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) using a multiple probe across students design. Participants were four kindergarten/first grade students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. All met the criteria for ASD…

  12. Effects of Psychomotor Intervention Program on Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElGarhy, Sayed; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a psychomotor intervention program (PIP) on body awareness and psychomotor concepts for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty-eight students (23 boys and 5 girls) with ASD participated in this study. Fourteen students with ASD were randomly assigned to the experimental group…

  13. The Effect of Perceptual-Motor Training on Attention in the Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Javad

    2012-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the effect of perceptual-motor training on attention in children with autism spectrum disorders. The participants (20 girls and 20 boys) were divided into experimental and control groups. They were selected from among 85 subjects after primary tests to be matched. The design of the study was…

  14. Is EEG-biofeedback an effective treatment in autism spectrum disorders? A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouijzer, M.E.J.; Schie, H.T. van; Gerrits, B.J.L.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2013-01-01

    EEG-biofeedback has been reported to reduce symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in several studies. However, these studies did not control for nonspecific effects of EEG-biofeedback and did not distinguish between participants who succeeded in influencing their own EEG activity and

  15. Effects of irradiance and light spectrum on growth of the scleractinian coral Galaxea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijgerde, T.H.M.; Henkemans, P.; Osinga, R.

    2012-01-01

    Due to global degradation of coral reefs and high demand for scleractinian corals, aquaculture of these marine organisms is gaining importance. To make coral aquaculture economically viable, optimisation of culture protocols is vital. We determined the effects of irradiance and light spectrum on the

  16. Psychotropic Drug Efficacy and Side Effects for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Hess, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is a frequently employed treatment option in the area of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A considerable literature base has developed indicating when these medications should or could be administered. However, research on the potential side effects and cost benefit analysis of these treatments is not well understood at this time.…

  17. Investigating Event Memory in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Effects of a Computer-Mediated Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Wei; Teoh, Yee-San

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of a novel avatar interviewing aid during memory interviews with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Thirty children were recruited for our study (Age: M = 7.60, SD = 0.68), half with ASD (13 boys; 2 girls) and the other half being neurotypical (13 boys; 2 girls). Children participated in a…

  18. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy for Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Miranda; Lalonde, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of art therapy for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The program we tested was structured to provide a therapeutic setting for children to discuss difficulties they experience in their social interactions, and give them…

  19. Effectiveness of Special Nursery Provision for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Osborne, Lisa A.; Corness, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of three local authority early teaching interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) was studied. Thirty-three children (2:6 to 4:0 years old) received one of three early teaching interventions: a 1:1 home-based programme, and two different forms of special nursery placement. Measures from the…

  20. The Effectiveness of Direct Instruction for Teaching Language to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Identifying Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Flores, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently demonstrate language delays (American Psychiatric Association "2000"). This study investigated the effects of a Direct Instruction (DI) language program implemented with elementary students with ASD. There is little research in the area of DI as a language intervention for students with ASD.…

  1. Effect of Developmental Quotient on Symptoms of Inattention and Impulsivity among Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A.; Fodstad, Jill C.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of developmental quotient on symptoms of inattention and impulsivity was examined among 198 toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders. There were two levels of developmental quotient: (1) low (less than or equal to 70; n = 80), and (2) typical (greater than 70; n = 118). Symptoms of inattention and impulsivity were assessed using 14 items…

  2. Facial Feedback and Social Input: Effects on Laughter and Enjoyment in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helt, Molly S.; Fein, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Both social input and facial feedback appear to be processed differently by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We tested the effects of both of these types of input on laughter in children with ASD. Sensitivity to facial feedback was tested in 43 children with ASD, aged 8-14 years, and 43 typically developing children matched for…

  3. The Effect of Rehearsal Training on Working Memory Span of Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomes, Carly; Rasmussen, Carmen; Pei, Jacqueline; Manji, Shazeen; Andrew, Gail

    2008-01-01

    A key area of weakness in individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is working memory, thus the goal of this study was to determine whether teaching children (aged 4-11) with FASD verbal rehearsal would increase their memory. Rehearsal training has been effective in other populations with working memory difficulties, so we…

  4. Supporting Individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders:a Summary of Effective Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggie, Jennifer; Xu, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a lifelong condition that significantly affects the individual's learning, development, behavior, family, and quality of life. Diagnosing children with this condition and providing effective supports is challenging for professionals because little intervention research has been performed with the…

  5. Effects of ABRACADBRA Instruction on Spelling in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Benjamin; Arciuli, Joanne; Stancliffe, Roger J.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of an evidence-based literacy program, ABRACADABRA, on the spelling abilities of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty children with ASD aged 5-11 years were assigned to matched instruction and waitlist control groups. Children in the instruction group received 26 hrs of individualized, home-based…

  6. Effects of ABRACADABRA Literacy Instruction on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Benjamin; Arciuli, Joanne; Stancliffe, Roger J.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of ABRACADABRA, a free computer-assisted literacy program, on the reading accuracy and comprehension skills of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ABRACADABRA is a balanced literacy instruction program, targeting both code and meaning-based reading abilities. Twenty children with ASD, aged 5-11…

  7. Effect of Demographic Factors on Empowerment Attributions of Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Ashley H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of demographic factors on empowerment attributions of parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Data were collected to determine differences between demographic factors of participants and self-reported empowerment attributions. A quantitative research design was employed in…

  8. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huskens, B.E.B.M.; Reijers, H.T.J.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous

  9. Effects of Age and Symptomatology on Cortical Thickness in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Thomas, Krissy A. R.; Duerden, Emma G.; Taylor, Margot J.; Lerch, Jason P.; Soorya, Latha V.; Wang, A. Ting; Fan, Jin; Hollander, Eric; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2013-01-01

    Several brain regions show structural and functional abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but the developmental trajectory of abnormalities in these structures and how they may relate to social and communicative impairments are still unclear. We assessed the effects of age on cortical thickness in individuals with…

  10. Effect of the optical system on the Doppler spectrum in laser-feedback interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Nikolić, Milan; Taimre, Thomas; Tucker, John R; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of factors influencing the morphology of the Doppler spectrum obtained from a laser-feedback interferometer. We explore the effect of optical system parameters on three spectral characteristics: central Doppler frequency, broadening, and signal-to-noise ratio. We perform four sets of experiments and replicate the results using a Monte Carlo simulation calibrated to the backscattering profile of the target. We classify the optical system parameters as having a strong or weak influence on the Doppler spectrum. The calibrated Monte Carlo approach accurately reproduces experimental results, and allows one to investigate the detailed contribution of system parameters to the Doppler spectrum, which are difficult to isolate in experiment.

  11. Large object investigation by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning, E-mail: coolboy006@sohu.com; Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Jun [College of Physics and Electronics, Nanjing XiaoZhuang University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 211171 (China)

    2014-10-13

    We present a method to investigate large object by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach. This method splits the original reference beam and redirects one of its branches as a second object beam. Through the modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two object beams can illuminate different parts of the large object and create a spectrum multiplexed hologram onto the focal plane array of the charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera. After correct spectrum extraction and image reconstruction, the large object can be fully observed within only one single snap-shot. The flexibility and great performance make our method a very attractive and promising technique for large object investigation under common 632.8 nm illumination.

  12. The effect of caffeine on energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Eynav; Tamir, Snait; Weinstein, Ayelet; Weinstein, Yitzhak

    2017-01-01

    The global prevalence of obesity has increased considerably in the last two decades. Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE), and thus negative energy balance is required to bring about weight loss, which can be achieved by either decreasing EI or increasing EE. Caffeine has been found to influence the energy balance by increasing EE and decreasing EI, therefore, it can potentially be useful as a body weight regulator. Caffeine improves weight maintenance through thermogenesis, fat oxidation, and EI. The sympathetic nervous system is involved in the regulation of energy balance and lipolysis (breakdown of lipids to glycerol and free fatty acids) and the sympathetic innervation of white adipose tissue may play an important role in the regulation of total body fat. This article reviews the current knowledge on the thermogenic properties of caffeine, and its effects on appetite and EI in relation to energy balance and body weight regulation.

  13. Dynamical effects in multifragmentation at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Normand, J. [Caen Univ., Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, IN2P3-CNRS/ENSICAEN, 14 (France)] [and others

    2003-04-01

    The fragmentation of the quasi-projectile is studied with the INDRA multidetector for different colliding systems and incident energies in the Fermi energy range. Different experimental observations show that a large part of the fragmentation is not compatible with the statistical fragmentation of a fully equilibrated nucleus. The study of internal correlations is a powerful tool, especially to evidence entrance channel effects. These effects have to be included in the theoretical descriptions of nuclear multifragmentation. (authors)

  14. Energy Effectiveness Assessment of Composting Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Plūme, I.

    2006-01-01

    The incorrect biomass composting improperly results in considerable emission of greenhouse gases, loss of effluent and composting heat into environment. The composting heat and gases utilisation is especially suitable for plant enrichment and heating of greenhouses. The mathematical model is worked out for assessment of energy effectiveness and sustainability of biomass composting process. Coefficient of energy effectiveness for traditional litter manure composting technologies is 0.45 and ca...

  15. Effects of hyperammonemia on brain energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Leke, Renata

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to the effects of elevated plasma ammonia levels on brain energy metabolism is abundant, but heterogeneous in terms of the conclusions. Thus, some studies claim that ammonia has a direct, inhibitory effect on energy metabolism whereas others find no such correlation...... but related to the fact that hepatic encephalopathy is always associated with reduced brain activity, a condition clearly characterized by a decreased CMRO2. Whether this may be related to changes in GABAergic function remains to be elucidated....

  16. Energy Efficiency and SINR Maximization Beamformers for Spectrum Sharing With Sensing Information

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbasi, Abdulrahman

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a cognitive radio multi-input-multi-output environment, in which we adapt our beamformer to maximize both energy efficiency (EE) and signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) metrics. Our design considers an underlaying communication using adaptive beamforming schemes combined with sensing information to achieve optimal energy-efficient systems. The proposed schemes maximize EE and SINR metrics subject to cognitive radio and quality-of-service constraints. The analysis of the proposed schemes is classified into two categories based on knowledge of the secondary-transmitter-to-primary-receiver channel. Since the optimizations of EE and SINR problems are not convex problems, we transform them into a standard semidefinite programming (SDP) form to guarantee that the optimal solutions are global. An analytical solution is provided for one scheme, while the second scheme is left in a standard SDP form. Selected numerical results are used to quantify the impact of the sensing information on the proposed schemes compared to the benchmark ones.

  17. Energy-Effective Rotation Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kascheev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents invention, which allows to create compact and cheap fog-forming devices for industrial hothouses (plants, greenhouses, storehouses, testing polygons and other Objects. Besides, this invention gives the possibilities to modernize the traversers of gas-water fire-fighting type AGVS-100 or AGVS-150, using turbojet engines. Utilization of fog-forming machines among fire-fighting devices will increase the effectiveness in fire-fighting of forest and industrial Objects and oil fields.

  18. A Method to Assign Spread Codes Based on Passive RFID Communication for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensors Using Spread Spectrum Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Takahashi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research has been conducted on systems that collect real-world information by using numerous energy harvesting wireless sensors. The sensors need to be tiny, cheap, and consume ultra-low energy. However, such sensors have some functional limits, including being restricted to wireless communication transmission. Therefore, when more than one sensor simultaneously transmits information in these systems, the receiver may not be able to demodulate if the sensors cannot accommodate multiple access. To solve this problem, a number of proposals have been made based on spread spectrum technologies for resistance to interference. In this paper, we point out some problems regarding the application of such sensors, and explain the assumption of spread codes assignment based on passive radio frequency identification (RFID communication. During the spread codes assignment, the system cannot work. Hence, efficient assignment method is more appropriate. We consider two assignment methods and assessed them in terms of total assignment time through an experiment. The results show the total assignment time in case of Electronic Product Code (EPC Global Class-1 Generation-2 which is an international standard for wireless protocols and the relationship between the ratio of the time taken by the read/write command and the ratio of total assignment time by the two methods. This implies that more efficient methods are obtained by considering the time ratio of read/write command.

  19. Characteristics of The Narrow Spectrum Beams Used in the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhem, N; El Balaa, H; Younes, G; Al Kattar, Z

    2017-06-15

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission has different calibration methods for various types of dosimeters used in industrial, military and medical fields. The calibration is performed using different beams of X-rays (low and medium energy) and Gamma radiation delivered by a Cesium 137 source. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in charge of calibration services uses different protocols for the determination of high and low air kerma rate and for narrow and wide series. In order to perform this calibration work, it is very important to identify all the beam characteristics for the different types of sources and qualities of radiation. The following work describes the methods used for the determination of different beam characteristics and calibration coefficients with their uncertainties in order to enhance the radiation protection of workers and patient applications in the fields of medical diagnosis and industrial X-ray. All the characteristics of the X-ray beams are determined for the narrow spectrum series in the 40 and 200 keV range where the inherent filtration, the current intensity, the high voltage, the beam profile and the total uncertainty are the specific characteristics of these X-ray beams. An X-ray software was developed in order to visualize the reference values according to the characteristics of each beam. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  1. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Sona, P., E-mail: pietro.sona@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Ballestrero, S. [Department of Physics University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); CERN PH/ADT, Geneve (Switzerland); Uggerhoj, U.I.; Andersen, K.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are established. The separate contributions to spectral distortion of electromagnetic processes other than bremsstrahlung are also studied in detail.

  2. Low-energy spectrum of iron-sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sandeep; Neese, Frank; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    FeS clusters are a universal biological motif. They carry out electron transfer, redox chemistry, and even oxygen sensing, in diverse processes including nitrogen fixation, respiration, and photosynthesis. The low-lying electronic states are key to their remarkable reactivity, but cannot be directly observed. Here we present the first ever quantum calculation of the electronic levels of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters free from any model assumptions. Our results highlight limitations of long-standing models of their electronic structure. In particular, we demonstrate that the widely used Heisenberg-Double-Exchange model underestimates the number of states by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which can conclusively be traced to the absence of Fe d$\\rightarrow$d excitations, thought to be important in these clusters. Further, the electronic energy levels of even the same spin are dense on the scale of vibrational fluctuations, and this provides a natural explanation for the ubiquity of these clusters in nature for cataly...

  3. Interaction of rigid C3N- with He: Potential energy surface, bound states, and rotational spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Moreno, Miguel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Halvick, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    A two-dimensional rigid rotor model of the potential energy surface is developed for the collision of C3N- with He. Ab initio calculations are performed at the coupled cluster level with single and double excitations and using a perturbative treatment of triple excitations. An augmented correlation consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta basis set complemented with a set of mid-bond functions is chosen for these calculations. The global T-shaped minimum (De = 62.114 cm-1) is found at the intermolecular distance R = 6.42 a0. A secondary minimum (De = 41.384 cm-1) is obtained for the linear configuration C3N--He and for R = 9.83 a0. Calculations of the rovibrational bound states are carried out by using a discrete variable representation method based on Sturmian functions. The first theoretical prediction of the absorption spectra for the He-C3N- complex in the microwave region is also provided.

  4. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application.

  5. Energy and spectrum efficiency in rural areas based on cognitive radio technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available to close the digital divide means that cost effective communication technologies should be deployed in rural areas for wireless broadband connectivity. Cognitive Radio (CR) is seen as a technology that will bring a new communication paradigm to address...

  6. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2002-09-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports day light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of day lighting and fluorescent lighting for office lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. The secondary mirror consists of eight planar-segmented mirrors that direct the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic array to produce electricity. This report describes eleven investigations on various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm the technical feasibility of this technology.

  7. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2003-01-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports day light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of day lighting and fluorescent lighting for office lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. The secondary mirror consists of eight planar-segmented mirrors that direct the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic array to produce electricity. This report describes several investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility of this technology.

  8. Interface Energy and Particle Size Effects on Effective Properties and Damage Energy Dissipation in Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Chung-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, since the materials science and technique have been further advanced to the characteristic size of solids in nano-size structures and nanocomposites, the interface/surface energy effect on mechanical and physical properties and damage energy dissipation of a nano-scale material or composite becomes significant and cannot be ignored. Therefore, the interface/surface energy and particle size effects on the effective properties and the damage dissipation in nanocomposites are investiga...

  9. The Effects of High Density on the X-ray Spectrum Reflected from Accretion Discs Around Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier A.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Dauser, Thomas; Parker, Micahel L.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Steiner, James F.; Wilms, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    Current models of the spectrum of X-rays reflected from accretion discs around black holes and other compact objects are commonly calculated assuming that the density of the disc atmosphere is constant within several Thomson depths from the irradiated surface. An important simplifying assumption of these models is that the ionization structure of the gas is completely specified by a single, fixed value of the ionization parameter (xi), which is the ratio of the incident flux to the gas density. The density is typically fixed at n(sub e) = 10(exp 15) per cu cm. Motivated by observations, we consider higher densities in the calculation of the reflected spectrum. We show by computing model spectra for n(sub e) approximately greater than 10(exp 17) per cu cm that high-density effects significantly modify reflection spectra. The main effect is to boost the thermal continuum at energies 2 approximately less than keV. We discuss the implications of these results for interpreting observations of both active galactic nuclei and black hole binaries. We also discuss the limitations of our models imposed by the quality of the atomic data currently available.

  10. [Mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene (Trp64Arg) does not influence insulin resistence, energy metabolism, fat distribution and lipid spectrum in young people. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendlová, B; Mazura, I; Vcelák, J; Pelikánová, T; Kunesová, M; Hainer, V; Obenberger, J; Palyzová, D

    1999-05-01

    A missence mutation Trp64Arg in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, a lower metabolic rate and the earlier onset of NIDDM but the published results are controversial. We investigated the effect of this mutation on insulin resistance (euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp), on fat mass and fat distribution (anthropometry, bioimpedance, CT) and resting metabolic rate (indirect calorimetry), lipid spectrum and other metabolic disturbances in Czech juveniles recruited from juvenile hypertensives (H, n = 68) and controls (C, n = 81). The frequency of this mutation (determined by digestion of 210 bp PCR product with MvaI) was double in H than in C (14.7%, vs. 7.4%) and the carriers of Arg64 allele had sig. higher fasting glucose (H: p = 0.002. C: p = 0.025). Four Trp64/Arg64 and six Trp64/Trp64 men (age 23 +/- 4.2, vs. 22.5 +/- 1.9 y, BMI 26 +/- 5.5, vs. 22.9 +/- 5.1 kg/m2) took part in a detailed pilot study. But no signif. differences (Horn's method) in fasting glucose (4.6 +/- 0.6, vs. 4.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/l), in parameters of insulin resistance (M-value150-180 min. 9.1 +/- 1.1, vs. 8.9 +/- 1.5 mg glucose/kg.min(-1)), resting metabolic rate/lean body mass (RMR/kg LBM: 78.6 +/- 4.6, vs. 85.6 +/- 23.2 kJ/kg), lipid spectrum and other screened parameters were found. The lowest resting metabolic rate (RMR/kg LBM 55.4; 62.6 kJ/kg) was found in brothers (both C, Trp64/Trp64) who highly differ in body constitution (BMI 19.0 resp. 32.4 kg/m2). We suppose that in this case the energy metabolism is probably determined by other genetic loci and does not correlate with body fat mass. Our pilot study does not confirm the influence of Trp64Arg mutation in heterozygous carriers on insulin resistance, energy metabolism and lipid spectrum.

  11. Effect of spectral range in surface inactivation of Listeria innocua using broad-spectrum pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodling, Sarah E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed light (PL) treatment is an alternative to traditional thermal treatment that has the potential to achieve several log-cycle reductions in the concentration of microorganisms. One issue that is still debated is related to what specifically causes cell death after PL treatments. The main objective of this work was to elucidate which portions of the PL range are responsible for bacterial inactivation. Stainless steel coupons with controlled surface properties were inoculated with a known concentration of Listeria innocua in the stationary growth phase and treated with 1 to 12 pulses of light at a pulse rate of 3 pulses per s and a pulse width of 360 micros. The effects of the full spectrum (lambda = 180 to 1,100 nm) were compared with the effects obtained when only certain regions of UV, visible, and near-infrared light were used. The effectiveness of the treatments was determined in parallel by the standard plate count and most-probable-number techniques. At a fluence of about 6 J/cm(2), the full-spectrum PL treatment resulted in a 4.08-log reduction of L. innocua on a Mill finish surface, the removal of lambda light resulted in no lethal effects on L. innocua. Overwhelmingly, the portions of the PL spectrum responsible for bacterial death are the UV-B and UV-C spectral ranges (X light (lambda > 400 nm). This work provides additional supporting evidence that cell death in PL treatment is due to exposure to UV light. Additionally, it was shown that even a minor modification of the light path or the UV light spectrum in PL treatments can have a significant negative impact on the treatment intensity and effectiveness.

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Davis, J.C.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18 000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject misreconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain

  13. Adaptive Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Systems Cross-Cutting R&D on adaptive full-spectrum solar energy systems for more efficient and affordable use of solar energy in buildings and hybrid photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Byard; Kim, Kwang

    2006-03-30

    This RD&D project is a multi-institutional effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae for CO{sub 2} sequestration or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the third generation (beta) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of 3 mm diameter fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the major achievements from this research that began in August 2001.

  14. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS Cross-Cutting R & D on adaptive full-spectrum solar energy systems for more efficient and affordable use of solar energy in buildings and hybrid photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; David L. Beshears

    2006-02-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the third generation (beta) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of 3 mm diameter fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations: Niche applications for HSL technology, Luminaire design characteristics for linear and point lighting fixtures, and Daylight affects on productivity.

  15. Video Game Playing Effects on Obesity in an Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Strahan, Brandy E.; Jennifer H. Elder

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has tripled in the past two decades, and adolescents with disabilities, specifically autism spectrum disorders (ASD), may be at greater risk for obesity due to the behavioral, physical, and psychosocial complications related to their disorder. This case study reports the effects of video game playing on an obese adolescent with ASD and illustrates the use of a multiple baseline single subject design. Over 12 weeks, the participant played inactive (6 weeks) and active video ...

  16. The social effect of ‘being imitated’ in children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Annarita eContaldo; Costanza eColombi; Antonio eNarzisi; Filippo eMuratori

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that ?being imitated? has social effects, and that the imitation of the child's actions may be used as a strategy to promote social engagement in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The observation of someone that imitates us recruits, indeed, neural areas involved in social cognition. We reviewed studies exploring the behavioral consequences of ?being imitated? in children with ASD. We aimed at assessing what are the social skills targeted by this strategy, and th...

  17. The effect of energy performance regulations on energy consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra-Santin, O.; Itard, L.

    2012-01-01

    Governments have developed energy performance regulations in order to lower energy consumption in the housing stock. Most of these regulations are based on the thermal quality of the buildings. In the Netherlands, the energy efficiency for new buildings is expressed as the EPC (energy performance

  18. [Spectrum-effect Relationship Between Total Antioxidant Activity and HPLC Fingerprint of Arctium lappa Root].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-juan; Jiang, Lin

    2014-12-01

    To explore the spectrum-effect relationship between the HPLC fingerprint of Arctium lappa root methanol extract and the total antioxidant activity. The experiment was carried out with Gemini C18 110A (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column using methanol-0.04% phosphoric acid as gradient mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, detection wavelength of 320 nm. The total antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the absorbance of each sample after being reacted with ammonium molybdate reagent. The spectrum-effect relationship was investigated using canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The spectrum-effect relationship between the HPLC fingerprint of Arctium lappa root methanol extract and the total antioxidant activity were established, the similarity of fingerprint of all samples was above 0.9. Peaks 1, 6, 9, 12 and 14 were principle components of Arctium lappa root for the total antioxidant activity. This method contributes to the fast comprehensive evaluation of quality of Arctium lappa root.

  19. Dexmedetomidine augments the effect of lidocaine: power spectrum and nerve conduction velocity distribution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkilic, Nizamettin; Tuncer, Seckin; Burat, Ilksen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the individual and combined inhibitory effects of dexmedetomidine and lidocaine on the conduction group of isolated nerve were investigated by determining conduction velocity distribution (CVD) and power spectrum. Electrophysiological compound action potential (CAP) recordings were conducted on isolated rat sciatic nerve before (Con) and 20 minutes after exposure to 1 mM lidocaine (Lido), 21pM dexmedetomidine (Dex) and their combination (Lido + Dex). Then for CVD, mathematical model and for power spectrum Fast Fourier analysis were conducted. Dexmedetomidine alone made no significant difference in shape and duration of CAPs as compared to Con, on the other hand lidocaine depresses amplitude and prolongs the duration of CAPs, but not more than combination of dexmedetomidine and lidocaine can do. Lidocaine caused a shift in the CVD histogram to relatively slower conducting group significantly while dexmedetomidine did not cause any significant change as compared to Control. Lidocaine, when combined with dexmedetomidine revealed a remarkable effect on the whole CVD histogram by causing almost complete blockage of fast conducting nerve fibers. The relative number of fibers in CVD is conserved for separate applications of anesthetics, but not for their combination. As in CVD, power spectrum shifted from higher to lower frequency region by lidocaine and significantly for lidocaine combined with dexmedetomidine application. Shifts for dexmedetomidine applied group were seen beggarly. We have concluded that dexmedetomidine alone did not influence nerve conduction, but when it is used with lidocaine it augments neural conduction blockage effect, especially on fast conducting nerve fibers.

  20. Fixing the Mirrors: A Feasibility Study of the Effects of Dance Movement Therapy on Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sabine C.; Mehl, Laura; Sobanski, Esther; Sieber, Maik; Fuchs, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    From the 1970s on, case studies reported the effectiveness of therapeutic mirroring in movement with children with autism spectrum disorder. In this feasibility study, we tested a dance movement therapy intervention based on mirroring in movement in a population of 31 young adults with autism spectrum disorder (mainly high-functioning and…

  1. Effects of a Reciprocal Questioning Intervention on the Question Generation and Responding of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalon, Kelly; Hanline, Mary Frances

    2008-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across participants was used to investigate the effects of reciprocal questioning strategy instruction delivered in cooperative pairs on the question generation and responding of children with autism spectrum disorder. Three children with autism spectrum disorder and nine general education peers participated in the…

  2. Measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Castano, V. M. [UNAM, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Gaso, I. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [UNAM, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    The energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments was measured using nuclear track detectors and digital image analysis system. The detection material was fused silica glass. The detectors were chemically etched in an 8% HF solution. After experimenting with various etching time, it was found that the best resolution of the track diameter distribution was obtained after 30 minutes of etching. Both Gaussian and Lorentzian curves were fit to the track diameter distribution histograms and used to determine the basic parameters of the distribution of the light (N{sub L}) and heavy (N{sub H}) formed peaks and the minimum of the central valley (N{sub V}). Advantages of the method presented here include the fully-automated analysis process, the low cost of the nuclear track detectors and the simplicity of the nuclear track method. The distribution resolution obtained by this method is comparable with the resolution obtained by electronic analysis devices. The descriptive variables calculated were very close to those obtained by other methods based on the use of semiconductor detectors. (Author)

  3. ART-XC: A Medium-energy X-ray Telescope System for the Spectrum-R-Gamma Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefiev, V.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.; Thachenko, A.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Semena, N.; Buntov,M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Gubarev, M.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The ART-XC instrument is an X-ray grazing-incidence telescope system in an ABRIXAS-type optical configuration optimized for the survey observational mode of the Spectrum-RG astrophysical mission which is scheduled to be launched in 2011. ART-XC has two units, each equipped with four identical X-ray multi-shell mirror modules. The optical axes of the individual mirror modules are not parallel but are separated by several degrees to permit the four modules to share a single CCD focal plane detector, 1/4 of the area each. The 450-micron-thick pnCCD (similar to the adjacent eROSITA telescope detector) will allow detection of X-ray photons up to 15 keV. The field of view of the individual mirror module is about 18 x 18 arcminutes(exp 2) and the sensitivity of the ART-XC system for 4 years of survey will be better than 10(exp -12) erg s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) over the 4-12 keV energy band. This will allow the ART-XC instrument to discover several thousand new AGNs.

  4. On scattering effects for volume sources in low-energy photon spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépy, Marie-Christine; Brondeau, Laurine; Ferreux, Laurent; Pierre, Sylvie

    2013-11-01

    In this study, different aspects of the Compton scattering inside volume sources are illustrated using experimental approach and Monte Carlo simulation. For the low-energy range (below 100 keV) scattered events represents around 30% of the whole spectrum. Influence of the source-detector geometry is discussed. The scattering effects induce strong differences in spectrum shape for different geometrical conditions. This should influence efficiency transfer factors. A new approach is proposed, including the scattered events, to avoid complex peak area determination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 1015–1018 eV derived from the Yakutsk array data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabourov A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A spectrum of cosmic rays within energy range 1015 − 3 × 1017 eV was derived from the data of the small Cherenkov setup, which is a part of the Yakutsk complex EAS array. In this, work a new series of observation is covered. These observations lasted from 2000 till 2010 and resulted in increased number of registered events within interval 1016–1018 eV, which in turn made it possible to reproduce cosmic ray spectrum in this energy domain with better precision. A sign of a thin structure is observed in the shape of the spectrum. It could be related to the escape of heavy nuclei from our Galaxy. Cosmic ray mass composition was obtained for the energy region 1016–1018 eV. A joint analysis of spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays was performed. Obtained results are considered in the context of theoretical computations that were performed with the use of hypothesis of galactic and meta-galactic origin of cosmic rays.

  6. The effect of fluorescent tracers on droplet spectrum, viscosity, and density of pesticide formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J; Preftakes, Collin; Peterson, Robert K D

    2010-10-01

    The most important factor affecting efficacy and drift of pesticide applications is the droplet spectrum. To measure pesticide drift, researchers utilize fluorescent tracers to rapidly quantify spray deposition. Although fluorescent tracers have been used for more than 50 years, no experiments have been performed on the effect they have on the properties of pesticide formulations (density and viscosity) or droplet spectrum, which affect the drift of pesticides. Therefore, we examined the effect of an oil- and water-based tracer on the volume median diameter (VMD), viscosity, and density of oil- and water-based pesticide formulations. In addition, we experimentally fit and demonstrate the utility of using distributions to characterize pesticide droplet spectra. The addition of tracers to both water- and oil-based formulations did not significantly alter the VMD, viscosity, and density. Lognormal distributions provided the best fit for the water- and oil-based formulations with and without tracer. Our results demonstrated that the addition of oil- and water-based tracers do not significantly alter pesticide formulations properties and droplet spectrum, and most likely do not alter the movement of pesticide droplets in the environment.

  7. Effects of modulated pulse format on spontaneous Brillouin scattering spectrum and BOTDR sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yunqi; Ye, Qing; Pan, Zhengqing; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-03-01

    The signal noise ratio (SNR) enhancement effects of spontaneous Brillouin scattering spectrum on Brilloluin optical time domain reflectometry (BOTDR) sensing system have been analyzed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally through changing the modulated pulse format. With the same pulse width or same spatial resolution, the SNR is larger for triangular pulse. Take the width of 200 ns as an illustration, the SNRs of the coherent detection power spectrum for trapezoidal pulse and triangular pulse increase 3 dB and 4.8 dB relative to that of rectangular pulse respectively. The corresponding spectral linewidthes are narrowed and the sensing distances are also increased by about two times from the rectangular pulse to the triangular pulse. This phenomenon will be helpful to improve the spatial resolution or achieve longer sensing distance in the BOTDR sensing system at the same systemic conditions.

  8. Temperature effects on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of a weakly modulated graphene monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha (Pakistan); Sabeeh, K [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); MacKinnon, A, E-mail: m.tahir@uos.edu.pk, E-mail: ksabeeh@qau.edu.pk, E-mail: kashifsabeeh@hotmail.com, E-mail: a.mackinnon@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-26

    In this work, we determine the effects of temperature on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of an electrically modulated graphene monolayer as well as a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The intra-Landau band magnetoplasmon spectrum within the self-consistent field approach is investigated for both the aforementioned systems. Results obtained not only exhibit Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations but also commensurability oscillations (Weiss oscillations). These oscillations are periodic as a function of inverse magnetic field. We find that both the magnetic oscillations, SdH and Weiss, have a greater amplitude and are more robust against temperature in graphene compared to a conventional 2DEG. Furthermore, there is a {pi} phase shift between the magnetoplasmon oscillations in the two systems which can be attributed to Dirac electrons in graphene acquiring a Berry's phase as they traverse a closed path in a magnetic field. (paper)

  9. Estimation of sea level muon energy spectrum at high latitude from the latest primary nucleon spectra near the top of the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Haldar, T K; Bhattacharya, D P; 10.1023/A:1024822518795

    2003-01-01

    Vertical muon energy spectra at sea level have been estimated from a directly measured primary cosmic-ray nucleon spectrum. The hadronic energy moments have been calculated from the CERN LEBC EHS data on the Lorentz invariant cross-section results on pp to pi /sup +or-/X and pp to K/sup +or-/X inclusive reactions and are duly corrected for A-A collisions. Finally, the sea level muon energy spectra have been calculated from the decay of conventional mesons, using standard formulation. The estimated muon spectra are found to be in good agreement with the directly measured muon spectra obtained from different experiments. (32 refs).

  10. Taurine, energy drinks, and neuroendocrine effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan J; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2016-12-01

    Taurine is an amino acid found abundantly in brain, retina, heart, and reproductive organ cells, as well as in meat and seafood. But it is also a major ingredient in popular "energy drinks," which thus constitute a major source of taurine supplementation. Unfortunately, little is known about taurine's neuroendocrine effects. The authors review the sparse data and provide a basic background on the structure, synthesis, distribution, metabolism, mechanisms, effects, safety, and currently proposed therapeutic targets of taurine. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  11. Thinking outside the box: effects of modes larger than the survey on matter power spectrum covariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putter, Roland de; Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, C/ Catedrático José Beltrán 2, Paterna (Spain); Percival, Will J., E-mail: rdeputter@berkeley.edu, E-mail: cwagner@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: will.percival@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Bldg., Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-01

    Accurate power spectrum (or correlation function) covariance matrices are a crucial requirement for cosmological parameter estimation from large scale structure surveys. In order to minimize reliance on computationally expensive mock catalogs, it is important to have a solid analytic understanding of the different components that make up a covariance matrix. Considering the matter power spectrum covariance matrix, it has recently been found that there is a potentially dominant effect on mildly non-linear scales due to power in modes of size equal to and larger than the survey volume. This beat coupling effect has been derived analytically in perturbation theory and while it has been tested with simulations, some questions remain unanswered. Moreover, there is an additional effect of these large modes, which has so far not been included in analytic studies, namely the effect on the estimated average density which enters the power spectrum estimate. In this article, we work out analytic, perturbation theory based expressions including both the beat coupling and this local average effect and we show that while, when isolated, beat coupling indeed causes large excess covariance in agreement with the literature, in a realistic scenario this is compensated almost entirely by the local average effect, leaving only ∼ 10% of the excess. We test our analytic expressions by comparison to a suite of large N-body simulations, using both full simulation boxes and subboxes thereof to study cases without beat coupling, with beat coupling and with both beat coupling and the local average effect. For the variances, we find excellent agreement with the analytic expressions for k < 0.2 hMpc{sup −1} at z = 0.5, while the correlation coefficients agree to beyond k = 0.4 hMpc{sup −1}. As expected, the range of agreement increases towards higher redshift and decreases slightly towards z = 0. We finish by including the large-mode effects in a full covariance matrix description for

  12. Effects of Energy intake and, dietary protein concentration on energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased protein intake resulted into incresed rate of heat production and protein energy retention and low rate of fat energy retention. The energy requirement for maintenance was slightly lower in animals fed on the high compared with those on low-protein diets. The partial efficiency of ME utilisation for growth, was poor ...

  13. A comparison of effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics and biosurfactants on established bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gerry A; Maloy, Aaron P; Banat, Malik M; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-11-01

    Current antibiofilm solutions based on planktonic bacterial physiology have limited efficacy in clinical and occasionally environmental settings. This has prompted a search for suitable alternatives to conventional therapies. This study compares the inhibitory properties of two biological surfactants (rhamnolipids and a plant-derived surfactant) against a selection of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin). Testing was carried out on a range of bacterial physiologies from planktonic and mixed bacterial biofilms. Rhamnolipids (Rhs) have been extensively characterised for their role in the development of biofilms and inhibition of planktonic bacteria. However, there are limited direct comparisons with antimicrobial substances on established biofilms comprising single or mixed bacterial strains. Baseline measurements of inhibitory activity using planktonic bacterial assays established that broad-spectrum antibiotics were 500 times more effective at inhibiting bacterial growth than either Rhs or plant surfactants. Conversely, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass of established single bacterial biofilms by 74-88 and 74-98 %, respectively. Only kanamycin showed activity against biofilms of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were also ineffective against a complex biofilm of marine bacteria; however, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass by 69 and 42 %, respectively. These data suggest that Rhs and plant-derived surfactants may have an important role in the inhibition of complex biofilms.

  14. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two

  15. Effect of correlation on energy of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, P., E-mail: priya_phys@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, Agra College, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Agra (India); Misra, G. [Department of Physics, Eritrea Institute of Technology, Asmara University, Asmara (Eritrea); Goyal, S.C. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, R.B.S. College, Bichpuri, Agra, (U.P. Technical University, Lucknow) (India)

    2009-11-15

    In the present paper we make an attempt to model the lattice energy with the lattice constants through the first-principles calculations. This formalism is designed particularly for application with the self-consistent pseudopotential (PP) method within the density functional (DF) framework and includes exchange and correlation effects. Applying the above formalism we have calculated the lattice energy and correlation energy for a number of solids belonging to groups I-VII and II-VI of the periodic table. The convergence of our results is in the favour of used PP. These results will be helpful in determining various structural and elastic properties of these solids and in the generation of equation of state.

  16. Effects of Self-Monitoring Package to Improve Social Skill of Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders in Japanese Regular Classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handa, Ken; Noro, Fumiyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of a self-monitoring package to improve a targeted social skill and problem behavior of two elementary school students with autism spectrum disorders placed in regular classroom...

  17. The matter power spectrum in redshift space using effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca de la Bella, Lucía; Regan, Donough; Seery, David; Hotchkiss, Shaun

    2017-11-01

    The use of Eulerian 'standard perturbation theory' to describe mass assembly in the early universe has traditionally been limited to modes with k lesssim 0.1 h/Mpc at z=0. At larger k the SPT power spectrum deviates from measurements made using N-body simulations. Recently, there has been progress in extending the reach of perturbation theory to larger k using ideas borrowed from effective field theory. We revisit the computation of the redshift-space matter power spectrum within this framework, including for the first time the full one-loop time dependence. We use a resummation scheme proposed by Vlah et al. to account for damping of baryonic acoustic oscillations due to large-scale random motions and show that this has a significant effect on the multipole power spectra. We renormalize by comparison to a suite of custom N-body simulations matching the MultiDark MDR1 cosmology. At z=0 and for scales k lesssim 0.4 h/Mpc we find that the EFT furnishes a description of the real-space power spectrum up to ~ 2%, for the l = 0 mode up to ~ 5%, and for the l = 2, 4 modes up to ~ 25%. We argue that, in the MDR1 cosmology, positivity of the l=0 mode gives a firm upper limit of k ≈ 0.74 h/Mpc for the validity of the one-loop EFT prediction in redshift space using only the lowest-order counterterm. We show that replacing the one-loop growth factors by their Einstein-de Sitter counterparts is a good approximation for the l=0 mode, but can induce deviations as large as 2% for the l=2, 4 modes. An accompanying software bundle, distributed under open source licenses, includes Mathematica notebooks describing the calculation, together with parallel pipelines capable of computing both the necessary one-loop SPT integrals and the effective field theory counterterms.

  18. Design of a nondestructive two-in-one instrument for measuring the polarization and energy spectrum at an X-ray FEL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingmin; Deng, Bangjie; Chen, Yuanmiaoliang; Liu, Bochao; Chen, Shaofei; Fan, Jinquan; Feng, Lie; Deng, Haixiao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2017-10-01

    The free electron laser (FEL), as a next-generation light source, is an attractive tool in scientific frontier research because of its advantages of full coherence, ultra-short pulse duration, and controllable polarization. Owing to the demand of real-time bunch diagnosis during FEL experiments, precise nondestructive measurements of the polarization and X-ray energy spectrum using one instrument are preferred. In this paper, such an instrument based on the electron time-of-flight technique is proposed. By considering the complexity and nonlinearity, a numerical model in the framework of Geant4 has been developed for optimization. Taking the Shanghai Soft X-ray FEL user facility as an example, its measurement performances' dependence on the critical parameters was studied systematically, and, finally, an optimal design was obtained, achieving resolutions of 0.5% for the polarization degree and 0.3 eV for the X-ray energy spectrum.

  19. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  20. The orbifolder. A tool to study the low energy effective theory of heterotic orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilles, H.P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, S. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Vaudrevange, P.K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics, Muenchen (Germany); Wingerter, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-10-15

    The orbifolder is a program developed in C{sup ++} that computes and analyzes the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifold compactifications. The program includes routines to compute the massless spectrum, to identify the allowed couplings in the superpotential, to automatically generate large sets of orbifold models, to identify phenomenologically interesting models (e.g. MSSM-like models) and to analyze their vacuum-configurations. (orig.)

  1. Racial and ethnic health disparities: evidence of discrimination's effects across the SEP spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Laura Hoyt; Ponce, Ninez A; Siegel, Judith M

    2010-04-01

    Perceived discrimination is a psychosocial stressor that plays a role in explaining racial/ethnic disparities in self-reported physical and mental health. The purpose of this paper is: (1) to investigate the association between perceived discrimination in receiving healthcare and racial/ethnic disparities in self-rated health status, physical, and emotional functional limitations among a diverse sample of California adults; (2) to assess whether discrimination effects vary by racial/ethnic group and gender; and (3) to evaluate how the effects of discrimination on health are manifest across the socioeconomic position (SEP) spectrum. Data were drawn from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey adult file (n=55,428). The analytic approach employed multivariate linear and logistic regressions. Discrimination is qualitatively identified into two types: (1) discrimination due to race/ethnicity, language, or accent, and (2) other discrimination. Findings show that both types of discrimination negatively influenced self-rated health, and were associated with a two to three-fold odds of limitations in physical and emotional health. Further, these effects varied by racial/ethnic group and gender, and the effects were mixed. Most notably, for emotional health, racial/ethnic discrimination penalized Latinas more than non-Latina Whites, but for physical health, other discrimination was less detrimental to Latinas than it was to non-Latina Whites. At higher levels of SEP, the effects of racial/ethnic discrimination on self-rated health and other discriminations' effects on physical health were attenuated. Higher SEP may serve as an important mitigator, particularly when comparing the medium to the low SEP categories. It is also possible that SEP effects cannot be extracted from the relationships of interest in that SEP is an expression of social discrimination. In fact, negative health effects associated with discrimination are evident across the SEP spectrum. This study

  2. Scaled-energy Floquet spectroscopy in a strong electric field: A semiquantal calculation of the recurrence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratovich, Vladimir; Delos, John B.

    1998-06-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom in a strong static electric field with a weak parallel radio-frequency (rf) field. We compute the photoabsorption spectrum by calculating the spectrum of Floquet states, including their quasienergies and their oscillator strengths. Our calculation is based upon ``semiquantal'' formulas: we calculate the discrete spectrum of quasienergy states by using a quantum adiabatic approximation combined with semiclassical (Bohr-Sommerfeld) quantization rules. We express this spectrum in a manner consistent with the method of scaled-variable spectroscopy, and then calculate the Fourier transform. These calculated absorption spectra and recurrence spectra are in good agreement with experiments on Li atoms. Additional approximations show that the recurrence spectrum is approximately equal to the product of the recurrence spectrum in a static field times an envelope function. That envelope function is the Fourier transform of a cluster of sidebands surrounding a progenitor level in the rf field. The resulting formula agrees with the low-frequency limit of a formula obtained from a semiclassical treatment.

  3. Effective atomic number estimation using kV-MV dual-energy source in LINAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Dousatsu; Haga, Akihiro; Kida, Satoshi; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) imaging can measure the effective atomic number (EAN) as well as the electron density, and thus its adoption may improve dose calculations in brachytherapy and external photon/particle therapy. An expanded energy gap in dual-energy sources is expected to yield more accurate EAN estimations than conventional DECT systems, which typically span less than 100kV. The aim of this paper is to assess a larger energy gap DECT by using a linear accelerator (LINAC) radiotherapy system with a kV X-ray imaging device, which are combined to provide X-rays in both the kV- and MV-energy ranges. Traditionally, the EAN is determined by parameterising the Hounsfield Unit; however, this is difficult in a kV-MV DECT due to different uncertainties in the reconstructed attenuation coefficient at each end of the energy spectrum. To overcome this problem, we included a new calibration step to produce the most likely linear attenuation coefficients, based upon the X-ray spectrum. To determine the X-ray spectrum, Monte Carlo calculations using GEANT4 were performed. Then the images were calibrated using information from eight inserts of known materials in a CIRS phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Agreement between the estimated and empirical EANs in these inserts was within 11%. Validation was subsequently performed with the CatPhan500 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem). The estimated EAN for seven inserts agreed with the empirical values to within 3%. Accordingly, it can be concluded that, given properly reconstructed images based upon a well-determined X-ray spectrum, kV-MV DECT provides an excellent prediction for the EAN. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The energy spectrum of neutrons from 7Li(d,n)8Be reaction at deuteron energy 2.9 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, Konstantin V.; Piksaikin, Vladimir M.; Zolotarev, Konstantin I.; Egorov, Andrey S.; Gremyachkin, Dmitrii E.

    2017-09-01

    The neutron beams generated at the electrostatic accelerators using nuclear reactions T(p,n)3He, D(d,n)3He, 7Li(p,n)7Be, T(d,n)4He, 7Li(d,n)8Be, 9Be(d,n)10B are widely used in neutron physics and in many practical applications. Among these reactions the least studied reactions are 7Li(d,n)8Be and 9Be(d,n)10B. The present work is devoted to the measurement of the neutron spectrum from 7Li(d,n)8Be reaction at 0∘ angle to the deuteron beam axis on the electrostatic accelerator Tandetron (JSC "SSC RF - IPPE") using activation method and a stilbene crystal scintillation detector. The first time ever 7Li(d,n)8Be reaction was measured by activation method. The target was a thick lithium layer on metallic backing. The energy of the incident deuteron was 2.9 MeV. As activation detectors a wide range of nuclear reactions were used: 27Al(n,p)27Mg, 27Al(n,α)24Na, 113In(n,n')113mIn, 115In(n,n')115mIn, 115In(n,γ)116mIn, 58Ni(n,p)58mCo, 58Ni(n,2n)57Ni, 197Au(n,γ)198Au, 197Au(n,2n)196Au, 59Co(n,p)59Fe, 59Co(n,2n)58m+gCo, 59Co (n,g)60Co. Measurement of the induced gamma-activity was carried out using HPGe detector Canberra GX5019 [1]. The up-to-date evaluations of the cross sections for these reactions were used in processing of the data. The program STAYSL was used to unfold the energy spectra. The neutron spectra obtained by activation detectors is consistent with the corresponding data measured by a stilbene crystal scintillation detector within their uncertainties.

  5. The energy spectrum of neutrons from 7Li(d,n8Be reaction at deuteron energy 2.9 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrofanov Konstantin V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron beams generated at the electrostatic accelerators using nuclear reactions T(p,n3He, D(d,n3He, 7Li(p,n7Be, T(d,n4He, 7Li(d,n8Be, 9Be(d,n10B are widely used in neutron physics and in many practical applications. Among these reactions the least studied reactions are 7Li(d,n8Be and 9Be(d,n10B. The present work is devoted to the measurement of the neutron spectrum from 7Li(d,n8Be reaction at 0∘ angle to the deuteron beam axis on the electrostatic accelerator Tandetron (JSC “SSC RF – IPPE” using activation method and a stilbene crystal scintillation detector. The first time ever 7Li(d,n8Be reaction was measured by activation method. The target was a thick lithium layer on metallic backing. The energy of the incident deuteron was 2.9 MeV. As activation detectors a wide range of nuclear reactions were used: 27Al(n,p27Mg, 27Al(n,α24Na, 113In(n,n'113mIn, 115In(n,n'115mIn, 115In(n,γ116mIn, 58Ni(n,p58mCo, 58Ni(n,2n57Ni, 197Au(n,γ198Au, 197Au(n,2n196Au, 59Co(n,p59Fe, 59Co(n,2n58m+gCo, 59Co (n,g60Co. Measurement of the induced gamma-activity was carried out using HPGe detector Canberra GX5019 [1]. The up-to-date evaluations of the cross sections for these reactions were used in processing of the data. The program STAYSL was used to unfold the energy spectra. The neutron spectra obtained by activation detectors is consistent with the corresponding data measured by a stilbene crystal scintillation detector within their uncertainties.

  6. Development of a general analysis and unfolding scheme and its application to measure the energy spectrum of atmospheric neutrinos with IceCube: IceCube Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K-H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H-G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M; Morik, K

    We present the development and application of a generic analysis scheme for the measurement of neutrino spectra with the IceCube detector. This scheme is based on regularized unfolding, preceded by an event selection which uses a Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance algorithm to select the relevant variables and a random forest for the classification of events. The analysis has been developed using IceCube data from the 59-string configuration of the detector. 27,771 neutrino candidates were detected in 346 days of livetime. A rejection of 99.9999 % of the atmospheric muon background is achieved. The energy spectrum of the atmospheric neutrino flux is obtained using the TRUEE unfolding program. The unfolded spectrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos covers an energy range from 100 GeV to 1 PeV. Compared to the previous measurement using the detector in the 40-string configuration, the analysis presented here, extends the upper end of the atmospheric neutrino spectrum by more than a factor of two, reaching an energy region that has not been previously accessed by spectral measurements.

  7. Effects of X-rays spectrum on the dose; Efectos del espectro de rayos X sobre la dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez I, J. L.; Hernandez A, P. L.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: johann_greenday@hotmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The X-ray equipment for diagnosis comes in different sizes and shapes depending on the scan type to perform. The X-ray spectrum is the energy distribution of the beam photons and consists of a continuous spectrum of photons braking and discrete spectrum due to the characteristic photons. The knowledge of the X-rays spectrum is important to understand like they affect the voltage changes (k Vp), current (m A), time (s) and the type of filter in the interaction mechanisms between X-rays and patient's body, the image receptor or other material that gets in the beam. Across the spectrum can be estimated the absorbed dose in any point of the patient, the quality of the image and the scattered radiation (which is related to the dose received by the equipment operator). The Monte Carlo method was used by MCNP5 code to calculate the spectrum of X-rays that occurs when a monoenergetic electron beam of 250 keV interact with targets of Mo, Rh and W. The spectra were calculated with and without filter, and the values of ambient dose equivalent were estimated, as well as the air kerma. (Author)

  8. Role of OH-stretch/torsion coupling and quantum yield effects in the first OH overtone spectrum of cis-cis HOONO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Anne B.; Fry, Juliane L.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Mollner, Andrew K.; Okumura, Mitchio

    2005-03-01

    A joint theoretical and experimental investigation is undertaken to study the effects of OH-stretch/HOON torsion coupling and of quantum yield on the previously reported first overtone action spectrum of cis-cis HOONO (peroxynitrous acid). The minimum energy path along the HOON dihedral angle is computed at the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples level with correlation consistent polarized quadruple ζ basis set, at the structure optimized using the triple ζ basis set (CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ//CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ). The two-dimensional ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for cis-cis HOONO are calculated as functions of the HOON torsion and OH bond length about the minimum energy path at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ and QCISD/AUG-cc-pVTZ (QCISD—quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation and AUG-augmented with diffuse functions) level of theory/basis, respectively. The OH-stretch vibration depends strongly on the torsional angle, and the torsional potential possesses a broad shelf at ˜90°, the cis-perp conformation. The calculated electronic energies and dipoles are fit to simple functional forms and absorption spectra in the region of the OH fundamental and first overtone are calculated from these surfaces. While the experimental and calculated spectra of the OH fundamental band are in good agreement, significant differences in the intensity patterns are observed between the calculated absorption spectrum and the measured action spectrum in the 2νOH region. These differences are attributed to the fact that several of the experimentally accessible states do not have sufficient energy to dissociate to OH+NO2 and therefore are not detectable in an action spectrum. Scaling of the intensities of transitions to these states, assuming D0=82.0kJ/mol, is shown to produce a spectrum that is in good agreement with the measured action spectrum. Based on this agreement, we assign two of the features in the spectrum to Δn=0

  9. Effects of video modeling with video feedback on vocational skills of adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Derek L; Gounden, Sadhana; Dagher, Richard E; Chan, Shu Fen; Furlonger, Brett E; Anderson, Angelika; Moore, Dennis W

    2017-02-16

    To examine the effectiveness of a video modeling (VM) with video feedback (VFB) intervention to teach vocational gardening skills to three adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A multiple probe design across skills was used to assess the effects of the intervention on the three participants' ability to perform skills accurately. The use of VM with VFB led to improvements across skills for two of the participants. The third participant required video prompting (VP) for successful skill acquisition. Skill performance generalized across personnel and settings for two of the participants, but it was not assessed for the third. Skill performance maintained at follow-up for all three participants. Social validity data gathered from participants, parents, and co-workers were positive. These findings suggest that VM with VFB and VP with VFB were effective and socially acceptable interventions for teaching vocational gardening skills to young adults with ASD.

  10. Modeling BSM effects on the Higgs transverse-momentum spectrum in an EFT approach

    CERN Document Server

    Grazzini, Massimiliano; Spira, Michael; Wiesemann, Marius

    2017-03-22

    We consider the transverse-momentum distribution of a Higgs boson produced through gluon fusion in hadron collisions. At small transverse momenta, the large logarithmic terms are resummed up to next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) accuracy. The resummed computation is consistently matched to the next-to-leading-order (NLO) result valid at large transverse momenta. The ensuing Standard Model prediction is supplemented by possible new-physics effects parametrised through three dimension-six operators related to the modification of the top and bottom Yukawa couplings, and to the inclusion of a point-like Higgs-gluon coupling, respectively. We present resummed transverse-momentum spectra including the effect of these operators at NLL+NLO accuracy and study their impact on the shape of the distribution. We find that such modifications, while affecting the total rate within the current uncertainties, can lead to significant distortions of the spectrum. The proper parametrization of such effects becomes increasingly im...

  11. Effect of black tea consumption on radial blood pulse spectrum and cognitive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Jan, Ming-Yie; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2017-04-01

    Black tea consumption has been proven to improve endothelial function and to lower the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment. Several effects of black tea on cardiovascular system had been surveyed. However, the black tea effect on pressure pulse spectrum remains unknown. The study was aimed to investigate the influence of black tea on radial blood pressure and Pulse Spectrum. Fourteen healthy subjects received water and single doses of black tea (0.05g/Kg) in separate weeks. The radial blood pressure and pulse wave were measured and the pressure pulses were evaluated using harmonic analysis. This report confirmed that black tea consumption (dose=0.05g/Kg) significantly increased third, fifth, (Ptea may increase cerebral blood flow (CBF), which was deduced from the results and from the conclusions of previous studies. The results also showed that the harmonic components of pressure pulse could be the vascular kinetic index that assessed the hemodynamic status in each time frame before and after consumption of black tea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cumulative risk effects in the bullying of children and young people with autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebron, Judith; Oldfield, Jeremy; Humphrey, Neil

    2017-04-01

    Students with autism are more likely to be bullied than their typically developing peers. However, several studies have shown that their likelihood of being bullied increases in the context of exposure to certain risk factors (e.g. behaviour difficulties and poor peer relationships). This study explores vulnerability to bullying from a cumulative risk perspective, where the number of risks rather than their nature is considered. A total of 722 teachers and 119 parents of young people with autism spectrum conditions participated in the study. Established risk factors were summed to form a cumulative risk score in teacher and parent models. There was evidence of a cumulative risk effect in both models, suggesting that as the number of risks increased, so did exposure to bullying. A quadratic effect was found in the teacher model, indicating that there was a disproportionate increase in the likelihood of being bullied in relation to the number of risk factors to which a young person was exposed. In light of these findings, it is proposed that more attention needs to be given to the number of risks to which children and young people with autism spectrum conditions are exposed when planning interventions and providing a suitable educational environment.

  13. [The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on the Spectrum of HPAM in Various Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    IR and UV-Vis was employed to analyzed the spectrum effect of hydrogen bonding on the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer(HPAM). The study reveals that, the characteristic absorption peak of free amino group moves to the low frequency due to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between amide group and carboxyl group. In the water solution, intramolecular hydrogen bonding is the main factor that shifted maximal absorption towards long wavelength. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intermolecular hydrogen bonds exist at the same time in the water solution contains intermediate sodium and calcium ions. While in the high concentration solution, the main form between amide group and carboxyl group is intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the spectrum of HPAM demonstrates different extent in various systems. In the water solution, the maximum absorption wavelength red shifts 8 nm. In the system contains sodium ions, this shift is 4 nm. And this shift is only 2 nm in the solution contains both sodium ions and calcium ions.

  14. Planck's view on the spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Jens; Basu, Kaustuv; Chluba, Jens; Bertoldi, Frank

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the stacked frequency spectrum of a large sample of galaxy clusters using Planck data, together with auxiliary data from the AKARI and IRAS missions. Our primary goal is to search for the imprint of relativistic corrections to the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) spectrum, which allow to measure the temperature of the intracluster medium. We remove Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds with a matched filtering technique, which is validated using simulations with realistic mock data sets. The extracted spectra show the tSZ-signal at high significance and reveal an additional far infrared (FIR) excess, which we attribute to thermal emission from the galaxy clusters themselves. This excess FIR emission from clusters is accounted for in our spectral model. We are able to measure the tSZ relativistic corrections at 2.2σ by constraining the mean temperature of our cluster sample to 4.4^{+2.1}_{-2.0} keV. We repeat the same analysis on a subsample containing only the 100 hottest clusters, for which we measure the mean temperature to be 6.0^{+3.8}_{-2.9} keV, corresponding to 2.0σ. The temperature of the emitting dust grains in our FIR model is constrained to ≃ 20 K, consistent with previous studies. Control for systematic biases is done by fitting mock clusters, from which we also show that using the non-relativistic spectrum for SZ signal extraction will lead to a bias in the integrated Compton parameter Y, which can be up to 14% for the most massive clusters. We conclude by providing an outlook for the upcoming CCAT-prime telescope, which will improve upon Planck with lower noise and better spatial resolution.

  15. Effective Land Use for Renewable Energy Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Teunis

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the energy densities for different methods to produce renew-able energy. Energy density is defined here as the energy that is annually produced on a certain area. Using low, average, and high energy density scenari

  16. Communicating the risks of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: effects of message framing and exemplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Ahern, Lee A; Connolly-Ahern, Colleen; Shen, Fuyuan

    2010-12-01

    Health messages can be either informative or descriptive, and can emphasize either potential losses or gains. This study, guided by message framing theory and exemplification theory, specifically investigated the combined effects of messages with loss-gain frames mixed with statistics or exemplar appeals. The findings revealed a series of main effects and interactions for loss-gain frames and statistics-exemplar appeals on fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention intention, intention to know more, perceived severity, perceived fear, perceived external efficacy, and perceived internal efficacy. The gain-statistics appeal showed an advantage in promoting perceived efficacy toward FASD, while the loss-exemplar appeal revealed an advantage in increasing prevention intention, perceived severity, and perceived fear toward FASD. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

  17. Effectiveness of a Standardized Equine-Assisted Therapy Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Loliva, Dafne; Cerino, Stefania; Chiarotti, Flavia; Venerosi, Aldina; Bramini, Maria; Nonnis, Enrico; Marcelli, Marco; Vinti, Claudia; De Santis, Chiara; Bisacco, Francesca; Fagerlie, Monica; Frascarelli, Massimo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effectiveness of an equine-assisted therapy (EAT) in improving adaptive and executive functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was examined (children attending EAT, n = 15, control group n = 13; inclusion criteria: IQ > 70). Therapeutic sessions consisted in structured activities involving horses and included both work on the ground and riding. Results indicate an improvement in social functioning in the group attending EAT (compared to the control group) and a milder effect on motor abilities. Improved executive functioning was also observed (i.e. reduced planning time in a problem-solving task) at the end of the EAT program. Our findings provide further support for the use of animal-assisted intervention programs as complementary intervention strategies for children with ASD.

  18. The social effect of ‘being imitated’ in children with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita eContaldo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that ‘being imitated’ has social effects, and that the imitation of the child’s actions may be used as a strategy to promote social engagement in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The observation of someone that imitates us recruits, indeed, neural areas involved in social cognition. We reviewed studies exploring the behavioral consequences of ‘being imitated’ in children with ASD. We aimed at assessing what are the social skills targeted by this strategy, and the factors that may improve the response. The ‘being imitated’ strategy improves social gazes, proximal social behaviors and play skills, particularly in children with low developmental level, and also when the strategy is implemented by children’s mothers. The ‘being imitated’ may be used as a tool in early intervention to improve social skills, helping to assess the effects of intervention at both behavioral and neural level.

  19. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    block size dropped from 1000 to 450 mm, with a realistic velocity observed to get the perforation of the net. The results of the study provide an important insight on the behaviour of low energy barriers. Data also shed an important light on the testing procedures which should be followed when full-scale experiments are performed on these structures, highlighting the need of considering the whole spectrum of potential block sizes. References [1] Spadari M, Kardani M, De Carteret R, Giacomini A, Buzzi O, Fityus S, Sloan S W (2013) Statistical evaluation of rockfall energy ranges for different geological settings of New South Wales, Australia. Eng Geol 158:57-65. [2] Thoeni K, Lambert C, Giacomini A, Sloan S W (2013) Discrete modelling of hexagonal wire meshes with a stochastically distorted contact model. Comp Geotech 49: 158-169. [3] Mentani A, Giacomini A, Buzzi O, Govoni L, Gottardi G, Fityus S (2015) Numerical Modelling of a Low-Energy Rockfall Barrier: New Insight into the Bullet Effect, Rock Mech Rock Eng, DOI10.1007/s00603-015-0803-1

  20. A flat-spectrum candidate for a track-type high-energy neutrino emission event, the case of blazar PKS 0723-008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, E.; Biermann, P. L.; Gergely, L. Á.

    2017-03-01

    By cross-correlating both the Parkes Catalogue and the Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources with the arrival direction of the track-type neutrinos detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, we find the flat-spectrum blazar PKS 0723-008 as a good candidate for the high-energy neutrino event 5 (ID5). Apart from its coordinates matching those of ID5, PKS 0723-008 exhibits further interesting radio properties. Its spectrum is flat up to high Planck frequencies, and it produced a fivefold-increased radio flux density through the last decade. Based upon these radio properties we propose a scenario of binary black hole evolution leading to the observed high-energy neutrino emission. The main contributing events are the spin-flip of the dominant black hole, the formation of a new jet with significant particle acceleration and interaction with the surrounding material, with the corresponding increased radio flux. Doppler boosting from the underlying jet pointing to the Earth makes it possible to identify the origin of the neutrinos, so the merger itself is the form of an extended flat-spectrum radio emission, a key selection criterion to find traces of this complex process.

  1. Effective Theory of Dark Energy at Redshift Survey Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the phenomenological consequences of general late-time modifications of gravity in the quasi-static approximation, in the case where cold dark matter is non-minimally coupled to the gravitational sector. Assuming spectroscopic and photometric surveys with configuration parameters similar to those of the Euclid mission, we derive constraints on our effective description from three observables: the galaxy power spectrum in redshift space, tomographic weak-lensing shear power spectrum and the correlation spectrum between the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and the galaxy distribution. In particular, with $\\Lambda$CDM as fiducial model and a specific choice for the time dependence of our effective functions, we perform a Fisher matrix analysis and find that the unmarginalized $68\\%$ CL errors on the parameters describing the modifications of gravity are of order $\\sigma\\sim10^{-2}$--$10^{-3}$. We also consider two other fiducial models. A nonminimal coupling of CDM enhances the effects of modified gravit...

  2. An Electromagnetic Spectrum for Millennial Students: Teaching Light, Color, Energy, and Frequency Using the Electronic Devices of Our Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a comparison of student learning outcomes is made in sophomore-level physical science classes using a "traditional" pedagogical approach versus a "modern" approach. Specifically, when students were taught the electromagnetic spectrum using diagrams and examples that incorporate technological advances and electronic devices of our…

  3. The pulse shape and the spectrum of PSR B0531+21 (Crab pulsar) in the low-energy gamma rays observed with FIGARO II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, E.; Feroci, M.; Costa, E.; Matt, G.; Agrinier, B.; Gouiffes, C.; Parlier, B.; Masnou, J. L.; Cusumano, G.; Mineo, T.; Sacco, B.; Scarsi, L.; Gerardi, G.; Salvati, M.; Mandrou, P.; Niel, M.; Olive, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    The FIGARO II experiment observed the Crab pulsar in the energy range 0.15-4 MeV during two transmediterranean flights, on 1990 July 9 and on 1986 July 11. A detailed analysis of the pulse profiles shows that the profile in the energy band 0.37-0.51 MeV is characterized, in addition to the main ones, by the presence in the Interpeak region of two other peaks, which could be associated with the 0.44 MeV line reported by Massaro et al. (1991). Spectral analysis confirms that the Ip spectrum, harder than those of P1 and P2, should progressively steepen with increasing energy. We conclude that the observed Crab emission can be due to the superposition of two components and that the one dominant in the Ip is associated with the pair production in the magnetosphere.

  4. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    . Observations: Three patients with idiopathic solar urticaria underwent phototesting with UV-B and UV-A radiation. The minimal urticarial dose (MUD) was determined 15 minutes after irradiation. The patients were subsequently tested with 5 times the MUD, and the reaction was graded every minute for 15 minutes......Background: It can be difficult to provide patients with idiopathic solar urticaria adequate protection from sunlight. In a nonrandomized controlled trial, we used a standardized phototest procedure to determine the effects of using sunscreen and antihistamine to control idiopathic solar urticaria....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin...

  5. Effectiveness of a Multisystem Aquatic Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Giovanni; Ippolito, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Marina; Sentenza, Luigi; Muzio, Mara Rosaria; Salzano, Sara; Conson, Massimiliano

    2018-01-08

    Aquatic therapy improves motor skills of persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), but its usefulness for treating functional difficulties needs to be verified yet. We tested effectiveness of a multisystem aquatic therapy on behavioural, emotional, social and swimming skills of children with ASD. Multisystem aquatic therapy was divided in three phases (emotional adaptation, swimming adaptation and social integration) implemented in a 10-months-programme. At post-treatment, the aquatic therapy group showed significant improvements relative to controls on functional adaptation (Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales), emotional response, adaptation to change and on activity level (Childhood Autism Rating Scale). Swimming skills learning was also demonstrated. Multisystem aquatic therapy is useful for ameliorating functional impairments of children with ASD, going well beyond a swimming training.

  6. Reconstruction of extensive air showers and measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 - 80 PeV at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-06-24

    IceTop is a km{sup 2} scale detector array for highly energetic cosmic radiation. It is a part of the IceCube Observatory that is presently being built at the geographic South Pole. It aims for the detection of huge particle cascades induced by PeV cosmic rays in the atmosphere. These extensive air showers are detected by cylindrical ice tanks that collect the Cherenkov light produced by penetrating particles. The main goal of IceTop is the investigation of the energy distribution and chemical composition of PeV to EeV cosmic rays. This thesis presents the first analysis of highly energetic cosmic ray data taken with IceTop. First, the light response of the IceTop tanks is parametrised as a function of energy and particle type. An expectation function for the distribution of shower signals in the detector plane is developed. The likelihood fit based on that can reconstruct the recorded shower events with resolutions of 1.5 in direction, 9m in location of the shower center, and 12% in energy. This is well competitive with other experiments. The resulting energy response of the array is studied to set up response matrices for different primary nuclei and inclinations. These allow for a deconvolution of the distribution of reconstructed energies to derive the real energy spectrum. Two unfolding algorithms are implemented and studied, and response matrices are modeled for four different composition assumptions. With each assumption, energy spectra are unfolded for three different bins in inclination, using a data sample with an exposure of 3.86.10{sup 11} m{sup 2} s sr, taken in August 2007. The range of the spectrum is 1-80 PeV. Finally, a new analysis method is developed that uses the fact that cosmic rays in the PeV range are expected to be isotropic. It is shown that this requirement can be used for a likelihood estimation that is sensitive to composition without using additional information from other detector components. The analysis shows a clear preference of

  7. Monsters, Monkeys, & Mandalas: Art Therapy with Children Experiencing the Effects of Trauma and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerteisen, June

    2008-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that describes the range of effects associated with the diagnoses of Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). FASD itself is not a diagnosis, but rather encompasses a wide range of symptomatic behaviors that occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during…

  8. Interactive Effects of Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure and Likely Gene Disrupting Mutations on the Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sean; Schoenbrun, Sarah; Hudac, Caitlin; Bernier, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    To examine the interactive effects of two proposed risk factors which may contribute to symptom severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): prenatal antidepressant exposure and likely gene-disrupting (LGD) mutations. Participants included 2748 individuals with ASD from the Simons Simplex Collection. We examined the effects of prenatal…

  9. Atmospheric muon and electron neutrino energy spectrum measured by first year of IceCube-86 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Takao; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The flux of atmospheric neutrinos is the main background for searches for cosmic neutrinos. Precise measurement of its spectrum allows us to reduce uncertainty of any kind of signal analysis. A unified analysis of atmospheric neutrinos using data collected with the full IceCube detector between May 2011 and May 2012 is presented in which both muon and electron flavors are included in a single framework.

  10. The kinetic energy spectrum of protons produced by the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of protons resulting from the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact have been measured for electron impact energies from threshold (approximately 17 eV) to 160 eV at 90 deg and 30 deg detection angles, using a crossed-beam experimental arrangement. To check reliability, two separate proton energy analysis methods have been employed, i.e., a time-of-flight proton energy analysis and an electrostatic hemispherical energy analyzer. The present results are compared with previous measurements.

  11. Mean fission neutron spectrum energies for /sup 252/Cf and fissile nuclides, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu, are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. There have been many data sets produced in recent years which deal with the shape of these spectra, particularly at both the low energy and the high energy portions of the curve. However, our interest here is in the average neutron energies of these spectra. We have tabulated all measurements for the five nuclides of interest. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Fortunately, the measurements have been performed with a number of techniques, which allows one to estimate the systematic error from the spread in the results for the different techniques. An attempt has been made to renormalize results when the neutron spectrum used for normalization purposes has been given. In addition to the tables of mean energy measurements, we have also tabulated the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. The following items were considered, where possible, in the analysis of the mean energies of the neutron spectra: the energy scale of the measurement, the determination of the detector efficiency, the sample size and the sample thickness and the scattering corrections made. The recommended mean energies for the spectra considered are shown. The uncertainty listed attempts to estimate the systematic error as well as merely the precision in each of the experiments. The recommended values for /sup 233,235/U, /sup 239,241/Pu, and /sup 252/Cf are 2.02 +- 0.03 MeV, 1.98 +- 0.03 MeV, 2.06 +- 0.04 MeV, 2.05 +- 0.05 MeV, and 2.14 +- 0.03 MeV, respectively. 73 refs.

  12. On Possible Interpretations of the High Energy Electron-Positron Spectrum Measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, D.; Profumo, S.; Strong, A.W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bregeon, J.; Di Bernardo, G.; Gaggero, D.; Giglietto, N.; Kamae, T.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pohl, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.

    2009-05-15

    The Fermi-LAT experiment recently reported high precision measurements of the spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons-plus-positrons (CRE) between 20 GeV and 1 TeV. The spectrum shows no prominent spectral features, and is significantly harder than that inferred from several previous experiments. Here we discuss several interpretations of the Fermi results based either on a single large scale Galactic CRE component or by invoking additional electron-positron primary sources, e.g. nearby pulsars or particle Dark Matter annihilation. We show that while the reported Fermi-LAT data alone can be interpreted in terms of a single component scenario, when combined with other complementary experimental results, specifically the CRE spectrum measured by H.E.S.S. and especially the positron fraction reported by PAMELA between 1 and 100 GeV, that class of models fails to provide a consistent interpretation. Rather, we find that several combinations of parameters, involving both the pulsar and dark matter scenarios, allow a consistent description of those results. We also briefly discuss the possibility of discriminating between the pulsar and dark matter interpretations by looking for a possible anisotropy in the CRE flux.

  13. Phototherapeutic spectrum expansion through synergistic effect of mesoporous silica trio-nanohybrids against antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthati, Yaswanth; Kankala, Ranjith Kumar; Busa, Prabhakar; Lin, Shi-Xiang; Deng, Jin-Pei; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lee, Chia-Hung

    2017-04-01

    The extensive impact of antibiotic resistance has led to the exploration of new anti-bacterial modalities. We designed copper impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Cu-MSN) with immobilizing silver nanoparticles (SNPs) to apply photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli. SNPs were decorated over the Cu-MSN surfaces by coordination of silver ions on diamine-functionalized Cu-MSN and further reduced to silver nanoparticles with formalin. We demonstrate that silver is capable of sensitizing the gram-negative bacteria E. coli to a gram-positive specific phototherapeutic agent in vitro; thereby expanding curcumin's phototherapeutic spectrum. The mesoporous structure of Cu-MSN remains intact after the exterior decoration with silver nanoparticles and subsequent curcumin loading through an enhanced effect from copper metal-curcumin affinity interaction. The synthesis, as well as successful assembly of the functional nanomaterials, was confirmed by various physical characterization techniques. Curcumin is capable of producing high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under light irradiation, which can further improve the silver ion release kinetics for antibacterial activity. In addition, the positive charged modified surfaces of Cu-MSN facilitate antimicrobial response through electrostatic attractions towards negatively charged bacterial cell membranes. The antibacterial action of the synthesized nanocomposites can be activated through a synergistic mechanism of energy transfer of the absorbed light from SNP to curcumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective energy planning for improving the enterprise’s energy performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Păunescu Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The global pressing need to protect the environment, save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide has prompted the enterprises to implementing both individual energy saving measures and a more systematic approach to improve the overall enterprise’s energy performance. Energy management is becoming a priority as enterprises strive to reduce energy costs, conform to regulatory requirements, and improve their corporate image. As such, enterprises are encouraged to manage their energy related matters in a systematic manner and a more harmonized way, to ensure continual improvement on their energy efficiency. Despite the increasing interest in energy management standards, a gap persists between energy management literature and current implementation practices. The release of the ISO 50001 international standard was meant to help the organizations develop sound energy management systems and effective process-based energy management structures that could be recognized through third-party certification. Building on the energy management literature and energy management standards, the current paper presents the essential steps the enterprises should take to practically design a sustainable energy management system. Also, by using multiple case studies of enterprises that have implemented an ISO 50001 energy management system, it introduces a structured approach that companies can use to effectively develop their energy planning and improve energy performance. The key components of the enterprise’s energy planning are discussed, as well as practical examples of energy objectives and performance indicators from various industries are offered. The paper shows that by establishing an effective energy planning system, this will efficiently meet demands for achieving energy performance indicators and international certification.

  15. An Application of the Direct Coulomb Electron Pair Production Process to the Energy Measurement of the "VH-Group" in the "Knee" Region of the "All-Particle" Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Wu, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The "all-particle" cosmic ray energy spectrum appears to be exhibiting a significant change in the spectral index just above approximately 3000 TeV. This could indicate (1) a change in the propagation of the cosmic rays in the galactic medium, and/or (2) the upper limit of the supernova shock wave acceleration mechanism, and/or (3) a new source of high-energy cosmic rays. Air shower and JACEE data indicate the spectral change is associated with a composition change to a heavier element mixture whereas DICE does not indicate this. A detector concept will be presented that utilizes the energy dependence of the production of direct Coulomb electron-positron pairs by energetic heavy ions. Monte Carlo simulations of a direct electron pair detector consisting of Pb target foils interleaved with planes of 1-mm square scintillating optical fibers will be discussed. The goal is to design a large area, non-saturating instrument to measure the energy spectrum of the individual cosmic ray elements in the "VH-group" for energies greater than 10 TeV/nucleon.

  16. Zooplankton are not fish: improving zooplankton realism in size-spectrum models mediates energy transfer in food webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Heneghan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for an equal distribution of biomass from bacteria to whales has led to development of size-spectrum models that represent the dynamics of the marine ecosystem using size rather than species identity. Recent advances have improved the realism of the fish component of the size-spectrum, but these often assume that small fish feed on an aggregated plankton size-spectrum, without any explicit representation of zooplankton dynamics. In these models, small zooplankton are grouped with phytoplankton as a resource for larval fish, and large zooplankton are parameterized as small fish. Here we investigate the impact of resolving zooplankton and their feeding traits in a dynamic size-spectrum model. First, we compare a base model, where zooplankton are parameterized as smaller fish, to a model that includes zooplankton-specific feeding parameters. Second, we evaluate how the parameterization of zooplankton feeding characteristics, specifically the predator-prey mass ratio (PPMR, assimilation efficiency and feeding kernel width, affects the productivity and stability of the fish community. Finally, we compare how feeding characteristics of different zooplankton functional groups mediate increases in primary production and fishing pressure. Incorporating zooplankton-specific feeding parameters increased productivity of the fish community, but also changed the dynamics of the entire system from a stable to an oscillating steady-state. The inclusion of zooplankton feeding characteristics mediated a trade-off between the productivity and resilience of the fish community, and its stability. Fish communities with increased productivity and lower stability were supported by zooplankton with a larger PPMR and a narrower feeding kernel – specialized herbivores. In contrast, fish communities that were stable had lower productivity, and were supported by zooplankton with a lower PPMR and a wider feeding kernel – generalist carnivores. Herbivorous

  17. The measurement of the cosmic ray primary energy spectrum at 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} eV with the KASCADE-Grande experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoni, Elena [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario INAF, Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Apel, W.D.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J.C.; Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Fuhrmann, D. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Ghia, P.L. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario INAF, Torino (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment operates at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. It's aim is the study of the primary cosmic radiation, through Extensive Air Shower detection, in the range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} eV. Here, measurements are of main interest to understand the high energy evolution of cosmic radiation: a change in the slope of the heavy primary spectrum is expected (as measured at lower energies for lighter primaries) as a possible confirmation of the predicted astrophysical mechanisms; moreover, in this range the transition from galactic to extragalactic radiation is supposed to take place and the observations could clarify the features of this transition, putting the basis for the interpretation of the data at the highest energies. For these tasks KASCADE-Grande fulfills very well the requirements, both concerning the acceptance and the experimental performances. The experiment is constituted by two co-operating arrays of detectors: the KASCADE array, with its 252 detectors in a dense grid of 200x200 m{sup 2} and the Grande array, made of 37 detectors arranged on a wider area of 700x700 m{sup 2}. The Grande array samples the total charged particles size of the air shower, while the KASCADE array provides the muon size In this contribution, KASCADE-Grande measurement of the cosmic ray primary energy spectrum is presented. The exploited technique, calibrated with simulations, combines the charged particles component and muon component on a shower by shower basis, performing the energy estimation of each primary event. Other techniques are also performed, for a better evaluation of systematics and a check of consistency of the hadronic interaction model used in simulations.

  18. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders – an exploratory research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. Results An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on ‘Overall development score’, as well as on their ‘Fine motor development’, ‘Cognitive performance’ and ‘Cognitive verbal development’. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. Conclusions This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program. PMID:22537536

  19. Effects of a dolphin interaction program on children with autism spectrum disorders: an exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Emílio; Nunes, Laura; Barros, Alexandra; Maroco, João; Salgueiro, Ana Isabel; Dos Santos, Manuel E

    2012-04-26

    Interaction programs involving dolphins and patients with various pathologies or developmental disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy, intellectual impairment, autism, atopic dermatitis, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression) have stimulated interest in their beneficial effects and therapeutic potential. However, the true effects observed in different clinical and psycho-educational setups are still controversial. An evaluation protocol consisting of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), Theory of Mind Tasks (ToM Tasks) and a custom-made Interaction Evaluation Grid (IEG) to evaluate behavioural complexity during in-pool interactions was applied to 10 children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The ATEC, ToM Tasks and CARS results show no benefits of the dolphin interaction program. Interestingly, the PEP-R suggests some statistically significant effects on 'Overall development score', as well as on their 'Fine motor development', 'Cognitive performance' and 'Cognitive verbal development'. Also, a significant evolution in behavioural complexity was shown by the IEG. This study does not support significant developmental progress resulting from the dolphin interaction program.

  20. EFFECTIVE RELEASE OF A BROAD SPECTRUM ANTIBIOTIC FROM ELASTIN-LIKE POLYPEPTIDE-COLLAGEN COMPOSITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tiffany R.; Marquart, Mary E.; Janorkar, Amol V.

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of hydrogels that possess an effective antibiotic release profile and better mechanical properties compared to the traditionally used collagen hydrogels has the potential to minimize post-surgical infections and support wound healing. Towards this goal, we prepared elastin-like polypeptide (ELP)-collagen composite hydrogels that displayed a significantly higher elastic modulus compared to the collagen hydrogels. We then characterized the release behavior of the collagen and ELP-collagen hydrogels loaded with varying dosages (1 – 5% w/w) of a commonly used broad spectrum antibiotic, doxycycline hyclate. Both collagen and ELP-collagen hydrogels showed a gradual time dependent doxycycline release over a period of 5 days. The ELP-collagen hydrogels, in general, showed a slower release of the doxycycline compared to the collagen hydrogels. The released doxycycline was found to be effective against four bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus sanguinis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in a dose dependent manner. Combined with their improved mechanical properties, the gradual and effective drug release from the biocompatible ELP-collagen hydrogels shown here may be beneficial for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PMID:24825292

  1. Modeling BSM effects on the Higgs transverse-momentum spectrum in an EFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazzini, Massimiliano [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich,CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Ilnicka, Agnieszka [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich,CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Physics Department, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute,CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzwerland (Switzerland); Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institute,CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzwerland (Switzerland); Wiesemann, Marius [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich,CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN Theory Division,CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-03-22

    We consider the transverse-momentum distribution of a Higgs boson produced through gluon fusion in hadron collisions. At small transverse momenta, the large logarithmic terms are resummed up to next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) accuracy. The resummed computation is consistently matched to the next-to-leading-order (NLO) result valid at large transverse momenta. The ensuing Standard Model prediction is supplemented by possible new-physics effects parametrised through three dimension-six operators related to the modification of the top and bottom Yukawa couplings, and to the inclusion of a point-like Higgs-gluon coupling, respectively. We present resummed transverse-momentum spectra including the effect of these operators at NLL+NLO accuracy and study their impact on the shape of the distribution. We find that such modifications, while affecting the total rate within the current uncertainties, can lead to significant distortions of the spectrum. The proper parametrization of such effects becomes increasingly important for experimental analyses in Run II of the LHC.

  2. The Effect of Mitochondrial Supplements on Mitochondrial Activity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanna M. Delhey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction is typically guided by expert opinion with a paucity of empirical evidence of the effect of treatment on mitochondrial activity. We examined citrate synthase and Complex I and IV activities using a validated buccal swab method in 127 children with autism spectrum disorder with and without mitochondrial disease, a portion of which were on common mitochondrial supplements. Mixed-model linear regression determined whether specific supplements altered the absolute mitochondrial activity as well as the relationship between the activities of mitochondrial components. Complex I activity was increased by fatty acid and folate supplementation, but folate only effected those with mitochondrial disease. Citrate synthase activity was increased by antioxidant supplementation but only for the mitochondrial disease subgroup. The relationship between Complex I and IV was modulated by folate while the relationship between Complex I and Citrate Synthase was modulated by both folate and B12. This study provides empirical support for common mitochondrial treatments and demonstrates that the relationship between activities of mitochondrial components might be a marker to follow in addition to absolute activities. Measurements of mitochondrial activity that can be practically repeated over time may be very useful to monitor the biochemical effects of treatments.

  3. Randomised controlled Trial of Improvisational Music therapy's Effectiveness for children with Autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either...... methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.......e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three...

  4. Long-Term Effects of Risperidone in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Placebo Discontinuation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troost, Pieter W.; Lahuis, Bertine E.; Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Ketelaars, Cees E. J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; van Engeland, Herman; Scahill, Lawrence; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The short-term benefit of risperidone in ameliorating severe disruptive behavior in pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders is well established; however, only one placebo-controlled, long-term study of efficacy is available. Method: Thirty-six children with an autism spectrum disorder (5-17 years old) accompanied by severe…

  5. Long-term effects of risperidone in children with autism spectrum disorders : A placebo discontinuation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, PW; Lahuis, BE; Steenhuis, MP; Ketelaars, CEJ; Buitelaar, JK; Van Engeland, H; Scahill, L; Minderaa, RB; Hoekstra, PJ

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The short-term benefit of risperidone in ameliorating severe disruptive behavior in pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders is well established; however, only one placebo-controlled, long-term study of efficacy is available. Method: Thirty-six children with an autism spectrum

  6. Long-term effects of risperidone in children with autism spectrum disorders : A placebo discontinuation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, PW; Lahuis, BE; Steenhuis, MP; Ketelaars, CEJ; Buitelaar, JK; Van Engeland, H; Scahill, L; Minderaa, RB; Hoekstra, PJ

    Objective: The short-term benefit of risperidone in ameliorating severe disruptive behavior in pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders is well established; however, only one placebo-controlled, long-term study of efficacy is available. Method: Thirty-six children with an autism spectrum

  7. Long-term effects of risperidone in children with autism spectrum disorders: a placebo discontinuation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, P.W.; Lahuis, B.E.; Steenhuis, M.P.; Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Engeland, H. van; Scahill, L.; Minderaa, R.B.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The short-term benefit of risperidone in ameliorating severe disruptive behavior in pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders is well established; however, only one placebo-controlled, long-term study of efficacy is available. METHOD: Thirty-six children with an autism spectrum

  8. Spectrum-Effect Relationships as a Systematic Approach to Traditional Chinese Medicine Research: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Ling Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Component fingerprints are a recognized method used worldwide to evaluate the quality of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs. To foster the strengths and circumvent the weaknesses of the fingerprint technique in TCM, spectrum-effect relationships would complementarily clarify the nature of pharmacodynamic effects in the practice of TCM. The application of the spectrum-effect relationship method is crucial for understanding and interpreting TCM development, especially in the view of the trends towards TCM modernization and standardization. The basic requirement for using this method is in-depth knowledge of the active material basis and mechanisms of action. It is a novel and effective approach to study TCMs and great progress has been made, but to make it more accurate for TCM research purposes, more efforts are needed. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge about the spectrum-effect relationship method, including the fingerprint methods, pharmacodynamics studies and the methods of establishing relationships between the fingerprints and pharmacodynamics. Some speculation regarding future perspectives for spectrum-effect relationship approaches in TCM modernization and standardization are also proposed.

  9. Development of the MICROMEGAS Detector for Measuring the Energy Spectrum of Alpha Particles by using a 241-Am Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Do Yoon; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting {\\alpha} particles emitted from an 241-Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of {\\alpha} particles from the 241-Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the {\\alpha} particle from the 241 Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the {\\alpha} particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for {\\alpha} particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that {\\alpha} particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGA...

  10. Measurement of the proton recoil spectrum in neutron beta decay with the spectrometer aSPECT. Study of systematic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Gertrud Emilie

    2012-01-24

    Free neutron decay, n{yields}pe anti {nu}{sub e}, is the simplest nuclear beta decay, well described as a purely left-handed, vector minus axial-vector interaction within the framework of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles and fields. Due to its highly precise theoretical description, neutron beta decay data can be used to test certain extensions to the SM. Possible extensions require, e.g., new symmetry concepts like left-right symmetry, new particles, leptoquarks, supersymmetry, or the like. Precision measurements of observables in neutron beta decay address important open questions of particle physics and cosmology, and are generally complementary to direct searches for new physics beyond the SM in high-energy physics. In this doctoral thesis, a measurement of the proton recoil spectrum with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT is described. From the proton spectrum the antineutrinoelectron angular correlation coefficient a can be derived. In our first beam time at the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz in Munich, Germany (2005-2006), background instabilities due to particle trapping and the electronic noise level of the proton detector prevented us from presenting a new value for a. In the latest beam time at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France (2007-2008), the trapped particle background has been reduced sufficiently and the electronic noise problem has essentially been solved. For the first time, a silicon drift detector was used. As a result of the data analysis, we identified and fixed a problem in the detector electronics which caused a significant systematic error. The target figure of the latest beam time was a new value for a with a total relative error well below the present literature value of 4 %. A statistical accuracy of about 1.4% was reached, but we could only set upper limits on the correction of the problem in the detector electronics, which are too high to determine a meaningful result. The present

  11. Energy transport modelling including ergodic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, N.; Bonnin, X.; Runov, A.; Schneider, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Zagorski, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, P.O.Box 49, Warsaw (Poland)

    2004-04-01

    The effect of ergodization (either by additional coils like in TEXTOR-DED or by intrinsic plasma effects like in W7-X) defines the need for transport models being able to describe this properly. A prerequisite for this is the concept of local magnetic coordinates allowing a correct discretization with minimized numerical errors. For these coordinates the full respective metric tensor has to be known. To study the energy transport in complex edge geometries (in particular for W7-X) we use a finite difference discretization of the transport equations on a custom-tailored grid in local magnetic coordinates. This grid is generated by field line tracing to guarantee an exact discretization of the dominant parallel transport (this also minimizes the numerical diffusion problem). The perpendicular fluxes are interpolated on cross-sectional planes (toroidal cuts), where a quasi-isotropic problem is solved by a constrained Delaunay triangulation (preserving magnetic surfaces where they exist), and discretization. All terms involving toroidal terms are discretized by finite differences. The first tests for W7X and NCSX were successfully performed. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. “We Dance and Find Each Other”1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hildebrandt, Malin; Koch, Sabine; Fuchs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    .... The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder...

  13. The energy spectrum of PbBi4Te7 on evidence derived from light reflection and absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Veis

    2015-10-01

    The compound under study was established to exhibit a narrow direct forbidden gap. It was found that its optical band gap Egopt=0.31eV, an energy gap parameter Eg0 between absolute extremums of the valence and conduction bands in the sample with the Hall electron concentration of 5.45 × 1020 cm–3 was equal to 0.08–0.12 eV, and a mdn/mdp ratio (effective masses of electron and hole states densities was equal to about unity. No other subbands located near the absolute extremum of conduction band were revealed in PbBi4Te7. The electron dispersion law was also found to be non-parabolic in this matter. The law involved can be described in the context of Kane non-parabolisity model taking into account an exchange interaction of free electrons. It was shown that the most probable value of the Eg0 parameter fell within the range from 0.16 to 0.24 eV for PbBi4Te7 with nondegenerate free electron gas.

  14. Topical nicotinamide modulates cellular energy metabolism and provides broad-spectrum protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirabu, G; Yiasemides, E; Halliday, G M; Park, J; Damian, D L

    2009-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation can profoundly suppress the cutaneous immune system, thus enhancing carcinogenesis. Agents that prevent UV-induced immunosuppression may thus reduce skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) prevents UV-induced immunosuppression and carcinogenesis in mice, and solar-simulated (ss) UV-induced immunosuppression in humans. Its effectiveness against different UV wavebands and mechanism of action is as yet unknown. To determine the effects and mechanisms of topical nicotinamide on UV-induced suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in humans. Healthy Mantoux-positive volunteers in four randomised, double-blinded studies were irradiated with solar-simulated (ss)UV (UVB + UVA) or narrowband UVB (300 nm) or UVA (385 nm). Topical nicotinamide (0.2% or 5%) or its vehicle were applied immediately after each irradiation. Mantoux testing was performed at irradiated sites and adjacent unirradiated control sites 48 h after the first irradiation and measured 72 h later. Immunosuppression was calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema and induration at test sites compared to control sites. Human keratinocyte cell cultures, with and without ssUV and nicotinamide, were used for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assessment of TP53 and enzymes that regulate oxidative phosphorylation. Nicotinamide cooperated with ssUV to increase enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism and p53, and significantly protected against immunosuppression caused by UVB, longwave UVA and single and repeated ssUV exposures. Longwave UVA, which is poorly filtered by most sunscreens, was highly immune suppressive even at doses equivalent to 20 min of sun exposure. Nicotinamide, which protected against both UVB and UVA, is a promising agent for skin cancer prevention.

  15. the effects of form and orientation on energy performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    ABSTRACT. The form and orientation of a building can have an effect on energy performance. The difficulty has been to find the most energy efficient form-aspect ratio. In this paper, a volume with differ- ent aspect ratios has been used to investigate the effect on energy performance (cooling load). The volume used is of the ...

  16. Measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Louis, F. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Geoazur, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Circella, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Donzaud, C. [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands); Flaminio, V. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje (Texel) (Netherlands); Kadler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (IT); Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Montaruli, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Geneva (CH); Morganti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Rostovtsev, A. [ITEP - Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (NL); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (NL); Taiuti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genova (IT); Tayalati, Y. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, B.P. 717, Oujda (MA)

    2013-10-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced during cascades initiated by the interaction of primary cosmic rays with air nuclei. In this paper, a measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} + anti {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum in the energy range 0.1-200 TeV is presented, using data collected by the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope from 2008 to 2011. Overall, the measured flux is {proportional_to}25 % higher than predicted by the conventional neutrino flux, and compatible with the measurements reported in ice. The flux is compatible with a single power-law dependence with spectral index {gamma}{sub meas}=3.58{+-}0.12. With the present statistics the contribution of prompt neutrinos cannot be established. (orig.)

  17. Effects of intranasal oxytocin on the neural basis of face processing in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Gregor; Heinrichs, Markus; Kumbier, Ekkehardt; Grossmann, Annette; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Herpertz, Sabine C

    2013-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with altered face processing and decreased activity in brain regions involved in face processing. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to promote face processing and modulate brain activity in healthy adults. The present study examined the effects of oxytocin on the neural basis of face processing in adults with Asperger syndrome (AS). A group of 14 individuals with AS and a group of 14 neurotypical control participants performed a face-matching and a house-matching task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The effects of a single dose of 24 IU intranasally administered oxytocin were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subject, cross-over design. Under placebo, the AS group showed decreased activity in the right amygdala, fusiform gyrus, and inferior occipital gyrus compared with the control group during face processing. After oxytocin treatment, right amygdala activity to facial stimuli increased in the AS group. These findings indicate that oxytocin increases the saliency of social stimuli and in ASD and suggest that oxytocin might promote face processing and eye contact in individuals with ASD as prerequisites for neurotypical social interaction. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the molecular structure on the electronic vertical spectrum of oxoglaucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cecilia Daza Espinosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical electronic spectrum of oxoglaucine by means of a multireference configuration interaction method (DFT/MRCI was studied. The effect of both methyl and methoxy groups on the geometries and energetic distribution of the low-lying excited states was analyzed. The results show that, by means of the TZVP basis set, at the ground state minima of oxoglaucine, oxoglaucine without methyl and methoxy groups, the lowest excited singlet states are of nπ* (S1 and ππ* (S2 type. Triplet states of ππ* (T1 and nπ* (T2 type are energetically accessible from S1. From the energetic point of view, it can be proposed that the channel for an efficient intersystem crossing 1(nπ*⇝3(ππ* is plausible. Although the presence of the methyl and methoxyl groups distort the planarity of the rings system, the effect in the vertical distribution of the lowest lying singlet and triplet states can be considered as negligible.

  19. Effective electrical energy policies in terms of DSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyunah

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates how well energy policies are adopted and operated. In terms of DSM or the Demand Side Management, ways of modifying energy demand are introduced. Also their effects are showed. Furthermore future plans of DSM are illustrated shortly.

  20. Effects of Explicit Instruction and Self-Directed Video Prompting on Text Comprehension of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, Emily Claire

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of explicit instruction combined with video prompting to teach text comprehension skills to students with autism spectrum disorder. Participants included 4 elementary school students with autism. A multiple probe across participants design was used to evaluate the intervention's…

  1. Bone Mineral Density Accrual in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effects of Calcium Intake and Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mahmood; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with autism spectrum disorders. For this reason 60 boy students with autism disorder (age 8-10 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  2. Improving question asking in high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders - Effectiveness of small-group training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Arts, M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Small-group training consisting of feedback and self-management was effective in improving question-asking skills during tutorial conversations in nine high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Training was implemented in a therapy room and lasted 6 weeks. Sessions were conducted

  3. The Effects of Physical Activity on the On-Task Behavior of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontez, Shane K. H.; Schwartz, Ilene S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adult-directed physical activities conducted during circle time on the on-task behavior of students during a journal-writing activity held immediately after circle. The participants of the study were three male students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who attended a full day inclusive…

  4. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min; Ooi, Yoon Phaik; Goh, Tze Jui; Pathy, Pavarthy; Fung, Daniel S. S.; Ang, Rebecca P.; Chua, Alina; Lam, Chee Meng

    2011-01-01

    We compared the effects of a 16-week Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) program and a Social Recreational (SR) program on anxiety in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Seventy children (9-16 years old) were randomly assigned to either of the programs (n CBT = 36; n SR = 34). Measures on child's anxiety using the Spence Child Anxiety…

  5. The Effect of a Platform Swing on the Independent Work Behaviors of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Linda C.; Dantzler, John A.; Walker, Anne N.; Wood, L. Becca

    2014-01-01

    A randomized pretest-posttest control group design was utilized to measure the effects of a platform swing on independent work behaviors of 30 children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Participants engaged in two 5-min intervals of independent work. Between the intervals, participants in the treatment group received 5 min of vestibular…

  6. The Effects of Scripted Peer Tutoring and Programming Common Stimuli on Social Interactions of a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursdottir, Anna-Lind; McComas, Jennifer; McMaster, Kristen; Horner, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of scripted peer-tutoring reading activities, with and without programmed common play-related stimuli, on social interactions between a kindergartner with autism spectrum disorder and his typically developing peer-tutoring partners during free play. A withdrawal design with multiple baselines across peers showed no…

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Comparing Pre-Diagnosis Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)-Targeted Intervention with Ontario's Autism Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Melanie; Rayar, Meera; Bashir, Naazish; Roberts, S. Wendy; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Coyte, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Novel management strategies for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) propose providing interventions before diagnosis. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the costs and dependency-free life years (DFLYs) generated by pre-diagnosis intensive Early Start Denver Model (ESDM-I); pre-diagnosis parent-delivered ESDM (ESDM-PD); and the Ontario…

  8. Effects of a Multimedia Social Skills Program in Increasing Social Responses and Initiations of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Heidi M.; Radley, Keith C.; Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine; O'Neill, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effectiveness of Superheroes Social Skills, a multimedia social skills package, in improving social responsiveness and social initiation behaviors of four elementary school children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The program was implemented in a public school setting in the southwestern United States for…

  9. Effects of Joint Attention Mediated Learning for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Initial Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, Hannah H.; Odom, Samuel L.; Baggett, Kathleen M.; Sideris, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effects of the Joint Attention Mediated Learning (JAML) intervention on acquisition of joint attention and other early social communication competencies for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-three parents and their toddlers were randomly assigned to JAML or a control condition.…

  10. Effects of Age and Attention on Auditory Global-Local Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nicholas E. V.; Ouimet, Tia; Tryfon, Ana; Doyle-Thomas, Krissy; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Hyde, Krista L.

    2016-01-01

    In vision, typically-developing (TD) individuals perceive "global" (whole) before "local" (detailed) features, whereas individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit a local bias. However, auditory global-local distinctions are less clear in ASD, particularly in terms of age and attention effects. To these aims, here…

  11. Effectiveness of a Fundamental Motor Skill Intervention for 4-Year-Old Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Emily; Balogh, Robert; Lloyd, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    A wait-list control experimental design was employed to investigate the effectiveness of a fundamental motor skill intervention at improving the motor skills, adaptive behavior, and social skills of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (experimental n?=?5, control n?=?4); the impact of intervention intensity was also explored. The…

  12. The Effectiveness of Social Stories[TM] to Develop Social Interactions with Adults with Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Rachel; Stansfield, Jois

    2012-01-01

    Most research into the effectiveness of Social Stories has focused on children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study examines the use of Social Stories with four adults with learning disabilities and social communication impairments characteristic of ASD. This study employed an N = 1 multiple-baseline, across-participant, AB design with…

  13. Effects of a Modified Milieu Therapy Intervention on the Social Communicative Behaviors of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancil, G. Richmond; Conroy, Maureen A.; Haydon, Todd F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combining milieu therapy and functional communication training (FCT) to replace aberrant behavior with functional communicative skills in 3 male preschool or elementary aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Study activities were conducted in the natural…

  14. The Effect of Music Therapy upon Language Acquisition for Children on the Autism Spectrum Aged 3-8 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Jones, Annette Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates the characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder include challenges with receptive and expressive language, which can negatively impact social-emotional development and physical regulation. The needs of children with autism are expected to greatly impact the current medical and educational resources, thus effective intervention…

  15. The effect of the video game Mindlight on anxiety symptoms in children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder [study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, L.A.M.W.; Creemers, D.H.M.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Granic, I.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the clinical setting, a large proportion of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience anxiety symptoms. Because anxiety is an important cause of impairment for children with an ASD, it is necessary that effective anxiety interventions are implemented for these

  16. Subjective Burden and Depression in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in India: Moderating Effect of Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prerna; Ghosh, Subharati; Nandi, Subhrangshu

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative study assessed subjective burden, depression, and the moderating effect of social support in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in India. Seventy mothers were interviewed using a structured interview schedule, which measured their subjective burden, depression, and social support from family, friends, and…

  17. Effects of Video Modeling on the Instructional Efficiency of Simultaneous Prompting among Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc-Tosun, Derya; Kurt, Onur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of simultaneous prompting with and without video modeling in teaching food preparation skills to four participants with autism spectrum disorder, whose ages ranged from 5 to 6 years old. An adapted alternating treatment single-case experimental design was used to…

  18. Effects and Moderators of a Short Theory of Mind Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begeer, S.M.; Howlin, P.; Hoddenbach, E.M.; Clauser, C.; Lindauer, R.J.L.; Clifford, P.; Gevers, C.; Boer, F.; Koot, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Limited perspective taking or “Theory of Mind” (ToM) abilities are a core deficit of autism, and many interventions are aimed to improve ToM abilities. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a ToM treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and, for the first time, the

  19. Effects of a Social Skills Intervention on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Peers with Shared Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Keith C.; O'Handley, Roderick D.; Battaglia, Allison A.; Lum, John D. K.; Dadakhodjaeva, Komila; Ford, William B.; McHugh, Melissa B.

    2017-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of the "Superheroes Social Skills" program (Jenson et al. 2011) in promoting accurate demonstration of target social skills in training and generalization conditions in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and peers with shared social deficits. Three preschool-age children with ASD…

  20. Brief Report: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Advocacy Program for Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Magaña, Sandra; Garcia, Marlene; Mello, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Latino, Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unique barriers in special education advocacy. Although advocacy programs are becoming more common in the United States, none of these programs target Latino families. This is a pilot study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an advocacy program for…

  1. Effects of Water Exercise Swimming Program on Aquatic Skills and Social Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a 10 week water exercise swimming program (WESP) on the aquatic skills and social behaviors of 16 boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first 10 week phase (phase I), eight children (group A) received the WESP while eight children (group B) did not. A second 10 week phase…

  2. The Effect of Visual Supports on Performance of the TGMD-2 for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Casey M.; Rudisill, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of visual supports on the performance of the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants (N = 22) performed the TGMD-2 under three different protocols (traditional protocol, picture task card protocol, and picture activity schedule…

  3. Prosocial effects of oxytocin in two mouse models of autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Brian L.; Nonneman, Randal J.; Agster, Kara L.; Nikolova, Viktoriya D.; Davis, Tamara T.; Riddick, Natallia V.; Baker, Lorinda K.; Pedersen, Cort A.; Jarstfer, Michael B.; Moy, Sheryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that oxytocin treatment improves social deficits and repetitive behavior in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, the neuropeptide has a short plasma half-life and poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. In order to facilitate the development of more bioavailable oxytocinergic compounds as therapeutics to treat core ASD symptoms, small animal models must be validated for preclinical screens. This study examined the preclinical utility of two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cByJ and C58/J, that exhibit phenotypes relevant to core ASD symptoms. Mice from both strains were intraperitoneally administered oxytocin, using either acute or sub-chronic regimens. Acute oxytocin did not increase sociability in BALB/cByJ; however, sub-chronic oxytocin had significant prosocial effects in both BALB/cByJ and C58/J. Increased sociability was observed 24 hours following the final oxytocin dose in BALB/cByJ, while prosocial effects of oxytocin emerged 1–2 weeks post-treatment in C58/J. Furthermore, acute oxytocin decreased motor stereotypy in C58/J and did not induce hypoactivity or anxiolytic-like effects in an open field test. This study demonstrates that oxytocin administration can attenuate social deficits and repetitive behavior in mouse models of ASD, dependent on dose regimen and genotype. These findings provide validation of the BALB/cByJ and C58/J models as useful platforms for screening novel drugs for intervention in ASDs and for elucidating the mechanisms contributing to the prosocial effects of oxytocin. PMID:23643748

  4. Caffeine consumption around an exercise bout: effects on energy expenditure, energy intake, and exercise enjoyment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schubert, Matthew M; Hall, Susan; Leveritt, Michael; Grant, Gary; Sabapathy, Surendran; Desbrow, Ben

    2014-01-01

    .... This study sought to determine whether combining exercise and caffeine supplementation was more effective for promoting acute energy deficits and manipulations to substrate metabolism than exercise alone...

  5. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  6. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  7. MEMS Based Solutions for an Integrated and Miniaturized Multi-Spectrum Energy Harvesting and Conservation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop three unique energy harvesting technologies utilizing our existing research strengths that will be of interest and...

  8. MEMS Based Solutions for an Integrated and Miniaturized Multi-Spectrum Energy Harvesting and Conservation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to integrate three unique energy harvesting technologies utilizing our existing research strengths that will be of interest and...

  9. Zellweger Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Donate The Zellweger Spectrum Zellweger Syndrome, Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum’s Disease (IRD) The disorders ... of the Zellweger spectrum: Zellweger syndrome (ZS), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and infantile Refsum disease (IRD). While these ...

  10. Photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli by natural sphalerite suspension: effect of spectrum, wavelength and intensity of visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmin; Lu, Anhuai; Li, Yan; Yip, Ho Yin; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Jin, Peng; Wong, Po-Keung

    2011-08-01

    The photocatalytic disinfection of Escherichia coli K-12 is investigated by the natural sphalerite (NS) under different spectra, wavelengths and intensities of visible light (VL) emitted by light-emitting-diode lamp (LED). The spectrum effect of VL on disinfection efficiency is studied by using white LED, fluorescent tube (FT) and xenon lamp (XE), which indicates that the "discreted peak spectrum" of FT is more effective to inactivate bacteria than "continuous spectrum" of LED and XE. Besides, the photocatalytic disinfection of bacteria is compared under different single spectrum (blue, green, yellow and red color) LEDs. The results show that the most effective wavelength ranges of VL for photocatalytic disinfection with the NS are 440-490 and 570-620 nm. Furthermore, a positive relationship is obtained between the disinfection efficiency and the VL intensity. The experiment shows that NS can completely inactivate 10(7)cfu mL(-1)E. coli K-12 within 8h irradiation by white LED with the intensity of 200 mW cm(-2) at pH 8. Moreover, the destruction process of the cell wall and the cell membrane are directly observed by TEM. Finally, no bacterial colony can be detected within a 96 h regrowth test of inactivated bacteria, which reveals that the VL-photocatalytic disinfection leads to an irreversible damage to the bacterial cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Staff training effective in increasing learning opportunities for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Bibi; Reijers, Hilde; Didden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of instruction and video feedback on staff's ABA skills during one-to-one play situations and initiations of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were collected within a multiple baseline design across 5 dyads. A continuous 20 s interval recording system was used to record motivation, creating opportunities, prompting and reinforcement of staff and child initiations. Training included instruction, consisting of instructions, video examples and role-plays. After this, a 4-h delayed video feedback condition started. Three staff members created significantly more learning opportunities during post-instruction and a significant increase occurred during video feedback for one staff member. Initiatives increased significantly in two children during post-instruction. During follow-up, three children showed unprompted initiatives. The mean percentage of spontaneous initiations increased during follow-up. The findings provide support for training staff in a clinical setting to create learning opportunities, which also may result in concomittant improvement in child initiations.

  12. An Effective Strategy to Build Up a Balanced Test Suite for Spectrum-Based Fault Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During past decades, many automated software faults diagnosis techniques including Spectrum-Based Fault Localization (SBFL have been proposed to improve the efficiency of software debugging activity. In the field of SBFL, suspiciousness calculation is closely related to the number of failed and passed test cases. Studies have shown that the ratio of the number of failed and passed test case has more significant impact on the accuracy of SBFL than the total number of test cases, and a balanced test suite is more beneficial to improving the accuracy of SBFL. Based on theoretical analysis, we proposed an PNF (Passed test cases, Not execute Faulty statement strategy to reduce test suite and build up a more balanced one for SBFL, which can be used in regression testing. We evaluated the strategy making experiments using the Siemens program and Space program. Experiments indicated that our PNF strategy can be used to construct a new test suite effectively. Compared with the original test suite, the new one has smaller size (average 90% test case was reduced in experiments and more balanced ratio of failed test cases to passed test cases, while it has the same statement coverage and fault localization accuracy.

  13. Video Game Playing Effects on Obesity in an Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy E. Strahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent obesity has tripled in the past two decades, and adolescents with disabilities, specifically autism spectrum disorders (ASD, may be at greater risk for obesity due to the behavioral, physical, and psychosocial complications related to their disorder. This case study reports the effects of video game playing on an obese adolescent with ASD and illustrates the use of a multiple baseline single subject design. Over 12 weeks, the participant played inactive (6 weeks and active video games (6 weeks on the Wii console. Physiological data were evaluated weekly at home. Stress and anxiety were measured via the Stress Survey Schedule for Individuals with Autism and Other Pervasive Non-Developmental Disorders (SSS and the Behavior Assessment System for Children Second Edition (BASC-2 pre- and postintervention. The Therapy Attitude Inventory (TAI was used to determine parental perception of video game playing as a socially valid intervention to reduce stress and anxiety. Results demonstrated that active video game playing slowed and/or reduced weight and BMI with minimal changes to waist-to-hip ratios, triceps skinfolds, and stress and anxiety. This study demonstrates how alternative methods for physical activity may be used to improve health outcomes of overweight/obese adolescents with ASD and suggests directions for future research.

  14. Indicated Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in South Africa: Effectiveness of Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marlene M; Joubert, Belinda; Cloete, Marise; Roux, Sumien; Baca, Beth A; Hasken, Julie M; Barnard, Ronel; Buckley, David; Kalberg, Wendy O; Snell, Cudore L; Marais, Anna-Susan; Seedat, Soraya; Parry, Charles D H; May, Philip A

    2015-12-23

    In the Western Cape Province of South Africa (ZA) a subculture of binge drinking produces the highest global documented prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD prevention research activities in ZA use the Comprehensive Prevention approach from the United States Institute of Medicine. Case management (CM) was delivered as a method of indicated prevention to empower heavy drinking pregnant women to achieve cessation or a reduction in drinking. CM activities incorporated life management, Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques and the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA). Data were collected at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Mean drinking decreases 6 months into CM; but overall alcohol consumption rose significantly over time to levels higher than baseline at 12 and 18 months. Alcohol consumption drops significantly from before pregnancy to the second and third trimesters. AUDIT scores indicate that problematic drinking decreases significantly even after the vulnerable fetus/baby was born. CM significantly increases client happiness, which correlates with reduced weekend drinking. CM was successful for women with high-risk drinking behaviour, and was effective in helping women stop drinking, or drink less, while pregnant, reducing the risk of FASD.

  15. The Effect on Stellarator Neoclassical Transport of a Fluctuating Electrostatic Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.E. Mynick; A.H. Boozer

    2004-11-23

    We study the effect on neoclassical transport of applying a fluctuating electrostatic spectrum, such as produced either by plasma turbulence, or imposed externally. For tokamaks, it is usually assumed that the neoclassical and ''anomalous'' contributions to the transport roughly superpose, D = D{sub nc} + D{sub an}, an intuition also used in modeling stellarators. An alternate intuition, however, is one where it is the collisional and anomalous scattering frequencies which superpose, {nu}{sub ef} = {nu} + {nu}{sub an}. For nonaxisymmetric systems, in regimes where {partial_derivative}D/{partial_derivative}{nu} < 0, this ''{nu}{sub ef} picture'' implies that turning on the fluctuations can decrease the total radial transport. Using numerical and analytic means, it is found that the total transport has contributions conforming to each of these intuitions, either of which can dominate. In particular, for stellarators, the {nu}{sub ef} picture is often valid, producing transport behavior differing from tokamaks.

  16. The Effects of Accretion Disk Thickness on the Black Hole Reflection Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Corbin; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2018-01-01

    Despite being the gravitational engines that power galactic-scale winds and mega parsec-scale jets in active galaxies, black holes are remarkably simple objects, typically being fully described by their angular momenta (spin) and masses. The modelling of AGN X-ray reflection spectra has proven fruitful in estimating the spin of AGN, as well as giving insight into their accretion histories and into the properties of plasmas in the strong gravity regime. However, current models make simplifying assumptions about the geometry of the reflecting material in the accretion disk and the irradiating X-ray corona, approximating the disk as an optically thick, infinitely thin disk of material in the orbital plane. We present results from the new relativistic raytracing suite, Fenrir, that explore the effects that disk thickness may have on the reflection spectrum and the accompanying reverberation signatures. Approximating the accretion disk as an optically thick, geometrically thin, radiation pressure dominated disk (Shakura & Sunyaev 1973), one finds that the disk geometry is non-negligible in many cases, with significant changes in the broad Fe K line profile. Finally, we explore the systematic errors inherent in other contemporary models that approximate that disk as having negligible vertical extent.

  17. The Effect of Music on Exercise Intensity among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley C. Woodman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD are at risk for obesity, commonly have sleep disorders, and exhibit stereotypic behaviors that disrupt their learning. Vigorous levels of exercise have been shown to ameliorate these issues in children with ASD, but little research exists to provide techniques for motivating children with ASD to engage in exercise. The present study examined the effect of music on exercise intensity in a group of 13 elementary school students with ASD. Data were collected across six days during structured (e.g., verbal and physical prompts and unstructured (e.g., minimal prompting exercise periods. During these exercise periods, three music conditions were randomized: no music, slow-tempo music, and fast-tempo music. Exercise intensity, measured in Metabolic Equivalent of Tasks by triaxial accelerometers, was greatest during the structured exercise periods and during the slow music condition. Student characteristics moderated the impact of music condition on exercise intensity, such that students with high levels of adaptive behavior or lower levels of maladaptive behavior displayed greater exercise intensity during the fast music condition.

  18. The effect of sung speech on socio-communicative responsiveness in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkoprovo ePaul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence to demonstrate the efficacy of music based interventions for improving social functioning in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. While this evidence lends some support in favour of using song over spoken directives in facilitating engagement and receptive intervention in ASD, there has been little research that has investigated the efficacy of such stimuli on socio-communicative responsiveness measures. Here, we present preliminary results from a pilot study which tested whether sung instruction, as compared to spoken directives, could elicit greater number of socio-communicative behaviours in young children with ASD. Using an adapted single-subject design, three children between the ages of 3 and 4 years, participated in a programme consisting of 18 sessions, of which 9 were delivered with spoken directives and 9 with sung. Sessions were counterbalanced and randomized for three play activities - block matching, picture matching and clay play. All sessions were video-recorded for post-hoc observational coding of three behavioural metrics which included performance, frequency of social gesture and eye contact. Analysis of the videos by two independent raters indicated increased socio-communicative responsiveness in terms of frequency of social gesture as well as eye contact during sung compared to spoken conditions across all participants. Our findings suggest that sung directives may play a useful role in engaging children with ASD and also serve as an effective interventional medium to enhance socio-communicative responsiveness.

  19. Indicated Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in South Africa: Effectiveness of Case Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene M. de Vries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Western Cape Province of South Africa (ZA a subculture of binge drinking produces the highest global documented prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. FASD prevention research activities in ZA use the Comprehensive Prevention approach from the United States Institute of Medicine. Case management (CM was delivered as a method of indicated prevention to empower heavy drinking pregnant women to achieve cessation or a reduction in drinking. CM activities incorporated life management, Motivational Interviewing (MI techniques and the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA. Data were collected at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Mean drinking decreases 6 months into CM; but overall alcohol consumption rose significantly over time to levels higher than baseline at 12 and 18 months. Alcohol consumption drops significantly from before pregnancy to the second and third trimesters. AUDIT scores indicate that problematic drinking decreases significantly even after the vulnerable fetus/baby was born. CM significantly increases client happiness, which correlates with reduced weekend drinking. CM was successful for women with high-risk drinking behaviour, and was effective in helping women stop drinking, or drink less, while pregnant, reducing the risk of FASD.

  20. Effects of categorical representation on visuospatial working memory in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Joana C; Souza, Cristiane; Gonçalves, Filipe; Pinho, Sandra; Filipe, Carlos N; Lachmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We tested whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in visuospatial working memory or in the use of the semantic system, in particular in categorization processes at the service of working memory. The performance of high-functioning individuals with ASD (N = 21) in a visual same-different task adapted from Lachmann and van Leeuwen [e.g., Lachmann, T., & van Leeuwen, C. (2010). Representational economy, not processing speed, determines preferred processing strategy of visual patterns. Acta Psychologica, 134(3), 290-298] was compared to those of typically developed controls (N = 25). In a categorical identity task, two successive patterns had to be judged as the same if they belonged to the same equivalence set (cf. Garner, W. R., & Clement, D. E. (1963). Goodness of pattern and pattern uncertainty. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 2, 446-452), including all possible rotation and reflection transformations (R&R category), and as different otherwise. In a physical identity task, only patterns that matched in both shape and orientation had to be responded to as the same; all others, including category matches, had to be classified as different. Equivalence sets had different sizes (ESS). Earlier studies showed an increase in reaction time (RT) with increasing ESS and, for the physical identity task, a response conflict for category matching. Both of these effects were interpreted as evidence for a categorical code by which individual patterns are mentally represented. Assuming that categorization processes are deficient in individuals with ASD, we expected no ESS effects and, in the physical identity task, absence of a response conflict for these individuals. In contrast, we found individuals with ASD to be generally as sensitive to ESS as controls, and they showed a response conflict in the physical identity task. Thus, categorical processing seems to be intact in ASD. However, a strong overall group effect was found in RTs

  1. Effect of high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy on spectrum of hexagonal ferrite films: static and dynamic problems

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryeva, N.; Sultanov, R.; Polishuk, E.; Kalinikos, B.

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of the relation between the form of the hybrid electromagnetic-spin-wave spectrum of the hexaferrite film and the mutual orientation of the anisotropy axis and the external bias magnetic field is presented. The investigation covers the solution of both static and dynamic problems. The obtained spectrum of hybrid electromagnetic-spin waves shows a strong dependence on the mutual orientation of the anisotropy axis and the external bias magnetic field. For several spec...

  2. Automatic control algorithm effects on energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnerney, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model was developed using actual wind time series and turbine performance data to simulate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model was used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long term energy production. The results from local site and turbine characteristics were generalized to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  3. On the Effective Equation of State of Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2010-01-01

    In an effective field theory model with an ultraviolet momentum cutoff, there is a relation between the effective equation of state of dark energy and the ultraviolet cutoff scale. It implies that a measure of the equation of state of dark energy different from minus one, does not rule out vacuum...... energy as dark energy. It also indicates an interesting possibility that precise measurements of the infrared properties of dark energy can be used to probe the ultraviolet cutoff scale of effective quantum field theory coupled to gravity. In a toy model with a vacuum energy dominated universe...... with a Planck scale cutoff, the dark energy effective equation of state is -0.96....

  4. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  5. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  6. Investigation of energy spectrum and nuclear interactions of primary cosmic radiation; Badanie widma energetycznego i oddzialywan jadrowych pierwotnego promieniowania kosmicznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczynski, H. [Dept. of High Energy Physics, The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In the paper the JACEE experiment data analysis: energy spectra in the energy range 10{sup 12} - 10{sup 15} eV of different nuclides in cosmic radiation and some aspects of nuclear interactions at energy above 10{sup 12} eV/nucleon is presented. The data were compared with results of theory of cosmic radiation acceleration by striking waves arises from supernova stars explosions. In the interactions of cosmic radiation nuclei the short-lived particles production has been observed what agrees with long-distance component of cascades initiated by cosmic radiation interactions. In one case an interaction with asymmetric photons emission were observed 72 refs, 33 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. simulation based analysis on the effects of orientation on energy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    ABSTRACT. Since the energy crisis in 2007, energy performance of buildings is gradually becoming an issue in Ghana. The authors of this paper used simulation as a tool to analyse three conventional resi- dential building types, in order to see the effects of orientation on energy performance, specifi- cally on cooling loads.

  9. Simulation Based Analysis On The Effects Of Orientation On Energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the energy crisis in 2007, energy performance of buildings is gradually becoming an issue in Ghana. The authors of this paper used simulation as a tool to analyse three conventional resi-dential building types, in order to see the effects of orientation on energy performance, specifi-cally on cooling loads. The three ...

  10. Steric effect studies on solar energy storage of norbornadiene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this research is to determine the possible solar energy storage in the norbornadiene (1) / quadricyclane (2) system, through involving steric effects on various position of carbon C1, C2 or C7 for 1 and 2; calculating the corresponding energies at B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The extent of the solar energy ...

  11. Dynamic droop scheme considering effect of intermittent renewable energy source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanbo; Chen, Zhe; Deng, Fujin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic droop control scheme for islanded microgrids dominated by intermittent renewable energy sources, which is able to perform desirable power sharing in the presence of renewable energy source fluctuation. First, allowable maximum power points of wind generator and PV...... flexibility and effectiveness in the presence of the renewable energy sources fluctuation....

  12. Actual energy consumption in dwellings. The effect of energy performance regulations and occupant behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra Santin, O.

    2010-10-19

    Residential buildings have continuously improved in energy efficiency, partly as a consequence of the introduction of energy regulations in many countries. Although better thermal properties and systems efficiency have lowered energy consumption for space heating in recent decades, substantial differences in energy consumption in similar dwellings are still being observed. These differences in consumption are thought to be caused by differences in occupancy patterns, by quality of construction and by rebound effects. This research addresses the effect of energy performance regulations and occupant behavior on energy consumption for space and water heating in dwellings built after the introduction of the energy performance regulations in the Netherlands. The results of this research show that improving the energy efficiency of buildings alone is not enough to decrease that energy consumption. The large differences found in the use of dwellings indicate that, especially in energy efficient houses, occupant behavior provides an opportunity for further reductions in the energy consumption for space heating which could boost the efforts to conserve energy worldwide.

  13. A Bayesian Model of the Uncanny Valley Effect for Explaining the Effects of Therapeutic Robots in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    One of the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is impaired reciprocal social interaction, especially in processing emotional information. Social robots are used to encourage children with ASD to take the initiative and to interact with the robotic tools to stimulate emotional responses. However, the existing evidence is limited by poor trial designs. The purpose of this study was to provide computational evidence in support of robot-assisted therapy for children with ASD. We thus propose an emotional model of ASD that adapts a Bayesian model of the uncanny valley effect, which holds that a human-looking robot can provoke repulsion and sensations of eeriness. Based on the unique emotional responses of children with ASD to the robots, we postulate that ASD induces a unique emotional response curve, more like a cliff than a valley. Thus, we performed numerical simulations of robot-assisted therapy to evaluate its effects. The results showed that, although a stimulus fell into the uncanny valley in the typical condition, it was effective at avoiding the uncanny cliff in the ASD condition. Consequently, individuals with ASD may find it more comfortable, and may modify their emotional response, if the robots look like deformed humans, even if they appear "creepy" to typical individuals. Therefore, we suggest that our model explains the effects of robot-assisted therapy in children with ASD and that human-looking robots may have potential advantages for improving social interactions in ASD.

  14. Measurement of continuum spectrum from {sup 12}C(p,p`x) at energy of 392 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Konishi, Daisuke; Uozumi, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Sakae, Takeji; Matoba, Masaru [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Nohtomi, Akihiro; Maki, Takashi; Koori, Norihiko

    1998-03-01

    Continuum spectra from {sup 12}C(p,p`x) reaction at 392 MeV were measured by using plastic and GSO(Ce) scintillators. The spectra of energy-angle double differential cross sections are compared with that of Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) simulation. Significant differences were found in the results at the forward angles. (author)

  15. Energy situation and renewables in Turkey and environmental effects of energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, Adem; Koemuercue, Murat Ihsan; Kankal, Murat [Civil Engineering Department, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Oezoelcer, Ismail Hakki [Civil Engineering Department, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Kaygusuz, Kamil [Department of Chemistry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-10-15

    The effects on global and environmental air quality of pollutants released into the atmosphere from fossil fuels in power plants provide strong arguments for the development of renewable energy resources. Clean, domestic and renewable energy is commonly accepted as the key for future life, not only for Turkey but also for the world. In this regard, the objective of this paper is to present a review of the energy situation, technical and economical potential and utilization of renewables, including hydraulic energy, biomass energy, solar energy, wind energy and geothermal energy, in Turkey and then concerned with greenhouse gas emissions status, especially in air pollution, and environmental impacts of renewable energy sources. The renewable energy potential of the country, their present utilization, and greenhouse gas emissions status are evaluated based on the available data. The present paper shows that there is an important potential for renewables in Turkey and making use of renewable energy and energy efficiency resources to provide energy services to the electricity consumers can provide significant environmental benefits for Turkey. (author)

  16. Phase-shift effect of amplitude spread function on spectrum and image formation in coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which includes coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microspectroscopy, permits label-free hyperspectral imaging. We report the theoretical study of the phase-shift effect of the impulse response function on the spectral and image-forming properties of coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy. We show that the spectrum and image are influenced by not only the NA of objective for excitation (NA(ex)) but also that for signal collection (NA(col)), in association with the phase-shift effect. We discuss that, under the condition NA(ex)≠NA(col), both the spectrum and the image become deformed by the phase-shift effect, which can be applied to the direct measurement of the imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility in CARS spectroscopy. We point out that, even in SRS microscopy, the nonresonant background can contribute to the image formation and cause the artifact in the image.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin Percy Prema Leela, J.; Hemamalini, R.; Muthu, S.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-07-01

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  18. Measurement of the $^{8}B$ neutrino spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, W; Jiang, C L; Ahmad, I; Freedman, S J; Greene, J; Heinz, A; Henderson, D; Janssens, R V F; Moore, E F; Mukherjee, G; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Pennington, T; Savard, G; Schiffer, J P; Seweryniak, D; Zinkann, G P; 10.1016/S0375-9474(03)01122-9

    2003-01-01

    The neutrino spectrum from the decay of /sup 8/B is a crucial ingredient in interpreting recent data from solar neutrino detectors. The beta /sup +/ decay of /sup 8/B proceeds to a broad state in /sup 8/Be, and the shape of the neutrino spectrum may be obtained from a measurement of the alpha spectrum following the beta /sup +/ decay. A new technique has been used at the ATLAS accelerator to measure this spectrum by implanting /sup 8/B particles into the midplane of a 91 mu m thick Si detector. The advantage of this method is that both alpha particles are detected and systematic effects due to energy loss in catcher foils and dead layers of the detector are eliminated. To calibrate the detector, alpha 's from the decay of /sup 20/Na ions produced and implanted with the same technique were used. (5 refs).

  19. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carri...

  20. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents.

  1. Discourse comprehension in autism spectrum disorder: Effects of working memory load and common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Jillian M; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Mirman, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Pragmatic language impairments are nearly universal in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Discourse requires that we monitor information that is shared or mutually known, called "common ground." While many studies have examined the role of Theory of Mind (ToM) in such impairments, few have examined working memory (WM). Common ground impairments in ASD could reflect limitations in both WM and ToM. This study explored common ground use in youth ages 8-17 years with high-functioning ASD (n = 13) and typical development (n = 22); groups did not differ on age, gender, IQ, or standardized language. We tracked participants' eye movements while they performed a discourse task in which some information was known only to the participant (e.g., was privileged; a manipulation of ToM). In addition, the amount of privileged information varied (a manipulation of WM). All participants were slower to fixate the target when considering privileged information, and this effect was greatest during high WM load trials. Further, the ASD group was more likely to fixate competing (non-target) shapes. Predictors of fixation patterns included ASD symptomatology, language ability, ToM, and WM. Groups did not differ in ToM. Individuals with better WM fixated the target more rapidly, suggesting an association between WM capacity and efficient discourse. In addition to ToM knowledge, WM capacity constrains common ground representation and impacts pragmatic skills in ASD. Social impairments in ASD are thus associated with WM capacity, such that deficits in domain-general, nonsocial processes such as WM exert an influence during complex social interactions. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1340-1352. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. C P violation effects in the diphoton spectrum of heavy scalars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Ligong; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Yongchao

    2017-11-01

    In a class of new physics models, an extended Higgs sector and new C P -violating sources are simultaneously present in order to explain the baryon asymmetry in the Universe. The aim of this work is to study the implications of beyond the Standard Model (SM) C P violation for the searches of heavy scalars at the LHC. In particular, we focus on the diphoton channel searches in the C P -violating two-Higgs-doublet model (CPV 2HDM). To have a sizable CPV in the scalar sector, the two heavy neutral scalars in 2HDM tend to be nearly degenerate. The theoretical constraints of unitarity, perturbativity and vacuum stability are considered, which requires that the heavy scalars MH≲1 TeV in a large region of the parameter space. The experimental limits are also taken into account, including the direct searches for heavy neutral scalars in the final state of the SM h , W and Z bosons; the differential t t ¯ data; those from the charged scalar sector which is implied by the oblique T parameter; and the precise measurements of the electric dipole moments of electrons and mercury. The quantum interference effects between the resonances and the SM background are crucially important for the diphoton signals, and the CPV mixing of the quasidegenerate heavy scalars could enhance significantly the resonance peak. With an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 at the LHC, almost the whole parameter space of CPV 2HDM could be probed in the diphoton channel, and the CPV could also be directly detected via the diphoton spectrum.

  3. China’s Energy Intensity, Determinants and Spatial Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the shadow of the energy crisis and environmental degradation, energy intensity is a hot topic in academic circles in China. The energy intensity distribution map of China indicates the fairly large geographic disparities globally and clustering locally in some areas, ascending from the southeast regions to the northwest provinces. Although energy intensity and its determinants vary from place to place, few studies have been made from the spatial perspective. Determinates of energy intensity and spatial spillover effects should be taken into consideration. Controlling for seven exogenous variables (per capita GDP; the share of the secondary sector; foreign direct investment; international trade, energy price, the share of coal, and transport sector and their spatial lags, we apply a spatial Durbin model to test for spatial spillover effects among energy intensity and exogenous variables from a panel of 29 Chinese provinces over 1998 to 2014. We find that per capita GDP has an insignificant and negative direct and indirect effect, but has a significant and negative total effect on energy intensity. The share of the secondary sector and the share of coal are found to have significant and positive direct and indirect effects on energy intensity. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI and Trade have significant and negative direct and indirect effects on energy intensity. The direct effect of energy price is found to be significantly positive while the indirect effect is negative. Only the direct effect of the Transport variable is significant and positive. The results of this study offer some theoretical evidence for differential localized policy making related to reduction in energy intensity.

  4. Assessing the effectiveness of policies to support renewable energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close to 80% of the world’s energy supply could be generated through renewables by mid-century with the right enabling public policies. Policies can play a fundamental role in promoting a sustainable energy-mix and it is key to measure their effectiveness in the medium and long run. What...... is the most effective way to measure and monitor this effectiveness? What can we learn from Brazil, one of the first emerging countries to refocus its national energy strategies toward renewable energy? And from South Africa, which committed to develop 42% of additional capacity in renewable by 2030......? These are some of the questions addressed in the report commissioned by UNEP DTIE: Assessing the effectiveness of policies to support renewable energy. The report demonstrates the importance of monitoring policy effectiveness by using the Policy Effectiveness Indicator (PEI) approach.i While there is no one...

  5. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A): study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months). In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session frequency for therapy

  6. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretsegger Monika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months. In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity or three sessions (high-intensity per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session

  7. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-05

    Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months). In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session frequency for therapy outcome. Current Controlled Trials

  8. Effect of moisture content on energy of comminution of soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result by experimental method shows that the effective energy of comminution was found to increase from 12.7-35.7x10-3 k w.h as the moisture content increased from 4-9% w.b. A significant linear relationship (P<0.05) does exist between the moisture levels and effective energy of comminution. The estimated energy ...

  9. "We Dance and Find Each Other"1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Malin K; Koch, Sabine C; Fuchs, Thomas

    2016-11-10

    The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder. Although the observed effects failed to reach significance at the conventional 0.05 threshold, possibly due to an undersized sample, an encouraging trend towards stronger symptom reduction in the treatment group for overall negative symptoms and for almost all subtypes was found at the 0.10-level. Effect sizes were small but clinically meaningful, and the resulting patterns were in accordance with theoretical expectations. The study at hand contributes to finding an effective treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder in accordance with the notion of embodiment.

  10. Effect of external energy on atomic, crystalline and powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Next to atoms and molecules the powders are the smallest state of matter available in high purities and large quantities. The effect of any external energy on the shape, morphology and structure can thus be studied with relative ease. The present investigation deals with the effect of a non-contact external energy on the ...

  11. Effect of external energy on atomic, crystalline and powder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Next to atoms and molecules the powders are the smallest state of matter available in high purities and large quantities. The effect of any external energy on the shape, morphology and structure can thus be studied with relative ease. The present investigation deals with the effect of a non-contact external energy ...

  12. Halo Pressure Profile through the Skew Cross-power Spectrum of the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect and CMB Lensing in Planck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmons, Nicholas; Cooray, Asantha; Feng, Chang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    We measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) skewness power spectrum in Planck , using frequency maps of the HFI instrument and the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) component map. The two-to-one skewness power spectrum measures the cross-correlation between CMB lensing and the thermal SZ effect. We also directly measure the same cross-correlation using the Planck CMB lensing map and the SZ map and compare it to the cross-correlation derived from the skewness power spectrum. We model fit the SZ power spectrum and CMB lensing–SZ cross-power spectrum via the skewness power spectrum to constrain the gas pressure profile of dark matter halos. The gas pressure profile is compared to existing measurements in the literature including a direct estimate based on the stacking of SZ clusters in Planck .

  13. Music, Technology and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Effectiveness of the Touch Screen Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ashleigh; Greher, Gena; Queenan, Alexa; Marshall, Savannah; Kopec, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The use of technology in music education is gaining momentum, although very little work has focused on students with disabilities. Our "SoundScape" programme addressed this gap through implementing a technology-based music programme for adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Programme participants met on a…

  14. Stress for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effects of Age, Gender, and Intelligence Quotient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kristen Louise

    2009-01-01

    Researchers previously have found that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience higher levels of stress and anxiety than individuals who are typically developing and than those with other disabilities. The purpose of this study was to identify the nature and degree of stress reported for individuals with ASD, with particular…

  15. An Effective Neurofeedback Intervention to Improve Social Interactions in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Elisabeth V. C.; Sivanathan, Aparajithan; Lim, Theodore; Suttie, Neil; Louchart, Sandy; Pillen, Steven; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback training (NFT) approaches were investigated to improve behavior, cognition and emotion regulation in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Thirteen children with ASD completed pre-/post-assessments and 16 NFT-sessions. The NFT was based on a game that encouraged social interactions and provided feedback based on imitation and…

  16. The Effect of Parenting Behaviors on Subsequent Child Behavior Problems in Autistic Spectrum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lisa A.; McHugh, Louise; Saunders, Jo; Reed, Phil

    2008-01-01

    The current research explored the relationship between parenting behaviors in parents of children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC) and subsequent child behavior problems. The sample consisted of 72 children (aged 5-16 years) and their parents, who were assessed over a period of 9-10 months. There was a relationship between parenting…

  17. Effectiveness of Instructional Strategies in Reading Comprehension for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Hyperlexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnett, Jenelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) commonly show deficits in social and communication skills, as well as in interpreting metaphorical meaning of language. These deficits often make reading comprehension more difficult for students with ASD. Past research has primarily focused on decoding rather than on comprehension skill interventions;…

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of Two Sight-Word Reading Interventions for a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulé, Christina M.; Volpe, Robert J.; Fefer, Sarah; Leslie, Laurel K.; Luiselli, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Traditional drill and practice (TDP) and incremental rehearsal (IR) are flashcard drill techniques for teaching sight words to students. Although both have extensive research support, no study to date has compared these methods with children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Utilizing an adaptive alternating treatments design, the present…

  19. Individual differences in executive functions, training effects & quality of life of children with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) appear to experience executive functioning (EF) problems, but there are large individual differences in EF-profiles in ASD. In the current study the majority of children with ASD (8-12 years) actually experienced no cognitive flexibility deficits.

  20. Social Anxiety Mediates the Effect of Autism Spectrum Disorder Characteristics on Hostility in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan Williams; Kreiser, Nicole L.; Pugliese, Cara; Scarpa, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Problems with social anxiety are frequently reported in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is possible that social anxiety, when present, exacerbates the experience of hostility and other forms of aggression in relation to ASD symptoms. This study sought to determine if social anxiety symptoms mediate the relationship between features…

  1. Effects of physical exercise on Autism Spectrum Disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sowa, M.; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally agreed that regular physical exercise promotes physical and mental health, but what are the benefits in people with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? This meta-analysis evaluates 16 behavioural studies reporting on a total of 133 children and adults with various variants of the

  2. The Effect of Inversion on Face Recognition in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Face identity recognition has widely been shown to be impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study we examined the influence of inversion on face recognition in 26 adults with ASD and 33 age and IQ matched controls. Participants completed a recognition test comprising upright and inverted faces. Participants with ASD…

  3. Five Steps for Developing Effective Transition Plans for High School Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szidon, Katherine; Ruppar, Andrea; Smith, Leann

    2015-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; 2006) requires schools to develop transition plans for students with disabilities, beginning at age 16, if not before. For students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the transition planning process includes unique considerations. This article describes five steps for developing effective…

  4. TH-A-19A-07: The Effect of Particle Tracking Step Size Limit On Monte Carlo- Computed LET Spectrum of Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, F; Bronk, L; Kerr, M; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mirkovic, D; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of charged particle tracking step size limit in the determination of the LET spectrum of therapeutic proton beams using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The LET spectra at different depths in a water phantom from a 79.7 MeV spot-scanning proton beam were calculated using Geant4. Five different tracking step limits 0.5 mm, 0.1 mm, 0.05 mm, 0.01 mm and 1 μm were adopted. The field size was set to 10×10 cm{sup 2} on the isocenter plane. A 40×40×6 cm{sup 3} water phantom was modelled as the irradiation target. The voxel size was set to 1×1×0.5 mm{sup 3} to obtain high resolution results. The LET spectra were scored ranging from 0.01 keV/μm to 10{sup 4}keV/μm in the logarithm scale. In addition, the proton energy spectra at different depths were also scored. Results: The LET spectra calculated using different step size limits were compared at four depths along the Bragg curve. At any depths, the spread of the LET spectra increases with the decrease of step size limit. In the dose buildup region (z = 1.9 cm) and in the region proximal to the Bragg peak (z = 3.95 cm), the frequency mean LET does not vary with decreasing step size limit. At Bragg peak (z = 4.75 cm) and in the distal edge (z = 4.85 cm), frequency mean LET decreases with decreasing step size limit. The energy spectrum at any specified depths does not vary with the step size limit. Conclusion: The calculated LET has a spectral distribution rather than a single value at any depths along the Bragg curve and the spread of the computed spectrum depends on the tracking step limit. Incorporating the LET spectrum distribution into the robust IMPT optimization plan may provide more accurate biological dose distribution than using the dose- or fluence-averaged LET. NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.

  5. An evaluation of the effects of intensity and duration on outcomes across treatment domains for children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Linstead, E; Dixon, D.R.; Hong, E; Burns, C O; French, R.; Novack, M N; Granpeesheh, D

    2017-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is considered an effective treatment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and many researchers have further investigated factors associated with treatment outcomes. However, few studies have focused on whether treatment intensity and duration have differential influences on separate skills. The aim of the current study was to investigate how treatment intensity and duration impact learning across different treatment domains, including academic, ...

  6. The effect of the video game Mindlight on anxiety symptoms in children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnhoven, Lieke A. M. W.; Creemers, Daan H. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Granic, Isabela

    2015-01-01

    Background In the clinical setting, a large proportion of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience anxiety symptoms. Because anxiety is an important cause of impairment for children with an ASD, it is necessary that effective anxiety interventions are implemented for these children. Recently, a serious game called Mindlight has been developed that is focused on decreasing anxiety in children. This approach is based on recent research suggesting that video games might be suit...

  7. Study protocol: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Kirsten; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Tick, Nouchka Tamar; Verhulst, Frank; Maras, Athanasios; Vegt, de, F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research shows that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) run several risks in their psychosexual development and that these adolescents can have limited access to reliable information on puberty and sexuality, emphasizing the need for specific guidance of adolescents with ASD in their psychosexual development. Few studies have investigated the effects of psychosexual training programs for adolescents with ASD and to date no randomized controlled trials are avai...

  8. Dark energy as a kinematic effect

    CERN Document Server

    Jennen, H

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalization of teleparallel gravity that is consistent with local spacetime kinematics regulated by the de Sitter group $SO(1,4)$. The mathematical structure of teleparallel gravity is shown to be given by a nonlinear Riemann--Cartan geometry without curvature, which inspires us to build the generalization on top of a de Sitter--Cartan geometry with a cosmological function. The cosmological function is given its own dynamics and naturally emerges nonminimally coupled to the gravitational field in a manner akin to teleparallel dark energy models or scalar-tensor theories in general relativity. New in the theory here presented, the cosmological function gives rise to a kinematic contribution in the deviation equation for the world lines of adjacent free-falling particles. While having its own dynamics, dark energy manifests itself in the local kinematics of spacetime.

  9. Cosmological dark energy effects from entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozziello, Salvatore, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Napoli, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Luongo, Orlando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Napoli, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México (UNAM) (Mexico); Mancini, Stefano [Scuola di Scienze and Tecnologie, Università di Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-06-03

    The thorny issue of relating information theory to cosmology is here addressed by assuming a possible connection between quantum entanglement measures and observable universe. In particular, we propose a cosmological toy model, where the equation of state of the cosmological fluid, which drives the today observed cosmic acceleration, can be inferred from quantum entanglement between different cosmological epochs. In such a way the dynamical dark energy results as byproduct of quantum entanglement.

  10. The effectiveness of energy management system on energy efficiency in the building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julaihi, F.; Ibrahim, S. H.; Baharun, A.; Affendi, R.; Nawi, M. N. M.

    2017-10-01

    Energy plays a key role in achieving the desired economic growth for the country. Worldwide industries use 40 percent energy for material and consumption protection to fulfil human needs which contributes almost 37 percent of global greenhouse gases emissions. One of the approach in order to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases to the environment is by conserving energy. This could be executed by implementing energy management especially in commercial and office buildings as daily electricity consumption is high in this type of building. Energy management can also increase the efficiency of energy in the building. Study has been conducted to investigate the performance on implementation of energy management system in office building. Energy management is one of the contemporary challenges, thus study adopts an exploratory approach by using a tool developed by UNIDO called EnMS or Energy Management System. Findings show that by implementing energy management can reduce electricity consumption up to 30%. However, serious initiatives by the organization are needed to promote the effectiveness of energy management.

  11. Biological effects of high-energy neutrons measured in vivo using a vertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Wendy W; Gersey, Brad B; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S

    2009-10-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0-0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0-15 Gy of reference gamma radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference gamma radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6-40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0-66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure.

  12. LEDs light spectrum effect on the success of fragmentation and growth of the leather coral Sarcophyton spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Chambel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for soft corals is reflected on the high attention of the scientific community during the last decades, with several studies focus on production techniques and optimization of coral husbandry (Schlacher et al., 2007;Sella and Benayahu, 2010. However, coral culture success is influenced by the interaction of different factors, such as water movement, temperature, nutrients, heterotrophic feeding and light conditions (Rocha et al., 2013a. Light plays a key role in the growth, reproduction and physiology of scleractinian corals that host phototrophic symbionts and it has been found that the photoresponse of corals is species-specific. Several studies have already focused on the effects of irradiance on coral and its algal symbionts (Osinga et al., 2011. Although, only a few works have investigated the role of the spectral quality of light on coral photobiology, physiology and growth (Rocha et al., 2013b. In the present study, we hypothesize that light spectrum can influence the growth performance of scleractinian corals when exposed at identical intensities of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR. To test our hypothesis we evaluated the effect of contrasting light spectra with an identical PAR of 70 ± 10 μmol quantam−2.s−1emitted by T8 fluorescent lamps (used as a control treatment and three different colours of Light Emitting Diode (LED, white, blue and red. It was evaluated survival and growth rates of Sarcophyton spp., an important scleractinian coral in the marine aquarium trade and for the bioprospecting of marine natural compounds. Replicated coral fragments were obtained from two mother colonies and were exposed to the four types of light spectrum for a period of 30 days. At the end of the experiment period, the results showed 100% of survival in coral fragments, and specific growth rate (SGR of 0,055 ± 0,09 %/day in control group and 0,091 ± 0,019 %/day, 0,210 ± 0,031 %/day and 0,380 ± 0,245 %/day in

  13. Performance outcomes and unwanted side effects associated with energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Pallarés, Jesús G

    2014-10-01

    Energy drinks are increasingly popular among athletes and others. Advertising for these products typically features images conjuring great muscle power and endurance; however, the scientific literature provides sparse evidence for an ergogenic role of energy drinks. Although the composition of energy drinks varies, most contain caffeine; carbohydrates, amino acids, herbs, and vitamins are other typical ingredients. This report analyzes the effects of energy drink ingredients on prolonged submaximal (endurance) exercise as well as on short-term strength and power (neuromuscular performance). It also analyzes the effects of energy drink ingredients on the fluid and electrolyte deficit during prolonged exercise. In several studies, energy drinks have been found to improve endurance performance, although the effects could be attributable to the caffeine and/or carbohydrate content. In contrast, fewer studies find an ergogenic effect of energy drinks on muscle strength and power. The existing data suggest that the caffeine dose given in studies of energy drinks is insufficient to enhance neuromuscular performance. Finally, it is unclear if energy drinks are the optimal vehicle to deliver caffeine when high doses are needed to improve neuromuscular performance. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  14. Public budgets for energy RD&D and the effects on energy intensity and pollution levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Daniel; Álvarez, Agustín; Cantos, José María

    2015-04-01

    This study, based on the N-shaped cubic model of the environmental Kuznets curve, analyzes the evolution of per capita greenhouse gas emissions (GHGpc) using not just economic growth but also public budgets dedicated to energy-oriented research development and demonstration (RD&D) and energy intensity. The empirical evidence, obtained from an econometric model of fixed effects for 28 OECD countries during 1994-2010, suggests that energy innovations help reduce GHGpc levels and mitigate the negative impact of energy intensity on environmental quality. When countries develop active energy RD&D policies, they can reduce both the rates of energy intensity and the level of GHGpc emissions. This paper incorporates a moderating variable to the econometric model that emphasizes the effect that GDP has on energy intensity. It also adds a variable that reflects the difference between countries that have made a greater economic effort in energy RD&D, which in turn corrects the GHG emissions resulting from the energy intensity of each country.

  15. Energy drinks and their adverse health effects: A systematic review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fahad; Rehman, Hiba; Babayan, Zaruhi; Stapleton, Dwight; Joshi, Divya-Devi

    2015-04-01

    With the rising consumption of so-called energy drinks over the last few years, there has been a growing body of literature describing significant adverse health events after the ingestion of these beverages. To gain further insight about the clinical spectrum of these adverse events, we conducted a literature review. Using PubMed and Google-Scholar, we searched the literature from January 1980 through May 2014 for articles on the adverse health effects of energy drinks. A total of 2097 publications were found. We then excluded molecular and industry-related studies, popular media reports, and case reports of isolated caffeine toxicity, yielding 43 reports. Energy drink consumption is a health issue primarily of the adolescent and young adult male population. It is linked to increased substance abuse and risk-taking behaviors. The most common adverse events affect the cardiovascular and neurological systems. The most common ingredient in energy drinks is caffeine, and it is believed that the adverse events are related to its effects, as well as potentiating effects of other stimulants in these drinks. Education, regulation, and further studies are required.

  16. Effectiveness of audiovisual distraction in behavior modification during dental caries assessment and sealant placement in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhruddin, Kausar Sadia; El Batawi, Hisham Yehia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of audiovisual (AV) distraction in behavior modification during dental caries assessment and sealant placement in children with autism spectrum disorder. This study was conducted on 28 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, aged 6.5-9.8 years. Children underwent one introductory (desensitization) appointment and three treatment sessions. During the introductory session, children had the procedures explained to them, they watched a movie projected on a screen while oral screening and assessment of cooperation level were carried out. In treatment session I, oral examination, charting, and dental x-rays were undertaken, whereas the children watched movies with or without video eyewear. During treatment sessions II/III, dental prophylaxis was carried out on upper and lower jaws in addition to the application of dental sealants on the right upper and lower and the left upper and lower permanent molars, respectively, while the children were distracted by cartoon movies using video eyewear. Changes in pulse oximeter and heart rate were recorded every 5 min. Independent samples t-test was used to assess the significance of changes in pulse and O2 saturation levels during each visit. International Caries Detection and Assessment System-code 2 was found to be the most prevalent (n = 58; 52%). A significant difference (P behavior in the subjects. Video eyewear distraction proved an effective tool in managing children with autism spectrum disorder during noninvasive preventive dental procedures.

  17. Individual differences in executive functions, training effects & quality of life of children with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    M. De Vries

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) appear to experience executive functioning (EF) problems, but there are large individual differences in EF-profiles in ASD. In the current study the majority of children with ASD (8-12 years) actually experienced no cognitive flexibility deficits. Working memory (WM) and inhibition deficits were observed, but only few children showed both. The experienced EF deficits were, however, related to daily life behavior. Moreover, both ASD-traits and EF w...

  18. Spectroscopic investigation (FTIR spectrum), NBO, HOMO-LUMO energies, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamideby DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leela, J Sherin Percy Prema; Hemamalini, R; Muthu, S; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A

    2015-07-05

    Capsicum a hill grown vegetable is also known as red pepper or chili pepper. Capsaicin(8-Methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component in chili peppers, which is currently used in the treatment of osteoarthritis, psoriasis and cancer. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of Capsaicin in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and analyzed. The vibrational frequencies of the title compound were obtained theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing the standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and were compared with Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Complete vibrational assignment analysis and correlation of the fundamental modes for the title compound were carried out. The vibrational harmonic frequencies were scaled using scale factor, yielding a good agreement between the experimentally recorded and the theoretically calculated values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intra molecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ∗ and π∗ antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E (2) confirm the occurrence of intra molecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the molecule has been computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Imprints of non-standard dark energy and dark matter models on the 21cm intensity map power spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Corasaniti, Pier-Stefano; Viel, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    We study the imprint of non-standard dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM) models on the 21cm intensity map power spectra from high-redshift neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. To this purpose we use halo catalogs from N-body simulations of dynamical DE models and DM scenarios which are as successful as the standard Cold Dark Matter model with Cosmological Constant (ΛCDM) at interpreting available cosmological observations. We limit our analysis to halo catalogs at redshift z=1 and 2.3 which are common to all simulations. For each catalog we model the HI distribution by using a simple prescription to associate the HI gas mass to N-body halos. We find that the DE models leave a distinct signature on the HI spectra across a wide range of scales, which correlates with differences in the halo mass function and the onset of the non-linear regime of clustering. In the case of the non-standard DM model significant differences of the HI spectra with respect to the ΛCDM model only arise from the suppressed abundance of low mass halos. These cosmological model dependent features also appear in the 21cm spectra. In particular, we find that future SKA measurements can distinguish the imprints of DE and DM models at high statistical significance.

  20. Effects of energy drinks on the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    Wassef, Bishoy; Kohansieh, Michelle; Makaryus, Amgad N

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the last decade, the use of energy drinks has been increasingly looked upon with caution as potentially dangerous due to their perceived strong concentration of caffeine aside from other substances such as taurine, guarana, and L-carnitine that are largely unknown to the general public. In addition, a large number of energy drink intoxications have been reported all over the world including cases of seizures and arrhythmias. In this paper, we focus on the effect of energy drinks on...

  1. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  2. COMPUTER MODELLING OF ENERGY SAVING EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian JANCZAREK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the dynamics of the heat transfer through the outer wall of the thermal technical spaces, taking into account the impact of the sinusoidal nature of the changes in atmospheric temperature. These temporal variations of the input on the outer surface of the chamber divider result at the output of the sinusoidal change on the inner wall of the room, but suitably suppressed and shifted in phase. Properly selected phase shift is clearly important for saving energy used for the operation associated with the maintenance of a specific regime of heat inside the thermal technical chamber support. Laboratory tests of the model and the actual object allowed for optimal design of the chamber due to the structure of the partition as well as due to the orientation of the geographical location of the chamber.

  3. Interference effect in elastic parton energy loss in a finitemedium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Similar to the radiative parton energy loss due to gluonbremsstrahlung, elastic energy loss of a parton undergoing multiplescattering in a finite medium is demonstrated to be sensitive tointerference effect. The interference between amplitudes of elasticscattering via a gluon exchange and that of gluon radiation reduces theeffective elastic energy loss in a finite medium and gives rise to anon-trivial length dependence. The reduction is most significant for apropagation length L<4/\\pi T in a medium with a temperature T. Thoughthe finite size effect is not significant for the average partonpropagation in the most central heavy-ion collisions, it will affect thecentrality dependence of its effect on jet quenching.

  4. Energy evaluation of protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Tomasz; Dobry, Marian Witalis

    2017-09-01

    This article describes an energy method of assessing protection effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves on the human dynamic structure. The study uses dynamic models of the human and the glove specified in Standard No. ISO 10068:2012. The physical models of human-tool systems were developed by combining human physical models with a power tool model. The combined human-tool models were then transformed into mathematical models from which energy models were finally derived. Comparative energy analysis was conducted in the domain of rms powers. The energy models of the human-tool systems were solved using numerical simulation implemented in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The simulation procedure demonstrated the effectiveness of the anti-vibration glove as a method of protecting human operators of hand-held power tools against vibration. The desirable effect is achieved by lowering the flow of energy in the human-tool system when the anti-vibration glove is employed.

  5. Energy-dependent effects of resveratrol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Canizal-Garcia, Melina; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Nava, Gerardo M; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic effects induced by resveratrol have been associated mainly with the consumption of high-calorie diets; however, its effects with standard or low-calorie diets remain unclear. To better understand the interactions between resveratrol and cellular energy levels, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. Herein it is shown that resveratrol: (a) decreased cell viability in an energy-dependent manner; (b) lessening of cell viability occurred specifically when cells were under cellular respiration; and (c) inhibition of oxygen consumption in state 4 occurred at low and standard energy levels, whereas at high energy levels oxygen consumption was promoted. These findings indicate that the effects of resveratrol are dependent on the cellular energy status and linked to metabolic respiration. Importantly, our study also revealed that S. cerevisiae is a suitable and useful model to elucidate the molecular targets of resveratrol under different nutritional statuses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Atomoxetine in autism spectrum disorder: no effects on social functioning; some beneficial effects on stereotyped behaviors, inappropriate speech, and fear of change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harfterkamp, M.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Minderaa, R.B.; Loo-Neus, G. van de; Gaag, R.J. van der; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the short-term treatment effects of atomoxetine on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in children and adolescents with both ASD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: A total of 97 patients 6-17 years of

  7. The optimum modification of energy spectra using FFT convolution/multigrid superposition algorithm on the focus radiation treatment system

    CERN Document Server

    Hanyu, Y; Hoshino, K; Ono, A; Sonoda, T; Hirabayashi, H; Karasawa, K; Mitsuhashi, N

    2003-01-01

    In the convolution/superposition algorithm, the energy spectrum should be modified to make the reconstructed dose distribution consistent with the measured dose distribution. The energy spectrum, which gives the best agreement, is not determined uniquely depending on the reconstruction procedure. In this report, the effects of the characteristics of the energy spectrum on the calculation accuracy are evaluated by comparing the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles for the reference energy spectrum with those calculated for the modified spectrum in order to optimize the energy spectrum modification procedure when 4 and 10 MV X-ray beams are used. Decreasing the number of energy bins brought a larger decrease rate in the computation accuracy than a decrease rate in computation time. Further, the decrease of the number of energy bins led to a change of the energy spectrum. The balance of the relative fluence weight in a each bin and its average energy, which determines the absoluted dose, are important p...

  8. Calculation on spectrum of direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons including dissociative electron attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liming; Champion, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    In this work, direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons (sub-keV) is simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The characteristics of the present simulation are to consider the new mechanism of DNA damage due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to allow determining damage to specific bases (i.e., adenine, thymine, guanine, or cytosine). The electron track structure in liquid water is generated, based on the dielectric response model for describing electron inelastic scattering and on a free-parameter theoretical model and the NIST database for calculating electron elastic scattering. Ionization cross sections of DNA bases are used to generate base radicals, and available DEA cross sections of DNA components are applied for determining DNA-strand breaks and base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons. The electron elastic scattering from DNA components is simulated using cross sections from different theoretical calculations. The resulting yields of various strand breaks and base damage in cellular environment are given. Especially, the contributions of sub-ionization electrons to various strand breaks and base damage are quantitatively presented, and the correlation between complex clustered DNA damage and the corresponding damaged bases is explored. This work shows that the contribution of sub-ionization electrons to strand breaks is substantial, up to about 40-70%, and this contribution is mainly focused on single-strand break. In addition, the base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons contributes to about 20-40% of the total base damage, and there is an evident correlation between single-strand break and damaged base pair A-T.

  9. Effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge (WAS) solubilization and enzyme activity was investigated in this study. Experimental results showed that the increase of ultrasonic specific energy in the range of 0 - 90000 kJ/kg dried sludge (DS) benefited WAS particle size reduction and the solubilization ...

  10. The Effects of Form and Orientation on Energy Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The difficulty has been to find the most energy efficient form-aspect ratio. In this paper, a volume with differ-ent aspect ratios has been used to investigate the effect on energy performance (cooling load). The volume used is of the same construction and an hourly dynamic simulation programme was used for the analysis.

  11. Effects of varying dietary zinc levels on energy and nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of varying dietary zinc levels on energy and nitrogen utilization in West African dwarf kids. ... Animals were transferred to individual metabolic cages for separate collection of feaces and urine 14 and 15 weeks later. Parameters determined were dry matter intake (DMI), energy utilization and nitrogen utilization.

  12. Introduction to renewable energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Vaughn C

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionEnergy and SocietyTypes of EnergyRenewable EnergyAdvantages/DisadvantagesEconomicsGlobal WarmingOrder of Magnitude EstimatesGrowth (Exponential)SolutionsEnergyIntroductionDefinition of Energy and PowerHeatThermodynamicsEnergy Dilemma in Light of the Laws of ThermodynamicsUse of Fossil FuelsNuclearFinite ResourceSummarySunSolar PowerElectromagnetic SpectrumEnergy Balance of the EarthEarth-Sun MotionInsolationSolar ResourceGreenhouse EffectHeat Transfer and StorageIntroductionConductionConvectionRadiationThermal MassSeasonal Heating or CoolingThermal ComfortSolar Heating and CoolingB

  13. Energy and society. [Effects of energy development on natural and societal environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, C.

    1976-04-01

    It is now clear that quality of life, material welfare, health, employment, and income are affected by energy availability and cost and there is no return to the cheap abundant energy of the past. This paper examines the feasibility of adjusting our energy systems so that we simultaneously decrease unemployment, costs, dependence on foreign resources, undesirable effluents and impacts on the biosphere. The major societal effects of energy systems developed by man can be related to four predominant technical sectors: first, the use of work animals; second, the direct conversion into mechanical work of inanimate stored solar energy (hydropower, wood, farm waste, and fossil fuels); third, the use of electricity as an energy form derived from these sources; and fourth, the use of nuclear energy as a primary source. Since the past and potential impacts of these developments are so many, only a few are explored here - chiefly those relationships of energy flow to the societal materialistic targets of health, security, social stability, upward mobility, and leisure. The traditional target of economic growth may be one of best composite means of achieving all of these materialistic goals, thus, industrial growth has been a prime objective. Other contributors to social development have been greater productivity in agriculture, improved transportation and communications, and shorter working hours. Two main topics discussed are: The Industrialization of Society and Food, Population, and Energy. (MCW)

  14. The orbifolder: A tool to study the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, H. P.; Ramos-Sánchez, S.; Vaudrevange, P. K. S.; Wingerter, A.

    2012-06-01

    The orbifolder is a program developed in C++ that computes and analyzes the low-energy effective theory of heterotic orbifold compactifications. The program includes routines to compute the massless spectrum, to identify the allowed couplings in the superpotential, to automatically generate large sets of orbifold models, to identify phenomenologically interesting models (e.g. MSSM-like models) and to analyze their vacuum configurations. Program summaryProgram title: orbifolder Catalogue identifier: AELR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 145 572 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 930 517 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language:C++ Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux (Fedora 15, Ubuntu 11, SuSE 11) Word size: 32 bits or 64 bits Classification: 11.1 External routines: Boost (http://www.boost.org/), GSL (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/) Nature of problem: Calculating the low-energy spectrum of heterotic orbifold compactifications. Solution method: Quadratic equations on a lattice; representation theory; polynomial algebra. Running time: Less than a second per model.

  15. The Effectiveness of Theory of Mind Training On the Social Skills of Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibsereshki, Narges; Nesayan, Abbas; Asadi Gandomani, Roghayeh; Karimlou, Masood

    2015-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) tend to have problems in establishing and maintaining their social relationships. Some professionals believe this social impairment is the result of deficit in Theory of Mind (ToM). This study was conducted to explore the effectiveness of ToM training on such children. A quasi-experimental method, pre- test, post-test with control group was used. The sample included of 12 girls and 12 boys with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD). Two instruments were used as follows: the Theory of Mind test and the social skills questionnaire (1). The samples were randomly placed in the experimental and control groups. The experimental groups had 15 sessions of ToM training and the control groups had just regular school program. The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov, independent t- and twoway- variance tests. The scores for social skills in the experimental group were significantly more than the control group. ToM training might improve the social skills of children with autism spectrum disorders.

  16. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion. Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  17. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Lee, Jung-Lyul

    2012-12-01

    An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion.Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  18. Acute effects of capsaicin on energy expenditure and fat oxidation in negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Pilou L H R; Hursel, Rick; Martens, Eveline A P; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-01-01

    Addition of capsaicin (CAPS) to the diet has been shown to increase energy expenditure; therefore capsaicin is an interesting target for anti-obesity therapy. We investigated the 24 h effects of CAPS on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure during 25% negative energy balance. Subjects underwent four 36 h sessions in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure. They received 100% or 75% of their daily energy requirements in the conditions '100%CAPS', '100%Control', '75%CAPS' and '75%Control'. CAPS was given at a dose of 2.56 mg (1.03 g of red chili pepper, 39,050 Scoville heat units (SHU)) with every meal. An induced negative energy balance of 25% was effectively a 20.5% negative energy balance due to adapting mechanisms. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and resting energy expenditure (REE) at 75%CAPS did not differ from DIT and REE at 100%Control, while at 75%Control these tended to be or were lower than at 100%Control (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02 respectively). Sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) at 75%CAPS did not differ from SMR at 100%CAPS, while SMR at 75%Control was lower than at 100%CAPS (p = 0.04). Fat oxidation at 75%CAPS was higher than at 100%Control (p = 0.03), while with 75%Control it did not differ from 100%Control. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was more decreased at 75%CAPS (p = 0.04) than at 75%Control (p = 0.05) when compared with 100%Control. Blood pressure did not differ between the four conditions. In an effectively 20.5% negative energy balance, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal supports negative energy balance by counteracting the unfavorable negative energy balance effect of decrease in components of energy expenditure. Moreover, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal promotes fat oxidation in negative energy balance and does not increase blood pressure significantly. Nederlands Trial Register; registration number NTR2944.

  19. Acute effects of capsaicin on energy expenditure and fat oxidation in negative energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilou L H R Janssens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addition of capsaicin (CAPS to the diet has been shown to increase energy expenditure; therefore capsaicin is an interesting target for anti-obesity therapy. AIM: We investigated the 24 h effects of CAPS on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure during 25% negative energy balance. METHODS: Subjects underwent four 36 h sessions in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure. They received 100% or 75% of their daily energy requirements in the conditions '100%CAPS', '100%Control', '75%CAPS' and '75%Control'. CAPS was given at a dose of 2.56 mg (1.03 g of red chili pepper, 39,050 Scoville heat units (SHU with every meal. RESULTS: An induced negative energy balance of 25% was effectively a 20.5% negative energy balance due to adapting mechanisms. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT and resting energy expenditure (REE at 75%CAPS did not differ from DIT and REE at 100%Control, while at 75%Control these tended to be or were lower than at 100%Control (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02 respectively. Sleeping metabolic rate (SMR at 75%CAPS did not differ from SMR at 100%CAPS, while SMR at 75%Control was lower than at 100%CAPS (p = 0.04. Fat oxidation at 75%CAPS was higher than at 100%Control (p = 0.03, while with 75%Control it did not differ from 100%Control. Respiratory quotient (RQ was more decreased at 75%CAPS (p = 0.04 than at 75%Control (p = 0.05 when compared with 100%Control. Blood pressure did not differ between the four conditions. CONCLUSION: In an effectively 20.5% negative energy balance, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal supports negative energy balance by counteracting the unfavorable negative energy balance effect of decrease in components of energy expenditure. Moreover, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal promotes fat oxidation in negative energy balance and does not increase blood pressure significantly. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  20. Multiparticle production in nuclear collisions using effective-energy approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sarkisyan, Edward K. G.; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse energy pseudorapidity density at midrapidity on the collision energy and on the number of nucleon participants, or centrality, measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the energy range spanning a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon. The study is based on the earlier proposed model, combining the constituent quark picture together with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics and shown to interrelate the measurements from different types of collisions. Within this picture, the dependence on the number of participants in heavy-ion collisions are found to be well described in terms of the effective energy defined as a centrality-dependent fraction of the collision energy. The effective energy approach is shown to reveal a similarity in the energy dependence for the most central and centrality data in the entire available energy range. Predictions are made for the forthcoming higher-energy measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC...