WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy semileptonic probes

  1. Intermediate energy semileptonic probes of the hadronic neutral current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolf, M.J.; Donnelly, T.W.; Dubach, J.; Beise, E.J.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD

    1993-06-01

    The present status and future prospects of intermediate-energy semileptonic neutral current studies are reviewed. Possibilities for using parity-violating electron scattering from nucleons and nuclei to study hadron structure and nuclear dynamics are emphasized, with particular attention paid to probes of strangeness content in the nucleon. Connections are drawn between such studies and tests of the electroweak gauge theory using electron or neutrino scattering. Outstanding theoretical issues in the interpretation of semileptonic neutral current measurements are highlighted and the prospects for undertaking parity-violating electron or neutrino scattering experiments in the near future are surveyed

  2. Measurement and interpretation of moments of the combined hadronic mass and energy spectrum in inclusive semileptonic B-meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, V.

    2007-11-29

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}. The variable n{sub X}{sup 2} is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson m{sub X}, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame E{sub X,BRF}, and a constant {lambda}=0.65 GeV, n{sub X}{sup 2}=m{sub X}{sup 2}c{sup 4}-2{lambda}E{sub X,BRF}+{lambda}{sup 2}. The moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle with k=2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {upsilon}(4S) {yields} B anti B events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments left angle n{sub X}{sup k} right angle up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}} and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B{yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, we determine the quark-mixing parameter vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction B(B{yields}X{sub c}l{sub {nu}}), and four non-perturbative heavy quark parameters. Using HQE

  3. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, Verena [Dresden Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic nX2 distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B → Xcℓν. The variable nX2 is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson mX, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame EX;BRF, and a constant ~Λ = 0.65 GeV, nX2 = mX2c4-2~ΛEX,BRF + ~Λ2. The moments Xk> with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e+e- → Υ(4S) {yields} B$\\bar{B}$ events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e--storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the nX2 distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments Xk> up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B → Xcℓν and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B → Xsγ, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |Vcb|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction β(B → Xcℓν), and four non-perturbative heavy quark

  4. Reconstruction of semileptonically decaying beauty hadrons produced in high energy pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezarek, G. [Nikhef,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lupato, A. [INFN Padova,Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro PD (Italy); Rotondo, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati,Via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati RM (Italy); Vesterinen, M. [Physicalisches Institute Heidelberg,Klaus-Tschira-Gebäude, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-02-06

    It is well known that in b-hadron decays with a single unreconstructible final state particle, the decay kinematics can be solved up to a quadratic ambiguity, without any knowledge of the b-hadron momentum. We present a method to infer the momenta of b-hadrons produced in hadron collider experiments using information from their reconstructed flight vectors. Our method is strictly agnostic to the decay itself, which implies that it can be validated with control samples of topologically similar decays to fully reconstructible final states. A multivariate regression algorithm based on the flight information provides a b-hadron momentum estimate with a resolution of around 60% which is sufficient to select the correct solution to the quadratic equation in around 70% of cases. This will improve the ability of hadron collider experiments to make differential decay rate measurements with semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  5. Semi-leptonic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, J.M.

    In spite of the presence of poorly understood strong interaction effects, the theory of hadronic currents leads to a considerable predictive power. This is shown in the discussion of the semi-leptonic decays

  6. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  7. Connections between inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, Mark B.

    1997-01-01

    B decay sum rules relate exclusive B semileptonic decay matrix elements to forward B-meson matrix elements of operators in HQET. At leading order the operators that occur are the b-quark kinetic energy λ 1 and chromomagnetic energy λ 2 . The latter is determined by the measured B*-B mass splitting. The derivation of these sum rules is reviewed and perturbative QCD corrections are discussed. A determination of λ 1 and the energy of the light degrees of freedom in a B-meson, Λ-bar, from semileptonic B decay data is presented. Future prospects for improving these sum rules are discussed

  8. Redesign of a Low Energy Probe Head

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Yi-Nong; Ries, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present situation of the low energy probe LE2 in TRIUMF cyclotron is that the thickness of the finger 5 is uniform over a radial length of 3.25 inch and its weight which amounts to ~447 g is affecting its re-circulating ball mechanism and causing it to fall below the median plane over its range of movement. We therefore re-design it in order to reduce its weight. First, we made simulations and determined the optimum thickness of the probe head vs its radial length. These simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements made. Finally, we calculated the temperature rise caused by the beam power dumped on the probe, and figured out the maximum current of beam that can be dumped on the finger.

  9. Bs semileptonic asymmetry at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Dufour, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    When neutral $B^{0}_{s,d}$ mesons evolve in time they can change into their own antiparticles. In this mixing process CP symmetry is not necessarily conserved, as the probability for a $B^{0}$ meson to change into a $\\bar{B}^{0}$ meson can be different from the probability for the reverse process. The CP violation in the $B^{0}_{s}$ system as measured using semileptonic decays, defined as $a^{s}_{sl}$, is very small according to the Standard Model. However, earlier measurements of the semileptonic mixing asymmetry in both the $B_s^{0}$ and $B_d^{0}$ systems have shown a $3 \\sigma$ deviation with respect to the Standard Model value. A measurement of $a^{s}_{sl}$ performed using $1 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected at the LHCb detector is presented, together with an outlook to the updated $3 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ result.

  10. Novel Probes of Gravity and Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; et al.

    2013-09-20

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.

  11. Unparticles: Scales and high energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, Myron; Feng, Jonathan L.; Rajaraman, Arvind; Shirman, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    Unparticles from hidden conformal sectors provide qualitatively new possibilities for physics beyond the standard model. In the theoretical framework of minimal models, we clarify the relation between energy scales entering various phenomenological analyses. We show that these relations always counteract the effective field theory intuition that higher dimension operators are more highly suppressed, and that the requirement of a significant conformal window places strong constraints on possible unparticle signals. With these considerations in mind, we examine some of the most robust and sensitive probes and explore novel effects of unparticles on gauge coupling evolution and fermion production at high energy colliders. These constraints are presented both as bounds on four-fermion interaction scales and as constraints on the fundamental parameter space of minimal models

  12. Neutral currents in semileptonic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1975-05-01

    The evidence for weak neutral currents is analyzed in semileptonic reactions with special emphasis on their Lorentz and internal symmetry structure. It is found that present observations are consistent with the expectations of gauge theories, but other possibilities can not be ruled out. Of particular interest in this respect is the presence of a large isoscalar component. The excitation of the Δ-resonance by neutral currents is analyzed, and pion-nucleon mass distributions are presented. Charge asymmetries sensitive to isoscalar-isovector interferences are discussed. (U.S.)

  13. LISA as a dark energy probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, K G; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Iyer, B R; Sinha, Siddhartha; Van Den Broeck, Chris; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the inclusion of higher signal harmonics in the inspiral signals of binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) leads to dramatic improvements in the parameter estimation with Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In particular, the angular resolution becomes good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster, in which case the redshift can be determined by electromagnetic means. The gravitational wave signal also provides the luminosity distance with high accuracy, and the relationship between this and the redshift depends sensitively on the cosmological parameters, such as the equation-of-state parameter w = p DE /ρ DE of dark energy. Using binary SMBH events at z < 1 with appropriate masses and orientations, one would be able to constrain w to within a few per cent. We show that, if the measured sky location is folded into the error analysis, the uncertainty on w goes down by an additional factor of 2-3, leaving weak lensing as the only limiting factor in using LISA as a dark energy probe.

  14. Semi-leptonic and rare decays

    CERN Document Server

    Borzumati, Francesca M; Aoki, M; Bevan, A; Cottingham, W N; Dighe, Amol S; Gambino, Paolo; De Groot, N; Harrison, P F; Khalil, S; Kim, C S; Liniger, P; Misiak, M; Reina, L; Ricciardi, G; Shibata, E I; Uraltsev, N; Wyler, D

    2001-01-01

    We review the theoretical and experimental results on semi-leptonic and rare B decays presented in working group 2 of the UK phenomenology workshop on heavy flavour physics and CP violation in Durham, 2000. (0 refs).

  15. Bs mesons: semileptonic and nonleptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we compute some nonleptonic and semileptonic decay widths of Bs mesons, working in the context of constituent quark models [1, 2]. For the case of semileptonic decays we consider reactions leading to kaons or different Jπ Ds mesons. The study of nonleptonic decays has been done in the factorisation approximation and includes the final states enclosed in Table 2.

  16. Scaling and the inclusive semileptonic decays of charmed particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, X.Y.; Nabavi, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A general formula describing the semileptonic decay of charmed particles is written in terms of structure functions. A procedure is proposed to estimate semileptonic decay widths by supposing that these structure functions may be averaged by their scaling limits

  17. Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nature of equation of state for the neutron star matter is crucially governed by the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. We attempt to probe the behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy around the saturation density by exploiting the empirical values for volume and surface symmetry energy ...

  18. Innovative SPM Probes for Energy-Storage Science: MWCNT-Nanopipettes to Nanobattery Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jonathan; Talin, Alec; Pearse, Alexander; Kozen, Alexander; Reutt-Robey, Janice

    As energy-storage materials and designs continue to advance, new tools are needed to direct and explore ion insertion/de-insertion at well-defined battery materials interfaces. Scanned probe tips, assembled from actual energy-storage materials, permit SPM measures of local cathode-anode (tip-sample) interactions, including ion transfer. We present examples of ``cathode'' MWCNT-terminated STM probe tips interacting with Li(s)/Si(111) anode substrates. The MWCNT tip functions as both SPM probe and Li-nanopipette,[1] for controlled transport and manipulation of Li. Local field conditions for lithium ionization and transfer are determined and compared to electrostatic models. Additional lithium metallic and oxide tips have been prepared by thin film deposition on conventional W tips, the latter of which effectively functions as a nanobattery. We demonstrate use of these novel probe materials in the local lithiation of low-index Si anode interfaces, probing local barriers for lithium insertion. Prospects and limitations of these novel SPM probes will be discussed. U.S. Department of Energy Award Number DESC0001160.

  19. Probing the dark energy with quasar clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvão, M O; de Mello Neto, J R T; Waga, I

    2002-03-04

    We show through Monte Carlo simulations that the Alcock-Paczyński test, as applied to quasar clustering, is a powerful tool to probe the cosmological density and equation of state parameters Omega(m0), Omega(x0), and w. By taking into account the effect of peculiar velocities upon the correlation function we obtain for the Two-Degree Field QSO Redshift Survey the predicted confidence contours for the cosmological constant (w = -1) and spatially flat (Omega(m0)+Omega(x0) = 1) cases. For w = -1, the test is especially sensitive to the difference Omega(m0)-Omega(Lambda0), thus being ideal to combine with cosmic microwave background results. For the flat case, it is competitive with future supernova and galaxy number count tests, besides being complementary to them.

  20. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique us- ing an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle. EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such ...

  1. Semileptonic b branching fractions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, P

    2000-01-01

    I review recent results on semileptonic branching fractions at LEP for Z/sup 0/ to bb data, for the average b hadron then for b baryons. From the inclusive BR(b to lX), one can obtain the most precise value for the CKM matrix element V/sub cb/. (14 refs).

  2. The semileptonic decays of charmed particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabavi, R.P.; Pham, X.Y.; Cottingham, W.N.

    1977-01-01

    A general formalism is developped for analyzing the semileptonic decays of charmed particles in terms of helicity amplitudes. This formalism is to the D and F mesons, and a simple experimental test for the V+-A coupling of the charmed quark, is proposed

  3. Radiative corrections for semileptonic decays of hyperons: the 'model independent' part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.; Szegoe, K.; Margaritis, T.

    1984-04-01

    The 'model independent' part of the order α radiative correction due to virtual photon exchanges and inner bremsstrahlung is studied for semileptonic decays of hyperons. Numerical results of high accuracy are given for the relative correction to the branching ratio, the electron energy spectrum and the (Esub(e),Esub(f)) Dalitz distribution in the case of four different decays. (author)

  4. Scanning probes for new energy materials: probing local structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balke, N.; Bonnell, D.; Ginger, D.S.; Kemerink, M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and control of materials properties, often at the nanoscale, are the foundation of many new strategies for energy generation, storage, and efficiency. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has evolved into a very large toolbox for the characterization of properties spanning size scales from

  5. Medium energy probes and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we explore two topics. The first topic is the marriage of medium energy reaction theory with the interacting boson model of nuclei in such a way that the multiple scattering is summed to all orders. The second topic is an exactly solvable potential model which gives realistic shell model eigenfunctions which can be used to calculate static and transition nuclear densities. (orig./HSI)

  6. Probing dark energy via galaxy cluster outskirts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Andrea; Sun, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to combine Planck data and the X-ray physical properties of the intracluster medium in the virialization region of a sample of 320 galaxy clusters (0.056 definition of cluster boundary radius is more tenable, namely based on a fixed overdensity with respect to the critical density of the Universe. This novel cosmological test has the capacity to provide a generational leap forward in our understanding of the equation of state of dark energy.

  7. Probing the TeV energy scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Despite its spectacular success, the Standard Model (SM) is widely believed to be incomplete. In fact there are good reasons to expect that new degrees of freedom, not present within the SM framework, will show up in particle collisions at TeV energies. Novel phenomena are, therefore, anticipated when this energy regime is explored at proton supercolliders such as the SSC or the LHC, and at the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders. Almost two hundred physicists, with roughly equal representation from North America, Europe and Asia, got together to discuss the physics possibilities of such colliders at the Second International Workshop on Physics and Experiments at Linear Electron-Positron Colliders, held during the last week of April in Waikoloa on the Big Island of Hawaii. It was the second in a series of international workshops which began in Saariselkä, Lapland, Finland in September 1991. The main theme of the workshop was the physics reach of, and the feasibility of experiments at, linear electron-positron colliders in the 300 GeV - 2 TeV collision energy region. Also discussed were the prospects for physics at electron-photon, photon-photon and electron-electron colliders

  8. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry

  9. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hinds, E.A., E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Ed.Hinds@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  10. PQCD analysis of inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Yu, H.

    1996-01-01

    We develop the perturbative QCD formalism for inclusive semileptonic B meson decays, which includes Sudakov suppression from the resummation of large radiative corrections near the high end of charged lepton energy. Transverse degrees of freedom of partons are introduced to facilitate the factorization of B meson decays. Ambiguities appearing in the quark-level analysis are then avoided. A universal distribution function, arising from the nonperturbative Fermi motion of the b quark, is constructed according to the heavy quark effective field theory based operator product expansion, through which the mean and the width of the distribution function are related to hadronic matrix elements of local operators. Charged lepton spectra of the B→X ul ν decay are presented. We find 50% suppression near the end point of the spectrum. The overall suppression on the total decay rate is 8% for the free quark model, and is less than 7% for the use of smooth distribution functions. With our predictions, it is then possible to extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element parallel V ub parallel from experimental data. We also discuss possible implications of our analysis when confronted with the rather small observed semileptonic branching ratio in B meson decays. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1993-10-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1992 to August 1993, which includes the first year of the three-year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of the existing research contract. As anticipated in the 1992--1995 proposal the major preoccupation during 1992--1993 was with Fermilab experiment E760. This experiment, whose primary objective is to make very high-resolution study of Charmonium Spectroscopy via proton-antiproton annihilations, has turned out to be a veritable gold-mine of exciting hadronic physics in other areas as well. These include the proton from factor in the time-life region, proton-antiproton forward scattering, QCD scaling laws, and light quark spectroscopy. A large fraction of the data from E760 have been analyzed during this year, and several papers have been published. In addition to the E760 experiment at Fermilab continued progress was made earlier nuclear physics-related experiments at LAMPF, MIT, and NIKHEF, and their results for publication. Topics include high- resolution electron scattering, quasi-free electron scattering and low-energy pion double charge exchange

  12. Nuclear studies with intermediate energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norum, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    Data from measurements at NIKHEF-K of the electro-production of neutral pions from the proton were completely analyzed and axe about to be submitted for publication. These results represent the first precise measurement of this fundamental process in the threshold region. The results are completely consistent with calculations based upon the Low Energy Theorems. Results from studies of a gas jet target in the electron storage ring of the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (SAL) have been fully analyzed and are being prepared for publication. An Internal Target Development Facility (ITDF), established at NIKHEF-K in a collaborative effort for the purpose of developing higher density gas jet targets suitable for use in electron rings, is operational. Diagnostic techniques are being evaluated in preparation for evaluating jet technology options. Our study of the calcium isotopes ( 42 C and 44 C) is nearing completion. Both the electron and proton scattering data have been completely analyzed. Consistent proton and neutron transition densities have been extracted, and are being compared to corresponding results from pion scattering. Preparations for (γ,π - ) measurements at SAL have been completed, and data taking is about to commence

  13. Precision probes of QCD at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioli, Simone; Farina, Marco; Pappadopulo, Duccio; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2017-07-01

    New physics, that is too heavy to be produced directly, can leave measurable imprints on the tails of kinematic distributions at the LHC. We use energetic QCD processes to perform novel measurements of the Standard Model (SM) Effective Field Theory. We show that the dijet invariant mass spectrum, and the inclusive jet transverse momentum spectrum, are sensitive to a dimension 6 operator that modifies the gluon propagator at high energies. The dominant effect is constructive or destructive interference with SM jet production. We compare differential next-to-leading order predictions from POWHEG to public 7 TeV jet data, including scale, PDF, and experimental uncertainties and their respective correlations. We constrain a New Physics (NP) scale of 3.5 TeV with current data. We project the reach of future 13 and 100 TeV measurements, which we estimate to be sensitive to NP scales of 8 and 60 TeV, respectively. As an application, we apply our bounds to constrain heavy vector octet colorons that couple to the QCD current. We project that effective operators will surpass bump hunts, in terms of coloron mass reach, even for sequential couplings.

  14. Semileptonic decays of the Bc meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2009-01-01

    We study the semileptonic transitions B c →η c ,J/Ψ,D,D*,B,B*,B s ,B s * in the leading order in the framework of a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. We compute relevant weak form factors as overlap integrals of the meson-wave functions obtained in the relativistic independent quark model in the whole accessible kinematical range. We predict that the semileptonic transitions of the B c meson are mostly dominated by two Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-favored modes, B c →B s (B s *)eν, contributing about 77% of the total decay width, and its decays to vector meson final states take place in the predominantly transverse mode. Our predicted values for the total decay rates, branching ratios, polarization ratios, the forward-backward asymmetry factor, etc., are broadly in agreement with other model predictions.

  15. Exclusive semileptonic B-meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, K.; Martin, A.D.; Wade, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    We study the semileptonic processes anti B → D * lanti ν and anti B → Dlanti ν and show that the invariant hadronic form factors describing the decays can be measured directly by observing the angular correlations of the decay products. We emphasize that this allows an almost model-independent determination of the V cb quark mixing-matrix element. We examine the theoretical models for the form factors in terms of the spectator quark approach. We present a general formalism for semileptonic decays which includes lepton mass effects, since the decay into τ-leptons may be important as background events in the search for rare decay modes involving missing particles. (orig.)

  16. Very high energy probes of the quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.; Madansky, L.

    1984-01-01

    Among the penetrating probes of nuclear matter the most frequently discussed have been those which involve the detection of photons or leptons with m/sub T/ approx. = P/sub T/ < 3 GeV. This is the expected range of emission from a hot, thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons. The suggestion has been made that in very high energy collisions of nuclei the properties of high P/sub T/ jets may also reflect the characteristics of the nuclear medium through which the parent partons have propagated just after the collision. In this note we expand on the possible uses of such a probe

  17. Measurement of semileptonic asymmetries at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    CP violation in neutral B meson mixing is an excellent place to search for the effects of new physics beyond the Standard Model. I report on the first measurements of the CP violating semileptonic asymmetries in the B_s0 and B_d0 systems from LHCb. Both are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and are the most precise single measurements of these parameters to date.

  18. Italian Physical Society b-hadron semileptonic decays with $\\tau$ leptons in final states in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gianluca Siddi, Benedetto

    2017-01-01

    Lepton universality, described in the Standard Model, predicts equal coupling between gauge bosons and the three lepton families. SM extensions give additional interactions, implying in some cases a stronger coupling with the third generation of leptons. Semileptonic decays of b-hadrons provide a sensitive probe to such New Physics effects. The presence of additional charged Higgs bosons, required by such SM extensions, can have significant effect on the semileptonic decay rate of $\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+}τ^−\\bar{ν}_{τ}$ . The combination of experimental measurements give a deviation from the standard model prediction of about 4 σ. It is therefore important to perform additional measurements in this sector in order to improve the precision and confirm or disprove this deviation. Results obtained by LHCb on $B^0 \\to D^{*−}τ^+ ν_τ$ decays, where the τ decays leptonically, are reported. The LHCb perspectives with other final states are discussed.

  19. Probing Free-Energy Surfaces with Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2011-05-01

    Many aspects of protein folding can be understood in terms of projections of the highly dimensional energy landscape onto a few (or even only one) particularly relevant coordinates. These free-energy surfaces can be probed conveniently from experimental differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms, as DSC provides a direct relation with the protein partition function. Free-energy surfaces thus obtained are consistent with two fundamental scenarios predicted by the energy-landscape perspective: (a) well-defined macrostates separated by significant free-energy barriers, in some cases, and, in many other cases, (b) marginal or even vanishingly small barriers, which furthermore show a good correlation with kinetics for fast- and ultrafast-folding proteins. Overall, the potential of DSC to assess free-energy surfaces for a wide variety of proteins makes it possible to address fundamental issues, such as the molecular basis of the barrier modulations produced by natural selection in response to functional requirements or to ensure kinetic stability.

  20. Dark energy two decades after: observables, probes, consistency tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huterer, Dragan; Shafer, Daniel L

    2018-01-01

    The discovery of the accelerating universe in the late 1990s was a watershed moment in modern cosmology, as it indicated the presence of a fundamentally new, dominant contribution to the energy budget of the universe. Evidence for dark energy, the new component that causes the acceleration, has since become extremely strong, owing to an impressive variety of increasingly precise measurements of the expansion history and the growth of structure in the universe. Still, one of the central challenges of modern cosmology is to shed light on the physical mechanism behind the accelerating universe. In this review, we briefly summarize the developments that led to the discovery of dark energy. Next, we discuss the parametric descriptions of dark energy and the cosmological tests that allow us to better understand its nature. We then review the cosmological probes of dark energy. For each probe, we briefly discuss the physics behind it and its prospects for measuring dark energy properties. We end with a summary of the current status of dark energy research.

  1. Direct probe of dark energy through gravitational lensing effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hong-Jian [T. D. Lee Institute, and School of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Zhen, E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: zh.zhang@pku.edu.cn [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-08-01

    We show that gravitational lensing can provide a direct method to probe the nature of dark energy at astrophysical scales. For lensing system as an isolated astrophysical object, we derive the dark energy contribution to gravitational potential as a repulsive power-law term, containing a generic equation of state parameter w . We find that it generates w -dependent and position-dependent modification to the conventional light orbital equation of w =−1. With post-Newtonian approximation, we compute its direct effect for an isolated lensing system at astrophysical scales and find that the dark energy force can deflect the path of incident light rays. We demonstrate that the dark-energy-induced deflection angle Δα{sub DE}∝ M {sup (1+1/3} {sup w} {sup )} (with 1+1/3 w > 0), which increases with the lensing mass M and consistently approaches zero in the limit M → 0. This effect is distinctive because dark energy tends to diffuse the rays and generates concave lensing effect . This is in contrast to the conventional convex lensing effect caused by both visible and dark matter. Measuring such concave lensing effect can directly probe the existence and nature of dark energy. We estimate this effect and show that the current gravitational lensing experiments are sensitive to the direct probe of dark energy at astrophysical scales. For the special case w =−1, our independent study favors the previous works that the cosmological constant can affect light bending, but our prediction qualitatively and quantitatively differ from the literature, including our consistent realization of Δα{sub DE} → 0 (under 0 M → ) at the leading order.

  2. Evaluating dark energy probes using multidimensional dark energy parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Bernstein, Gary

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the value of future dark-energy experiments by modeling their ability to constrain the dark-energy equation of state. Similar work was recently reported by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) using a two dimensional parameterization of the equation-of-state evolution. We examine constraints in a nine-dimensional dark-energy parameterization, and find that the best experiments constrain significantly more than two dimensions in our 9D space. Consequently the impact of these experiments is substantially beyond that revealed in the DETF analysis, and the estimated cost per 'impact' drops by about a factor of 10 as one moves to the very best experiments. The DETF conclusions about the relative value of different techniques and of the importance of combining techniques are unchanged by our analysis

  3. Semileptonic B-meson decays in SU(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuohong; Hou Yunzhi

    1994-01-01

    Based on the SU(3) approximate symmetry in the strong interaction three-body and four-body semileptonic B-meson decays are analyzed. Relations between decay rates are derived. Some of these relations may provide information on the nature of various competing dynamical effects that can occur in semileptonic B-meson decays

  4. Stop search in the compressed region via semileptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Gao, Christina; Li, Lingfeng; Neill, Nicolás A. [Department of Physics, University of California,Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-05-05

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the superpartners of the top quark (stops) play the crucial role in addressing the naturalness problem. For direct pair-production of stops with each stop decaying into a top quark plus the lightest neutralino, the standard stop searches have difficulty finding the stop for a compressed spectrum where the mass difference between the stop and the lightest neutralino is close to the top quark mass, because the events look too similar to the large tt̄ background. With an additional hard ISR jet, the two neutralinos from the stop decays are boosted in the opposite direction and they can give rise to some missing transverse energy. This may be used to distinguish the stop decays from the backgrounds. In this paper we study the semileptonic decay of such signal events for the compressed mass spectrum. Although the neutrino from the W decay also produces some missing transverse energy, its momentum can be reconstructed from the kinematic assumptions and mass-shell conditions. It can then be subtracted from the total missing transverse momentum to obtain the neutralino contribution. Because it suffers from less backgrounds, we show that the semileptonic decay channel has a better discovery reach than the fully hadronic decay channel along the compressed line m{sub t̃}−m{sub χ̃}≈m{sub t}. With 300 fb{sup −1}, the 13 TeV LHC can discover the stop up to 500 GeV, covering the most natural parameter space region.

  5. Low energy probes of PeV scale sfermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Harnik, Roni; Zupan, Jure

    2013-11-27

    We derive bounds on squark and slepton masses in mini-split supersymmetry scenario using low energy experiments. In this setup gauginos are at the TeV scale, while sfermions are heavier by a loop factor. We cover the most sensitive low energy probes including electric dipole moments (EDMs), meson oscillations and charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) transitions. A leading log resummation of the large logs of gluino to sfermion mass ratio is performed. A sensitivity to PeV squark masses is obtained at present from kaon mixing measurements. A number of observables, including neutron EDMs, mu->e transitions and charmed meson mixing, will start probing sfermion masses in the 100 TeV-1000 TeV range with the projected improvements in the experimental sensitivities. We also discuss the implications of our results for a variety of models that address the flavor hierarchy of quarks and leptons. We find that EDM searches will be a robust probe of models in which fermion masses are generated radiatively, while LFV searches remain sensitive to simple-texture based flavor models.

  6. Semileptonic decays of strange beauty mesons at Belle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswald, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Semileptonic decays of b-flavoured mesons are an important tool for the determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke. In this thesis, measurements of semileptonic B s meson decays are presented. They provide complementary information to the precision measurements of B meson decays and serve as a test of QCD-calculations predicting SU(3) flavour symmetry for the partial decay widths and form factors. The semi-inclusive and inclusive analyses of semileptonic B s decays are based on the 121.4 fb -1 dataset collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e + e - collider in Tsukuba, Japan. The sample recorded at a centre-of-mass energy √(s)=10.86 GeV, which corresponds to the Y(5S) resonance, contains (7.1±1.3) million B s pair events. To measure the semi-inclusive B s → D s Xlν and B s → D s * Xlν branching fractions, D s and D s * candidates are reconstructed and are paired with an oppositely charged lepton, l + =e + ,μ + . The yields of correctly reconstructed D s and D s * mesons are determined by fits to their respective invariant mass distributions. The signal yield and the yields of the remaining backgrounds are extracted using kinematic distributions of the reconstructed decay products and the constraint from the known initial state of the e + e - collision. The measured branching fractions are: B(B s → D s Xlν)=(8.2±0.2(stat)±0.6(syst)±1.4(ext)) % and B(B s → D s * lν)=(5.4±0.4(stat)±0.4(syst)±0.9 (ext)) %, where the first two uncertainties are the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measurement and the last uncertainty is due to external parameters. Making an assumption about the B s → D s Xlν branching fraction, the measurement of the B s → D s Xlν yield is also used to obtain the current best estimate of the B s pair production cross-section at a centre-of-mass energy √(s)=10.86 GeV: σ(e + e - → B s pairs)=(57.1±1.5(stat)±4.3(syst)±4.2(ext)) pb. The semi

  7. Methods for Probing New Physics at High Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Peter B.

    This dissertation covers two broad topics. The title, " Methods for Probing New Physics at High Energies," hopefully encompasses both of them. The first topic is located in part I of this work and is about integral dispersion relations. This is a technique to probe for new physics at energy scales near to the machine energy of a collider. For example, a hadron collider taking data at a given energy is typically only sensitive to new physics occurring at energy scales about a factor of five to ten beneath the actual machine energy due to parton distribution functions. This technique is sensitive to physics happening directly beneath the machine energy in addition to the even more interesting case: directly above. Precisely where this technique is sensitive is one of the main topics of this area of research. The other topic is located in part II and is about cosmic ray anisotropy at the highest energies. The unanswered questions about cosmic rays at the highest energies are numerous and interconnected in complicated ways. What may be the first piece of the puzzle to fall into place is determining their sources. This work looks to determine if and when the use of spherical harmonics becomes sensitive enough to determine these sources. The completed papers for this work can be found online. For part I on integral dispersion relations see reference published in Physical Review D. For part II on cosmic ray anisotropy, there are conference proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The analysis of the location of an experiment on anisotropy reconstruction is, and the comparison of different experiments' abilities to reconstruct anisotropies is published in The Astrophysical Journal and the Journal of High Energy Astrophysics respectively. While this dissertation is focused on three papers completed with Tom Weiler at Vanderbilt University, other papers were completed at the same time. The first was with Nicusor Arsene, Lauretiu Caramete, and

  8. Measurement of the branching fraction of Ds inclusive semileptonic decay Ds+→e+X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, S.M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Du, Z.Z.; Fan, X.L.; Fang, J.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, X.P.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Kang, S.H.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lan, H.B.; Lang, P.F.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Lin, S.Z.; Lu, F.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.A.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Luo, S.Q.; Luo, Y.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Sun, S.J.; Tan, Y.P.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, D.Z.; Xu, G.F.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, W.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Ye, S.Z.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, X.Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.; Bardon, O.; Cowan, R.F.; Fero, M.; Blum, I.; Gratton, P.; Izen, J.M.; Kim, B.K.; Lou, X.C.; Lowery, B.; Standifird, J.

    1997-01-01

    The absolute inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of the D s meson has been measured based on 22.3 pb -1 of e + e - collision data collected with the Beijing Spectrometer at √ (s) =4.03GeV. At this energy, the D s are produced in pairs: e + e - →D s + D s - . We reconstructed 171±21±15 D s events in five hadronic decay modes. In the recoil system of these events, several D s inclusive semileptonic decays were observed and the branching fraction is estimated to be B(D s + →e + X)=(7.7 -4.3-2.1 +5.7+2.4 )%. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. The semileptonic baryonic decay Ds+ → p p bar e+νe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Kang, Xian-Wei

    2018-05-01

    The decay Ds+ → p p bar e+νe with a proton-antiproton pair in the final state is unique in the sense that it is the only semileptonic baryonic decay which is physically allowed in the charmed meson sector. Its measurement will test our basic knowledge on semileptonic Ds+ decays and the low-energy p p bar interactions. Taking into account the major intermediate state contributions from η ,η‧ ,f0 (980) and X (1835), we find that its branching fraction is at the level of 10-9 ∼10-8. The location and the nature of X (1835) state are crucial for the precise determination of the branching fraction. We wish to trigger a new round of a careful study with the upcoming more data in BESIII as well as the future super tau-charm factory.

  10. Observations of Λc+ semileptonic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Krueger, A.; Nau, A.; Nippe, A.; Reidenbach, M.; Schaefer, M.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Sefkow, F.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R.D.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Toepfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Britton, D.I.; Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Edwards, K.W.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Kutschke, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Orr, R.S.; Patel, P.M.; Prentice, J.D.; Seidel, S.C.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Van de Water, R.G.; Yoon, T.S.; Ressing, D.; Schael, S.; Schubert, K.R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Childers, R.; Darden, C.W.

    1991-06-01

    Direct observations of the semileptonic decay of Λ c + in the decay channels Λ c + →Λe + Χ and Λ c + →Λμ + Χ have been made using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II e + e - storage ring. The cross section times branching ratio were found to be, σ(e + e - →Λ c + Χ).BR(Λ c + →Λe + Χ)=4.20±1.28±0.71 pb and σ(e + e - →Λ c + Χ).BR(Λ c + →Λμ + Χ)=3.91±2.02±0.90 pb. (orig.)

  11. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze; Van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2014-01-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe

  12. Probing the dynamics of dark energy with novel parametrizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jingzhe; Zhang Xin

    2011-01-01

    We point out that the CPL parametrization has a problem that the equation of state w(z) diverges in the far future, so that this model can only properly describe the past evolution but cannot depict the future evolution. To overcome such a difficulty, in this Letter we propose two novel parametrizations for dark energy, the logarithm form w(z)=w 0 +w 1 ((ln(2+z))/(1+z) -ln2) and the oscillating form w(z)=w 0 +w 1 ((sin(1+z))/(1+z) -sin(1)), successfully avoiding the future divergency problem in the CPL parametrization, and use them to probe the dynamics of dark energy in the whole evolutionary history. Our divergency-free parametrizations are proven to be very successful in exploring the dynamical evolution of dark energy and have powerful prediction capability for the ultimate fate of the universe. Constraining the CPL model and the new models with the current observational data, we show that the new models are more favored. The features and the predictions for the future evolution in the new models are discussed in detail.

  13. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Brassington, Nicola, E-mail: llanz@ipac.caltech.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  14. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben; Zhu, Zhiyong; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations

  15. Semileptonic decays of strange beauty mesons at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, Christian

    2015-06-19

    Semileptonic decays of b-flavoured mesons are an important tool for the determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke. In this thesis, measurements of semileptonic B{sub s} meson decays are presented. They provide complementary information to the precision measurements of B meson decays and serve as a test of QCD-calculations predicting SU(3) flavour symmetry for the partial decay widths and form factors. The semi-inclusive and inclusive analyses of semileptonic B{sub s} decays are based on the 121.4 fb{sup -1} dataset collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider in Tsukuba, Japan. The sample recorded at a centre-of-mass energy √(s)=10.86 GeV, which corresponds to the Y(5S) resonance, contains (7.1±1.3) million B{sub s} pair events. To measure the semi-inclusive B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν and B{sub s} → D{sub s}{sup *}Xlν branching fractions, D{sub s} and D{sub s}{sup *} candidates are reconstructed and are paired with an oppositely charged lepton, l{sup +}=e{sup +},μ{sup +}. The yields of correctly reconstructed D{sub s} and D{sub s}{sup *} mesons are determined by fits to their respective invariant mass distributions. The signal yield and the yields of the remaining backgrounds are extracted using kinematic distributions of the reconstructed decay products and the constraint from the known initial state of the e{sup +}e{sup -} collision. The measured branching fractions are: B(B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν)=(8.2±0.2(stat)±0.6(syst)±1.4(ext)) % and B(B{sub s} → D{sub s}{sup *}lν)=(5.4±0.4(stat)±0.4(syst)±0.9 (ext)) %, where the first two uncertainties are the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measurement and the last uncertainty is due to external parameters. Making an assumption about the B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν branching fraction, the measurement of the B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν yield is also used to obtain the current best estimate of the B{sub s} pair

  16. Exclusive semileptonic decays of charmed and b-flavored mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, N.; Tripathy, S.K.; Kar, S.; Dash, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the exclusive semileptonic decays of (B,B s ;D,D s ) mesons into less heavy as well as light mesons in a field-theoretic framework based on the independent quark model with a confining potential in scalar-vector-harmonic form. With the recoil effect properly taken into account, the present model describes consistently the semileptonic decays of charmed and b-flavored mesons, agreeing well with the experimental data. The transition form factors in the heavy to heavy decays, in particular, comply with the heavy quark symmetry relations expected from HQET. The CKM parameters extracted in this formalism are close to the existing data. The model prediction also satisfies the Isgur-Wise relation connecting the form factors of the semileptonic (B→ρeν) and that of rare radiative decay (B→ργ). copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Further remarks on isospin breaking in charmless semileptonic B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Castro, G. [Institut de Physique Theorique, Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Lopez Castro, G; Muntildeoz, J.H.; Sanchez, G. Toledo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Muntildeoz, J.H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Tolima, A.A. 546, Ibague (Colombia)

    1997-11-01

    We consider the isospin-breaking corrections to charmless semileptonic decays of B mesons. Both the recently measured branching ratios of exclusive decays by the CLEO Collaboration and the end-point region of the inclusive lepton spectrum in form factor models can be affected by these corrections. Isospin corrections can affect the determination of {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} from exclusive semileptonic B decays at a level comparable to present statistical uncertainties. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Fits combining hyperon semileptonic decays and magnetic moments and CVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, A.; Kielanowski, P.

    1982-10-01

    We have performed a test of CVC by determining the baryon charges and magnetic moments from the hyperon semileptonic data. Then CVC was applied in order to make a joint fit of all baryon semileptonic decay data and baryon magnetic moments for the spectrum generating group (SG) model as well as for the conventional (cabibbo and magnetic moments in nuclear magnetons) model. The SG model gives a very good fit with chi 2 /n/sub D/ = 25/20 approximately equals 21% C.L. whereas the conventional model gives a fit with chi 2 /n/sub D/ = 244/20

  19. Semileptonic Branching Fractions of Charged and Neutral B Mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athanas, M.; Brower, W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Sperka, D.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.; Ehrlich, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Salman, S.; Sapper, M.; Wuerthwein, F.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.; Ong, B.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Zoeller, M.M.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Gibbons, L.; Kwon, Y.

    1994-01-01

    An examination of leptons in Υ(4S) events tagged by reconstructed B meson decays yields semileptonic branching fractions of b - =(10.1±1.8±1.5)% for charged and b 0 =(10.9±0.7±1.1)% for neutral B mesons. This is the first measurement for charged B mesons. Assuming equality of the charged and neutral semileptonic widths, the ratio b - /b 0 =0.93±0.18±0.12 is equivalent to the ratio of lifetimes

  20. LHCb : Measurement of the $B_c$ Lifetime in semileptonic decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The lifetime of the $B_c^+$ meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a $J\\!/\\!\\psi$ meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $2\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$, are collected by the LHCb detector in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $8\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$. The measured lifetime is $$\\tau = 509 \\pm 8 \\pm 12 \\mathrm{~fs},$$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  1. Measurement of |V(Ub)| Using Inclusing Semileptonic B Meson Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hojeong; /Texas U.

    2006-03-24

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| made with a sample of 64 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector. Using Heavy Quark theory, we combine the observed yield of leptons from semileptonic B decay in the electron energy interval 2.1-2.6 GeV with a recent CLEO measurement of the B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} photon spectrum to find |V{sub ub}| = (4.25 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.45 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -3}, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the last two are from theory.

  2. Search for new physics in semileptonic $B$-decays

    CERN Document Server

    Klaver, Suzanne

    2016-11-15

    Semileptonic decays provide an excellent environment for testing the Standard Model (SM). Violation of lepton universality would be a smoking gun for physics beyond the SM. Using semi-tauonic $B$ decays, LHCb finds a value of $\\mathcal{R}(D^*) = \\mathcal{B}(\\bar{B}^0 \\to D^{*+} \\tau^{-} \\bar{\

  3. On the recent anomalies in semileptonic B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biancofiore P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both BABAR and LHCb Collaborations have recently claimed signals of possible deviations with respect to the Standard Model through the analyses of specific semileptonic B–meson decays. We firstly investigate the semileptonic b → c decay with a τ lepton in the final state for which new BABAR measurements are available, showing a deviation from the Standard Model at 3.4 σ level. We study the effects of a new tensor operator in the effective weak Hamiltonian on a set of observables, in semileptonic B → D(∗ modes as well as in semileptonic B and Bs decays to excited charmed mesons. Moreover, we discuss the phenomenology of the mode B → K∗ ℓ+ ℓ−, in the framework of a warped extra-dimensional model. Since a complete set of form factor almost independent observables have been recently measured by the LHCb Collaboration, with few sizable deviations with respect to the Standard Model in some of them, it would be interesting to put constraints on such a scenario from the FCNC transition b → sℓ+ℓ−.

  4. Measurements of inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of b hadrons in $Z^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of b hadrons produced in Z decays is presented. An enriched Z -> bbbar sample is obtained with a lifetime flavour-tagging technique. The leptonic events are then selected from this sample, and classified according to their origin, which is determined by comparing the distribution of several kinematic variables using artificial neural network techniques. Using 3.6 million multihadronic events collected with the OPAL detector at energies near the Z resonance, the values BR(b->lX) =(10.83 +- 0.10(stat.) +- 0.20(syst.) +0.20 -0.13(model)) % BR(b->c->lX) = (8.40 +- 0.16(stat.) +- 0.21(syst.) +0.33 -0.29 (model)) % are measured, where b denotes all weakly decaying b hadrons and l represents either e or mu. The second error includes all experimental systematic uncertainties whereas the last error is due to uncertainties in modelling of the lepton momentum spectrum in semileptonic decays and b quark fragmentation. The average fraction of the beam energy carr...

  5. MIB Probes for measurements of particle and energy fluxes in plasma of Wendelstein 7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Raitses, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetically insulated baffled (MIB) probes and probe arrays that share the simplicity of simple Langmuir probes but supersede them in their ability to make real-time measurements of plasma potential, temperature and energy/particle fluxes in W7-X stellarator plasma are being developed. The probes offer the advantages of direct measurements of the plasma fluid observables, while being non-emitting and electrically floating. The principle of operation of the probe is based on the dependence of the voltage drop in the plasma-probe sheath on the direction of the local magnetic field. The core technology for these probes rests with the use of a special baffling configuration such that electron current to the probe is fully controllable in the closed, open or partially open orientation, by a simple rotation of the baffle with respect to the magnetic field alignment in the plasma. The baffled-probe designs proposed for edge diagnostics will increase the capability to characterize separately plasma properties in real-time for understanding of underlying physics in the edge plasma.

  6. Reconstruction of the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, R.R.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Kudryavtsev, A.A.; Khromov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gorbunov et al. have developed a kinetic theory of the electron current drawn by a probe, which substantially extends the region of applicability of the probe method for determining the electron energy distribution function, enabling probes to be used for intermediate and high pressures (up to p ≤ 0.5 atm for monatomic gases). They showed that for λ var-epsilon >> a + d (where a is the probe radius, d is the sheath thickness, and λ var-epsilon is the electron energy relaxation length) the current density j e (V) drawn by the probe is related to the unperturbed distribution function by an integral equation involving the distribution function. The kernal of the integral equation can be written as a function of the diffusion parameter. In the present paper the method of quadrature sums is employed in order to obtain the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures. This technique enables them to recover the distribution function from the integral equation when the diffusion parameter has an arbitrary energy dependence ψ 0 (var-epsilon) in any given energy range. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by application to both model problems and experimental data

  7. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  8. Probing Dark Energy via Neutrino and Supernova Observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Lawrence; Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for extracting cosmological evolution parameters is proposed, using a probe other than light: future observations of the diffuse anti-neutrino flux emitted from core-collapse supernovae (SNe), combined with the SN rate extracted from future SN surveys. The relic SN neutrino differential flux can be extracted by using future neutrino detectors such as Gadolinium-enriched, megaton, water detectors or 100-kiloton detectors of liquid Argon or liquid scintillator. The core-collapse SN rate can be reconstructed from direct observation of SN explosions using future precision observatories. Our method, by itself, cannot compete with the accuracy of the optical-based measurements but may serve as an important consistency check as well as a source of complementary information. The proposal does not require construction of a dedicated experiment, but rather relies on future experiments proposed for other purposes

  9. Probing Dark Energy via Neutrino and Supernova Observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Lawrence; Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad

    2006-07-10

    A novel method for extracting cosmological evolution parameters is proposed, using a probe other than light: future observations of the diffuse anti-neutrino flux emitted from core-collapse supernovae (SNe), combined with the SN rate extracted from future SN surveys. The relic SN neutrino differential flux can be extracted by using future neutrino detectors such as Gadolinium-enriched, megaton, water detectors or 100-kiloton detectors of liquid Argon or liquid scintillator. The core-collapse SN rate can be reconstructed from direct observation of SN explosions using future precision observatories. Our method, by itself, cannot compete with the accuracy of the optical-based measurements but may serve as an important consistency check as well as a source of complementary information. The proposal does not require construction of a dedicated experiment, but rather relies on future experiments proposed for other purposes.

  10. Neutron decay, semileptonic hyperon decay and the Cabibbo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The decay rates and formfactor ratios of neutron decay and semileptonic hyperon decays are compared in the framework of the Cabibbo model. The results indicate SU(3) symmetry breaking. The Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V us determined from these decays is in good agreement with the value determined from K→πeν decays, and with unitarity of the KM-matrix. (orig.)

  11. Exclusive semileptonic B decays in the bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lie-Svendsen, Oe.

    1989-09-01

    Using a recoil corrected version of the MIT bag model, the author has computed the relevant form factors and decay rates for the exclusive semileptonic decays B→De anti ν e and B→D*e anti ν e. The results are similar to other quark model calculations, but it is shown that the D* mode is suppressed due to the influence of the spectator quark. The D*'s produced are almost unpolarized in this model

  12. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Lambda Baryons in a Quark Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin; Simon Capstick

    2005-03-01

    The semileptonic decays of {Lambda}{sub c} and {Lambda}{sub b} are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model. Both nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians are used to obtain the baryon wave functions from a fit to the spectra, and the wave functions are expanded in both the harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. The latter basis leads to form factors in which the kinematic dependence on q{sup 2} is in the form of multipoles, and the resulting form factors fall faster as a function of q{sup 2} in the available kinematic ranges. As a result, decay rates obtained in the two models using the Sturmian basis are significantly smaller than those obtained using the harmonic oscillator basis. In the case of the {Lambda}{sub c}, decay rates calculated using the Sturmian basis are closer to the experimentally reported rates. However, we find a semileptonic branching fraction for the {Lambda}{sub c} to decay to excited {Lambda}* states of 11% to 19%, in contradiction with what is assumed in available experimental analyses. Our prediction for the {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decays is that decays to the ground state {Lambda}{sub c} provide a little less than 70% of the total semileptonic decay rate. For the decays {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}, the analytic form factors we obtain satisfy the relations expected from heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point, at leading and next-to-leading orders in the heavy-quark expansion. In addition, some features of the heavy-quark limit are shown to naturally persist as the mass of the heavy quark in the daughter baryon is decreased.

  13. Test of right-handed currents in baryon semileptonic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Huerta, R.; Maya, M.; Perez Marcial, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a right-handed boson on baryon semileptonic decay is considered. The analysis of polarized and unpolarized decays is carried out and it is shown that the best place to look for a right-handed current (RHC) signature is in polarized baryon decay. However, our results are useful for high statistics experiments. In order to see the contribution of the right-handed currents in the case of unpolarized hyperon decay, the Cabibbo theory should be assumed. (orig.)

  14. Observation of Ξc0 semileptonic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronstroem, H.I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R.P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R.D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Toepfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Britton, D.I.; Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Edwards, K.W.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Prentice, J.D.; Saull, P.R.B.; Seidel, S.C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Van de Water, R.G.; Yoon, T.S.; Ressing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K.R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.

    1992-12-01

    Observation of the semileptonic decay of the charmed baryon Ξ c 0 in the decay channel Ξ c 0 → Ξ - l + X has been made using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY. The cross section times branching ratio was found to be σ(e + e - → Ξ c 0 X).BR(Ξ c 0 → Ξ - l + X) = 0.74±0.24±0.09 pb. (orig.)

  15. Theoretical study of cylindrical energy analyzers for MeV range heavy ion beam probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    1993-07-01

    A cylindrical energy analyzer with drift spaces is shown to have a second order focusing for beam incident angle when the deflection angle is properly chosen. The analyzer has a possibility to be applied to MeV range heavy ion beam probes, and will be also available for accurate particle energy measurements in many other fields. (author)

  16. Constraining dark energy with clusters: Complementarity with other probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Carlos; Huterer, Dragan; Frieman, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    The Figure of Merit Science Working Group recently forecast the constraints on dark energy that will be achieved prior to the Joint Dark Energy Mission by ground-based experiments that exploit baryon acoustic oscillations, type Ia supernovae, and weak gravitational lensing. We show that cluster counts from ongoing and near-future surveys should provide robust, complementary dark energy constraints. In particular, we find that optimally combined optical and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect cluster surveys should improve the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit for pre-Joint Dark Energy Mission projects by a factor of 2 even without prior knowledge of the nuisance parameters in the cluster mass-observable relation. Comparable improvements are achieved in the forecast precision of parameters specifying the principal component description of the dark energy equation of state parameter, as well as in the growth index γ. These results indicate that cluster counts can play an important complementary role in constraining dark energy and modified gravity even if the associated systematic errors are not strongly controlled.

  17. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-01-01

    The semileptonic decays of (Omega) c and (Omega) b are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy Λ baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For (Omega) b to (Omega) c the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured Λ c + → Λe + ν rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of (Omega) b to pairs of ground and excited (Omega) c states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of (Omega) Q vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 ± 2%) for the fraction of (Omega) c → Ξ (*) decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of (Omega) c → (Omega) (*) decays to the ground state (Omega). The elastic fraction of (Omega) b → (Omega) c ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models

  18. Higgs production as a probe of dark energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Seery, David

    2009-11-01

    We study Higgs production under the influence of a light, scalar dark energy field with chameleon-like couplings to matter. Our analysis is relevant for hadron colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider, which are expected to manufacture Higgs particles through weak boson fusion, or associated production with a Z or W ± . We show that the corrections arising in these models are too small to be observed. This result can be attributed to the gauge invariance of the low energy Lagrangian. As a by-product of our analysis, we provide the first microphysical realization of a dark energy model coupled to the electromagnetic field strength. In models where dark energy couples to all matter species in a uniform manner we are able to give a new, stringent bound on its coupling strength. (orig.)

  19. Higgs production as a probe of dark energy interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Seery, David; Weltman, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    We study Higgs production under the influence of a light, scalar dark energy field with chameleon-like couplings to matter. Our analysis is relevant for hadron colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider, which are expected to manufacture Higgs particles through weak boson fusion, or associated production with a Z or W. We show that the corrections arising in these models are too small to be observed. This result can be attributed to the gauge invariance of the low energy Lagrangian. As a by-product of our analysis, we provide the first microphysical realization of a dark energy model coupled to the electromagnetic field strength. In models where dark energy couples to all matter species in a uniform manner we are able to give a new, stringent bound on its coupling strength.

  20. Higgs production as a probe of dark energy interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA2306, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Physique Theorique; Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Davis, Anne-Christine; Seery, David [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences; Weltmann, Amanda [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences; Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics; Centre for Theoretical Cosmology Fellow, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    We study Higgs production under the influence of a light, scalar dark energy field with chameleon-like couplings to matter. Our analysis is relevant for hadron colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider, which are expected to manufacture Higgs particles through weak boson fusion, or associated production with a Z or W{sup {+-}}. We show that the corrections arising in these models are too small to be observed. This result can be attributed to the gauge invariance of the low energy Lagrangian. As a by-product of our analysis, we provide the first microphysical realization of a dark energy model coupled to the electromagnetic field strength. In models where dark energy couples to all matter species in a uniform manner we are able to give a new, stringent bound on its coupling strength. (orig.)

  1. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion collisions (HIC have been widely used to extract the parametrization of symmetry energy term of nuclear equation of state as a function of barionic density. HIC in fact are a unique tool in terrestrial laboratories to explore the symmetry energy around the saturation density (ρ0 = 0.16fm−3 from sub-saturation densities (Fermi energies towards compressed nuclear matter (ρ > 2 − 3ρ0 that can be reached at relativistic energies, as a function of different conditions of temperature, mass asymmetry and isospin. One of the main study at present is to reach a coherent description of EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter from heavy ion collisions of stable and exotic nuclei, nuclear structure studies and astrophysical observations. In this work an overview of the current status of the research is shortly reviewed together with new perspectives aimed to reduce the present experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  2. Probing energy metabolism and microviscosity in cancer using FLIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lukina, Maria M.; Shimolina, Lyubov'E.; Kuimova, Marina K.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav I.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a promising non-invasive highly sensitive technique for probing multiple physiological and physicochemical parameters in living cells and tissues. The present study is focused on the investigation of bioenergetics and microscopic viscosity of cultured cancer cells and animal tumors using FLIM during natural growth and chemotherapy. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of the metabolic cofactor NAD(P)H revealed a decrease of the relative amplitude of free NAD(P)H after cisplatin treatment, indicating a change towards a more oxidative metabolic state. Microviscosity mapping performed with the use of fluorescent molecular rotor BODIPY-2 showed a pronounced increase in the plasma membrane viscosity in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. Although biochemical mechanisms underlying the metabolic and viscosity alterations during chemotherapy have yet to be clarified, our data suggest that the cisplatin-induced changes in cellular metabolism and membrane viscosity play a role in the cytotoxicity of the drug. The results of the study contribute to an understanding of mechanisms of cisplatin action and will be useful for development new approach for assessing response to a therapy.

  3. Higgs production as a probe of chameleon dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare; Davis, Anne-Christine; Seery, David; Weltman, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study various particle physics effects of a light, scalar dark energy field with chameleonlike couplings to matter. We show that a chameleon model with only matter couplings will induce a coupling to photons. In doing so, we derive the first microphysical realization of a chameleonic dark energy model coupled to the electromagnetic field strength. This analysis provides additional motivation for current and near-future tests of axionlike and chameleon particles. We find a new bound on the coupling strength of chameleons in uniformly coupled models. We also study the effect of chameleon fields on Higgs production, which is relevant for hadron colliders. These are expected to manufacture Higgs particles through weak boson fusion, or associated production with a Z or W ± . We show that, like the Tevatron, the LHC will not be able to rule out or observe chameleons through this mechanism, because gauge invariance of the low energy Lagrangian suppresses the corrections that may arise.

  4. Measurement of inclusive semileptonic B decays with the ARGUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nau, A.

    1993-01-01

    Using data collected with the ARGUS detector at the ε + ε - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, the inclusive semileptonic branching ratio of B mesons, the charm content of the final hadronic state and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke have been measured. Model-dependent inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of B mesons are obtained by fitting theoretical models to measured and corrected lepton spectra. Using the free-quark model gives BR (B → Xl y ) = (9.4±0.1±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke 0.041±0.001±0.002, the model of Altarelli et al. BR(B→Xlν)=(9.7±0.2±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.041±0.001±0.002, the one of Grinstein et al. BR(B→Xlν)=(9.5±0.1±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke 0.042±0.001±0.006, and a modified version of the Grinstein et al. model with free D ** content BR(B→Xlν) =(9.7±0.5±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.043±0.006±0.002 were l is either an electron or a muon. The first quoted error on the semileptonic branching ratio is statistical and the second systematic, whereas the first error on vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke is experimental and the second theoretical. A 'model-independent' inclusive semileptonic branching ratio for B mesons and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke are obtained by tagging electrons with D 0 and D *+ mesons. The results are: BR(B→Xeν)=(11.2±2.8±1.1)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.045±0.006±0.002. Counting the charm fraction in the final hadronic state in semileptonic B decays with letpon momenta greater than 1.2 GeV/c yields (97±11±8)%. (orig.) [de

  5. Probing dark energy using convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinda, Bikash R., E-mail: bikash@ctp-jamia.res.in [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2017-09-01

    Weak lensing convergence statistics is a powerful tool to probe dark energy. Dark energy plays an important role to the structure formation and the effects can be detected through the convergence power spectrum, bi-spectrum etc. One of the most promising and simplest dark energy model is the ΛCDM . However, it is worth investigating different dark energy models with evolving equation of state of the dark energy. In this work, detectability of different dark energy models from ΛCDM model has been explored through convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum.

  6. Probing hot dense matter with jet energy loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levai, P.; Barnafoeldi, G.G.; Gyulassy, M.; Vitev, I.; Fai, G.; Zhang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    We study, in a pQCD calculation augmented by nuclear effects, the jet energy loss needed to reproduce the π 0 spectra in Au+Au collisions at large p T , measured by PHENIX at RHIC. The transverse width of the parton momentum distributions (intrinsic k T ) is used phenomenologically to obtain a reliable baseline pp result. Jet quenching is applied to the nuclear spectra (including shadowing and multiscattering) to fit the data. Latest results on fluctuating gluon radiation are considered to measure the opacity of the produced hot dense matter at RHIC energy. (orig.)

  7. Pair transfer processes probed at deep sub barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradi, L.; Mason, P.; Fioretto, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Szinler, S.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N.; Pollarolo, G.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C.A.; Gadea, A.; Haas, F.; Marginean, N.

    2011-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer cross sections in the system 40 Ca+ 96 Zr have been measured at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼ 25% below. Target-like (lighter) recoils in inverse kinematics have been completely identified in A,Z and Q-value with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental slopes of the neutron transfer probabilities at large internuclear separation are consistent with the values derived from the binding energies. A phenomenological interpretation of the transfer probabilities indicates the presence of enhanced values for the even number of neutron transfers. (authors)

  8. Neutron stars as probes of extreme energy density matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... Neutron stars have long been regarded as extraterrestrial laboratories from which we can learn about extreme energy density matter at low temperatures. In this article, some of the recent advances made in astrophysical observations and related theory are highlighted. Although the focus is on the much ...

  9. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. L. Junager

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells.

  10. Probing nuclei with high-energy hadronic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    I review the subject of hadron-nucleus collisions at energies where peturbative theory is applicable. Reactions studied experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron include the Drell-Yan Process, direct photon production, quarkonium production, and open charm production. I conclude with an observation about a new era of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus experiments which will be carried out at the hadron colliders, RHIC and LHC

  11. Probing Plasmonic Nanostructures with Electron Energy - Loss Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren

    for nonlocal response. The experimental work comprises the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to excite and study both localized and propagating surface plasmons in metal structures. Following a short introduction, we present the theoretical foundation to describe nonlocal response in Maxwell......, dimer with nanometer-sized gaps, core-shell nanowire with ultrathin metal shell, and a thin metal film. In all cases we compare the nonlocal models with the local-response approximation. Below the plasma frequency, we find that the distance between the induced positive and negative surface charges...

  12. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.

  13. Probes for the development of medium deep geothermal energy; Sonden zur Erschliessung der mitteltiefen Geothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuckmann, Uwe; Gottschalk, Daniel [REHAU AG und Co., Rehau (Germany)

    2011-10-24

    Compared to the near-surface geothermal energy, higher temperatures can be developed in the medium-depth geothermal energy (400 to 1,000 meters). Thus, the efficiency of geothermal power plants can be increased. The significantly higher yield performance and extraction performance are opposite to the higher costs of installation. At high thermal gradients of the surface one may completely dispense with the heat pump and directly heat. Geothermal probes at the current state of the art are reaching the limits of its applicability. Only newly developed geothermal probes offer a pressure resistance and temperature resistance in order to exploit these deeper regions. Such projects will be accompanied by the mining authority according to the power of approval. Extensive financial supports are available with the market incentive program of the Federal Government. Thus, the use of geothermal probes is possible in deeper regions. The feasibility and cost of future projects will be affected positively.

  14. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  15. Probing quark mass effects in low-energy hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditsche, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Since quarks are confined inside hadrons, their properties as well as their contributions to hadronic observables can be assessed by indirect methods only. As the strength of the strong interaction increases with the spatial distance, the treatment of quantum chromodynamics at low energies in general requires non-perturbative methods like dispersion relations or lattice gauge theory. Based on the fact that the light quark masses are very small with respect to the typical hadronic mass scales for mesons and baryons, furthermore effective field theories can be constructed to describe low-energy properties and dynamics of hadrons perturbatively. The present work is concerned with two particularly interesting hadronic processes that are closely related to the light quark masses. Although distinct theoretical frameworks utilizing different calculational techniques are applied, in both cases the investigations at hand are prerequisites for high-precision analyses of the respective quark-mass effects. In the first part of this thesis, we investigate higher-order isospin-breaking effects in η→3π decays, namely η→π 0 π + π - and η→3π 0 , in chiral perturbation theory. By evaluating the second-order mixed strong and electromagnetic isospin-breaking corrections, we confirm the picture that the electromagnetic contributions are small. Therefore, η→3π is perfectly suited to extract isospin-breaking ratios of light quark masses via comparing theoretical predictions with experimental results. Since for an accurate determination a detailed description of the Dalitz plot distributions is necessary, we study the different effects of higher-order isospin breaking in η→3π on a more general basis. In particular, we investigate corrections to isospin relations between both decay channels at the level of Dalitz plot parameters, showing that the branching ratio of the two partial decay widths entails sizeable uncertainties. In the second part, we develop a dispersive

  16. Review of semileptonic $b$-hadron decays excluding the $| V_{ xb} |$ and $R$$(D^{(*)})$ measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A review of other semileptonic b -hadron decays that are not related to R ( D ( ∗ ) ) and | V xb | anomalies are presented. A couple of long-standing puzzles in B → D ∗∗ ` ν decays are revisited and potential issues and advantages of studying B 0 s and Λ 0 b semileptonic decays are discussed.

  17. Exclusive semileptonic decays of open bottom mesons into pseudoscalar open charm mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Arpit; Vinodkumar, P.C.; Patel, Bhavin

    2013-01-01

    The study of semileptonic decays of heavy quarks provides the cleanest avenue for the determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, which are fundamental parameters in the standard model of particle physics. The coupling strength of the weak b → c transition is proportional to |Vcb|, which has been measured in exclusive semileptonic transitions B → Dℓν ℓ

  18. LHCb Results on Semileptonic B/B$_s$/$\\Lambda_b$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2013-01-01

    Studies of semileptonic decays of b hadrons with the LHCb experiment are reported. In particular, measurements of the b hadron production fractions at the LHC and Bs semileptonic decays in P-wave charmed mesons are presented. An outlook of the LHCb potential in measuring the CKM matrix elements Vub and Vcb, as well as decays involving taus, is given.

  19. Search for direct $CP$ violation in $D^0 \\rightarrow h^- h^+$ modes using semileptonic $B$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A search for direct $CP$ violation in $D^0\\rightarrow h^-h^+$ (where $h=K$ or $\\pi$) is presented using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2011 by LHCb in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The analysis uses $D^0$ mesons produced in inclusive semileptonic $b$-hadron decays to the $D^0\\mu X$ final state, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to tag the flavour of the $D^0$ meson. The difference in the $CP$-violating asymmetries between the two decay channels is measured to be \\begin{equation} \\Delta A_{CP} = A_{CP}(K^-K^+)-A_{CP}(\\pi^-\\pi^+) = (0.49\\pm 0.30\\,\\rm{(stat)} \\pm 0.14\\,\\rm{(syst)})\\% \\ . \

  20. Semileptonic decays of Λ{sub c} baryons in the relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustov, R.N.; Galkin, V.O. [Institute of Informatics in Education, FRC CSC RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in studying weak decays of the Λ{sub c} baryon we investigate its semileptonic decays in the framework of the relativistic quark model based on the quasipotential approach with the QCD-motivated potential. The form factors of the Λ{sub c} → Λlν{sub l} and Λ{sub c} → nlν{sub l} decays are calculated in the whole accessible kinematical region without extrapolations and additional model assumptions. Relativistic effects are systematically taken into account including transformations of baryon wave functions from the rest to moving reference frame and contributions of the intermediate negative-energy states. Baryon wave functions found in the previous mass spectrum calculations are used for the numerical evaluation. Comprehensive predictions for decay rates, asymmetries and polarization parameters are given. They agree well with available experimental data. (orig.)

  1. Probing low-energy hyperbolic polaritons in van der Waals crystals with an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govyadinov, Alexander A; Konečná, Andrea; Chuvilin, Andrey; Vélez, Saül; Dolado, Irene; Nikitin, Alexey Y; Lopatin, Sergei; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E; Aizpurua, Javier; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-07-21

    Van der Waals materials exhibit intriguing structural, electronic, and photonic properties. Electron energy loss spectroscopy within scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for nanoscale mapping of such properties. However, its detection is typically limited to energy losses in the eV range-too large for probing low-energy excitations such as phonons or mid-infrared plasmons. Here, we adapt a conventional instrument to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, a representative van der Waals material. The boron nitride spectra depend on the flake thickness and on the distance of the electron beam to the flake edges. To explain these observations, we developed a classical response theory that describes the interaction of fast electrons with (anisotropic) van der Waals slabs, revealing that the electron energy loss is dominated by excitation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons, and not of bulk phonons as often reported. Thus, our work is of fundamental importance for interpreting future low-energy loss spectra of van der Waals materials.Here the authors adapt a STEM-EELS system to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and apply it to map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, revealing that the electron loss is dominated by hyperbolic phonon polaritons.

  2. Probing low-energy hyperbolic polaritons in van der Waals crystals with an electron microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Govyadinov, Alexander A.

    2017-07-14

    Van der Waals materials exhibit intriguing structural, electronic, and photonic properties. Electron energy loss spectroscopy within scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for nanoscale mapping of such properties. However, its detection is typically limited to energy losses in the eV range-too large for probing low-energy excitations such as phonons or mid-infrared plasmons. Here, we adapt a conventional instrument to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, a representative van der Waals material. The boron nitride spectra depend on the flake thickness and on the distance of the electron beam to the flake edges. To explain these observations, we developed a classical response theory that describes the interaction of fast electrons with (anisotropic) van der Waals slabs, revealing that the electron energy loss is dominated by excitation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons, and not of bulk phonons as often reported. Thus, our work is of fundamental importance for interpreting future low-energy loss spectra of van der Waals materials.Here the authors adapt a STEM-EELS system to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and apply it to map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, revealing that the electron loss is dominated by hyperbolic phonon polaritons.

  3. Probing low-energy hyperbolic polaritons in van der Waals crystals with an electron microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Govyadinov, Alexander A.; Konečná , Andrea; Chuvilin, Andrey; Vé lez, Saü l; Dolado, Irene; Nikitin, Alexey Y.; Lopatin, Sergei; Casanova, Fè lix; Hueso, Luis E.; Aizpurua, Javier; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Van der Waals materials exhibit intriguing structural, electronic, and photonic properties. Electron energy loss spectroscopy within scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for nanoscale mapping of such properties. However, its detection is typically limited to energy losses in the eV range-too large for probing low-energy excitations such as phonons or mid-infrared plasmons. Here, we adapt a conventional instrument to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, a representative van der Waals material. The boron nitride spectra depend on the flake thickness and on the distance of the electron beam to the flake edges. To explain these observations, we developed a classical response theory that describes the interaction of fast electrons with (anisotropic) van der Waals slabs, revealing that the electron energy loss is dominated by excitation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons, and not of bulk phonons as often reported. Thus, our work is of fundamental importance for interpreting future low-energy loss spectra of van der Waals materials.Here the authors adapt a STEM-EELS system to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and apply it to map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, revealing that the electron loss is dominated by hyperbolic phonon polaritons.

  4. International workshop on the 'Physics of interfaces by synchrotron radiation and other high energy probes'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krummacher, S.; Gudat, W.

    1986-05-01

    The present 'book of abstracts' consists of the abstracts of 23 lectures, held at the international workshop on the 'Physics of interfaces by synchrotron radiation and other high energy probes', April 1986, Bad Honnef, FRG. The subjects are: The use of photoemission in the study of interfaces and adsorbates, EEL spectroscopy applications, spin polarization, photoionization processes and EXAFS. (BHO)

  5. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  6. Final Technical Report - Nuclear Studies with Intermediate Energy Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, Blaine [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-12-14

    During the almost 20 year period of this grant research was carried out on atomic nuclei and their constituents using both photons and electrons. Research was carried out at the electron accelerator facility of the Netherlands Institute for Nuclear and High Energy Physics (NIKHEFK, Amsterdam) until the electron accelerator facility was closed in 1998. Subsequently, research was carried out at the Laser-Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) located at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) until the LEGS was closed at the end of 2006. During the next several years research was carried out at both the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) and the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) of the Tri-Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) located on the campus of Duke University. Since approximately 2010 the principal focus was on research at TUNL, although analysis of data from previous research at other facilities continued. The principal early focus of the research was on the role of pions in nuclei. This was studied by studying the production of pions using both photons (at LEGS) and electrons (at NIKHEF-K and JLAB). Measurements of charged pion photoproduction from deuterium at LEGS resulted in the most interesting result of these two decades of work. By measuring the production of a charged pion (p + ) in coincidence with an emitted photon we observed structures in the residual two-nucleon system. These indicated the existence of long-lived states not explicable by standard nuclear theory; they suggest a set of configurations not explicable in terms of a nucleon-nucleon pair. The existence of such “exotic” structures has formed the foundation for most of the work that has ensued.

  7. SU(3) properties of semileptonic and nonleptonic decays of mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montvay, I.

    1977-11-01

    The recent discovery of charmed D and F mesons led to an accumulation of a lot of information on the weak decays of these particles. The facts known at present are generally consistent with the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiami scheme for the weak currents, which are predicted the fourth flavour of quarks, the charm. The weak decays of the charmed mesons are governed by SU(3) rules analogous to the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule for strong decays. Such Su(3) rules are given for semileptonic and nonleptonic decays of strange and charmed mesons. These relations depend on the colour structure of currents in the nonleptonic case. (D.P.)

  8. Normal or abnormal isospin-fractionation as a qualitative probe of nuclear symmetry energy at supradensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wenmei; Yong, Gaochan; Wang, Yongjia; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Zuo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Within two different frameworks of isospin-dependent transport model, effect of nuclear symmetry energy at supradensities on the isospin-fractionation (IsoF) was investigated. With positive/negative symmetry potential at supradensities (i.e., values of symmetry energy increase/decrease with density above saturation density), for energetic nucleons, the value of neutron to proton ratio of free nucleons is larger/smaller than that of bound nucleon fragments. Compared with extensively studied quantitative observables of nuclear symmetry energy, the normal or abnormal isospin-fractionation of energetic nucleons can be a qualitative probe of nuclear symmetry energy at supradensities

  9. Probing in-medium spin–orbit interaction with intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating for the first time both the spin and isospin degrees of freedom explicitly in transport model simulations of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, we observe that a local spin polarization appears during collision process. Most interestingly, it is found that the nucleon spin up–down differential transverse flow is a sensitive probe of the spin–orbit interaction, providing a novel approach to probe both the density and isospin dependence of the in-medium spin–orbit coupling that is important for understanding the structure of rare isotopes and synthesis of superheavy elements

  10. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  11. Semileptonic decays of the B{sub c} meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar-751004 (India); Naimuddin, Sk [Department of Physics, Maharishi College of Natural Law, Bhubaneswar-751007 (India); Dash, P C [Department of Physics, Prananath Autonomous College, Khurda-752057 (India); Kar, Susmita [Department of Physics, North Orissa University, Baripada-757003 (India)

    2009-10-01

    We study the semileptonic transitions B{sub c}{yields}{eta}{sub c},J/{psi},D,D*,B,B*,B{sub s},B{sub s}* in the leading order in the framework of a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in the equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. We compute relevant weak form factors as overlap integrals of the meson-wave functions obtained in the relativistic independent quark model in the whole accessible kinematical range. We predict that the semileptonic transitions of the B{sub c} meson are mostly dominated by two Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-favored modes, B{sub c}{yields}B{sub s}(B{sub s}*)e{nu}, contributing about 77% of the total decay width, and its decays to vector meson final states take place in the predominantly transverse mode. Our predicted values for the total decay rates, branching ratios, polarization ratios, the forward-backward asymmetry factor, etc., are broadly in agreement with other model predictions.

  12. Studies of the inclusive semileptonic decays of the B hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Jong Il

    2000-01-01

    A detailed description of a new analysis, in which the correlation of the electric charge of the b-quark to that of the lepton is utilized to isolate different decay modes of the b-hadrons, is presented. Using the data collected by the DELPHI detector during the 1994 and 1995 data-taking periods, the inclusive b-hadron semileptonic branching fraction is measured to be B R b→ℓ % =10.75+/-0.15stat +/-0.28syst -0.24+0.43model . Along with the semileptonic branching fraction, the branching fractions for the cascade mode, b→c→ℓ , and the upper-vertex mode, b→c&d1;→ℓ , are also measured: BR b→c→ℓ %=7.99+/-0.27 stat+/-0.28 syst-0.21+0.10 model BR b→c→ℓ %=1.34+/-0.30 stat+/-0.29 syst+0.36-0.58 model.

  13. Probing interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Miao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we place observational constraints on the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model. We consider three kinds of phenomenological interactions between holographic dark energy and matter, i.e., the interaction term Q is proportional to the energy densities of dark energy (ρ Λ ), matter (ρ m ), and matter plus dark energy (ρ m +ρ Λ ). For probing the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model, we use the latest observational data including the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Constitution data, the shift parameter of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) given by the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our results show that the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model are both rather small. Besides, it is interesting to find that there exists significant degeneracy between the phenomenological interaction and the spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model

  14. High-energyprobe laser for laser-plasma experiments at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S.H.; Weiland, T.L.; Bower, J.; MacKinnon, A.J.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    For the characterization of inertial confinement fusion plasmas, we implemented a high-energyprobe laser at the Nova laser facility. A total energy of >50 J at 4ω, a focal spot size of order 100 μm, and a pointing accuracy of 100 μm was demonstrated for target shots. This laser provides intensities of up to 3x10 14 Wcm -2 and therefore fulfills high-power requirements for laser-plasma interaction experiments. The 4ω probe laser is now routinely used for Thomson scattering. Successful experiments were performed in gas-filled hohlraums at electron densities of n e >2x10 21 cm -3 which represents the highest density plasma so far being diagnosed with Thomson scattering. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. The evolution of ring current ion energy density and energy content during geomagnetic storms based on Van Allen Probes measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H.; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Li, X.; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Baker, D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Enabled by the comprehensive measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), Helium Oxygen Proton Electron mass spectrometer (HOPE), and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instruments onboard Van Allen Probes in the heart of the radiation belt, the relative contributions of ions with different energies and species to the ring current energy density and their dependence on the phases of geomagnetic storms are quantified. The results show that lower energy (<50 keV) protons enhance much more often and also decay much faster than higher-energy protons. During the storm main phase, ions with energies <50 keV contribute more significantly to the ring current than those with higher energies; while the higher-energy protons dominate during the recovery phase and quiet times. The enhancements of higher-energy proton fluxes as well as energy content generally occur later than those of lower energy protons, which could be due to the inward radial diffusion. For the 29 March 2013 storm we investigated in detail that the contribution from O + is ~25% of the ring current energy content during the main phase and the majority of that comes from <50 keV O + . This indicates that even during moderate geomagnetic storms the ionosphere is still an important contributor to the ring current ions. Using the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relation, the contributions of ring current particles to the magnetic field depression during this geomagnetic storm are also calculated. In conclusion, the results show that the measured ring current ions contribute about half of the Dst depression.

  16. Phosphorescence as a probe of exciton formation and energy transfer in organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Segal, M.

    2004-01-01

    The development of highly efficient phosphorescent molecules has approximately quadrupled the quantum efficiency of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). By harnessing triplet as well as singlet excitons, efficient molecular phosphorescence has also enabled novel studies of exciton physics in organic semiconductors. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in understanding exciton formation and energy transfer using phosphorescent molecular probes. Particular emphasis is given to two topics of current interest: energy transfer in blue phosphorescent OLEDs, and quantifying the formation ratio of singlet to triplet excitons in small-molecular weight materials and polymers. (orig.)

  17. Radiative corrections of semileptonic hyperon decays Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaritisz, T.; Szegoe, K.; Toth, K.

    1982-07-01

    The beta decay of free quarks is studied in the framework of the standard SU(2) x U(1) model of weak and electromagnetic interactions. The so-called 'weak' part of radiative corrections is evaluated to order α in one-loop approximation using a renormalization scheme, which adjusts the counter terms to the electric charge, and to the mass of the charged and neutral vector bosons, Msub(w) and Msub(o), respectively. The obtained result is, to a good approximation, equal with the 'weak' part of radiative corrections for the semileptonic decay of any hyperon. It is shown in the model that the methods, which work excellently in case of the 'weak' corrections, do not, in general, provide us with the dominant part of the 'photonic' corrections. (author)

  18. Semileptonic Bc decays in the light-front quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the exclusive semileptonic B c →(D,η c ,B,B s )lν l , η b →B c lν l (l=e,μ,τ) decays using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD motivated effective Hamiltonian. The form factors f + (q 2 ) and f - (q 2 ) are obtained from the analytic continuation method in the q + =0 frame. While the form factor f + (q 2 ) is free from the zero mode, the form factor f - (q 2 ) is not free from the zero mode in the q + =0 frame. Using our effective method to relate the non-wave function vertex to the light-front valence wave function, we incorporate the zero-mode contribution as a convolution of zero-mode operator with the initial and final state wave functions.

  19. Measurement of |Vub| from Inclusive Charmless Semileptonic B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, P.; Barberio, E.; Limosani, A.; Sevior, M. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Wedd, R.; Adachi, I.; Dalseno, J.; Haba, J.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the partial branching fraction for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays and the corresponding value of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V ub |, using a multivariate analysis method to access ∼90% of the B→X u lν phase space. This approach dramatically reduces the theoretical uncertainties from the b-quark mass and nonperturbative QCD compared to all previous inclusive measurements. The results are based on a sample of 657x10 6 BB pairs collected with the Belle detector. We find that ΔB(B→X u lν;p l *B >1.0 GeV/c)=1.963x(1±0.088 stat ±0.081 syst )x10 -3 . Corresponding values of |V ub | are extracted using several theoretical calculations.

  20. Search for semileptonic decays of photoproduced charmed mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    In the broad band neutral beam at Fermilab, a search for photoproduction of charmed D mesons was done using photons of 100 to 300 GeV. The reaction considered was γ + Be → DantiD + X, leptons + ..., K 0 /sub s/nπ/sup +-/. No statistically significant evidence for D production is observed based on the K 0 /sub s/nπ/sup +-/ mass spectrum. The sensitivity of the search is commensurate with theoretical estimates of sigma(γp → DantiD + X) approximately 500 nb, however this is dependent on branching ratios and photoproduction models. Data are given on a similar search for semileptonic decays of charmed baryons. 48 references

  1. System size and beam energy effects on probing the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy with pion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ming; Xiao Zhigang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Yong Gaochan; Zhu Shengjiang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the isospin-and momentum-dependent hadronic transport model IBUU04, we have investigated the π - /π + ratio in the following three reactions: 48 Ca+ 48 Ca, 124 Sn + 124 Sn and 197 Au + 197 Au with nearly the same isospin asymmetry but different masses, at the bombarding energies from 0.25 to 0.6 AGeV. It is shown that the sensitivity of probing the E sym (ρ) with π - /π + increases with increasing the system size or decreasing the beam energy, showing a correlation to the degree of isospin fractionation. Therefore, with a given isospin asymmetry, heavier system at energies near the pion threshold is preferential to study the behavior of nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities.

  2. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  3. Determination of hot carrier energy distributions from inversion of ultrafast pump-probe reflectivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilpern, Tal; Manjare, Manoj; Govorov, Alexander O; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gray, Stephen K; Harutyunyan, Hayk

    2018-05-10

    Developing a fundamental understanding of ultrafast non-thermal processes in metallic nanosystems will lead to applications in photodetection, photochemistry and photonic circuitry. Typically, non-thermal and thermal carrier populations in plasmonic systems are inferred either by making assumptions about the functional form of the initial energy distribution or using indirect sensors like localized plasmon frequency shifts. Here we directly determine non-thermal and thermal distributions and dynamics in thin films by applying a double inversion procedure to optical pump-probe data that relates the reflectivity changes around Fermi energy to the changes in the dielectric function and in the single-electron energy band occupancies. When applied to normal incidence measurements our method uncovers the ultrafast excitation of a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution and its subsequent thermalization dynamics. Furthermore, when applied to the Kretschmann configuration, we show that the excitation of propagating plasmons leads to a broader energy distribution of electrons due to the enhanced Landau damping.

  4. Heavy-residue isoscaling as a probe of the symmetry energy of hot fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souliotis, G.A.; Shetty, D.V.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E.; Jandel, M.; Veselsky, M.; Yennello, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The isoscaling properties of isotopically resolved projectile residues from peripheral collisions of 86 Kr (25 MeV/nucleon) 64 Ni (25 MeV/nucleon), and 136 Xe (20 MeV/nucleon) beams on various target pairs are employed to probe the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy. The present study focuses on heavy projectile fragments produced in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions near the onset of multifragment emission (E * /A=2-3 MeV). For these fragments, the measured average velocities are used to extract excitation energies. The excitation energies, in turn, are used to estimate the temperatures of the fragmenting quasiprojectiles in the framework the Fermi gas model. The isoscaling analysis of the fragment yields provided the isoscaling parameters α that, in combination with temperatures and isospin asymmetries provided the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy of the hot fragmenting quasiprojectiles. The extracted values of the symmetry energy coefficient at this excitation energy range (2-3 MeV/nucleon) are lower than the typical liquid-drop model value ∼25 MeV corresponding to ground-state nuclei and show a monotonic decrease with increasing excitation energy. This result is of importance in the formation of hot nuclei in heavy-ion reactions and in hot stellar environments such as supernova

  5. Measurement of the Moments of the Hadronic Invariant Mass Distribution in Semileptonic B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.

    2005-01-01

    Using 180 pb -1 of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we measure the first two moments of the hadronic invariant mass-squared distribution in charmed semileptonic B decays. From these we determine the non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory parameters Λ and λ 1 used to relate the B meson semileptonic branching ratio to the CKM matrix element |V cb |

  6. Transitional behavior of different energy protons based on Van Allen Probes observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Chao; Bortnik, Jacob; Chen, Lunjin; Ma, Qianli

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamical behavior of ~1 eV to 50 keV ions and identifying the energies at which the morphologies transit are important in that they involve the relative intensities and distributions of the large-scale electric and magnetic fields, the outflow, and recombination rates. However, there have been only few direct observational investigations of the transition in drift behaviors of different energy ions before the Van Allen Probes era. In this paper, we statistically analyze ~1 eV to 50 keV hydrogen (H + ) differential flux distributions near geomagnetic equator by using Van Allen Probes observations to investigate the H + dynamics under the regulation of large-scale electric and magnetic fields. Our survey clearly indicates three types of H + behaviors within different energy ranges, which is consistent with previous theory predictions. Finally, using simple electric and magnetic field models in UBK coordinates, we have further constrained the source regions of different energy ions and their drift directions.

  7. Probing dark energy with braneworld cosmology in the light of recent cosmological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.; Magaña, Juan; Hernández-Almada, A.; Motta, V.

    We investigate a brane model based on Randall-Sundrum scenarios with a generic dark energy component. The latter drives the accelerated expansion at late-times of the universe. In this scheme, extra terms are added into Einstein Field equations that are propagated to the Friedmann equations. To constrain the dark energy equation-of-state (EoS) and the brane tension we use observational data with different energy levels (Supernovae Type Ia, H(z), baryon acoustic oscillations, and cosmic microwave background radiation distance, and a joint analysis) in a background cosmology. Beside EoS being consistent with a cosmological constant at the 3σ confidence level for each dataset, the baryon acoustic oscillations probe favors an EoS consistent with a quintessence dark energy. Although we found different lower limit bounds on the brane tension for each dataset, being the most restricted for CMB, there is not enough evidence of modifications in the cosmological evolution of the universe by the existence of an extra dimension within observational uncertainties. Nevertheless, these new bounds are complementary to those obtained by other probes like table-top experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, and stellar dynamics. Our results show that a further test of the braneworld model with appropriate correction terms or a profound analysis with perturbations, may be needed to improve the constraints provided by the current data.

  8. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giurgiu, Gavril A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons using semileptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ℓ+v decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.7 ps-1 at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B → μX decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B$0\\atop{s}$ flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B0 and B+ semileptonic B0/+ → Dℓv decays. The oscillation frequency Δmd in semileptonic B0 → Dℓv decays is measured to be Δmd = (0.501 ± 0.029(stat.) ± 0.017(syst.)) ps-1.

  9. Measurement of CP violation in B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing using semileptonic decays at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Lucia

    2015-07-22

    This thesis presents the measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb{sup -1} collected at the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. This analysis uses untagged, semileptonic B{sup 0}→D{sup -}μ{sup +}ν{sup -} and B{sup 0}→D{sup *-}μ{sup +}ν{sup -} decays, where the D{sup -} decays into K{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup -}, and the D{sup *-} decays into anti D{sup 0}(→ K{sup +}π{sup -})π{sup -}. The neutrino in the semileptonic B decays is not reconstructed. A decay time dependent fit allows to disentangle the CP asymmetry from the possible B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} production asymmetry. Detection and reconstruction asymmetries are calibrated using promptly produced Cabibbo-favored D{sup +} decays, and inclusive secondary J/ψ decays. The CP-violating asymmetry is measured to be a{sup d}{sub sl}=(-0.02±0.19 (stat)±0.30(syst))%. This result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction, and it is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date. This measurement is published in Physical Review Letters.

  10. Study of the ${X^\\pm(5568)}$ state with semileptonic decays of the ${B_s^0}$ meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2017-12-29

    We present a study of the $X^\\pm(5568)$ using semileptonic decays of the $B_s^0$ meson using the full Run II integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb$^{-1}$ in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96\\,TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We report evidence for a narrow structure, $X^\\pm(5568)$, in the decay sequence $X^\\pm(5568) \\to B_s^0 \\pi^\\pm$ where $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^\\mp D_s^\\pm \\, \\mathrm{X}$, $D_s^\\pm \\rightarrow \\phi \\pi^{\\pm}$ which is consistent with the previous measurement by the D0 collaboration in the hadronic decay mode, $X^\\pm(5568) \\to B^0_s \\pi^\\pm$ where $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\phi$. The mass and width of this state are measured using a combined fit of the hadronic and semileptonic data, yielding $m = 5566.9 ^{+3.2}_{-3.1} \\thinspace {\\rm (stat)} ^{+0.6}_{-1.2} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)}$\\,MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma = 18.6 ^{+7.9}_{-6.1} {\\rm \\thinspace (stat)} ^{+3.5}_{-3.8} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)} $\\,MeV/$c^2$ with a significance of 6.7$\\,\\sigma$.

  11. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  12. Invariance of the solid-liquid interfacial energy in electrowetting probed via capillary condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rohini; Olivier, Gloria K; Frechette, Joelle

    2010-07-20

    Capillary condensation is employed to probe the solid-liquid interfacial energy in electrowetting on dielectric. The height of an annular water meniscus formed via capillary condensation inside the surface force apparatus is measured as a function of the potential applied across the meniscus and the dielectric stack where the meniscus is formed. According to the Kelvin equation, a decrease in the solid-liquid interfacial energy at constant temperature and relative humidity should lead to an increase in the meniscus height. Our experimental results on nanometer-sized meniscus are in agreement with the work of Mugele [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2007, 19, 375112] and unequivocally demonstrate that the real contact angle (or the solid-liquid interfacial energy) remains unaltered in electrowetting on dielectric.

  13. PET-Probe: Evaluation of Technical Performance and Clinical Utility of a Handheld High-Energy Gamma Probe in Oncologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Seza A; Daghighian, Farhad; Essner, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an invaluable part of patient evaluation in surgical oncology. PET is less than optimal for detecting lesions PET-positive lesions can be challenging as a result of difficulties in surgical exposure. We undertook this investigation to assess the utility of a handheld high-energy gamma probe (PET-Probe) for intraoperative identification of 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG)-avid tumors. Forty patients underwent a diagnostic whole-body FDG-PET scan for consideration for surgical exploration and resection. Before surgery, all patients received an intravenous injection of 7 to 10 mCi of FDG. At surgery, the PET-Probe was used to determine absolute counts per second at the known tumor site(s) demonstrated by whole-body PET and at adjacent normal tissue (at least 4 cm away from tumor-bearing sites). Tumor-to-background ratios were calculated. Thirty-two patients (80%) underwent PET-Probe-guided surgery with therapeutic intent in a recurrent or metastatic disease setting. Eight patients underwent surgery for diagnostic exploration. Anatomical locations of the PET-identified lesions were neck and supraclavicular (n = 8), axilla (n = 5), groin and deep iliac (n = 4), trunk and extremity soft tissue (n = 3), abdominal and retroperitoneal (n = 19), and lung (n = 2). PET-Probe detected all PET-positive lesions. The PET-Probe was instrumental in localization of lesions in 15 patients that were not immediately apparent by surgical exploration. The PET-Probe identified all lesions demonstrated by PET scanning and, in selected cases, was useful in localizing FDG-avid disease not seen with conventional PET scanning.

  14. Janus probe, a detection system for high energy reactor gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1980-03-01

    In reactor environments, gamma-ray spectra are continuous and the absolute magnitude as well as the general shape of the gamma continuum are of paramount importance. Consequently, conventional methods of gamma-ray detection are not suitable for in-core gamma-ray spectrometry. To meet these specific needs, a method of continuous gamma-ray spectrometry, namely Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, was developed for in-situ observations of reactor environments. A new gamma-ray detection system has been developed which extends the applicability of Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry up to roughly 7 MeV. This detection system is comprised of two separate Si(Li) detectors placed face-to-face. Hence this new detection system is called the Janus probe. Also shown is the block diagram of pulse processing instrumentation for the Janus probe. This new gamma probe not only extends the upper energy limit of in-core gamma-ray spectrometry, but in addition possesses other fundamental advantages

  15. Probing the energy barriers and magnetization reversal processes of nanoperforated membrane based percolated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, V; Schultz, L; Schulze, C; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Faustini, M; Grosso, D; Lee, J; Kim, S-K; Suess, D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetization reversal processes in Co/Pt multilayers prepared on nanoperforated templates are probed by magnetization relaxation measurements. The signature of pinning controlled domain wall movement as expected for percolated media is identified. This contrasts with the nucleation-type reversal mechanism of a Co/Pt reference film prepared on a smooth substrate. A zero field energy barrier of 93k B T is determined by fluctuation field measurements and is elucidated by micromagnetic calculations using the nudged elastic band method. This value is sufficiently large to qualify the material as a promising percolated medium. (paper)

  16. Probing potential energy curves of C2- by translational energy spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Aravind, G.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies on collision induced dissociation of C 2 - with Ar at an impact energy of 15 keV. The C - fragment ion kinetic-energy release (KER) distribution is measured and is used to compute the KER in the center of mass (c.m.) frame (KER c.m. ). We employ the reflection method to deduce an effective repulsive potential-energy curve for the molecular anion that is otherwise difficult to evaluate from quantum computational methods. The nuclear wave packet of the molecular ion in the initial ground state is computed by the semiclassical WKB method using the potential-energy curve of the 2 Σ g + ground electronic state calculated by an ab initio quantum computation method. The ground-state nuclear wave packet is reflected on a parametrized repulsive potential-energy curve where the parameters are determined by fitting the measured KER c.m. with the calculated KER distribution

  17. Moments in inclusive semileptonic B meson decays at the Belle experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanda, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Since my return to Austria in the year 2003, I have measured observables in inclusive B meson decays at the Belle experiment and worked together with theorists on the interpretation of these measurements in terms of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vcb|. And in fact, only this memorial book project made me fully aware of Kolya Uraltsev's ground breaking theoretical contributions to this field. He was not a theorist who talked a lot to an experimentalist like me, and maybe this is not a bad thing for good science. I certainly remember his enthusiasm from conferences, e.g., when I was powerless to keep his presentation to the scheduled time as a session chair at the CKM2005 workshop in San Diego. Still I feel there is some amount of irony in the fact, that I know so little about a person whose work has been so decisive for my career in high energy physics. To commemorate Kolya Uraltsev's pioneering work on inclusive semileptonic B meson decays B → Xcℓν and on the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), which has already been paid tribute to in other articles in this volume, I will review the measurement of the electron energy and the hadronic mass moments in B → Xcℓν decays performed at the Belle experiment. These measurements allow to both test his theoretical calculations and to extract |Vcb| and non-perturbative quantities, such as the b-quark mass, from his formulae.

  18. Searches for top-antitop quark resonances in semileptonic final states with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00358030

    This thesis presents the results of two searches for a top-antitop quark ($t\\bar{t}$) resonance in semileptonic final states using data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Evidence of resonant $t\\bar{t}$ production would represent a clear sign of new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The first search is based on the full data set recorded by the CMS experiment in proton-proton (pp) collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\text{TeV}$ during the LHC Run-1, for a total integrated luminosity of $19.7~\\text{fb}^{-1}$. The second search considers $2.6~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of pp collisions data recorded by the CMS experiment in the first year of the LHC Run-2 (2015) at the higher center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\text{TeV}$. Both analyses make use of state-of-the-art techniques for the identification of top quarks produced with large transverse momentum. This approach maximizes the sensitivity of the analyses for high-mass...

  19. In-Situ Probing Plasmonic Energy Transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells by Ultrabroadband Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Li, Jia-Xing; Yabushita, Atsushi; Tang, Shih-Han; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-12-18

    In this work, we demonstrated a viable experimental scheme for in-situ probing the effects of Au nanoparticles (NPs) incorporation on plasmonic energy transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells by elaborately analyzing the lifetimes and zero moment for hot carrier relaxation with ultrabroadband femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The signals of enhanced photobleach (PB) and waned photoinduced absorption (PIA) attributable to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au NPs were in-situ probed in transient differential absorption spectra. The results suggested that substantial carriers can be excited from ground state to lower excitation energy levels, which can reach thermalization much faster with the existence of SPR. Thus, direct electron transfer (DET) could be implemented to enhance the photocurrent of CIGS solar cells. Furthermore, based on the extracted hot carrier lifetimes, it was confirmed that the improved electrical transport might have been resulted primarily from the reduction in the surface recombination of photoinduced carriers through enhanced local electromagnetic field (LEMF). Finally, theoretical calculation for resonant energy transfer (RET)-induced enhancement in the probability of exciting electron-hole pairs was conducted and the results agreed well with the enhanced PB peak of transient differential absorption in plasmonic CIGS film. These results indicate that plasmonic energy transfer is a viable approach to boost high-efficiency CIGS solar cells.

  20. Probing neutrino dark energy with extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwald, A.; Schrempp, L.

    2006-06-01

    Recently, a new non-Standard Model neutrino interaction mediated by a light scalar field was proposed, which renders the big-bang relic neutrinos of the cosmic neutrino background a natural dark energy candidate, the so-called Neutrino Dark Energy. As a further consequence of this interaction, the neutrino masses become functions of the neutrino energy densities and are thus promoted to dynamical, time/redshift dependent quantities. Such a possible neutrino mass variation introduces a redshift dependence into the resonance energies associated with the annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on relic anti-neutrinos and vice versa into Z-bosons. In general, this annihilation process is expected to lead to sizeable absorption dips in the spectra to be observed on earth by neutrino observatories operating in the relevant energy region above 10 13 GeV. In our analysis, we contrast the characteristic absorption features produced by constant and varying neutrino masses, including all thermal background effects caused by the relic neutrino motion. We firstly consider neutrinos from astrophysical sources and secondly neutrinos originating from the decomposition of topological defects using the appropriate fragmentation functions. On the one hand, independent of the nature of neutrino masses, our results illustrate the discovery potential for the cosmic neutrino background by means of relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy. On the other hand, they allow to estimate the prospects for testing its possible interpretation as source of Neutrino Dark Energy within the next decade by the neutrino observatories ANITA and LOFAR. (Orig.)

  1. Semileptonic B decays in the Standard Model and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Michael

    2010-09-15

    In this thesis we study several aspects of decays based on the quark level transitions b{yields}s{nu}anti {nu} and b{yields}s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} as well as transition form factors for radiative and rare semileptonic B meson decays. The quark level transition b{yields}s{nu}anti {nu} offers a transparent study of Z penguin and other electroweak penguin effects in New Physics (NP) scenarios in the absence of dipole operator contributions and Higgs penguin contributions. We present an analysis of B{yields}K*{nu}anti {nu} with improved form factors and of the decays B{yields}K{nu}anti {nu} and B{yields}X{sub s}{nu}anti {nu} in the Standard Model (SM) and in a number of NP scenarios like the general Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), general scenarios with modified Z/Z{sup '} penguins and in a singlet scalar extension of the SM. The results for the SM and NP scenarios can be transparently visualized in a ({epsilon};{eta}) plane. The rare decay B{yields}K*({yields}K{pi}){mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is regarded as one of the crucial channels for B physics as it gives rise to a multitude of observables. We investigate systematically the often correlated effects in these observables in the context of the SM and various NP models, in particular the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity and various MSSM scenarios and identify those observables with small to moderate dependence on hadronic quantities and large impact of NP. Furthermore, we study transition form factors for radiative and rare semi-leptonic B-meson decays into light pseudoscalar or vector mesons, combining theoretical and phenomenological constraints from Lattice QCD, light-cone sum rules, and dispersive bounds. We pay particular attention to form factor parameterizations which are based on the so-called series expansion, and study the related systematic uncertainties on a quantitative level. In this analysis as well as in the analysis of the b{yields}s transitions, we use consistently a convenient form

  2. Very High Specific Energy, Medium Power Li/CFx Primary Battery for Launchers and Space Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Paul; Godillot, Gerome; Peres, Jean Paul; Corbin, Julien; Espinosa, Amaya

    2014-08-01

    Benchmark with existing technologies shows the advantages of the lithium-fluorinated carbon (Li/CFx) technology for use aboard future launchers in terms of a low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), especially for high energy demanding missions such as re-ignitable upper stages for long GTO+ missions and probes for deep space exploration.This paper presents the new results obtained on this chemistry in terms of electrical and climatic performances, abuse tests and life tests. Studies - co-financed between CNES and Saft - looked at a pure CFx version with a specific energy up to 500 Wh/kg along with a medium power of 80 to 100 W/kg.

  3. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  4. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung from intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions as a probe of the nuclear symmetry energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, G.-C.; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2008-01-01

    Hard photons from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions are examined as a potential probe of the nuclear symmetry energy within a transport model. Effects of the symmetry energy on the yields and spectra of hard photons are found to be generally smaller than those due to the currently existing uncertainties of both the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections and the photon production probability in the elementary process pn→pnγ. Very interestingly, nevertheless, the ratio of hard photon spectra R 1/2 (γ) from two reactions using isotopes of the same element is not only approximately independent of these uncertainties but also quite sensitive to the symmetry energy. For the head-on reactions of 132 Sn + 124 Sn and 112 Sn + 112 Sn at E beam /A=50 MeV, for example, the R 1/2 (γ) displays a rise up to 15% when the symmetry energy is reduced by about 20% at ρ=1.3ρ 0 which is the maximum density reached in these reactions

  5. Role of "intrinsic charm" in semileptonic B-meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Breidenbach, C; Mannel, T; Turczyk, S

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the role of so-called "intrinsic-charm" operators in semi-leptonic B-meson decays, which appear first at order 1/m_b^3 in the heavy quark expansion. We show by explicit calculation that -- at scales mu <= m_c -- the contributions from "intrinsic-charm" effects can be absorbed into short-distance coefficient functions multiplying, for instance, the Darwin term. Then, the only remnant of "intrinsic charm" are logarithms of the form ln(m_c^2/m_b^2), which can be resummed by using renormalization-group techniques. As long as the dynamics at the charm-quark scale is perturbative, alpha_s(m_c) << 1, this implies that no additional non-perturbative matrix elements aside from the Darwin and the spin-orbit term have to be introduced at order 1/m_b^3. Hence, no sources for additional hadronic uncertainties have to be taken into account. Similar arguments may be made for higher orders in the 1/m_b expansion.

  6. Heavy-light semileptonic decays in staggered chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.

    2007-07-01

    We calculate the form factors for the semileptonic decays of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons in partially quenched staggered chiral perturbation theory (SχPT), working to leading order in 1/mQ, where mQ is the heavy-quark mass. We take the light meson in the final state to be a pseudoscalar corresponding to the exact chiral symmetry of staggered quarks. The treatment assumes the validity of the standard prescription for representing the staggered “fourth-root trick” within SχPT by insertions of factors of 1/4 for each sea-quark loop. Our calculation is based on an existing partially quenched continuum chiral perturbation theory calculation with degenerate sea quarks by Bećirević, Prelovsek, and Zupan, which we generalize to the staggered (and nondegenerate) case. As a byproduct, we obtain the continuum partially quenched results with nondegenerate sea quarks. We analyze the effects of nonleading chiral terms, and find a relation among the coefficients governing the analytic valence mass dependence at this order. Our results are useful in analyzing lattice computations of form factors B→π and D→K, when the light quarks are simulated with the staggered action.

  7. Comparison of species-resolved energy spectra from ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparison between energy spectra measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument and the Van Allen Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) for two significant and distinct events in early 2013. The first is an impulsive solar particle event on March 17th. While intense, this event presented no significant surprises in terms of its composition or anisotropy characteristics, thus providing a good baseline for response of the trapped radiation belts as observed by the Van Allen Probes. The second solar event occurred late May 22nd and early May 23rd. This event has a much greater concentration of medium and heavy ions than the St. Patrick's Day event, as well as having very peculiar energy spectra with evidence of two distinct populations. During the St. Patrick's Day Event, the energy spectra for helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron all show the same spectral power law slope -3.1. The event shows strong anisotropy with intensities differing by a factor of four for both protons and Z>1 ions. The late May event also has strong anisotropy, and in the same directions as the St. Patrick's Day Event, but with very different composition and energy spectra. The spectra are much harder with power law spectral slopes of -0.5. Additionally, there is a significant spectral bump at 3 MeV/nuc for helium that is not present in the spectra of the heavier ions. The intensities of the heavier ions, however, show an increase that is an order of magnitude greater than the increase seen for helium. The March 17 RBSPICE observations show multiple injection events lasting for less than an hour each during the Van Allen Probes B apogees. These injections are seen in protons as well as Helium and only somewhat observed in Oxygen. Spectral slopes for the observations range from approximately -5 during quiet times to double peaked events with a spectral slope of approximately -2 at the beginning of the injection

  8. Electron-muon correlation as a new probe of strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2009-01-01

    As a new and clean probe to the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP), we propose an azimuthal correlation of an electron and a muon that originate from the semileptonic decay of charm and bottom quarks. By solving the Langevin equation for the heavy quarks under the hydrodynamic evolution of the hot plasma, we show that substantial quenching of the away-side peak in the electron-muon correlation can be seen if the sQGP drag force acting on heavy quarks is large enough as suggested from the gauge/gravity correspondence. The effect could be detected in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Multi-Probe Methodology and Simulated Likelihood Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, E.; et al.

    2017-06-28

    We present the methodology for and detail the implementation of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) 3x2pt DES Year 1 (Y1) analysis, which combines configuration-space two-point statistics from three different cosmological probes: cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and galaxy clustering, using data from the first year of DES observations. We have developed two independent modeling pipelines and describe the code validation process. We derive expressions for analytical real-space multi-probe covariances, and describe their validation with numerical simulations. We stress-test the inference pipelines in simulated likelihood analyses that vary 6-7 cosmology parameters plus 20 nuisance parameters and precisely resemble the analysis to be presented in the DES 3x2pt analysis paper, using a variety of simulated input data vectors with varying assumptions. We find that any disagreement between pipelines leads to changes in assigned likelihood $\\Delta \\chi^2 \\le 0.045$ with respect to the statistical error of the DES Y1 data vector. We also find that angular binning and survey mask do not impact our analytic covariance at a significant level. We determine lower bounds on scales used for analysis of galaxy clustering (8 Mpc$~h^{-1}$) and galaxy-galaxy lensing (12 Mpc$~h^{-1}$) such that the impact of modeling uncertainties in the non-linear regime is well below statistical errors, and show that our analysis choices are robust against a variety of systematics. These tests demonstrate that we have a robust analysis pipeline that yields unbiased cosmological parameter inferences for the flagship 3x2pt DES Y1 analysis. We emphasize that the level of independent code development and subsequent code comparison as demonstrated in this paper is necessary to produce credible constraints from increasingly complex multi-probe analyses of current data.

  10. Probing the stability of superheavy dark matter particles with high-energy neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There is currently mounting evidence for the existence of dark matter in our Universe from various astrophysical and cosmological observations, but the two of the most fundamental properties of the dark matter particle, the mass and the lifetime, are only weakly constrained by the astronomical and cosmological evidence of dark matter. We derive lower limits on the lifetime of dark matter particles with masses in the range 10 TeV - 10 18 GeV from the non-observation of ultrahigh energy neutrinos in the AMANDA, IceCube, Auger and ANITA experiments. All these experiments probe different energy windows and perfectly complement each other. For dark matter particles which produce neutrinos in a two body or a three body decay, we find that the dark matter lifetime must be longer than ∼ 10 26 s for masses between 10 TeV and the Grand Unification scale. We will consider various scenarios where the decay of the dark matter particle produces high energy neutrinos. Neutrinos travel in the Universe without suffering an appreciable attenuation, even for EeV neutrinos, in contrast to photons which rapidly lose their energy via pair production. This remarkable property makes neutrinos a very suitable messenger to constrain the lifetime of superheavy dark matter particles. Finally, we also calculate, for concrete particle physics scenarios, the limits on the strength of the interactions that induce the dark matter decay. (author)

  11. Probing gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons at high energy hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the probe of the gauge-phobic (or nearly gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons (GPHB at high energy hadron colliders including the 14 TeV LHC and the 50 TeV Super Proton–Proton Collider (SppC. We take the process pp→tt¯tt¯, and study it at the hadron level including simulating the jet formation and top quark tagging (with jet substructure. We show that, for a GPHB with MH<800 GeV, MH can be determined by adjusting the value of MH in the theoretical pT(b1 distribution to fit the observed pT(b1 distribution, and the resonance peak can be seen at the SppC for MH=800 GeV and 1 TeV.

  12. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe 2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong

    2015-09-21

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  13. Probing Critical Point Energies of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Surprising Indirect Gap of Single Layer WSe 2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong; Chen, Yuxuan; Johnson, Amber; Li, Ming-yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Mende, Patrick C.; Feenstra, Randall M.; Shih, Chih Kang

    2015-01-01

    By using a comprehensive form of scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we have revealed detailed quasi-particle electronic structures in transition metal dichalcogenides, including the quasi-particle gaps, critical point energy locations, and their origins in the Brillouin zones. We show that single layer WSe surprisingly has an indirect quasi-particle gap with the conduction band minimum located at the Q-point (instead of K), albeit the two states are nearly degenerate. We have further observed rich quasi-particle electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of atomic structures and spin-orbit couplings. Such a local probe for detailed electronic structures in conduction and valence bands will be ideal to investigate how electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides are influenced by variations of local environment.

  14. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  15. Semileptonic Λ/sub c/+ decays with the Mark II at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, S.

    1988-04-01

    Semileptonic Λ/sub c/ + decays have been observed in 29 GeV e + e/sup /minus/ annihilation. We observe the channels Λ/sub c/ + → e + ΛX and Λ/sub c/ + → μμΛX. The production rate for Λ/sub c/ + , times Br(Λ/sub c/ → l + ΛX) of 0.0031 +- 0.0012 +- 0.0010 per hadronic event for electrons, and 0.0024 +- 0.0007 per hadronic event for muons. When combined with the Lund model prediction for Λ/sub c/ + production, this gives semileptonic branching ratios of roughly 5% about what is expected. When combined with the UCLA model prediction for Λ/sub c/ + production, this gives semileptonic branching ratios of 17% and 13% for electrons and muons, somewhat higher than expected

  16. A proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karl; Murphy, Shane; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-03-01

    A compact proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy measurements is described. Using the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a field emission (FE) electron source in conjunction with this analyzer, which is placed at a glancing angle to the surface plane, FE sample current and electron reflectivity imaging may be performed simultaneously. This is demonstrated in measurements of Ag nanostructures prepared on graphite by electron-beam lithography, where a material contrast of 13% is observed, with a lateral resolution of 25 nm, between the silver and graphite in electron reflectivity images. Topological contrast mechanisms such as edge enhancement and shadowing are also observed, giving rise to additional features in the electron reflectivity images. The same instrument configuration has been used to measure electron energy loss spectra on bare graphite, where the zero loss peak, π band plasmon loss peak and secondary electron peaks are observed. Using this simple and compact analyzer an STM, with sufficient open access to the tip-sample junction, may easily be augmented to provide simultaneous elemental and topographic mapping, supplementing STM image measurements with FE sample current and electron reflectivity images, as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements, in the same instrument.

  17. Lepton Flavour Universality tests in $B$ decays as a probe for New Physics arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00003200

    In the Standard Model (SM), the coupling of the electroweak gauge bosons to the leptons is lepton flavour universal. Tests of this property constitute sensitive probes for new physics models that violate lepton flavour universality. Recent tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell\\ell$ decays and semileptonic $b\\to c\\tau\\bar{\

  18. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G; Althouse, W; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, P; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergstrom, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Commins, E; Craig, W; Day, C; DeJongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Fouchez, D; Frieman, J; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Fevre, OL; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marriner, J; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nugent, P; Oluseyi, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, J; Perlmutter, S; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Refregier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sholl, M; Smadja, G; Smith, RM; Smoot, G; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Lippe, HVD; Walder, J-P; Wang, G; Wester, W

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova / Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled measurements. We describe a self-consistent reference mission design for building a Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and for performing a wide-area weak gravitational lensing study. A 2-m wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The SNAP mission will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for several thousand supernovae at redshifts between z=0.1 and 1.7. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees resolves ~100 galaxies per square arcminute. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and flatness of space can all be measured with SNAP supernova and weak-lensing measurements to a systematics-limited accuracy of 1%. For a flat universe, the density-to-pressure ratio of dark energy can be similarly measured to 5% for the present value w0 and ~0.1 for the time variation w'. The large survey area, depth, spatial resolution, time-sampling, and nine-band optical to NIR photometry will support additional independent and/or complementary dark-energy measurement approaches as well as a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  19. Use of low energy alkali ion scattering as a probe of surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbury, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of low energy ion scattering as a probe of surface structure with emphasis on work done using alkali ions. Various schemes for extracting structural information from the ion energy and angle distributions are discussed in terms of advantages and disadvantages of each. The scattering potential which is the primary non-structural parameter needed for analysis, is discussed in terms of recent experimental results. The structure of clean and reconstructed surfaces are discussed, with examples of measurements of layer relaxations on the Mo(111) surface and missing row reconstructions on the Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces. Studies of adsorbate covered surfaces are presented with respect to location of the adsorbate and its effect on the structure of the underlying substrate. Finally, examples are given which demonstrate the sensitivity of ion scattering to surface defects and disordering on reconstructed Au(110) and Pt(110) surfaces and unreconstructed Mo(111) surfaces, and to ordering of adsorbates on Mo(001). 47 refs., 12 figs

  20. 6th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes of High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    One of the premier meetings in the field of high-energy nuclear physics, the Hard Probes conference series brings together the experimental and theoretical communities interested in the hard and electromagnetic observables related to nuclear matter at extreme temperatures and densities. Prior to the conference, the University of Cape Town will host a summer school for young physicists in the field. High energy nuclear physics focuses on the science of a trillion degrees. These temperatures were last seen in nature a microsecond after the Big Bang, but mankind recreates them thousands of times a second in particle accelerators such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At these temperatures, 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun, the strong force is dominant, and we hope to learn about the fundamental and non-trivial emergent many-body dynamics of the quarks and gluons that make up 99% of the mass of the visible universe. We anticipate the usual format for the H...

  1. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianlang; March, Katia; Crozier, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO 2 anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO 2 showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO 2 nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Probing the density dependence of the symmetry potential in intermediate-energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingfeng; Li Zhuxia; Soff, Sven; Gupta, Raj K; Bleicher, Marcus; Stoecker, Horst

    2005-01-01

    Based on the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model, the effects of the density-dependent symmetry potential for baryons and of the Coulomb potential for produced mesons are investigated for neutron-rich heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. The calculated results of the Δ - /Δ ++ and π - /π + production ratios show a clear beam-energy dependence on the density-dependent symmetry potential, which is stronger for the π - /π + ratio close to the pion production threshold. The Coulomb potential of the mesons changes the transverse momentum distribution of the π - /π + ratio significantly, though it alters only slightly the π - and π + total yields. The π - yields, especially at midrapidity or at low transverse momenta and the π - /π + ratios at low transverse momenta are shown to be sensitive probes of the density-dependent symmetry potential in dense nuclear matter. The effect of the density-dependent symmetry potential on the production of both K 0 and K + mesons is also investigated

  3. Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy for the study of energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes from extractions of spinach leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. van Rensburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ultrafast transient processes, of temporal durations in the picosecond and femtosecond regime, are made possible by femtosecond pump probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Such an ultrafast pump probe transient absorption setup has been implemented at the CSIR National Laser Centre and has been applied to investigate energy transfer processes in different parts of photosynthetic systems. In this paper we report on our first results obtained with Malachite green as a benchmark. Malachite green was chosen because the lifetime of its excited state is well known. We also present experimental results of the ultrafast energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes in samples prepared from spinach leaves. Various pump wavelengths in the range 600–680 nm were used; the probe was a white light continuum spanning 420–700 nm. The experimental setup is described in detail in this paper. Results obtained with these samples are consistent with those expected and achieved by other researchers in this field.

  4. Measurements of the branching fractions for the semileptonic decays D-s(+) -> phi e(+)v(e), phi mu(+)v(mu), eta mu(+)v(mu) and eta 'mu(+)v(mu)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2018-01-01

    By analyzing 482 pb(-1) of e(+) e(-) collision data collected at the center-of-mass energy root s = 4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the branching fractions for the semi-leptonic decays D-s(+) -> phi e(+)v(e), phi mu(+)v(mu), eta mu(+)v(mu) and eta'mu(+)v(mu) to be B(D-s(+) -> phi

  5. Isospin corrections to charmless semileptonic {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital V} transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Cruz, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48, 72500 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Lopez Castro, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Munoz, J.H. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]|[Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Tolima, A. A. 546, Ibague (Colombia)

    1996-08-01

    We compute isospin corrections to the charmless semileptonic {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital V} transitions arising from {rho}-{omega} mixing and discuss its relevance in the determination of {ital V}{sub {ital ub}}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Non-perturbative heavy quark effective theory. An application to semi-leptonic B-decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Morte, Michele; Heitger, Jochen; Simma, Hubert; Sommer, Rainer; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin

    2015-01-01

    We review a lattice strategy how to non-perturbatively determine the coefficients in the HQET expansion of all components of the heavy-light axial and vector currents, including 1/m h -corrections. We also discuss recent preliminary results on the form factors parameterizing semi-leptonic B-decays at the leading order in 1/m h .

  7. Form factors for semileptonic Bs→Klν decays in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, Felix Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We present an exploratory study of the calculation of the form factor f + (q 2 ) for the semileptonic decay B s →Klν in large-volume lattice QCD simulations with two dynamical sea quark flavours using O(a) improved Wilson fermions. We discuss the computation of relevant two- and three-point functions and consider complementary methods how these can be combined to obtain the form factor. In particular, we put forward the strategy of a combined fit in which data of all correlators enter and which has as fit parameters energies and amplitudes of the correlators and the form factor. The b quark is treated in HQET; our present analysis focuses on the static limit. Meanwhile, we have developed the code and performed the measurements of all needed O(1/m h ) corrections which will be used as soon as their coefficients will have been computed by the ALPHA collaboration. In order to be able to measure the form factor at the same value of the momentum transfer q 2 on all ensembles, we impose twisted boundary conditions on the s and b quarks that allow for a free tuning of the quark momenta and thus of q 2 . We perform measurements on a subset of N f =2 CLS gauge configurations, obtaining the form factor at three different lattice spacings and roughly the same pion mass of about 330 MeV. Using these, we carry out a continuum extrapolation and observe that it is relatively flat in a 2 . A measurement at a different pion mass indicates that quark mass effects are small. We compare our continuum value of the form factor with recently published results of other collaborations and observe a good agreement.

  8. Intermediate/high energy probes and the structure of nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Quarks and gluons in nuclei are essential to a complete understanding of the response of nuclei to high energy probes. We propose to obtain evidence of the behavior of quarks in nuclei through theoretical analyses of recent data. Deep inelastic lepton scattering on nuclei provides the least ambiguous signature of quark behavior and recent data from SLAC and CERN show some remarkable features. According to our latest analyses, the quark cluster model we indroduced in1981 provides a framework to explain much of the existing data. We propose to improve the model by eliminating a number of approximations and to incorporate more information from QCD regarding the properties of six and nine quark clusters. We also propose to apply the model to predict results for particle production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Finally, we propose a series of investigations into the quantum statistical properties of nuclei using microscopic many body theory with the goal to obtain the equation of state of finite nuclei

  9. Thermal Bremsstrahlung probing nuclear multifragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Enterria, D.G.

    2000-05-01

    The thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter at moderate temperatures and densities, in the vicinity of the predicted nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, are studied using as experimental probe the hard-photons (E γ > 30 MeV) emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Photon and charged-particle production in four different heavy-ion reactions (Ar 36 + Au 197 , Ag 107 , Ni 58 , C 12 at 60 A*MeV) is measured exclusively and inclusively coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with two charged-particle and intermediate-mass-fragment detectors covering nearly 4π. We confirm that Bremsstrahlung emission in first-chance (off-equilibrium) proton-neutron collisions (pnγ) is the dominant origin of hard photons. We also firmly establish the existence of a thermal radiation component emitted in second-chance proton-neutron collisions. This thermal Bremsstrahlung emission takes place in semi-central and central nucleus-nucleus reactions involving heavy targets. We exploit this observation i) to demonstrate that thermal equilibrium is reached during the reaction, ii) to establish a new thermometer of nuclear matter based on Bremsstrahlung photons, iii) to derive the thermodynamical properties of the excited nuclear sources and, in particular, to establish a 'caloric curve' (temperature versus excitation energy), and iv) to assess the time-scales of the nuclear break-up process. (author)

  10. A ratiometric fluorescent probe based on boron dipyrromethene and rhodamine Förster resonance energy transfer platform for hypochlorous acid and its application in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a ratiometric fluorescent probe BRT based on boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and rhodamine-thiohydrazide Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) platform for sensing hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with high selectivity and sensitivity. The probe can detect HOCl in 15 s with the detection limit of 38 nM. Upon mixing with HOCl the fluorescence colour of probe BRT changed from green to orange. Moreover, probe BRT was applied to successfully monitor HOCl in living RAW 264.7 cells. - Highlights: • A probe based on BODIPY and rhodamine was developed for sensing HOCl. • The probe could sense HOCl in a ratiometric manner based on the FRET platform in PBS buffer solution. • The probe can detect HOCl in 15 s accompanied with a fluorescence colour change. • This probe was successfully used to monitor HOCl in living RAW 264.7 cells.

  11. Probing dark energy with cluster counts and cosmic shear power spectra: including the full covariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Masahiro; Bridle, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Several dark energy experiments are available from a single large-area imaging survey and may be combined to improve cosmological parameter constraints and/or test inherent systematics. Two promising experiments are cosmic shear power spectra and counts of galaxy clusters. However, the two experiments probe the same cosmic mass density field in large-scale structure, therefore the combination may be less powerful than first thought. We investigate the cross-covariance between the cosmic shear power spectra and the cluster counts based on the halo model approach, where the cross-covariance arises from the three-point correlations of the underlying mass density field. Fully taking into account the cross-covariance, as well as non-Gaussian errors on the lensing power spectrum covariance, we find a significant cross-correlation between the lensing power spectrum signals at multipoles l∼10 3 and the cluster counts containing halos with masses M∼>10 14 M o-dot . Including the cross-covariance for the combined measurement degrades and in some cases improves the total signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios up to ∼±20% relative to when the two are independent. For cosmological parameter determination, the cross-covariance has a smaller effect as a result of working in a multi-dimensional parameter space, implying that the two observables can be considered independent to a good approximation. We also discuss the fact that cluster count experiments using lensing-selected mass peaks could be more complementary to cosmic shear tomography than mass-selected cluster counts of the corresponding mass threshold. Using lensing selected clusters with a realistic usable detection threshold ((S/N) cluster ∼6 for a ground-based survey), the uncertainty on each dark energy parameter may be roughly halved by the combined experiments, relative to using the power spectra alone

  12. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianlang [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States); March, Katia [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bâtiment 510, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: CROZIER@asu.edu [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO{sub 2} showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60 nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1 eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. - Highlights: • Bandgap states detected with aloof beam monochromated EELS on oxide nanoparticle surfaces. • Dielectric theory applied to simulate the spectra and interpret surface structure. • Density of states models also be employed to understand the surface electronic structure. • In MgO, one states associate with water species was found close to the valence band edge. • In anatase, two mid-gap states associated with point defects were found.

  13. Thermal dileptons from coarse-grained transport as fireball probes at SIS energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatyuk, Tetyana; Seck, Florian; Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf; Stroth, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a coarse-graining method to convert hadronic transport simulations of Au+Au collisions at SIS energies into local temperature, baryon and pion densities, we compute the pertinent radiation of thermal dileptons based on an in-medium ρ spectral function that describes available spectra at ultrarelativistic collision energies. In particular, we analyze how far the resulting yields and slopes of the invariant-mass spectra can probe the lifetime and temperatures of the fireball. We find that dilepton radiation sets in after the initial overlap phase of the colliding nuclei of about 7 fm/c, and lasts for about 13 fm/c. This duration closely coincides with the development of the transverse collectivity of the baryons, thus establishing a direct correlation between hadronic collective effects and thermal EM radiation, and supporting a near local equilibration of the system. This fireball ''lifetime'' is substantially smaller than the typical 20-30 fm/c that naive considerations of the density evolution alone would suggest. We furthermore find that the total dilepton yield radiated into the invariant-mass window of M = 0.3-0.7 GeV/c 2 normalized to the number of charged pions, follows a relation to the lifetime found earlier in the (ultra-)relativistic regime of heavy-ion collisions, and thus corroborates the versatility of this tool. The spectral slopes of the invariant-mass spectra above the φ -meson mass provide a thermometer of the hottest phases of the collision, and agree well with the maximal temperatures extracted from the coarse-grained hadron spectra. (orig.)

  14. Electron Energy Loss and One- and Two-Photon Excited SERS Probing of “Hot” Plasmonic Silver Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Joseph, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    in an optical experiment and electron energy loss intensity at energies corresponding to excitation wavelengths used for optical probing. This inverse relation exists independent on specific nanoaggregate geometries and is mainly controlled by the gap size between the particles forming the aggregate. The ratio...... between two- and one-photon excited SERS measured at different excitation wavelengths provides information about local fields in the hottest spots and their dependence on the photon energy. Our data verify experimentally the predicted increase of local optical fields in the hot spots with increasing wave...

  15. Probing early universe cosmology and high energy physics through space-borne interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungarelli, C.; Vecchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the impact of space-borne laser interferometric experiments operating in the low-frequency window (∼ 1 μHz - 1 Hz), with the goal of identifying the fundamental issues that regard the detection of a primordial background of GW predicted by slow-roll inflationary models, corresponding to h 100 2 Ω ∼ 10 -16 - 10 -15 . We analyse the capabilities of the planned single-instrument LISA mission and the sensitivity improvements that could be achieved by cross-correlating the data streams from a pair of detectors of the LISA-class. We show that the two-detectors configuration is extremely powerful, and leads to the detection of a stochastic background as weak as h 100 2 Ω ∼ 10 -14 . However, such instrumental sensitivity cannot be exploited to achieve a comparable performance for the detection of the primordial component of the background, due to the overwhelming power of the stochastic signal produced by short-period solar-mass binary systems of compact objects, that cannot be resolved as individual sources. We estimate that the primordial background can be detected only if its fractional energy density h 100 2 Ω is greater than a few times 10 -12 . The key conclusion of our analysis is that the typical mHz frequency band, regardless of the instrumental noise level, is the wrong observational window to probe slow-roll inflationary models. We discuss possible follow-on missions with optimal sensitivity in the ∼ μHz-regime and/or in the ∼ 0.1Hz-band specifically aimed at gravitational wave cosmology. (author)

  16. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie [Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France and Fondation STAE, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234-31432, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  17. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40±1 eV.

  18. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E

    2009-01-01

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  19. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E, E-mail: R.E.Palmer@bham.ac.u [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-25

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  20. A high-energy (35-500 MeV) proton monitor for the Gravity Probe-B Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. E-mail: stil@may.ie; Rusznyak, Peter; Buchman, Sasha; Shestople, Paul; Thatcher, John

    2003-02-11

    An innovative fault tolerant, high-energy particle monitor designed to record protons in the range 35-500 MeV when in polar orbit aboard NASA's Gravity Probe B spacecraft, is described. This device, which is configured to provide continuous, reliable operation in the hostile particle environment traversed by the spacecraft, can potentially be used either as an onboard monitor or as a scientific experiment.

  1. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments in Inclusive Semileptonic Decays (bar B) → Xc (ell)-(bar ν)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luth, Vera

    2011-01-01

    We present results for the moments of observed spectra in inclusive semileptonic B-meson decays to charm hadrons (bar B) → X c (ell) - (bar ν). Moments of the hadronic-mass and the combined mass-and-energy spectra for different minimum electron or muon momenta between 0.8 and 1.9 GeV/c are obtained from a sample of 232 x 10 6 Γ(4S) → B(bar B) events, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. We also present a reevaluation of the moments of electron-energy spectra and partial decay fractions B((bar B) → X c e - (bar ν)) for minimum electron momenta between 0.6 and 1.5 GeV/c based on a sample of 51 x 10 6 Γ(4S) → B(bar B) events. The measurements are used for the extraction of the total decay fraction, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V cb |, the quark masses m b and m c , and four heavy-quark QCD parameters in the framework of a Heavy-Quark Expansion (HQE). We find B((bar B) → X c (ell) - (bar ν)) = (10.64 ± 0.17 ± 0.06)% and |V cb | = (42.05 ± 0.45 ± 0.70) x 10 -3 .

  2. Jet calibration and top quark mass measurement in the semi-leptonic channel in the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balli, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to provide a measurement as accurate as possible of the top quark mass in the semi-leptonic decay channel. This experimental measurement is made thanks to the ATLAS detector near LHC, a proton-proton collider. The main interests for this precision measurement are the physics constraints to the theoretical models of fundamental constituents. Besides, the top quark mass is a parameter allowing to have more information on the vacuum stability at the Planck scale within the Standard Model. Jet energy calibration is crucial to this measurement. The impact of real data taking conditions on this calibration and on jet performance is detailed. The top quark mass measurement using 2011 data collected at an energy in the center-of-mass of 7 TeV is presented. It is using a tri dimensional template analysis method. The measured top quark mass is: m(top) = 172.01 ± 0.92 (stat) ± 1.17 (syst) GeV. The 2012 data collected at an energy in the center-of-mass of 8 TeV are also analysed, and a preliminary result for the top quark mass is provided: m(top) = 172.82 ± 0.39 (stat) ± 1.12 (syst) GeV, the combination of both measurements being the most accurate result of this thesis: m(top) = 172.64 ± 0.37 (stat) ± 1.10 (syst) GeV. (author) [fr

  3. A Study of Semileptonic $B$ Decays in Orbitally Excited $D$ Mesons at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Vincenzo

    In this thesis, a study of semi-inclusive semileptonic $B$ decays in excited $D$ mesons has been presented; in particular, the analysis has been focused on orbitally excited $P$-wave $D^{**}$ mesons and on higher mass resonances found in the data sample. The theoretical framework to study inclusive semileptonic $B$ meson decays is the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) approach, while exclusive decay modes are described different models, such as the so-called ISGW2 and LLSW; on the other hand, excited $D$ mesons properties are predicted by the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET). The final measurements has been perfomed on a data sample collected at LHCb experiment (Chapter 2) in the (2011-2012) data taking period, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of $3 fb^{-1}$. This data sample has been subjected to two different selection stages, calibrated on a MonteCarlo (MC) sample: a pre-selection of $B \\to D^{*} \\mu \

  4. Inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of b hadrons produced in Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Boix, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Ward, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.W.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of b hadrons produced in Z decay is presented, using four million hadronic events collected by the ALEPH detector from 1991 to 1995. Electrons and muons are selected opposite to b-tagged hemispheres. Two different methods are explored to distinguish the contributions from direct $\\bl$ and cascade $\\bcl$ dec ays to the total lepton yield. One is based on the lepton transverse momentum spectrum, the other makes use of the correlation between the charge of the lepton and charge estimators built from tracks in the opposite hemisphere of the event. The latter method reduces the dependence on the modelling of semileptonic b decays. The results obtained by averaging the two techniques are BR(b->l) = 0.1070 +- 0.0010 +- 0.0023 +- 0.0026 BR(b->c->l) = 0.0818 +- 0.0015 +- 0.0022 + 0.0022 -0.0014

  5. Measurement of the First and Second Moments of the Hadronic Mass Distribution in Semileptonic B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Flächer, H U

    2003-01-01

    We report a preliminary measurement of the first and second moments of the hadronic mass distributions in B -> X sub c (ell)nu decays. The measurements are based on UPSILON(4S) -> B(bar B) events where the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and a charged lepton from the decay of the other B meson is identified. The moments are presented for threshold lepton momenta ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 GeV. From the moments we determine the non-perturbative Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) parameters, (bar LAMBDA) and lambda sub 1. We combine the measured moments with earlier BABAR measurements of the semileptonic branching ratios and B lifetimes and perform a simultaneous fit to the HQE for the moments obtained for different threshold lepton momenta and the semileptonic decay width. This fit results in an improved value for the CKM matrix element |V sub c sub b |.

  6. Light Driven Energy Research at LCLS: Planned Pump-Probe X-ray Spectroscopy Studies on Photosynthetic Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil hydrocarbon resources. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanism of how nature has solved this problem is of fundamental importance and could be critical to aid in the design of manufactured devices to accomplish the conversion of sunlight into useful electrochemical energy and transportable fuel in the foreseeable future. In order to understand the photosynthetic splitting of water by the Mn-OEC we need to be able to follow the reaction in real time at an atomic level. A powerful probe to study the electronic and molecular structure of the Mn-OEC is x-ray spectroscopy. Here, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has two crucial qualities for LCLS based time-dependent pump-probe studies of the Mn-OEC: a) it directly probes the Mn oxidation state and ligation, b) it can be performed with wavelength dispersive optics to avoid the necessity of scanning in pump probe experiments. Recent results and the planned time dependent experiments at LCLS will be discussed. )

  7. Semileptonic Decays of B(B_s) to Light Tensor Mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, S.; Khosravi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The semileptonic B_s(B)→K_2"⁎(a_2,f_2)lν, l=τ,μ, transitions are investigated in the frame work of the three-point QCD sum rules. Considering the quark condensate contributions, the relevant form factors of these transitions are estimated. The branching ratios of these channel modes are also calculated at different values of the continuum thresholds of the tensor mesons and compared with the obtained data for other approaches.

  8. A study of the semileptonic decay mode D0 → K-e+nu/sub e/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, J.C.; Appel, J.A.; Bracker, S.B.

    1987-09-01

    We present an analysis of the exclusive semileptonic decay mode D 0 → K - e + nu/sub e/. We have measured the ratio of decay rates Γ(D 0 → K - e + nu/sub e/)/Γ(D 0 → K - π + ). After correcting for the reconstruction efficiencies and subtracting the contribution from other decay modes we have found the ratio to be equal to 0.77 +- 0.12(stat) +- 0.13(syst)

  9. Bound on dissipative effects from semileptonic neutral B-meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, F.; Marcantoni, S.; Pinotti, P.; Zimmermann, K. [Universita di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Floreanini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    The semileptonic decay asymmetry A{sub Δm} is studied within the open quantum systems approach to the physics of the neutral meson B{sup 0}-B{sup 0} system: this extended treatment takes into account possible non-standard, dissipative effects induced by the presence of an external environment. A bound on these effects is provided through the analysis of available experimental data from the Belle Collaboration. (orig.)

  10. Impact Parameter Dependence of π"-/π"+ Ratio in Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy Using Heavy-Ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Guo-Qiang; Wei, Gao-Feng; Lu, Yi-Xin; Cao, Xin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The impact parameter dependence of π"-/π"+ ratio is examined in heavy-ion collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon within a transport model. It is shown that the sensitivity of π"-/π"+ ratio on symmetry energy shows a transition from central to peripheral collisions; that is, the stiffer symmetry energy leads to a larger π"-/π"+ ratio in peripheral collisions while the softer symmetry energy always leads this ratio to be larger in central collisions. After checking the kinematic energy distribution of π"-/π"+ ratio, we found this transition of sensitivity of π"-/π"+ ratio to symmetry energy is mainly from less energetic pions; that is, the softer symmetry energy gets the less energetic pions to form a smaller π"-/π"+ ratio in peripheral collisions while these pions generate a larger π"-/π"+ ratio in central collisions. Undoubtedly, the softer symmetry energy can also lead more energetic pions to form a larger π"-/π"+ ratio in peripheral collisions. Nevertheless, considering that most of pions are insufficiently energetic at this beam energy, we therefore suggest the π"-/π"+ ratio as a probe of the high-density symmetry energy effective only in central at most to midcentral collisions, thereby avoiding the possible information of low-density symmetry energy carried in π"-/π"+ ratio from peripheral collisions.

  11. External meeting - Geneva University: Semileptonic and Radiative B-meson decays

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél : 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Wednesday 4 April 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Semileptonic and Radiative B-meson decays by Dr Antonio Limosani / K2K, Japon The success of the B Factories at KEK and SLAC has furthered our knowledge of CP violation, a necessary ingredient for the creation of a matter-dominanted universe. Ever increasing data samples has ushered in a new era of precision CP measurements, in which the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is examined for signs of New Physics. One of the crucial pieces of information, surprisingly, comes not from CP violation but from studies of semileptonic decays of the B mesons. I will discuss how various measurements of semileptonic and radiative B decays combine together to provide a precision measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vcb| and to determine the value of s...

  12. Triton-3He relative and differential flows as probes of the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Zhang Xunchao

    2009-01-01

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence afterburner, we study the triton- 3 He (t- 3 He) ratio with both relative and differential transverse flows in semicentral 132 Sn+ 124 Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-proton ratios with relative and differential flows are also discussed as a reference. We find that similar to the neutron-proton pairs, the t- 3 He pairs also carry interesting information regarding the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Moreover, the nuclear symmetry energy affects more strongly the t- 3 He relative and differential flows than the π - /π + ratio in the same reaction. The t- 3 He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  13. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  14. Probing WWγ and WWγγ couplings with high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Schrempp, F.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of a 500 GeV 'Next Linear e + e - Collider' (NLC) for probing anomalous WWγ and WWγγ couplings in the γ(γ) mode is investigated. The γe - →W - ν and the γγ→W + W - processes are studied. Differential cross sections are given for polarized and unpolarized beams. CP violating couplings are also discussed. (K.A.) 13 refs., 6 figs

  15. Study of semileptonic and leptonic neutral-current processes and of $\\mu$-polarization using counter techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    .PP This experiment will study semileptonic neutral current neutrino interactions with nucleons, using principally the dichromatic neutrino beam N1 and will make measurements of the polarization of muons produced in the WA1 experiment by neutrino-nucleon interactions, using the horn-focused broad-band neutrino The main part of the apparatus is a fine-grained target calorimeter in which the energy and direction of the hadronic jet resulting from the neutrino scattering is measured by electronic techniques. It is supplemented by a muon detector and spectrometer. The fine-grained calorimeter is used as a polarimeter for muons produced in WA1. \\\\ \\\\ The calorimeter is composed of 13 modules, each 1.2 m long and 4~m x 4~m in cross section. A module consists of six 3 m x 3 m target plates made of 8 cm thick marble with 12 cm gaps for insertion of 20 scintillation counters of 15 cm width and 3 cm thickness, 128 proportional counters of 3~x~3~cm|2 cross-section and 4~m length, and 256 streamer tubes of 0.9~x~0.9~cm|2...

  16. First evidence for WW and WZ diboson production with semi-leptonic decays at a Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle

    2009-01-01

    Presented is a measurement of the simultaneous production of a W ± boson in association with a second weak boson (W ± or Z 0 ) in p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. Events are consider with one electron or one muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two hadronic jets. The data were collected by the D0 detector in Run IIa of the Tevatron accelerator and correspond to 1.07 fb -1 of integrated luminosity for each of the two channels (WW/WZ → eνq(bar q) and WW/WZ → μνq(bar q)). The cross section for WW + WZ production is measured to be 20.2 ± 2.5(stat) ± 3.6(sys) ± 1.2(lum) pb with a Gaussian significance of 4.4 standard deviations above the background-only scenario. This measurement is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and represents the first direct evidence for WW and WZ production with semi-leptonic decays at a hadron collider

  17. Measurements of hyperon semileptonic decays at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron I The Sigma ^{-} to Lambda e^{-} nu decay mode

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Gray, R J; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Ott, R J; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Thresher, J J

    1982-01-01

    The charged hyperon beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) has been used to collect data on semileptonic decays of Sigma ^{-}, Xi ^{-} and Lambda . A magnetic channel selects 100 GeV/c negatively charged particles produced in the forward direction by interaction of the 200 GeV/c SPS proton beam on a BeO target. The Sigma ^{-} and Xi ^{-} hyperons are concurrently identified in a DISC Cernekov counter, and their decay products are analysed by a magnetic spectrometer. Electron-hadron discrimination is achieved by the combined use of lead-glass and lead/scintillator counters, transition radiation detectors, and a Cerenkov counter. The authors report results on the Sigma ^{-} to Lambda e^{-} nu decay mode. Measurements of the GL polarization and of the centre-of-mass distributions (baryon kinetic energy, electron-neutrino correlation, and Dalitz plot distributions) yield the vector to axial-vector form factor ratio f/sub 1//g/sub 1/=+0.034+or-0.080, in agreement with the value expected from the conserved...

  18. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. A direct probe of dark energy interactions with a solar System laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a mission concept for direct detection of dark energy interactions with normal matter in a Solar System laboratory. Dark energy is the leading proposal to...

  20. Pion production - a probe for coherence in medium energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Neutral pion production is observed in heavy ion collisions at beam energies as low as 25 MeV/u, where this process is consumming the major portion of the total center of mass energy available. At these low beam energies single nucleon nucleon collision models and also models that incorporate the cooperative sharing of the beam energy of several nucleons do not reproduce the data. Rather, the data presented here call for a fully coherent production mechanism. (orig.)

  1. Results on semileptonic D0 and D/sub s/ decays and evidence for non-D/bar D/ decays of the /psi/ (3770)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Observation of Cabibbo suppressed semileptonic D 0 decays; Search for D/sub s/ semileptonic decays; and Preliminary evidence for non-D/bar D/ decays of the /psi/ (3770). 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Probing the electronic structure of redox species and direct determination of intrinsic reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique capable of directly determining the intrinsic reorganization energies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions is described. Appropriate solution phase redox species are prepared in the gas phase using electrospray ionization and probed using photodetachment spectroscopy. Five metal complex anions involved in the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple are investigated and the intramolecular reorganization energies are measured directly from spectral features due to removing the most loosely bound 3d electron from the Fe(II)-complexes. The photodetachment spectra also yield electronic structure information about the Fe 2+ -Fe 3+ redox couple and provide a common electronic structure origin for the reducing capability of the Fe(II)-complexes, the most common redox reagents. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. Utilization of surface-near geothermal energy by means of energy piles and geothermal probes; Nutzung der oberflaechennahen Geothermie mittels Energiepfaehlen und Erdwaermesonden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaolong

    2013-05-01

    In collaboration with the Institute of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics (Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany), a pilot plant for geothermal and sorption supported air-conditioning was built in the dockside area of Hamburg. The author of the book under consideration investigates a geothermal power plant with five energy poles and three boreholes. The economic and environmental benefits of this pilot plant were detected. The thermodynamic behavior of these energy piles was numerically simulated very well. The complex processes in the energy pile and in the soil could be mapped By means of a thermal-hydraulic-mechanical coupled simulation. The extraction capacity of a geothermal probe could be significantly increased by means of a combination of a groundwater circulation method with borehole heat exchangers.

  4. Measurement of the Semileptonic Branching Ratio of Charm Hadrons Produced in $Z^{0} \\to c\\bar{c}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The inclusive charm hadron semileptonic branching fractions B(c to e) and B(c to mu) in Z to ccbar events have been determined using 4.4 million hadronic Z decays collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. A charm-enriched sample is obtained by selecting events with reconstructed D*+- mesons. Using leptons found in the hemisphere opposite that of the D*+- mesons, the semileptonic branching fractions of charm hadrons are measured to be B(c to e) = 0.103 +-0.009 +0.009 -0.008 and B(c to mu) = 0.090 +-0.007 +0.007 -0.006 where the first errors are in each case statistical and the others systematic. Combining these measurements, an inclusive semileptonic branching fraction of charm hadrons of B(c to l) = 0.095 +-0.006 +0.007 -0.006 is obtained.

  5. Measurement of the form factor ratios in semileptonic decays of charm mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Zaliznyak

    1999-01-01

    I have measured the form factor ratios r 2 = A 2 (0)/A 1 (0) and r V = V (0)/A 1 (0) in the semileptonic charm meson decay D + → (anti K) *0 e + ν e from data collected by the Fermilab E791 collaboration. Form factors are introduced in the calculation of the hadronic current in semileptonic decays of strange, charm, or bottom mesons, such as D + → (anti K) *0 e + ν e . Semileptonic decays provide insight into quark coupling to the W boson since the leptonic and hadronic amplitudes in the Feynman diagram for the decay are completely separate. There are no strong interactions between the final state leptons and quarks. A number of theoretical models predict the values of the form factors for D + → (anti K) *0 e + ν e , though there is a large range of predictions. E791 is a hadroproduction experiment that recorded over 20 billion interactions with a 500 GeV π - beam incident on five thin targets during the 1991-92 Fermilab fixed-target run. Approximately 3000 D + → (anti K) *0 e + ν e decays are fully reconstructed. In order to extract the form factor ratios from the data, I implement a multidimensional unbinned maximum likelihood fit with a large sample of simulated (Monte Carlo) D + → (anti K) *0 e + ν e events. The large E791 data sample provides the most precise measurement of the form factor ratios to date. The measured values for the form factor ratios are r 2 = 0.71 ± 0.08 ± 0.09 and r V = 1.84 ± 0.11 ± 0.08. These results are in good agreement with some Lattice Gauge calculations. However the agreement with quark model predictions is not as good

  6. Importance of supernovae at z>1.5 to probe dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe suggests that an unknown component with strongly negative pressure, called dark energy, currently dominates the dynamics of the universe. Such a component makes up ∼70% of the energy density of the universe yet has not been predicted by the standard model of particle physics. The best method for exploring the nature of this dark energy is to map the recent expansion history, at which type Ia supernovae have proved adept. We examine here the depth of survey necessary to provide a precise and qualitatively complete description of dark energy. A realistic analysis of parameter degeneracies, allowance for natural time variation of the dark energy equation of state, and systematic errors in astrophysical observations all demonstrate the importance of a survey covering the full range 0< z < or approx. 2 for revealing the nature of dark energy

  7. Multiphoton ionization as a probe of molecular photofragmentation: statistical and dynamical energy partitioning in the multiphoton dissociation of nitromethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockney, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) appears in its first use as a probe of laser-induced photofragmentation. Specifically, MPI here reveals the internal and translational energy content of the nascent fragments from the infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of nitromethane (CH 3 NO 2 ). The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed by two pulsed and focused lasers - a CO 2 laser to induce collision-free unimolecular dissociation of CH 3 NO 2 , and a tunable dye laser following immediately to ionize selectively one of the pair of dissociation fragments for detection by a mass spectrometer and particle multiplier. A computer simulation of each fragment's MPI spectrum, a series of four photon resonances to members of the npsigma/sub u/ Rydberg state of NO 2 and three photon resonances to two vibrational members of the #betta# 1 Rydberg state of CH 3 , aids in determining the fragment's internal energy content. The dye laser is delayed and its focus is traced through a small quarter circle centered at the focus of the CO 2 laser. The flight times of the fragments from the point of dissociation and their laboratory scattering angular distributions at fixed ionizing laser wavelength provide their center of mass recoil velocity distributions. The energy deposited in the fragments evidences a striking mixture of statistical and dynamical energy partitioning. The statistical RRKM theory of unimolecular decomposition accurately predicts the amount of internal energy found in the fragments

  8. Diabatic emission of neutrons: A probe for the energy dissipation mechanism in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Cassing, W.

    1984-05-01

    The precompound emission of neutrons in central nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated within the framework of dissipative diabatic dynamics. For 92 Mo + 92 Mo at bombarding energies between 7.5 and 20 MeV/u the differential neutron multiplicities dMsub(n)/dEsub(n) are estimated from the decay of highly excited diabatic single-particle states. The energy spectra have an almost exponential high-energy tail with effective temperatures up to 10 MeV for 20 MeV/u bombarding energy. (orig.)

  9. Premier Tools of Energy Research Also Probe Secrets of Viral Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Glennda

    2011-03-28

    Advanced light sources peer into matter at the atomic and molecular scales, with applications ranging from physics, chemistry, materials science, and advanced energy research, to biology and medicine.

  10. Search for new mechanism of CP violation through tau decay and semileptonic decay at hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Yung Su.

    1996-11-01

    If CP is violated in any decay process involving leptons it will signify the existence of a new force (called the X boson) responsible for CP violation that may be the key to understanding matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The author discusses the signatures of CP violation in (1) the decay of tau lepton, and (2) the semileptonic decay of π, K, D, B and t particles by measuring the polarization of the charged lepton in the decay. The author discusses how the coupling constants and their phases of the coupling of the X boson to 9 quark vertices and 3 lepton vertices can be obtained through 12 decay processes

  11. Semileptonic *DELTA*S=1 decays of baryons with boosted bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeg, J.O.; Lie-Svendsen, Oe.

    1984-03-01

    Recoil effects for strangeness-changing semileptonic decays of baryons by means of boosted quark mode solutions of the MIT bag model is calculated. Both the quark and the psevdoscalar part of the axial current is considered. It is shown that the induced scalar form factor f*sb3* and the ''weak electric'' form factor g*sb2* are proportional to the mass difference of the final and initial baryon. Moreover, it is shown that the quark wave function mismatch, which decreases the conventional vector form factor f*sb1*, can be compensated by recoil effects. Thus a better agreement with experiment seems to be achieved. (Auth.)

  12. Semileptonic decays of B mesons into excited charm mesons: leading order and 1/mc contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannel, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use the heavy quark effective theory to investigate the form factors that describe the semileptonic decays of a B meson into excited daughter mesons. For an excited daughter meson with charm, a single form factor is needed at leading order, while five form factors and two dimensionful constants are needed to order 1/m c in the heavy quark expansion. For non-charmed final states, a total of four form factors are needed at leading order. For the process B→D(*)Xlν, four form factors are also needed at leading order. (orig.)

  13. Semileptonic decays of atomlike hadrons in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Toshiaki; Morii, Toshiyuki; Tanimoto, Morimitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Semileptonic decays of heavy flavored hadrons are analyzed in the heavy quark effective theory (HQET) with leading 1/m Q corrections. All existing date for B-bar→D (*) lν-bar and D-bar→K (*) lν-bar are reproduced well in virtue of 1/m Q corrections, while the value of |V cb | derived by the HQET is almost independent of those corrections. In particular, 1/m s corrections are remarkable for D-bar→K (*) l ν -bar. Semiloptonic decays of Λ c and Λ b are also discussed including the 1/m Q corrections. (author)

  14. A precise determination of the electroweak mixing angle from semileptonic neutrino scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lanceri, Livio

    1987-01-01

    After the discovery of the weak neutral current,' great efforts were undertaken to test the prediction of the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model that stated that the coupling in all neutral current phenomena depends on one single parameter, $sin^{2}\\Theta_{w}$. Indeed, a unique value of this parameter can explain the couplings measured in many different processes, including leptonic and semileptonic neutrino scattering, asymmetries in electron-nucleon, electron-positron, and muon interactions, parity violating effects in atomic transitions, and the masses of the W and z bosons. $^{2}$

  15. Probing medium-induced jet splitting and energy loss in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ning-Bo; Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You

    2018-06-01

    The nuclear modification of jet splitting in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC energies is studied based on the higher twist formalism. Assuming coherent energy loss for the two splitted subjets, a non-monotonic jet energy dependence is found for the nuclear modification of jet splitting function: strongest modification at intermediate jet energies whereas weaker modification for larger or smaller jet energies. Combined with the smaller size and lower density of the QGP medium at RHIC than at the LHC, this helps to understand the groomed jet measurements from CMS and STAR Collaborations: strong modification of the momentum sharing zg distribution at the LHC and no obvious modification of zg distribution at RHIC. In addition, the observed nuclear modification pattern of the groomed jet zg distribution cannot be explained solely by independent energy loss of the two subjets. Our result may be tested in future measurements of groomed jets with lower jet energies at the LHC and larger jet energies at RHIC, for different angular separations between the two subjets.

  16. Rare leptonic and semileptonic $b$-hadron decays and tests of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069512

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of heavy-flavoured particles provide an ideal laboratory to look for deviations from the Standard Model, and explore energy regimes beyond the LHC reach. Decays proceeding via electroweak penguin diagrams are excellent probes to search for New Physics, and $b \\to s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ processes are particularly interesting since they give access to many observables such as branching fractions, asymmetries and angular observables. Recent results from the LHCb experiment are reviewed.

  17. STUDY OF SEMILEPTONIC DECAYS OF B MESONS TO CHARMED BARYONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, Colin P.

    2003-01-01

    Using data collected by the CLEO II detector at a center-of-mass energy on or near the Υ(4S) resonance, we have determined the 90% confidence level upper limit Β((bar B) → Λ c + e - X)/Β((bar B) → (Λ c + or (bar Λ) c - )X) - → Λ c + (bar p)e - (bar ν) e )/Β((bar B) → Λ c + (bar p)X) c + (bar p)X)/Β((bar B) → (Λ c + or (bar Λ) c - )X) = 0.57 ± 0.05 ± 0.05

  18. Study of semileptonic decays of B mesons to charmed baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; OGrady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Bliss, D.W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V.; Asner, D.M.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Lange, D.J.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Balest, R.; Behrens, B.H.; Ford, W.T.; Park, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D.G.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Dombrowski, S. von; Drell, P.S.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hopman, P.I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Ward, C.; Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Patton, S.; Prescott, C.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Browder, T.E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Hans, R.M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M.A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Using data collected by the CLEO II detector at a center-of-mass energy on or near the Υ(4S) resonance, we have determined the 90% confidence level upper limit B(bar B→Λ c + e - X)/B(bar B→(Λ c + or bar Λ c - )X) - →Λ c + bar pe - bar ν e )/B(bar B→Λ c + bar pX) c + bar pX)/B(bar B→(Λ c + or bar Λ c - )X)=0.57±0.05±0.05. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Probing the sign-changeable interaction between dark energy and dark matter with current observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan-Juan; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Li, Yun-He; He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Xin

    2018-03-01

    We consider the models of vacuum energy interacting with cold dark matter in this study, in which the coupling can change sigh during the cosmological evolution. We parameterize the running coupling b by the form b( a) = b 0 a+ b e(1- a), where at the early-time the coupling is given by a constant b e and today the coupling is described by another constant b 0. We explore six specific models with (i) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ 0, (ii) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ de, (iii) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ c, (iv) Q = b( a) Hρ 0, (v) Q = b( a) H ρ de, and (vi) Q = b( a) Hρ c. The current observational data sets we use to constrain the models include the JLA compilation of type Ia supernova data, the Planck 2015 distance priors data of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the Hubble constant direct measurement. We find that, for all the models, we have b 0 0 at around the 1 σ level, and b 0 and b e are in extremely strong anti-correlation. Our results show that the coupling changes sign during the evolution at about the 1 σ level, i.e., the energy transfer is from dark matter to dark energy when dark matter dominates the universe and the energy transfer is from dark energy to dark matter when dark energy dominates the universe.

  20. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy at high densities with nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifels, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. The symmetry energy is the part of the equation of state which is connected to the asymmetry in the neutron/proton content. During recent years a multitude of experimental and theoretical efforts on different fields have been undertaken to constraint its density dependence at low densities but also above saturation density (ρ_0=0.16 fm ^{-3} . Conventionally the symmetry energy is described by its magnitude S_v and the slope parameter L , both at saturation density. Values of L = 44 -66MeV and S_v=31 -33MeV have been deduced in recent compilations of nuclear structure, heavy-ion reaction and astrophysics data. Apart from astrophysical data on mass and radii of neutron stars, heavy-ion reactions at incident energies of several 100MeV are the only means do access the high density behaviour of the symmetry energy. In particular, meson production and collective flows upto about 1 AGeV are predicted to be sensitive to the slope of the symmetry energy as a function of density. From the measurement of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to charged particles at GSI, a more stringent constraint for the slope of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities has been deduced. Future options to reach even higher densities will be discussed.

  1. Remarks on semileptonic B and D decays into orbitally excited mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, H B; Briceno, A Moreno; Munoz, J H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Tolima, A. A. 546, Ibague (Colombia)

    2003-09-01

    We have obtained the differential decay rate and calculated the branching ratios of the exclusive semileptonic decays B(D) {yields} Xl{nu}, where X is a p-wave meson, using the nonrelativistic ISGW quark model. Our results are compared with the predictions of the ISGW2 model. We have computed some branching ratios that were not reported or were reported with 0.00 in this model. For example, we find that Br(B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} B-bar{sub s2}*{sup 0}l{sup -}{nu}-bar ) 4.03 x 10{sup -5}, Br(B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} B-bar{yields}{sub 2}*{sup 0}l{sup -} {nu}-bar ) = 3.65 x 10{sup -6} and Br(D{sup +}{sub s} {yields} f{sub 2}l{sup +}{nu}) = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}, which seem to be within the reach of forthcoming experiments. Furthermore, we have classified the B{sub u,d,s} {yields} Tl{nu} decays into two groups and compared the semileptonic and nonleptonic decays including a tensor meson in the final state.

  2. Weak electric and magnetic form factors for semileptonic baryon decays in an independent-quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, N.; Dash, B.K.; Das, M.

    1985-01-01

    Weak electric and magnetic form factors for semileptonic baryon decays are calculated in a relativistic quark model based on the Dirac equation with the independent-quark confining potential of the form (1+γ 0 )V(r). The values obtained for (g 2 /g 1 ), for various decay modes in a model with V(r) = a'r 2 , are roughly of the same order as those predicted in the MIT bag model. However in a similar model with V(r) = (a/sup nu+1/r/sup ν/+V 0 ), the (g 2 /g 1 ) values agree with the nonrelativistic results of Donoghue and Holstein. Incorporating phenomenologically the effect of nonzero g 2 in the ratio (g 1 /f 1 ), we have estimated the values for (f 2 /f 1 ) for various semileptonic transitions. It is observed that SU(3)-symmetry breaking does not generate significant departures in (f 2 /f 1 ) values from the corresponding Cabibbo values

  3. Measurement of the semileptonic $CP$ asymmetry in $B^0-\\overline{B}{}^0$ mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; 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    2015-01-01

    The semileptonic $CP$ asymmetry in $B^0-\\overline{B}{}^0$ mixing, $a_{\\rm sl}^d$, is measured in proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$, recorded by the LHCb experiment. Semileptonic $B^0$ decays are reconstructed in the inclusive final states $D^-\\mu^+$ and $D^{*-}\\mu^+$, where the $D^-$ meson decays into the $K^+\\pi^-\\pi^-$ final state, and the $D^{*-}$ meson into the $\\overline{D}{}^0(\\rightarrow K^+\\pi^-)\\pi^-$ final state. The asymmetry between the numbers of $D^{(*)-}\\mu^+$ and $D^{(*)+}\\mu^-$ decays is measured as a function of the decay time of the $B^0$ mesons. The $CP$ asymmetry is measured to be $a_{\\rm sl}^d = (-0.02 \\pm 0.19 \\pm 0.30)\\%$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise measurement of $a_{\\rm sl}^d$ to date and is consistent with the prediction from the Standard Model.

  4. Measurement of the semileptonic CP asymmetry in B0-B[over ¯]0 mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-01-30

    The semileptonic CP asymmetry in B0-B[over ¯]0 mixing, a(sl)(d), is measured in proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb-1, recorded by the LHCb experiment. Semileptonic B0 decays are reconstructed in the inclusive final states D-μ+ and D*-μ+, where the D- meson decays into the K+π-π- final state and the D*- meson into the D[over ¯]0(→K+π-)π- final state. The asymmetry between the numbers of D(*)-μ+ and D(*)+μ- decays is measured as a function of the decay time of the B0 mesons. The CP asymmetry is measured to be a(sl)(d)=(-0.02±0.19±0.30)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise measurement of a(sl)(d) to date and is consistent with the prediction from the standard model.

  5. Simulation of D{sub s} semileptonic decay with the PANDA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lu [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Ritman, James [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA experiment will study a wide range of physics topics with beams of antiprotons incident on fixed proton or complex nuclei targets. One of the interesting issues is the D{sub s} semileptonic decay, which is governed by both the weak and strong forces. Here the strong interaction effects can be parameterized by the transition form factor. Techniques such as lattice QCD offer increasingly precise calculations, but as the uncertainties shrink, experimental validation of the results becomes increasingly important. The achievable performance of the full PANDA detector for these types of reactions has not yet been studied in detail; however, this is expected to work very well based upon the design performance and experience with similar detector systems. We evaluate the performance in the measurement of the semileptonic decay form factor of D{sub s}{sup +}→η e{sup +}ν{sub e}. The kinematics of the neutrino have been reconstructed with a complete simulation model of the detector and reconstruction tools. In the reconstruction procedure, we focus on developing the software and evaluating the expected precision. This talk summarizes the simulation and reconstruction status of the D{sub s} decay chain. With theoretical predictions of the cross section, we obtain a preliminary estimate of the expected count rate for the future data taking.

  6. Semileptonic Λb→Λcℓν¯ℓ transition in full QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, K.; Süngü, J. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The tree-level b →c ℓν¯ ℓ based hadronic transitions have been the focus of much attention since recording significant deviations of the experimental data, on the ratios of the branching fractions in τ and e -μ channels of the semileptonic B →D transition, from the SM predictions by the BABAR Collaboration in 2012. It can be of great importance to look whether similar discrepancies take place in the semileptonic baryonic Λb→Λcℓν¯ ℓ decay channel or not. In this accordance we estimate the decay width as well as the ratios of the branching fractions in τ and e -μ channels of this baryonic transition by calculating the form factors, entering the amplitude of this transition as the main inputs, in the framework of QCD sum rules in full theory. We compare the obtained results with the predictions of other theoretical studies. Our results may be compared with the corresponding future experimental data to look for possible deviations of data from the SM predictions.

  7. Measurement of the semileptonic $CP$ asymmetry in $B^0 - \\bar {B^0}$ mixing

    CERN Multimedia

    De Vries, Jacco

    2015-01-01

    The semileptonic CP asymmetry in B0−B⎯⎯⎯0 mixing, adsl, is measured in proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb−1, recorded by the LHCb experiment. Semileptonic B0 decays are reconstructed in the inclusive final states D−μ+ and D∗−μ+, where the D− meson decays into the K+π−π− final state, and the D∗− meson into the D⎯⎯⎯0(→K+π−)π− final state. The asymmetry between the numbers of D(∗)−μ+ and D(∗)+μ− decays is measured as a function of the decay time of the B0 mesons. The CP asymmetry is measured to be adsl=(−0.02±0.19±0.30)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise measurement of adsl to date and is consistent with the prediction from the Standard Model.

  8. Investigation of Semileptonic {ital B} Meson Decays to {ital p} -Wave Charm Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M. [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Glenn, S.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Xing, X. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; McLean, K.W.; Marka, S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I.C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; OGrady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bliss, D.W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V. and others

    1998-05-01

    We have studied semileptonic B meson decays with a p -wave charm meson in the final state using 3.29{times}10{sup 6} B{ovr B} events collected with the CLEOII detector at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring. We find a value for the exclusive semileptonic product branching fraction B(B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}D{sup 0}{sub 1} {ell}{sup {minus}}{ovr {nu}}{sub {ell}}) B(D{sup 0}{sub 1}{r_arrow}D{sup {asterisk}+} {pi}{sup {minus}})=(0.373{plus_minus}0.085{plus_minus} 0.052{plus_minus}0.024){percent} and an upper limit for B(B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}D{sup {asterisk}0}{sub 2} {ell}{sup {minus}}{ovr {nu}}{sub {ell}}) B(D{sup {asterisk}0}{sub 2}{r_arrow}D{sup {asterisk}+ }{pi}{sup {minus}}){lt}0.16{percent} (90{percent} C.L.). Furthermore, we present the first measurement of the q{sup 2} spectrum for B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}D{sup 0}{sub 1}{ell}{sup {minus}} {ovr {nu}}{sub {ell}} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Probing WWγ and WWγγ couplings with high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Schrempp, F.

    1991-12-01

    We examine the potential of a future 500 GeV linear e + e - collider for probing anomalous WW γ and WW γγ couplings in the so-called γ(γ)model, corresponding to colliding γe and γγ beams from Compton backscattering of laser light. We consider in detail the 'minimal' set (k γ , λ γ ) of CP conserving anomalous couplings and present first results for the CP violating 'partner' couplings (anti K γ , anti l γ ) as well. The reactions under consideration are γe → Wν, γγ → W + W - and, as a reference, also e + e - → W + W - . We discuss the impact of both circular polarization of laser photons and polarized e(anti e) beams. Photon 'beams' due to classical Bremsstrahlung are also studied for comparison. We analyze in detail, how changes of the assumed machine parameters, cuts and systematic errors affect the sensitivity to the anomalous couplings. (orig.)

  10. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  11. Development of a primer–probe energy transfer based real-time PCR for the detection of Swine influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2013-01-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) causes a contagious and requiring official notification disease of pigs and humans. In this study, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay based on primer–probe energy transfer (PriProET) for the detection of SIV RNA was developed...... of the specific product amplification. The assay is specific for influenza virus with a sensitivity of detection limit of approximately 10 copies of RNA by PCR. Based on serial dilutions of SIV, the detection limit of the assay was approximately 0.003 TCID50/ml for H1N1 A/Swine/Poland/KPR9/2004 virus. The Pri...

  12. Probing the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, A. P.; Bradley, J. D. B.; Hulko, O.; Stevanovic, D. V.; Edwards, C. J.; Kallis, A.; Coleman, P. G.; Crowe, I. F.; Halsall, M. P.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe preliminary results from studies of the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) embedded in stoichiometric, thermally grown SiO2 using Variable Energy Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (VEPAS). We show that the VEPAS technique is able to monitor the introduction of structural damage. In SiO2 through the high dose Si+ ion implantation required to introduce excess silicon as a precursor to Si-nc formation. VEPAS is also able to characterize the rate of the removal of this damage with high temperature annealing, showing strong correlation with photoluminescence. Finally, VEPAS is shown to be able to selectively probe the interface between Si-ncs and the host oxide. Introduction of hydrogen at these interfaces suppresses the trapping of positrons at the interfaces.

  13. Advances in electrostatic energy analyzers for ion beam probe diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, L.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    Two new concepts are discussed for feedback controlled electrostatic energy analyzers; a dual gain analyzer for current density measurements, and bottom plate coupling to provide dc stability and better frequency response. An analyzer incorporating both of these concepts was built and preliminary measurements of its performance were made. These measurements are not reported here. (U.S.)

  14. Probing the Free Energy Landscape of the FBP28 WW Domain Using Multiple Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Allen, Lucy R.; Tamiola, Kamil; Mark, Alan E.; Paci, Emanuele

    The free-energy landscape of a small protein, the FBP 28 WW domain, has been explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with alternative descriptions of the molecule. The molecular models used range from coarse-grained to all-atom with either an implicit or explicit treatment of the solvent.

  15. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  16. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  17. Search for exclusive charmless semileptonic decays of B → ππlν with the Belle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beleno, Cesar; Frey, Ariane [II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen University (Germany); Collaboration: Belle-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Semileptonic decays of B mesons are the most suitable way to measure the magnitude of CKM matrix elements such as vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke and vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke. One technique for extracting these quantities is using an exclusive analysis in which a particular channel is reconstructed. For instance, for the study of V{sub ub} just about 25% of the exclusive decay channels for charmless semileptonic decays of B mesons have been measured. Currently, the most precise measurement of vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke comes from the exclusive channel B → πlν. However, the dominant systematic errors for this measurement stem from uncertainties in the knowledge of branching fractions and form factors of other charmless semileptonic B decays. In this analysis, we perform a spectroscopy study of semileptonic decays with the final state meson decaying into two pions. We implement a boosted decision tree method to reduce the contributions of background using the complete data set collected by the Belle detector.

  18. Radial transport of high-energy oxygen ions into the deep inner magnetosphere observed by Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, K.; Seki, K.; Keika, K.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2017-12-01

    It is known that proton is main contributor of the ring current and oxygen ions can make significant contribution during major magnetic storms. Ions are supplied to the ring current by radial transport from the plasma sheet. Convective transport of lower-energy protons and diffusive transport of higher-energy protons were reported to contribute to the storm-time and quiet-time ring current respectively [e.g., Gkioulidou et al., 2016]. However, supply mechanisms of the oxygen ions are not clear. To characterize the supply of oxygen ions to the ring current during magnetic storms, we studied the properties of energetic proton and oxygen ion phase space densities (PSDs) for specific magnetic moment (μ) during the April 23-25, 2013, geomagnetic storm observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. We here report on radial transport of high-energy (μ ≥ 0.5 keV/nT) oxygen ions into the deep inner magnetosphere during the late main phase of the magnetic storm. Since protons show little change during this period, this oxygen radial transport is inferred to cause the development of the late main phase. Enhancement of poloidal magnetic fluctuations is simultaneously observed. We estimated azimuthal mode number ≤5 by using cross wavelet analysis with ground-based observation of IMAGE ground magnetometers. The fluctuations can resonate with drift and bounce motions of the oxygen ions. The results suggest that combination of the drift and drift-bounce resonances is responsible for the radial transport of high-energy oxygen ions into the deep inner magnetosphere. We also report on the radial transport of the high-energy oxygen ions into the deep inner magnetosphere during other magnetic storms.

  19. Study of ion tracks by micro-probe ion energy loss spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Havránek, Vladimír; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Horák, Pavel; Fink, Dietmar; Apel, P. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 332, AUG (2014), s. 308-311 ISSN 0168-583X. [21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). Seattle, 23.06.2013-28.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion energy loss spectrometry * single ion track * microprobe * tomography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  20. Probing shape coexistence in neutron-deficient $^{72}$Se via low-energy Coulomb excitation

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-­deficient $^{72}$Se by performing a low-­energy Coulomb excitation measurement. Matrix elements will be determined for low-­lying excited states allowing for a full comparison with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the intrinsic shape of the ground state, and the second 0$^{+}$ state, will be investigated using the quadrupole sum rules method.

  1. Probing the structure of matter with Stanford's new $78 million high-energy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, G.

    1981-01-01

    The US high-energy physics program recently gained a powerful new experimental tool with the completion of the Positron Electron Project (PEP). PEP is a colliding beam storage ring two kilometres in circumference. Collisions are obtained in the PEP ring by injecting electrons and positrons from SLAC's existing linear accelerator so that they circulate in opposite directions. At 6 points in the ring the beams will collide. PEP will enable collisions to be produced at up to 36 GeV

  2. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex has long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent m...

  3. Probing thin over layers with variable energy/cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spool, A.; White, R.

    2006-01-01

    A series of carbon-coated magnetic recording disks proved ideal for exploring sampling depth and ion formation trends as a function of variations in energy and cluster size (Au x ) of the primary ion beam, and variations in over coat thickness and type. Ion yield from the underlying metal layer increased with increasing energy and decreasing cluster size of the primary ions. The yields varied nearly linearly with over layer thickness. In contrast, M x Cs y depth profiles were unaffected by changes in the primary ion. The samples were fortuitously dosed with dinonyl phthalate, allowing a study similar to prior GSIMS work [I.S. Gilmore, M.P. Seah, J.E. Johnstone, in: A. Benninghoven, P. Bertrand, H.-N. Migeon, H.W. Werner (Eds.), Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on SIMS, Elsevier, Brussels, 2000, p. 801]. Ions prominent in the EI mass spectrum, including even electron ions, were more consistently enhanced at lower energies and higher cluster sizes than the primary (M + H) + ion. The total secondary ion count was inversely proportional to the film thickness. Secondary electrons, largely originating in the buried metal layer, may be inducing organic ion formation [A.M. Spool, Surf. Interface Anal. 36 (2004) 264

  4. High energy synchrotron radiation. A new probe for condensed matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.R.; Bouchard, R.; Brueckel, T.; Lippert, M.; Neumann, H.B.; Poulsen, H.F.; Ruett, U.; Schmidt, T.; Zimmermann, M. von

    1994-01-01

    The absorption of 150 keV synchrotron radiation in matter is weak and, as normally done with neutrons, bulk properties are studied in large samples. However, the k-space resolution obtained with a Triple Crystal Diffractometer (TCD) for high energy synchrotron radiation is about one order of magnitude better than in high resolution neutron diffraction. The technique has been applied to measure the structure factor S(Q) of amorphous solids up to momentum transfers of the order of 32 A -1 , to study the intermediate range Ortho-II ordering in large, high quality YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.5 single crystals and for investigations of the defect scattering from annealed Czochralski grown silicon crystals. Magnetic superlattice reflections have been measured in MnF 2 demonstrating the potential of the technique for high resolution studies of ground state bulk antiferromagnetism. Recently the question of two length scales in the critical scattering at the 100 K phase transition in SrTiO 3 was studied. At the PETRA storage ring, which serves as an accumulator for the HERA electron-proton-ring at DESY and which can be operated up to electron energies of 12 GeV, an undulator beam line is currently under construction and should be available in summer 1995. It opens up exciting new research opportunities for photon energies from about 20 to 150 keV. (orig.)

  5. Design of triads for probing the direct through space energy transfers in closely spaced assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Jean-Michel; Aly, Shawkat M; Fortin, Daniel; Guilard, Roger; Harvey, Pierre D

    2013-08-05

    Using a selective stepwise Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, two trimers built on three different chromophores were prepared. These trimers exhibit a D(^)A1-A2 structure where the donor D (octa-β-alkyl zinc(II)porphyrin either as diethylhexamethyl, 10a, or tetraethyltetramethyl, 10b, derivatives) through space transfers the S1 energy to two different acceptors, di(4-ethylbenzene) zinc(II)porphyrin (A1; acceptor 1) placed cofacial with D, and the corresponding free base (A2; acceptor 2), which is meso-meso-linked with A1. This structure design allows for the possibility of comparing two series of assemblies, 9a,b (D(^)A1) with 10a,b (D(^)Â1-A2), for the evaluation of the S1 energy transfer for the global process D*→A2 in the trimers. From the comparison of the decays of the fluorescence of D, the rates for through space energy transfer, kET for 10a,b (kET ≈ 6.4 × 10(9) (10a), 5.9 × 10(9) s(-1) (10b)), and those for the corresponding cofacial D(^)A1 systems, 9a,b, (kET ≈ 5.0 × 10(9) (9a), 4.7 × 10(9) s(-1) (9b)), provide an estimate for kET for the direct through space D*→A2 process (i.e., kET(D(^)A1-A2) - kET(D(^)A1) = kET(D*→A2) ∼ 1 × 10(9) s(-1)). This channel of relaxation represents ∼15% of kET for D*→A1.

  6. γ-rays as a probe to study nuclear dynamics and nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of gamma rays in nuclear physics is reviewed, and it is shown how they offer insight into the structure and damping of giant resonances, and how they can be used as an isospin filter. Results from inclusive and exclusive experiments at GANIL are discussed. It is stressed that although the production of high energy gamma rays in heavy ion reactions between 30 MeV/A and 86 MeV/A is understood qualitatively, most models fail in being more quantitative

  7. Energy gap and surface structure of superconducting diamond films probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Terukazu; Takano, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Masanori; Takenouchi, Tomohiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) experiments on (1 1 1)-oriented epitaxial films of heavily boron-doped diamond at T = 0.47 K. The STM topography shows two kinds of atomic structures: a hydrogenated 1 x 1 structure, C(1 1 1)1 x 1:H, and an amorphous structure. On the C(1 1 1)1 x 1:H region, the tunneling spectra show superconducting property with the energy gap Δ = 0.83 meV. The obtained gap ratio 2Δ/k B T c = 3.57 is consistent with the weak-coupling BCS theory

  8. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  9. Voids in the Cosmic Web as a probe of dark energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novosyadlyj

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of large voids in the Cosmic Web from the initial adiabatic cosmological perturbations of space-time metric, density and velocity of matter is investigated in cosmological model with the dynamical dark energy accelerating expansion of the Universe. It is shown that the negative density perturbations with the initial radius of about 50 Mpc in comoving to the cosmological background coordinates and the amplitude corresponding to the r.m.s. temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background lead to the formation of voids with the density contrast up to -0.9, maximal peculiar velocity about 400 km/s and the radius close to the initial one. An important feature of voids formation from the analyzed initial amplitudes and profiles is establishing the surrounding overdensity shell. We have shown that the ratio of the peculiar velocity in units of the Hubble flow to the density contrast in the central part of a void does not depend or weakly depends on the distance from the center of the void. It is also shown that this ratio is sensitive to the values of dark energy parameters and can be used to find them based on the observational data on mass density and peculiar velocities of galaxies in the voids.

  10. Testing the standard model with precision calculations of semileptonic B-decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turczyk, Sascha S.

    2011-01-14

    Measurements in the flavour sector are very important to test the Standard Model, since most of the free parameters are related to flavour physics. We are discussing semileptonic B-meson decays, from which an important parameter, vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, is extracted. First we discuss higher-order non-perturbative corrections in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons. We identify the relevant hadronic matrix elements up to 1/m{sup 5}{sub b} and estimate them using an approximation scheme. Within this approach the e ects on the integrated rate and on kinematic moments are estimated. Similar estimates are presented for B {yields} X{sub s} + {gamma} decays. Furthermore we investigate the role of so-called ''intrinsic-charm'' operators in this decay, which appear first at order 1/m{sup 3}{sub b} in the heavy-quark expansion. We show by explicit calculation that - at scales {mu} {<=} m{sub c} - the contributions from ''intrinsic-charm'' effects can be absorbed into short-distance coefficient functions multiplying, for instance, the Darwin term. Then, the only remnant of ''intrinsic charm'' are logarithms of the form ln(m{sup 2}{sub c}/m{sup 2}{sub b}), which can be resummed by using renormalization-group techniques. As long as the dynamics at the charm quark scale is perturbative, {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub c}) << 1, this implies that no additional non-perturbative matrix elements aside from the Darwin and the spin-orbit term have to be introduced at order 1/m{sup 3}{sub b}. However, ''intrinsic charm'' leads at the next order to terms with inverse powers of the charm mass: 1/m{sup 3}{sub b} x 1/m{sup 2}{sub c}. Parametrically they complement the estimate of the potential impact of 1/m{sup 4}{sub b} contributions, which we will explore. In this context, we draw semiquantitative conclusions for the expected scale of weak annihilation in semileptonic B decays, both for its

  11. Testing the standard model with precision calculations of semileptonic B-decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turczyk, Sascha S.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements in the flavour sector are very important to test the Standard Model, since most of the free parameters are related to flavour physics. We are discussing semileptonic B-meson decays, from which an important parameter, vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke, is extracted. First we discuss higher-order non-perturbative corrections in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons. We identify the relevant hadronic matrix elements up to 1/m 5 b and estimate them using an approximation scheme. Within this approach the e ects on the integrated rate and on kinematic moments are estimated. Similar estimates are presented for B → X s + γ decays. Furthermore we investigate the role of so-called ''intrinsic-charm'' operators in this decay, which appear first at order 1/m 3 b in the heavy-quark expansion. We show by explicit calculation that - at scales μ ≤ m c - the contributions from ''intrinsic-charm'' effects can be absorbed into short-distance coefficient functions multiplying, for instance, the Darwin term. Then, the only remnant of ''intrinsic charm'' are logarithms of the form ln(m 2 c /m 2 b ), which can be resummed by using renormalization-group techniques. As long as the dynamics at the charm quark scale is perturbative, α s (m c ) 3 b . However, ''intrinsic charm'' leads at the next order to terms with inverse powers of the charm mass: 1/m 3 b x 1/m 2 c . Parametrically they complement the estimate of the potential impact of 1/m 4 b contributions, which we will explore. In this context, we draw semiquantitative conclusions for the expected scale of weak annihilation in semileptonic B decays, both for its valence and non-valence components. The last part is dedicated to a complementary measurement of vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke from exclusive B → D (*) l anti ν l . Since this determination shows a slight tension with respect to the inclusive one, we investigate wether a non standard model contribution may distort the extraction. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the form factor ratios in semileptonic decays of charm mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaliznyak, Renata [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    I have measured the form factor ratios r2 = A2 (0)/A1 (0) and rV = V (0)/A1 (0) in the semileptonic charm meson decay D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ve from data collected by the Fermilab E791 collaboration. Form factors are introduced in the calculation of the hadronic current in semileptonic decays of strange, charm, or bottom mesons, such as D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve . Semileptonic decays provide insight into quark coupling to the W boson since the leptonic and hadronic amplitudes in the Feynman diagram for the decay are completely separate. There are no strong interactions between the final state leptons and quarks. A number of theoretical models predict the values of the form factors for D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve , though there is a large range of predictions. E791 is a hadroproduction experiment that recorded over 20 billion interactions with a 500 GeV π- beam incident on five thin targets during the 1991-92 Fermilab fixed-target run. Approximately 3000 D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ ve decays are fully reconstructed. In order to extract the form factor ratios from the data, I implement a multidimensional unbinned maximum likelihood fit with a large sample of simulated (Monte Carlo) D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0 e+ve events. The large E791 data sample provides the most precise measurement of the form factor ratios to date. The measured values for the form factor ratios are r2 = 0.71 ± 0.08 ± 0.09 and rV = 1.84 ± 0.11 ±} 0.08. These results are in good agreement with some Lattice Gauge calculations. However the agreement with quark model predictions is not as good.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-01-01

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with the W boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t anti t→W ± W -+ b anti b→q anti qlνb anti b is the ''golden channel'' for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb -1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: m t =(169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV. The simultaneous measurement of a scaling factor for the jet energy

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with the W boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t anti t{yields}W{sup {+-}}W{sup -+}b anti b{yields}q anti ql{nu}b anti b is the ''golden channel'' for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: m{sub t}=(169.2{+-}3.5(stat.){+-}1.0(syst.)) GeV. The

  15. Probing dark energy models with extreme pairwise velocities of galaxy clusters from the DEUS-FUR simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillot, Vincent R.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Corasaniti, Pier-Stefano; Rasera, Yann

    2015-06-01

    Observations of colliding galaxy clusters with high relative velocity probe the tail of the halo pairwise velocity distribution with the potential of providing a powerful test of cosmology. As an example it has been argued that the discovery of the Bullet Cluster challenges standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model predictions. Halo catalogues from N-body simulations have been used to estimate the probability of Bullet-like clusters. However, due to simulation volume effects previous studies had to rely on a Gaussian extrapolation of the pairwise velocity distribution to high velocities. Here, we perform a detail analysis using the halo catalogues from the Dark Energy Universe Simulation Full Universe Runs (DEUS-FUR), which enables us to resolve the high-velocity tail of the distribution and study its dependence on the halo mass definition, redshift and cosmology. Building upon these results, we estimate the probability of Bullet-like systems in the framework of Extreme Value Statistics. We show that the tail of extreme pairwise velocities significantly deviates from that of a Gaussian, moreover it carries an imprint of the underlying cosmology. We find the Bullet Cluster probability to be two orders of magnitude larger than previous estimates, thus easing the tension with the ΛCDM model. Finally, the comparison of the inferred probabilities for the different DEUS-FUR cosmologies suggests that observations of extreme interacting clusters can provide constraints on dark energy models complementary to standard cosmological tests.

  16. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  17. Probing core polarization around 78Ni: intermediate energy Coulomb excitation of 74Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchi T.

    2013-12-01

    We have recently measured the B(E2; 0+ → 2+ of the 74Ni nucleus in an intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of the Michigan State University. The 74Ni secondary beam has been produced by fragmentation of 86Kr at 140 AMeV on a thick Be target. Selected radioactive fragments impinged on a secondary 197Au target where the measurement of the emitted γ-rays allows to extract the Coulomb excitation cross section and related structure information. Preliminary B(E2 values do not point towards an enhancement of the transition matrix element and the comparison to what was already measured by Aoi and co-workers in [1] opens new scenarios in the interpretation of the shell evolution of the Z=28 isotopes.

  18. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex had long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices.

  19. The dynamics of the Local Group as a probe of dark energy and modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study the dynamics of the Local Group (LG) within the context of cosmological models beyond General Relativity (GR). Using observable kinematic quantities to identify candidate pairs, we build up samples of simulated LG-like objects drawing from f(R), symmetron, Dvali, Gabadadze & Porrati and quintessence N-body simulations together with their Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) counterparts featuring the same initial random phase realizations. The variables and intervals used to define LG-like objects are referred to as LG model; different models are used throughout this work and adapted to study their dynamical and kinematic properties. The aim is to determine how well the observed LG dynamics can be reproduced within cosmological theories beyond GR, We compute kinematic properties of samples drawn from alternative theories and ΛCDM and compare them to actual observations of the LG mass, velocity and position. As a consequence of the additional pull, pairwise tangential and radial velocities are enhanced in modified gravity and coupled dark energy with respect to ΛCDM inducing significant changes to the total angular momentum and energy of the LG. For example, in models such as f(R) and the symmetron this increase can be as large as 60 per cent, peaking well outside of the 95 per cent confidence region allowed by the data. This shows how simple considerations about the LG dynamics can lead to clear small-scale observational signatures for alternative scenarios, without the need of expensive high-resolution simulations.

  20. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  1. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay based on primer-probe energy transfer for the detection of all serotypes of bluetongue virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leblanc, N; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Fernandez, J

    2010-01-01

    A real-time RT-PCR assay based on the primer–probe energy transfer (PriProET) was developed to detect all 24 serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV). BTV causes serious disease, primarily in sheep, but in other ruminants as well. A distinguishing characteristic of the assay is its tolerance toward...

  2. Measurements of hyperon semileptonic decays at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourquin, M.; Chatelus, Y.; Brown, R.M.

    1983-06-01

    Results on five different hyperon semileptonic decays from the WA2 experiment, performed in the CERN SPS charged hyperon beam, have been analysed within the framework of the Cabibbo model. For the first time, the inconsistencies, which inevitably occur when the results from different experiments are combined, have been avoided in these comprehensive fits to high statistics data from a single hyperon decay experiment. Excellent agreement with the basic Cabibbo model has been obtained using the WA2 data either alone or together with neutron lifetime measurements. These results contrast strongly with other recent Cabibbo analyses which have indicated the presence of SU(3) breaking effects. Using additional information on ft values for superallowed nuclear Fermi transitions, an upper limit on the mixing parameter sintheta 3 in the Kobayashi-Maskawa six quark scheme has been obtained. (author)

  3. Search for new mechanism of CP violation through decay of leptons and semileptonic decay of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1996-11-01

    If CP is violated in any decay process involving leptons it will signify the existence of a new scalar boson (called the X boson) responsible for CP violation that may be the key to understanding matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The authors discuss the signatures of CP violation in (1) the decay of tau and mu leptons, and (2) the semileptonic decay of π, K, D, B and t particles by measuring the polarization of the charged lepton in the decay. The authors discuss how the coupling constants and their phases of the coupling of the X boson to 9 quark vertices and 3 lepton vertices can be obtained through 12 decay processes

  4. vertical bar Vub vertical bar from exclusive semileptonic B→π decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, Jonathan M.; Nieves, Juan

    2007-01-01

    We use Omnes representations of the form factors f + and f 0 for exclusive semileptonic B→π decays, paying special attention to the treatment of the B* pole and its effect on f + . We apply them to combine experimental partial branching fraction information with theoretical calculations of both form factors to extract vertical bar V ub vertical bar. The precision we achieve is competitive with the inclusive determination and we do not find a significant discrepancy between our result, vertical bar V ub vertical bar=(3.90+/-0.32+/-0.18)x10 -3 , and the inclusive world average value (4.45+/-0.20+/-0.26)x10 -3 [Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG), hep-ex/0603003

  5. Measurement of the Λb0 Lifetime Using Semileptonic Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L. S.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Arthaud, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, P.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Biscarat, C.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chan, K.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clément, C.; Clément, B.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de Jong, P.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, J.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hansson, P.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hossain, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kalk, J. M.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Kirsch, M.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Krop, D.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lacroix, F.; Lam, D.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lellouch, J.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewin, M.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, L.; Lietti, S. M.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martin, B.; McCarthy, R.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, A.; Michaut, M.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mommsen, R. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Ochando, C.; Onoprienko, D.; Oshima, N.; Osta, J.; Otec, R.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padley, P.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Penning, B.; Perea, P. M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Pompoš, A.; Pope, B. G.; Popov, A. V.; Potter, C.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rakitine, A.; Rangel, M. S.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Renkel, P.; Reucroft, S.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schliephake, T.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Siccardi, V.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, J.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strauss, E.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Svoisky, P.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tiller, B.; Tissandier, F.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torchiani, I.; Trefzger, T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Unalan, R.; Uvarov, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Eijk, B.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; von Toerne, E.; Voutilainen, M.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wagner, R.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, L.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weber, G.; Weerts, H.; Wenger, A.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yu, C.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zivkovic, L.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2007-11-01

    We report a measurement of the Λb0 lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3fb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002 2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Λb0 baryon is reconstructed via the decay Λb0→μν¯Λc+X. Using 4437±329 signal candidates, we measure the Λb0 lifetime to be τ(Λb0)=1.290-0.110+0.119(stat)-0.091+0.087(syst)ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Λb0 decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value.

  6. Semi-Leptonic weak decay form factors of LAMBDAb and SIGMAb(OMEGAb) to proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghigat, M.

    1996-01-01

    The matrix elements of the semi-leptonic weak decays of Λ b and of Σ b Ω b to proton are calculated, in the Bethe-Salpeter formalism. We propose a protonic wave function in terms of its dynamically indistinguishable constituent quarks. We show that there are two universal form factors for Λ b → P and four for Σ b (OMEGA b ) → P decays. They depend, as expected, on the Lorentz scalar Υ 1 .Υ 2 , whereΥ 1 and Υ 2 , are the velocities of the baryons. On the first order perturbation approximation, however, the two and the four form factors degenerate to one expression for each of the two decays. (author). 14 refs

  7. Extraction of the CKM matrix element Vus from the hyperon semileptonic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.; Dahiya, H.; Chatley, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The chiral constituent quark model with configuration mixing (χCQM config ), which is successful in explaining the weak vector and axial-vector form factors for the strangeness-changing as well as strangeness-nonchanging hyperon semileptonic decays at Q 2 =0, has been extended to determine the CKM matrix element V us for the strangeness-changing decays. The implications of the effect of the SU(3) symmetry breaking, Q 2 -dependence and radiative corrections on the form factors and V us have also been investigated. It is found that the results with SU(3) symmetry breaking show considerable improvement over the SU(3) symmetric results when compared with the existing experimental data. The inclusion of the Q 2 -dependence and radiative corrections in form factors have only a small effect on the prediction of V us as is expected from the theory. (orig.)

  8. A Precision Measurement of sin$^{2}\\theta$$_{w}$ from Semileptonic Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wotschack, Jorg

    1987-01-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring the electroweak mixing parameter sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, of the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg theory $^{1}$ as precisely as possible: first, its value may be predicted by models of Grand Unification;$^{2}$ second, precise measurements of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ from different processes would test the validity of electroweak radiative corrections. $^{3,$}$. Different methods have been used to determine sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, over a large range of $Q^{2}$ values. FIGURE 1 gives a compilation of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ with remarkable agreement between the results. At present, it is most precisely determined in semileptonic neutrino-nucleon scattering from the ratio of neutral current (NC) to charged current (CC) cross and in proton-antiproton collisions from the W boson mass. $^{10,11}$.

  9. Semileptonic decays of B and D mesons in the light-front formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaus, W.

    1990-01-01

    The light-front formalism is used to present a relativistic calculation of form factors for semileptonic D and B decays in the constituent quark model. The quark-antiquark wave functions of the mesons can be obtained, in principle, from an analysis of the meson spectrum, but are approximated in this work by harmonic-oscillator wave functions. The predictions of the model are consistent with the experimental data for B decays. The Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) matrix element |V cs | is determined by a comparison of the experimental and theoretical rates for D 0 →K - e + ν, and is consistent with a unitary KM matrix for three families. The predictions for D→K * transitions are in conflict with the data

  10. Semileptonic and radiative decays of the Bc meson in the light-front quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the exclusive semileptonic B c →(D,η c ,B,B s )lν l , η b →B c lν l (l=e,μ,τ) decays using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian. The form factors f + (q 2 ) and f - (q 2 ) are obtained from the analytic continuation method in the q + =0 frame. While the form factor f + (q 2 ) is free from the zero mode, the form factor f - (q 2 ) is not free from the zero mode in the q + =0 frame. We quantify the zero-mode contributions to f - (q 2 ) for various semileptonic B c decays. Using our effective method to relate the non-wave-function vertex to the light-front valence wave function, we incorporate the zero-mode contribution as a convolution of the zero-mode operator with the initial and final state wave functions. Our results are then compared to the available experimental data and the results from other theoretical approaches. Since the prediction on the magnetic dipole B c *→B c +γ decay turns out to be very sensitive to the mass difference between B c * and B c mesons, the decay width Γ(B c *→B c γ) may help in determining the mass of B c * experimentally. Furthermore, we compare the results from the harmonic oscillator potential and the linear potential and identify the decay processes that are sensitive to the choice of confining potential. From the future experimental data on these sensitive processes, one may obtain more realistic information on the potential between the quark and antiquark in the heavy meson system.

  11. Measurement of the Bs anti-Bs oscillation frequency using semileptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Vivek [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    This thesis reports a time dependent measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms using semileptonic decays B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ℓ+X. We use a data sample of 1 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider to reconstruct ~ 61, 500 semileptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ decays. This analysis of B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mixing has a sensitivity of 19.4 ps-1 and shows an evidence of B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations at Δms ~17.75 ps-1 with an amplitude significance of ~2. In combination with the analyses of ~ 8,700 hadronic B$0\\atop{s}$ decays at CDF, we have made the first direct observation of time-dependent B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ flavor oscillations measuring Δms = 17.77$+0.09\\atop{-0.10}$ (stat) ± 0.07 (syst) ps -1. The obtained value of Δms agrees with the Standard Model expectation. When combined with the world average values for Δmd, m$\\bar{B}$0s and m $\\bar{B}$0s, along with other theoretical input, this result yields the ratio of CKM matrix elements |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2060 ± 0.0007 (exp)$+0.0081\\atop{-0.0060}$ (theor).

  12. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Gearheart, Michael; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Li, Bao-An; Murphy, Kyleah; Wen, De-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy L of such models, and constraints extracted on L from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust; (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer; (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden recoupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning; (iv) the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tail of light curves from giant flares from soft gamma-ray repeaters, confronting models of torsional crust oscillations; (v) the upper limit on the frequency to which millisecond pulsars can be spun-up due to accretion from a binary companion, confronting models of the r-mode instability arising above a threshold frequency determined in part by the viscous dissipation timescale at the crust-core boundary; and (vi) the observations of precursor electromagnetic flares a few seconds before short gamma-ray bursts, confronting a model of crust shattering caused by resonant excitation of a crustal oscillation mode by the tidal gravitational field of a companion neutron star just before merger. (orig.)

  13. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Gearheart, Michael; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Li, Bao-An [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Murphy, Kyleah [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Umpqua Community College, Roseburg, Oregon (United States); Wen, De-Hua [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); South China University of Technology, Department of Physics, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy L of such models, and constraints extracted on L from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust; (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer; (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden recoupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning; (iv) the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tail of light curves from giant flares from soft gamma-ray repeaters, confronting models of torsional crust oscillations; (v) the upper limit on the frequency to which millisecond pulsars can be spun-up due to accretion from a binary companion, confronting models of the r-mode instability arising above a threshold frequency determined in part by the viscous dissipation timescale at the crust-core boundary; and (vi) the observations of precursor electromagnetic flares a few seconds before short gamma-ray bursts, confronting a model of crust shattering caused by resonant excitation of a crustal oscillation mode by the tidal gravitational field of a companion neutron star just before merger. (orig.)

  14. Probing a steep EoS for dark energy with latest observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Mariana; Macorra, Axel de la

    2018-01-01

    We present a parametrization for the Dark Energy Equation of State "EoS" which has a rich structure, performing a transition at pivotal redshift zT between the present day value w0 to an early time wi =wa +w0 ≡ w(z ≫ 0) with a steepness given in terms of q parameter. The proposed parametrization is w =w0 +wa(z /zT) q /(1 +(z /zT)) q , with w0, wi, q and zT constant parameters. It reduces to the widely used EoS w =w0 +wa(1 - a) for zT = q = 1 . This transition is motivated by scalar field dynamics such as for example quintessence models. We study if a late time transition is favored by BAO measurements combined with local determination of H0 and information from the CMB. We find that our dynamical DE model allows to simultaneously fit H0 from local determinations and Planck CMB measurements, alleviating the tension obtained in a ΛCDM model. We obtain a smaller χ2 in our DE model than in ΛCDM showing that a dynamical DE is preferred with a reduction of 4.8%, 20.2% and 42.8% using BAO + H0, BAO + CMB and BAO + CMB + H0 datasets, respectively. However due to the increased number of free parameters in the EoS information criteria favors ΛCDM over our DE model at this stage. Nevertheless it is crucial to obtain the dynamics of DE from the observational data to show the path for theoretical DE models based on fundamental physics.

  15. Ratiometric Time-Gated Luminescence Probe for Nitric Oxide Based on an Apoferritin-Assembled Lanthanide Complex-Rhodamine Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; Dai, Zhichao; Liu, Xiangli; Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-11-03

    Using apoferritin (AFt) as a carrier, a novel ratiometric luminescence probe based on luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) between a Tb(3+) complex (PTTA-Tb(3+)) and a rhodamine derivative (Rh-NO), PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO, has been designed and prepared for the specific recognition and time-gated luminescence detection of nitric oxide (NO) in living samples. In this LRET probe, PTTA-Tb(3+) encapsulated in the core of AFt is the energy donor, and Rh-NO, a NO-responsive rhodamine derivative, bound on the surface of AFt is the energy acceptor. The probe only emits strong Tb(3+) luminescence because the emission of rhodamine is switched off in the absence of NO. Upon reaction with NO, accompanied by the turn-on of rhodamine emission, the LRET from Tb(3+) complex to rhodamine occurs, which results in the remarkable increase and decrease of the long-lived emissions of rhodamine and PTTA-Tb(3+), respectively. After the reaction, the intensity ratio of rhodamine emission to Tb(3+) emission, I565/I539, is ∼24.5-fold increased, and the dose-dependent enhancement of I565/I539 shows a good linearity in a wide concentration range of NO. This unique luminescence response allowed PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO to be conveniently used as a ratiometric probe for the time-gated luminescence detection of NO with I565/I539 as a signal. Taking advantages of high specificity and sensitivity of the probe as well as its good water-solubility, biocompatibility, and cell membrane permeability, PTTA-Tb(3+)@AFt-Rh-NO was successfully used for the luminescent imaging of NO in living cells and Daphnia magna. The results demonstrated the efficacy of the probe and highlighted it's advantages for the ratiometric time-gated luminescence bioimaging application.

  16. Simulation of the D{sub s} semileptonic decay with the PANDA detector and experimental verification of the Micro-Vertex-Detector pixel readout ASIC with proton test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lu

    2016-07-14

    The PANDA experiment will study a wide range of physics topics with beams of antiprotons incident on fixed proton or complex nuclear targets. One issue is the D{sub s} semileptonic decay, which is governed by the weak and strong forces. The interaction can be parameterized by a transition form factor. The performance of PANDA to measure the decay form factor of D{sup +}{sub s}→ηe{sup +}ν{sub e} is evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. This thesis concentrates on describing the software development and the evaluation of the expected precision. A preliminary estimate of the expected count rate is obtained. In this measurement, it is essential to reconstruct the D{sub s} semileptonic decay with high efficiency and purity in order to overcome the many orders of magnitude higher background. The Micro-Vertex-Detector plays an import role in the whole tracking system. The rate capability and tracking performance of the recent ASIC prototype for the readout of the MVD is tested using a beam of high-energy protons.

  17. Probing long-range structural order in SnPc/Ag(111) by umklapp process assisted low-energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauernik, Stephan; Hein, Petra; Gurgel, Max; Falke, Julian; Bauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on tin-phthalocyanine (SnPc) adsorbed on silver Ag(111). Upon adsorption of SnPc, strongly dispersing bands are observed which are identified as secondary Mahan cones formed by surface umklapp processes acting on photoelectrons from the silver substrate as they transit through the ordered adsorbate layer. We show that the photoemission data carry quantitative structural information on the adsorbate layer similar to what can be obtained from a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) study. More specifically, we compare photoemission data and LEED data probing an incommensurate-to-commensurate structural phase transition of the adsorbate layer. Based on our results we propose that Mahan-cone spectroscopy operated in a pump-probe configuration can be used in the future to probe structural dynamics at surfaces with a temporal resolution in the sub-100-fs regime.

  18. Determination of $|V_{ub}|$ from the measurement of the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching ratio of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Affholderbach, K; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Alemany, R; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Armstrong, S R; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Azzurri, P; Badaud, F; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Becker, U; Benchouk, C; Bencivenni, G; Berlich, R; Bettarini, S; Betteridge, A P; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Black, S N; Blair, G A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Blondel, A; Blum, Walter; Boccali, T; Boix, G; Bologna, G; Bonissent, A; Bonneaud, G R; Booth, C N; Bossi, F; Botterill, David R; Boucrot, J; Bourdon, P; Bowdery, C K; Bozzi, C; Brandt, S; Brient, J C; Bright-Thomas, P G; Bryant, L M; Buchmüller, O L; Buck, P G; Bujosa, G; Buskulic, Damir; Böhrer, A; Büscher, V; Calderini, G; Callot, O; Cameron, W; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carpinelli, M; Carr, J; Cartwright, S L; Casado, M P; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Charles, E; Chazelle, G; Chen, S; Chiarella, V; Chmeissani, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Clifft, R W; Colaleo, A; Colas, P; Colrain, P; Combley, F; Corden, M; Cordier, A; Cowan, G D; Coyle, P; Crawford, G; Creanza, D; Crespo, J M; Curtis, L; Dann, J H; Daskalakis, G; Davier, M; De Palma, M; Delfino, M C; Dell'Orso, R; Deschamps, O; Dhamotharan, S; Dietl, H; Dissertori, G; Dornan, Peter J; Drevermann, H; Duflot, L; Décamp, D; Edgecock, T R; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Etienne, F; Falvard, A; Fantechi, R; Felici, G; Ferdi, C; Ferguson, D P S; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Ferrante, I; Finch, A J; Focardi, E; Forti, F; Forty, Roger W; Foster, F; Foà, L; Frank, M; Ganis, G; Gao, Y; Garrido, L; Gay, P; Gelao, G; Georgiopoulos, C H; Geweniger, C; Ghete, V M; Ghez, P; Giannini, G; Giassi, A; Giehl, I; Giorgi, M A; Girone, M; Girtler, P; Gobbo, B; González, S; Goodsir, S M; Goy, C; Graefe, G; Graugès-Pous, E; Green, M G; Greening, T C; Gregorio, A; Grivaz, J F; Grupen, Claus; Guicheney, C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Hanke, P; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Hansper, G; Harvey, J; Hayes, O J; Haywood, S; Henrard, P; Hepp, V; Heusse, P; Hoffmann, C; Hu, H; Huang, X; Hughes, G; Höcker, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Jacholkowska, A; Jaffe, D E; Jakobs, K; Janot, P; Jin, S; Johnson, R P; Jones, R W L; Jost, B; Jousset, J; Juste, A; Kelly, M S; Kim, D W; Kim, H Y; Kleinknecht, K; Kluge, E E; Kneringer, E; Konstantinidis, N P; Kozanecki, Witold; Kroha, H; Kuhn, D; Kyriakis, A; Lançon, E; Laurelli, P; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Lefrançois, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lehto, M H; Lemaire, M C; Leroy, O; Ligabue, F; Lin, J; Litke, A M; Locci, E; Lucotte, A; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, J G; Lütjens, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Mannert, C; Mannocchi, G; Marinelli, N; Markou, C; Marrocchesi, P S; Martin, E B; Martin, F; Martínez, M; Mato, P; McNamara, P A; McNeil, M A; Medcalf, T; Merino, G; Merle, E; Messineo, A; Michel, B; Minard, M N; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Moser, H G; Motsch, F; Moutoussi, A; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Musolino, G; Männer, W; Nachtman, J M; Nash, J; Negus, P; Nief, J Y; Nielsen, J; Nilsson, B S; Norton, P R; Nuzzo, S; O'Shea, V; Orejudos, W; Ouyang, Q; Pacheco, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Pallin, D; Pan, Y B; Park, I C; Parrini, G; Pascual, A; Passalacqua, L; Payre, P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Perret, P; Perrodo, P; Pietrzyk, B; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Putzer, A; Pérez, P; Quast, G; Ragusa, F; Raine, C; Rander, J; Ranieri, A; Ranjard, F; Raso, G; Renardy, J F; Renk, B; Rensch, B; Riu, I; Rizzo, G; Robertson, N A; Rohne, E; Rolandi, Luigi; Rosnet, P; Rothberg, J E; Rougé, A; Roussarie, A; Rousseau, D; Rudolph, G; Ruggieri, F; Rumpf, M; Saadi, Y; Sadouki, A; Sander, H G; Sanguinetti, G; Saraiva, P; Scarr, J M; Schael, S; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Schuller, J P; Schune, M H; Schwindling, J; Sciabà, A; Scott, I J; Sedgbeer, J K; Selvaggi, G; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Sguazzoni, G; Silvestris, L; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Smith, K; Smolik, L; Sommer, J; Spagnolo, P; Stenzel, H; Stephan, F; Strong, J A; Sánchez, F; Talby, M; Tanaka, R; Taylor, G; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tejessy, W; Tempesta, P; Tenchini, Roberto; Teubert, F; Thompson, A S; Thompson, J C; Thompson, L F; Thomson, E; Thulasidas, M; Tittel, K; Tomalin, I R; Tonelli, G; Tournefier, E; Trabelsi, A; Trabelsi, K; Tricomi, A; Vallage, B; Van Gemmeren, P; Vannini, C; Vayaki, Anna; Veillet, J J; Venturi, A; Verderi, M; Verdini, P G; Videau, H L; Videau, I; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wachsmuth, H W; Walsh, J; Wang, T; Wasserbaech, S R; Werner, S; Wiedenmann, W; Williams, M D; Williams, M I; Wolf, G; Wright, A E; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Wunsch, M; Wäänänen, A; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zachariadou, K; Zeitnitz, C; Zerwas, D; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zito, G; Zobernig, G

    1999-01-01

    From a study of the kinematic properties of the final state produced in the semileptonic decays b-->X l nu, the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching ratio of b hadrons is measured. With a sam ple of 3.6 million hadronic Z decays recorded between 1992 and 1995 with the ALEPH detector at LEP, the value Br(b-->X_u l nu) is determined to be (1.73 +- 0.55_stat +- 0.55_syst)*10^{-3}, where X_u represents any charmless hadronic state and b is a mixture of b hadrons weighted by their production rates. This measurement yields the result |V_ub|^2= (18.68 +- 5.94_stat +- 5.94_syst +- 1 .45_HQE)*10^{-6}, where the last error comes from the conversion of the branching ratio to the CKM matrix element squared.

  19. Measurement of plasma-surface energy fluxes in an argon rf-discharge by means of calorimetric probes and fluorescent microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, H. R.; Kersten, H.; Hannemann, M.; Basner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Measured energy influx densities toward a tungsten dummy substrate in an argon rf-plasma are presented and a model for the description of the energy influx density based on plasma parameters, which have been obtained by Langmuir probe measurements, is applied. Furthermore, temperature measurements of microparticles are presented, which are confined in the plasma sheath. An extension of the model is developed for the description of the energy influx density to the particles. The comparison of model and experimental results offer the possibility to obtain an improved understanding of plasma-surface interactions.

  20. Flow of Energy through the Inner Magnetosphere during the March 17, 2015 solar storm as observed by the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Madanian, H.; Gerrard, A. J.; Patterson, J. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a large solar storm impacted the Earth's magnetosphere with a maximum negative Dst of -232 nT. We report on the temporal and spatial evolution of the proton energetic particle distributions in phase space during this storm, as measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on board each of the Van Allen Probes. We characterize the distribution prior to onset of the storm to provide a definition of quiet time conditions. We then show how the distribution evolves during the storm noting key changes of the distribution as a function of L and MLT and showing how the pitch angle distributions change throughout the storm. These observations displayed a number of interesting features of the storm including high beta plasma conditions and multiple injections of protons into the inner magnetosphere. We present the radial changes of the distribution at storm onset and following the evolution of the distribution during storm recovery. We compare observations of the East/West asymmetry in the proton distribution before versus after onset using both Van Allen Probes A and B spacecraft observations. Finally, we note interesting changes in the distribution showing an anomalous dropout in mid-energies of the distribution and observe an outward radial propagation of this dropout during recovery.

  1. Addendum to ''Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral baryons with light or charm quarks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Tun, D.M.; Garcia, A.; Sanchez-Colon, G.

    1994-01-01

    We show that the radiative corrections containing terms up to order αq/πM 1 for unpolarized semileptonic decays of baryons with positron emission can be obtained by simply reversing the sign of the axial-vector form factors in the corresponding final expressions of such decays with electron emission. This rule is valid regardless of the final kinematical variables chosen and of the particular Lorentz frame in which the final results are required

  2. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  3. Theoretical and experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasiorowicz, S.; Ruddick, K.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses experimental and theoretical work in High Energy Physics. Some topics discussed are: quantum field theory; supersymmetry; cosmology; superstring model; relic photinos; inflationary universe; dark matter; standard model; supernovae; semileptonic decay; quantum Langevin equation; underground neutrino detection at Soudan; strange quark systems; cosmic ray detection; superconducting super collider detectors; and studies of direct photon production

  4. Measurement of Inclusive b Semileptonic Branching Fractions at the Z Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trandafir, Aurel

    2000-05-23

    This document presents a new measurement of inclusive b semileptonic branching fractions B(b-->l) and B(b-->c-->l). The b-->l and b-->c-->l are separated by a means that uses correlation between the final state lepton charge and that of its parent b quark as a constraint. Monte Carlo counts of electrons and muons are calibrated to the data using a newly developed technique based on pairs of mutually independent tests for each particle hypothesis separately. The data sample consists of about 550,000 hadronic Z decays collected at the SLD between 1993 and 1998. Upon analysis of electron and muon counts in 61602 hadronic event hemispheres tagged as containing either a b or a b-bar, the author reports: B(b-->e) = 0.0949{+-}0.0049{+-}0.0050, B(b-->mu) = 0.1066{+-}0.0038{+-}0.0049, combined B(b-->l) = 0.1015{+-}0.0030{+-}0.0035; and B(b-->c-->e) = 0.0811{+-}0.0053{+-}0.0030, B(-->b-->c-->mu) = 0.0717{+-}0.0045{+-}0.0024, combined B(b-->c-->l) = 0.0756{+-}0.0034{+-}0.0019.

  5. Model-independent analysis of semileptonic B decays to D** for arbitrary new physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernlochner, Florian U.; Ligeti, Zoltan; Robinson, Dean J.

    2018-04-01

    We explore semileptonic B decays to the four lightest excited charm mesons, D**={D0*,D1* ,D1 ,D2*} , for nonzero charged lepton mass and for all b →c ℓν ¯ four-Fermi interactions, including calculation of the O (ΛQCD/mc ,b) and O (αs) corrections to the heavy quark limit for all form factors. In the heavy quark limit, some form factors are suppressed at zero recoil; therefore, the O (ΛQCD/mc ,b) corrections can be very important. The D** rates exhibit sensitivities to new physics in b →c τ ν ¯ mediated decays complementary to the D and D* modes. Since they are also important backgrounds to B →D(*)τ ν ¯, the correct interpretation of future semitauonic B →D(*) rate measurements requires consistent treatment of both the D** backgrounds and the signals. Our results allow more precise and more reliable calculations of these B →D**ℓν ¯ decays and are systematically improvable by better data on the e and μ modes. As an example, we show that the D** rates are more sensitive to a new c ¯ σμ νb tensor interaction than the D(*) rates.

  6. Measurement of vertical stroke Vub vertical stroke using b hadron semileptonic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Aakesson, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    The magnitude of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V ub vertical stroke is determined by measuring the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching fraction of beauty hadrons at OPAL based on b → X u lν event topology and kinematics. This analysis uses OPAL data collected between 1991 and 1995, which correspond to about four million hadronic Z decays. We measure Br(b → X u lν) to be (1.63 ±0.53 +0.55 -0.62 ) x 10 -3 . The first uncertainty is the statistical error and the second is the systematic error. From this analysis, vertical stroke V ub vertical stroke is determined to be: vertical stroke V ub vertical stroke =(4.00±0.65(stat) +0.67 -0.76 (sys)±0.19(HQE)) x 10 -3 . The last error represents the theoretical uncertainties related to the extraction of vertical stroke V ub vertical stroke from Br(b→X u l ν) using the Heavy Quark Expansion. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurwitz, Martina [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW + WZ) = 16.5-3.0+3.3 pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 ± 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4σ. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  8. Strange mass corrections to hyperonic semi-leptonic decays in statistical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, A.; Batra, M. [Thapar University, School of Physics and Material Science, Patiala (India)

    2013-12-15

    We study the spin distribution, weak decay coupling constant ratios for strange baryon octets with SU(3) breaking effects. Baryon is taken as an ensemble of quark-gluon Fock states in the sea with three valence quarks with definite spin, color and flavor quantum numbers. We apply the statistical model to calculate the probabilities of each Fock states, to analyze the impact of SU(3) breaking in the weak decays. The symmetry breaking effects are studied in terms of a parameter ''r '' whose best-fit value is obtained from the experimental data of semi-leptonic weak decay coupling constant ratios. We suggest the dominant contribution from H{sub 1}G{sub 8} (sea with spin one and color octet) where symmetry breaking corrections lead to the deviations in the value of the axial-vector matrix elements ratio F/D from experimental values by 17%. We conclude that symmetry breaking also significantly affects the polarization of quark in strange baryons. (orig.)

  9. Study of the semileptonic decay $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\to \\Lambda^{+}_{c}l^{-}\\overline{v}_{l}$

    CERN Document Server

    Albertus, C; Nieves, J; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2005.01.005

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of a nonrelativistic quark model we evaluate the six form factors associated with the Lambda /sub b//sup 0/ to Lambda /sub c//sup +/l/sup -/v/sub l/ semileptonic decay. The baryon wave functions were evaluated using a variational approach applied to a family of trial functions constrained by Heavy Quark Symmetry (HQS). We use a spectator model with only one-body current operators. For these operators we keep up to first order terms on the internal (small) heavy quark momentum, but all orders on the transferred (large) momentum. Our result for the partially integrated decay width is in good agreement with lattice calculations. Comparison of our total decay width to experiment allows us to extract theV/sub cb /Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element for which we obtain a value of ¿V/sub cb/¿=0.047+or-0.005 in agreement with a recent determination by the DELPHI Collaboration. Furthermore, we obtain the universal Isgur-Wise function with a slope parameter rho /sup 2/=0.98 in agreement with...

  10. Search for direct CP violation in D{sup 0}→h{sup −}h{sup +} modes using semileptonic B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abellan Beteta, C. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J. [Fakultät Physik, Technische Universität Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Alessio, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Alexander, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ali, S. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), Gatchina (Russian Federation); Alvarez Cartelle, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, A.A. [Sezione INFN di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Amato, S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amerio, S. [Sezione INFN di Padova, Padova (Italy); Amhis, Y. [LAL, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Anderlini, L. [Sezione INFN di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Anderson, J. [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Andreassen, R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); and others

    2013-06-10

    A search for direct CP violation in D{sup 0}→h{sup −}h{sup +} (where h=K or π) is presented using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup −1} collected in 2011 by LHCb in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The analysis uses D{sup 0} mesons produced in inclusive semileptonic b-hadron decays to the D{sup 0}μX final state, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to tag the flavour of the D{sup 0} meson. The difference in the CP-violating asymmetries between the two decay channels is measured to be ΔA{sub CP}=A{sub CP}(K{sup −}K{sup +})−A{sub CP}(π{sup −}π{sup +})=(0.49±0.30(stat)±0.14(syst))%. This result does not confirm the evidence for direct CP violation in the charm sector reported in other analyses.

  11. A study of B0-B0(bar) oscillations frequency and determination of flavor-tagging efficiency using semileptonic and hadronic B0 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} flavor oscillations are studied in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. One B is reconstructed in a hadronic or semileptonic decay mode, and the flavor of the other B in the event is determined with a tagging algorithm that exploits the relation between the flavor of the heavy quark and the charges of its decay products. Tagging performance is characterized by an efficiency {epsilon}{sub i} and a probability for mis-identification, w{sub i}, for each tagging category. We report a determination of the wrong-tag probabilities, w{sub i}, and a preliminary result for the time-dependent B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} oscillation frequency, {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.512 {+-} 0.017 {+-} 0.022 {Dirac_h} ps{sup -1}.

  12. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short peptides probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the 10A domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-26

    Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short polypeptides were probed by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method by employing a short-distance FRET pair (R(0) approximately 10 A) based on tryptophan as natural donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as synthetic acceptor. Two substrates for kinases, LeuArgArgTrpSerLeuGly-Dbo (peptide I) and TrpLysArgThrLeuArgArg-Dbo (peptide II), were investigated, with serine and threonine, respectively, as phosphorylation sites. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in H(2)O revealed a decrease in FRET efficiency for peptide I and an increase for peptide II; this suggested that the effective distances between donor and acceptor increased and decreased, respectively. The same trends and similar absolute variations in effective donor-acceptor distances were observed in propylene glycol, a less polar and highly viscous solvent; this suggested that the variations are due to intrinsic structural preferences. Fitting of the time-resolved decay traces according to a distribution function model (Gaussian distribution) provided the mean donor-acceptor distances, which showed an increase upon phosphorylation for peptide I (from 9.7 to 10.5 A) and a decrease for peptide II (from 10.9 to 9.3 A) in H(2)O. The broadness (half-width) of the distributions, which provides a measure of the rigidity of the peptides, remained similar upon phosphorylation of peptide I (3.0 versus 3.1 A), but decreased for peptide II (from 3.1 to 0.73 A in H(2)O); this suggests a more compact, structured conformation upon phosphorylation of the latter peptide. The elongation of the peptide backbone (by ca. 0.7 A) for peptide I is attributed to an increase in steric demand upon phosphorylation, which favors an extended conformation. The contraction (by ca. 1.4 A) and structural rigidification of peptide II is attributed to attractive Coulombic interactions and hydrogen bonding between the

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefner, Petra [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany)

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  14. Probing the global potential energy minimum of (CH2O)2: THz absorption spectrum of (CH2O)2 in solid neon and para-hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Voute, A.; Mihrin, Dmytro

    2017-01-01

    )2 embedded in cryogenic neon and enriched para-hydrogen matrices. A (semi)-empirical value for the change of vibrational zero-point energy of 5.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 is proposed for the dimerization process. These THz spectroscopic observations are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic......The true global potential energy minimum configuration of the formaldehyde dimer (CH2O)2, including the presence of a single or a double weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motif, has been a long-standing subject among both experimentalists and theoreticians as two different energy minima...... conformations of Cs and C2h symmetry have almost identical energies. The present work demonstrates how the class of large-amplitude hydrogen bond vibrational motion probed in the THz region provides excellent direct spectroscopic observables for these weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motifs...

  15. Measurement of the t(bar t) production cross section in p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 Tev using lepton plus jets events with semileptonic B decays to muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the t(bar t) production cross section using 194 pb -1 of CDF II data using events with a high transverse momentum electron or muon, three or more jets, and missing transverse energy. The measurement assumes 100% t → Wb branching fraction. Events consistent with t(bar t) decay are found by identifying jets containing heavy flavor semileptonic decays to muons. The dominant backgrounds are evaluated directly from the data. Based on 20 candidate events and an expected background of 9.5 ± 1.1 events, we measure a production cross section of 5.3 ± 3.3 -1.0 +1.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model

  16. Probing the Energy Level Alignment and the Correlation with Open-Circuit Voltage in Solution-Processed Polymeric Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-Dan; Li, Ho-Wa; Cheng, Yuanhang; Guan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Taili; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2016-03-23

    Energy level alignment at the organic donor and acceptor interface is a key to determine the photovoltaic performance in organic solar cells, but direct probing of such energy alignment is still challenging especially for solution-processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin films. Here we report a systematic investigation on probing the energy level alignment with different approaches in five commonly used polymer:[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) BHJ systems. We find that by tuning the weight ratio of polymer to PCBM the electronic features from both polymer and PCBM can be obtained by photoemission spectroscopy. Using this approach, we find that some of the BHJ blends simply follow vacuum level alignment, but others show strong energy level shifting as a result of Fermi level pinning. Independently, by measuring the temperature-dependent open-circuit voltage (VOC), we find that the effective energy gap (Eeff), the energy difference between the highest occupied molecular orbital of the polymer donor (EHOMO-D) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the PCBM acceptor (ELUMO-A), obtained by photoemission spectroscopy in all polymer:PCBM blends has an excellent agreement with the extrapolated VOC at 0 K. Consequently, the photovoltage loss of various organic BHJ photovoltaic devices at room temperature is in a range of 0.3-0.6 V. It is believed that the demonstrated direct measurement approach of the energy level alignment in solution-processed organic BHJ will bring deeper insight into the origin of the VOC and the corresponding photovoltage loss mechanism in organic photovoltaic cells.

  17. Semileptonic decays of pseudoscalar particles (M→M'+l+ν(l)) and short-distance behaviour of quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrely, C.; Machet, B.; Rafael, E. de.

    1980-12-01

    The form factors which govern the semileptonic decays of pseudoscalar particles (M→M'+l+ν(l)) are constrained by the knowledge of the two-point function PIsup(μv)(q) in the deep euclidean region. We derive the precise constrains from a QCD calculation of PIsup(μv) which includes perturbative contributions to two-loops as well as leading non-perturbative contributions. Applications to PIl 3 , Kl 3 and D + →antiK 0 e + νe decays are discussed

  18. Kaon semileptonic decay form factors from Nf = 2 non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broemmel, D.; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present first results from the QCDSF collaboration for the kaon semileptonic decay form factors at zero momentum transfer, using two flavours of non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quarks. A lattice determination of these form factors is of particular interest to improve the accuracy on the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V us vertical stroke. Calculations are performed on lattices with lattice spacing of about 0.08 fm with different values of light and strange quark masses, which allows us to extrapolate to chiral limit. Employing double ratio techniques, we are able to get small statistical errors. (orig.)

  19. Semileptonic (Λb → Λc eV) decay in a field theoretic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, R.K.; Panda, A.R.; Sahoo, R.K.; Swain, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The semileptonic decay width of heavy baryons such as (Λ b → Λ c eV) has been estimated in the framework of a nonrelativistic field theoretic quark model where four component quark field operators along with a harmonic oscillator wave function are used to describe translationally invariant hadronic states. The present estimation does not make an explicit use of heavy quark symmetry and has a reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured decay width, polarisation ratio and form factors with the harmonic oscillator radii and quark momentum distribution inside the hadron as free parameters. (author)

  20. Probing the global potential energy minimum of (CH2O)2: THz absorption spectrum of (CH2O)2 in solid neon and para-hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J; Voute, A; Mihrin, D; Heimdal, J; Berg, R W; Torsson, M; Wugt Larsen, R

    2017-06-28

    The true global potential energy minimum configuration of the formaldehyde dimer (CH 2 O) 2 , including the presence of a single or a double weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motif, has been a long-standing subject among both experimentalists and theoreticians as two different energy minima conformations of C s and C 2h symmetry have almost identical energies. The present work demonstrates how the class of large-amplitude hydrogen bond vibrational motion probed in the THz region provides excellent direct spectroscopic observables for these weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motifs. The combination of concentration dependency measurements, observed isotopic spectral shifts associated with H/D substitutions and dedicated annealing procedures, enables the unambiguous assignment of three large-amplitude infrared active hydrogen bond vibrational modes for the non-planar C s configuration of (CH 2 O) 2 embedded in cryogenic neon and enriched para-hydrogen matrices. A (semi)-empirical value for the change of vibrational zero-point energy of 5.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol -1 is proposed for the dimerization process. These THz spectroscopic observations are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic energies) and MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ (force fields) electronic structure calculations yielding a (semi)-empirical value of 13.7 ± 0.3 kJ mol -1 for the dissociation energy D 0 of this global potential energy minimum.

  1. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  2. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  3. Probing Very High Energy Prompt Muon and Neutrino fluxes and the cosmic ray knee via Underground Muons

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Raj; Panda, Sukanta

    2005-01-01

    We calculate event rate and demonstrate the observational feasibility of very high energy muons (1-1000 TeV) in a large mass underground detector operating as a pair-meter. This energy range corresponds to surface muon energies of $\\sim$(5 TeV - 5000 TeV) and primary cosmic ray energies of $\\sim$ (50 TeV - 5 $\\times 10^4$ TeV). Such measurements would significantly assist in an improved understanding of the prompt contribution to $\

  4. Simulations of the measurement of the form factor for the D{sub s} semileptonic decay with the PANDA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lu; Stockmanns, Tobias [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Ritman, James [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The PANDA experiment will study a wide range of physics topics with beams of antiprotons incident on fixed protons or complex nuclei targets. One of the interesting issues is the D{sub s} semileptonic decay, which is governed by both the weak and strong forces. Here the strong interaction effects can be parameterized by the transition form factor. Techniques such as lattice QCD offer increasingly precise calculations, but as the uncertainties shrink, experimental validation of the results becomes increasingly important. The achievable performance of the full PANDA detector for these types of reactions has not yet been studied in detail; however, this is expected to work very well based upon the design performance and experience with similar detector systems. We evaluate the performance in the measurement of the semileptonic decay form factor of D{sub s}{sup +} → ην{sub e}e{sup +}. With different beam momenta, the Monte Carlo studies have been performed to obtain the achievable reconstruction efficiency using a complete simulation model of the detector and analysis tools. In the reconstruction procedure, we focus on developing the software and evaluating the expected precision. This talk summarizes the simulation status of the D{sub s} decay chain. With theoretical predictions of the cross section, we obtain a preliminary estimate of the expected count rate for the future data taking.

  5. Semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Xiao, Ying [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Information Engineering, Tangshan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B{sub c} branching fractions to J/ψπ{sup +} and J/ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ} final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B{sub c} → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B{sub c} meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10{sup -7} up to 10{sup -2} and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψπ{sup +}))/(BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ})) is in good agreement with the data. For B{sub c} → Vlν{sub l} decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  6. Semileptonic decays of B_c meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B_c branching fractions to J/ψπ"+ and J/ψμ"+ν_μ final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B_c meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B_c → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B_c meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10"-"7 up to 10"-"2 and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B_c"+→J/Ψπ"+))/(BR(B_c"+→J/Ψμ"+ν_μ)) is in good agreement with the data. For B_c → Vlν_l decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  7. Andromede project: Surface analysis and modification with probes from hydrogen to nano-particles in the MeV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, Michael J.; Cottereau, Evelyne; Rasser, Bernard; Verzeroli, Elodie; Agnus, Benoit; Gaubert, Gabriel; Donzel, Xavier; Delobbe, Anne; Della-Negra, Serge

    2015-01-01

    The Andromede project is the center of a multi-disciplinary team which will build a new instrument for surface modification and analysis using the impact of probes from hydrogen to nano-particles (Au 400 +4 ) in the MeV range. For this new instrument a series of atomic, polyatomic, molecular and nano-particle ion beams will be delivered using two ion sources in tandem, a liquid metal ion source and an electron cyclotron resonance source. The delivered ion beams will be accelerated to high energy with a 4 MeV van de Graaff type accelerator. By using a suite of probes in the MeV energy range, ion beam analysis techniques, MeV atomic and cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry can all be performed in one location. A key feature of the instrument is its ability to produce an intense beam for injection into the accelerator. The commissioning of the two sources shows that intense beams from atomic ions to nano-particles can be delivered for subsequent acceleration. The calculations and measurements for the two sources are presented.

  8. Self-synchronization of the modulation of energy-levels population with electrons in GaAs induced by picosecond pulses of probe radiation and intrinsic stimulated emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L., E-mail: bil@cplire.ru; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Picosecond optical pumping leads to the initiation of intrinsic picosecond stimulated emission in GaAs. As was established previously, due to the interaction of pulses of probe radiation with those of intrinsic emission, the dependence of the absorption α of the probe pulse on its delay τ with respect to the pump pulse is modulated with oscillations. It is found that the oscillatory dependences α(τ) have a similar shape only in the case of certain combinations of energies of the interacting pulses. As a result, it is assumed that the above interaction is, in fact, a synchronization of modulations (formed by pulses) of charge-carrier populations at energy levels; this synchronization occurs in the direction of the reconstruction of detailed equilibrium. The real-time picosecond self-modulation of the absorption α is measured for the first time. The characteristics of this self-modulation as well as absorption α and intrinsic emission self-modulation characteristics measured previously by correlation methods are now accounted for by the concept of synchronization.

  9. A simple and selective resonance Rayleigh scattering-energy transfer spectral method for determination of trace neomycin sulfate using Cu2O particle as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huixiang; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2018-02-01

    The stable Cu2O nanocubic (Cu2ONC) sol was prepared, based on graphene oxide (GO) catalysis of glucose-Fehling's reagent reaction, and its absorption and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were examined. Using the as-prepared Cu2ONC as RRS probe, and coupling with the neomycin sulfate (NEO) complex reaction, a new, simple, sensitive and selective RRS-energy transfer (RRS-ET) method was established for detection of neomycin sulfate, with a linear range of 1.4-112 μM and a detection limit of 0.4 μM. The method has been applied to the detection of neomycin sulfate in samples with satisfactory results.

  10. A Study of Neutral B Meson Time Evolution Using Exclusively Reconstructed Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T

    2003-11-05

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental building blocks of the Universe and their basic interactions. The model naturally describes the time evolution of the basic particles, of which lifetime and mixing are two examples. The neutral B meson, consisting of a bottom quark and an oppositely charged down quark, enjoys a lifetime of about 1.5 ps and the special property of mixing with its antiparticle partner, the {bar B}{sup 0}. That is, due to second order weak interactions, the B{sup 0} meson can change into a {bar B}{sup 0} meson and back again as it evolves through time. The details of this behavior offer an opportunity to closely examine the Standard Model. In this dissertation, I report on a measurement of the lifetime and mixing frequency of the neutral B meson. Using the semileptonic decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, we select more than 68,000 signal and background candidates from about 23 million B{bar B} pairs collected in 1999-2000 with the BABAR detector located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The other B in the event is reconstructed inclusively. By constructing a master probability density function that describes the distribution of decay time differences in the sample, we use a maximum likelihood technique to simultaneously extract the B{sup 0} lifetime and mixing parameters with precision comparable to the year 2000 world average. The results are {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = (1.523{sub -0.023}{sup +0.024} {+-} 0.022) ps and {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.492 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.013) ps{sup -1}. The statistical correlation coefficient between {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and {Delta}m{sub d} is -0.22. I describe in detail several cutting-edge strategies this analysis uses to study these phenomena, laying important groundwork for the future. I also discuss several extensions of this work to include possible measurements of higher order parameters such as {Delta}{Lambda}{sub d}.

  11. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  12. Using Mechanical Energy as a Probe for the Detection and Imaging of Shallow Buried Inclusions in Dry Granular Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Surajit; Krishna Mohan, T. R.; Visco, Donald P.; Swaminathan, Saravanan; Sokolow, Adam; Avalos, Edgar; Nakagawa, Masami

    Mechanical energy, such as sound waves and impulses, have been used to detect shallow buried objects for more than half a century. Yet, very little is understood about how mechanical energy propagates into one of the simplest kinds of soil, namely, a granular bed. Here we present an overview of the state of the art in our understanding of mechanical energy propagation in granular beds.

  13. Measurements of the absolute branching fractions for the semileptonic decays D0 -> K-mu+nu_mu and D0 -> pi-mu+nu_mu

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Jin Chen; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, J H; Hu, T; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang, Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Jian, Liu; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Zheng,Wang; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, Z Y; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Yiyun,Zhang; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-01-01

    Based on the data sample of 33 pb$^{-1}$ collected at and around 3.773 GeV with the BESII detector at the BEPC collider, the absolute branching fractions for the semileptonic decays $D^0\\to K^-\\mu^+\

  14. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  15. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  16. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex

  17. Probing the origin of cosmic-rays with extremely high energy neutrinos using the IceCube Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.

    2013-01-01

    originate from cosmogenic neutrinos produced in the interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with ambient photons while propagating through intergalactic space. Exploiting IceCube’s large exposure for extremely high energy neutrinos and the lack of observed events above 100 PeV, we can rule out...

  18. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  19. Probing the communication of deoxythymidine triphosphate in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by communication maps and interaction energy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran

    2017-11-08

    We calculate communication maps for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) and other parts of the protein. This approach locates energy transport channels from the dTTP to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules. We examine the water dynamics near the catalytic site of HIV-1 RT by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that, within the catalytic site, the relaxation of water molecules is similar to that of the hydration water molecules present in other proteins and the relaxation time scale is fast enough to transport energy and helps in communication between dTTP and other residues in the system. To quantify energy transfer, we also calculate the interaction energies of dTTP, 2Mg 2+ , doxy-guanosine nucleotide (DG22) with their surrounding residues by using the B3LYP-D3 method. The results, from classical vibrational energy diffusivity and QM interaction energy, are complementary to identify the important residues involved in the process of polymerization. The positive and negative interactions by dTTP with different types of residues in the catalytic region make the residues transfer energy through vibrational communication.

  20. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  1. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  2. Measurement of the pp→t anti tγ inclusive cross section in the semi-leptonic decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammes, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The top quark, being the heaviest of the six quarks in the Standard Model of Particle Physics, had not been discovered until 1995. Hence, many of its properties could not be measured at a high precision or even not be investigated at all so far. Since the top quark is so heavy, it might play a special role in electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Especially its coupling to the electroweak (EW) gauge bosons could reveal hints to New Physics, if there were deviations from the predictions by the Standard Model. The total cross section of the top quark pair production process with the additional emission of a photon (t anti tγ) has been determined with the ATLAS experiment as a first measurement of the couplings of EW gauge bosons to the top quark, since this process provides the largest cross section compared to other EW couplings. The t anti tγ cross section measurement has been performed in the semi-leptonic (e+jets and μ+jets) decay channel using a template fit method with 1.04 fb -1 of ATLAS data collected at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV in 2011. Various background sources have been investigated, using data-driven methods whenever possible; the impact of systematic uncertainties has been evaluated using a statistical ensemble of 3000 pseudo experiments. The result of the measurement yields a cross section of σ t anti tγ x BR=[1.84±0.49(stat.) +0.50 -0.50 (syst.)±0.07(lumi.)] pb at a significance of 2.9 σ.

  3. Measurement of the pp{yields}t anti t{gamma} inclusive cross section in the semi-leptonic decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rammes, Marcus

    2012-07-01

    The top quark, being the heaviest of the six quarks in the Standard Model of Particle Physics, had not been discovered until 1995. Hence, many of its properties could not be measured at a high precision or even not be investigated at all so far. Since the top quark is so heavy, it might play a special role in electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Especially its coupling to the electroweak (EW) gauge bosons could reveal hints to New Physics, if there were deviations from the predictions by the Standard Model. The total cross section of the top quark pair production process with the additional emission of a photon (t anti t{gamma}) has been determined with the ATLAS experiment as a first measurement of the couplings of EW gauge bosons to the top quark, since this process provides the largest cross section compared to other EW couplings. The t anti t{gamma} cross section measurement has been performed in the semi-leptonic (e+jets and {mu}+jets) decay channel using a template fit method with 1.04 fb{sup -1} of ATLAS data collected at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV in 2011. Various background sources have been investigated, using data-driven methods whenever possible; the impact of systematic uncertainties has been evaluated using a statistical ensemble of 3000 pseudo experiments. The result of the measurement yields a cross section of {sigma}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t{gamma}} x BR=[1.84{+-}0.49(stat.){sup +0.50}{sub -0.50}(syst.){+-}0.07(lumi.)] pb at a significance of 2.9 {sigma}.

  4. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  5. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Deep geothermal energy probe Heubach. Project plan and facility planning by using a practical example; Tiefen-Erdwaermesonde Heubach. Projektablauf und Anlagenplanung anhand eines Praxisbeispiels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, David; Kuebert, Markus; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone [tewag GmbH, Starzach-Felldorf (Germany); Lemes, Zijad [HEAG Suedhessische Energie AG (HSE), Darmstadt (Germany). Q100 Regenerative Energien; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Koett, Anne [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt und Geologie (HLUG), Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2012-10-16

    For the decentralized supply of an industrial company in Heubach nearby Gross-Umbach (Federal Republic of Germany) with geothermal energy for heating and cooling, the first geothermal deep drilling was performed in the German federal state of Hesse. The concept of a sustainable energy supply is based on the utilization of heat and cold from near-surface geothermal energy as well as on the heat production from an 800 metre coaxial deep geothermal probe (K-TEWS). HEAG Suedhessische Energie AG (Darmstadt, Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the project manager. The company H. Anger's Soehne (Hessisch Lichtenau, Federal Republic of Germany) as a project partner is responsible for the execution of the drilling. Due to the innovative character and the outstanding importance for the future utilization of the geothermal energy for the energy supply, this project was promoted by the Hessian Ministry for the Environment, Energy, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany). The Hessian Agency for the Environment and Geology (Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany) as well as the University Kassel (Kassel, Federal Republic of Germany) serve as scientific counterparts. Tewag GmbH (Regensburg, Federal Republic of Germany) is the technical planner of the geotechnical component of the execution of construction work, and is in charge of the thermal simulation and elaboration of the optimal extension concept. By means of this research and demonstration project, experiences on the heat supply using TEWS systems as well as on the project plan have to be acquired. Furthermore, experiences on the optimization in the planning and implementation are to be acquired in order to evaluate the transferability and economic efficiency at future locations practically. After presentation of the project, the authors of the contribution under consideration describe the planning phases of the project, some aspects of the public relations, the planning approaches, the

  7. Open heavy flavor production via semi-leptonic decayed muons in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yujiao, C

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of heavy quark production and suppression in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions probe the inter- actions of heavy quarks with the hot, dense medium created in the collisions. ATLAS has measured heavy quark production in √sNN = 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions via semi-leptonic decays of open heavy flavour hadrons to muons. Results are presented for the per-event muon yield as a function of muon transverse momentum, pT, over the range of 4 < pT < 14 GeV. Over that momentum range single muon production results largely from heavy quark decays. The centrality dependence of the muon yields is characterized by the “central to peripheral” ratio, RCP. Using this measure, muon production from heavy quark decays is found to be suppressed by a centrality-dependent factor that increases smoothly from peripheral to central collisions. Muon production is suppressed by approximately a factor of two in central collisions relative to peripheral collisions. Within the experimental errors, the observed supp...

  8. Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, James, A.

    2012-06-22

    The originally proposed and funded research activities followed two major areas of study: semileptonic probes of the hadronic neutral current and charm production. The charm production work revolved around the Jefferson Lab experiment E03-008, 'Sub-threshold J/psi Photoprouction', which ran in late 2004. The PI was a co-spokesperson for the experiment. For the three year renewal proposal starting in 2007, the scope and size of the research project changed and increased. In addition to the parity violating studies, the PI had well defined lead roles in a series experiments nucleon spin-structure functions.

  9. Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The originally proposed and funded research activities followed two major areas of study: semileptonic probes of the hadronic neutral current and charm production. The charm production work revolved around the Jefferson Lab experiment E03-008, 'Sub-threshold J/psi Photoprouction', which ran in late 2004. The PI was a co-spokesperson for the experiment. For the three year renewal proposal starting in 2007, the scope and size of the research project changed and increased. In addition to the parity violating studies, the PI had well defined lead roles in a series experiments nucleon spin-structure functions.

  10. Induced Förster resonance energy transfer by encapsulation of DNA-scaffold based probes inside a plant virus based protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Mark V.; Overeem, Nico J.; Singhai, Gaurav; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Insight into the assembly and disassembly of viruses can play a crucial role in developing cures for viral diseases. Specialized fluorescent probes can benefit the study of interactions within viruses, especially during cell studies. In this work, we developed a strategy based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the assembly of viruses without labeling the exterior of viruses. Instead, we exploit their encapsulation of nucleic cargo, using three different fluorescent ATTO dyes linked to single-stranded DNA oligomers, which are hybridised to a longer DNA strand. FRET is induced upon assembly of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, which forms monodisperse icosahedral particles of about 22 nm, thereby increasing the FRET efficiency by a factor of 8. Additionally, encapsulation of the dyes in virus-like particles induces a two-step FRET. When the formed constructs are disassembled, this FRET signal is fully reduced to the value before encapsulation. This reversible behavior makes the system a good probe for studying viral assembly and disassembly. It, furthermore, shows that multi-component supramolecular materials are stabilized in the confinement of a protein cage.

  11. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  12. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Development of Primer-Probe Energy Transfer real-time PCR for the detection and quantification of porcine circovirus type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balint, Adam; Tenk, Miklós; Deim, Zoltán

    2009-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay, based on Primer-Probe Energy Transfer (PriProET), was developed to improve the detection and quantification of porcine circovirus type 2 (PVC2). PCV2 is recognised as the essential infectious agent in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and has been associated...... in different organs. The data obtained in this study correlate with those described earlier; namely, the viral load in 1 ml plasma and in 500 ng tissue DNA exceeds 10(7) copies in the case of PMWS. The results indicate that the new assay provides a specific, sensitive and robust tool for the improved detection...... and quantification of PCV2....

  14. Probing the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide and decalanine using temperature as a tunable parameter in molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    We perform several molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of solvated alanine dipeptide and decalanine in vacuum with temperature as a tunable parameter and in the process, generate Markov state models (MSMs) at each temperature. An interesting observation that the kinetic rates appear to obey the Arrhenius rate law allows us to predict the dynamics of alanine dipeptide at 300 K at the microsecond timescales using the nanoseconds long high temperature calculations without actually performing MD simulations at 300 K. We conclude that the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide contains superbasins deeper than k B T and determine the energy barriers associated with the moves from the Arrhenius rate expression. Similar insights regarding the energy landscape associated with folding/unfolding pathways of a deca-alanine molecule are obtained using kinetic rates calculated at different temperatures. (paper)

  15. Evaluation of high-energy electron detectors for probing the inner magnetosphere under high-counting condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Yukihiro; Takashima, Takeshi; Mitani, Takefumi; Miyake, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    An ERG (Energization and Radiation in Geospace) satellite will be launched to study the acceleration processes of energetic particles in the radiation belt surrounding the earth. It is very important to reveal the acceleration process of high-energy particles for both science and the application to space weather forecast. Drastic increases of high-energy electrons in the radiation belt is sometimes observed during a geomagnetic storm. When a large magnetic storm occurs, energetic electron count rates may exceed flux limits expected in the nominal design and large number of incident electrons leading to detection loss. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that the count rate range of a single detection on board ERG satellite can be expanded by means of reading circuit operations to decrease an area of detection. In our ground experiment, we also found an unexpected result that count peaks shift to the higher energy side under high counting conditions. (author)

  16. Semileptonic B to D Decays at Nonzero Recoil with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered Quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Si-Wei; DeTar, Carleton; Du, Daping; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermilab Lattice-MILC collaboration is completing a comprehensive program of heavy-light physics on the MILC (2+1)-flavor asqtad ensembles with lattice spacings as small as 0.045 fm and light-to-strange-quark mass ratios as low as 1/20. We use the Fermilab interpretation of the clover action for heavy valence quarks and the asqtad action for light valence quarks. The central goal of the program is to provide ever more exacting tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We give a progress report on one part of the program, namely the analysis of the semileptonic decay B to D at both zero and nonzero recoil. Although final results are not presented, we discuss improvements in the analysis methods, the statistical errors, and the parameter coverage that we expect will lead to a significant reduction in the final error for |V cb | from this decay channel.

  17. Measurement of B0 and B+ Lifetimes using Semileptonic Decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David K. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Lifetime measurements for B0 and B+ are presented using semileptonic decays of B mesons from 360 pb-1 of data collected by CDF's lepton plus displaced track trigger. The decays B → ℓνDX, where D is either D +, D0, or D* +, are partially reconstructed from a muon or electron, a displaced track, and a fully reconstructed charm meson. The B 0 and B+ lifetimes are obtained from an unbinned maximum-likelihood fit to the proper decay length distributions. The measured lifetimes are τB 0 = 1.527 ± 0.012(stat.) ± 0.023( syst.)ps and τB + = 1.629 ± 0.013(stat.) ± 0.025( syst.)ps.

  18. Semileptonic inclusive heavy meson decay: duality in a nonrelativistic potential model in the Shifman-Voloshir limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morenas, V.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Oliver, L.; Pene, O.; Raynal, J.C.; Melikhov, D.

    2000-01-01

    Quark-hadron duality in the inclusive semileptonic decay B → X c lν in the Shifman-Voloshin limit Λ b - m c b ,m c is studied within a nonrelativistic potential model. The integrated semileptonic decay rate is calculated in two ways: first, by constructing the Operator Product Expansion, and second by a direct summation of the exclusive channels. Sum rules (Bjorken, Voloshin, etc) for the potential model are derived, providing a possibility to compare the two representations for Γ(B → X c lν). An explicit difference between them referred to as duality-violation effect is found. The origin of this effect is related to higher charm resonances which are kinematically forbidden in the decay process but are nevertheless picked up by the OPE. Within the considered 1/m c 2 order the OPE and the sum over exclusive channels match each other, up to the contributions of higher resonances, by virtue of the sum rules. In particular this is true for the terms of order δm 2 /m 2 c and Λδm/m c 2 which are present in each of the decay channels and cancel in the sum of these channels due to the Bjorken and Voloshin sum rules, respectively. The size of the duality violation effects is estimated to be of the order O(Λ 2+b /m 2 c δm b ) with b > 0 depending on the details of the potential. Constraints for a better accuracy are discussed. (authors)

  19. Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy for the study of energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes from extractions of spinach leaves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available been implemented at the CSIR National Laser Centre and has been applied to investigate energy transfer processes in different parts of photosynthetic systems. In this paper, researchers report on the first results obtained with Malachite green as a...

  20. A Health Probe in College Students Living in Los Angeles and in Taiwan: Dietary Pattern, Physical Activity and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Hui; Yang, Hsin Ling; Chen, Yin Chang; Davis, Rebecca; Schwartz, Miriam E.; Tam, Chick F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to examine differences of dietary pattern, physical activity and energy balance in 240 college students with 137 of them enrolled in California State University, Los Angeles (LA) and the other 93 enrolled in China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan (TW). A three-day dietary record and a 24-hour physical activity journal were…

  1. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Kerry Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  2. Measurements of $B^{0}-\\overline{B}^{0}$ Mixing, $\\Gamma(Z^{0} \\to b\\overline{b}) / \\Gamma (Z^{0} \\to$ Hadrons) and Semileptonic Branching Ratios for $b$-Flavoured Hadrons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Akers, R J; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Astbury, Alan; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Baines, J T M; Ball, A H; Banks, J; Barlow, R J; Barnett, S; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Beaudoin, G; Beck, A; Beck, G A; Becker, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentkowski, P; Berlich, P; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Boden, B; Bosch, H M; Boutemeur, M; Breuker, Horst; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Buijs, A; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chu, S L; Clarke, P E L; Clayton, J C; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooper, M; Coupland, M; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Deng, H; Dieckmann, A; Dittmar, Michael; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Duboscq, J E; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Dumas, D J P; Elcombe, P A; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fabbro, B; Fierro, M; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fischer, H M; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Gaidot, A; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Gensler, S W; Gentit, F X; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gillies, James D; Goldberg, J; Gingrich, D M; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Grant, F C; Hagemann, J; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hargrove, C K; Harrison, P F; Hart, J; Hattersley, P M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Heflin, E; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hilse, T; Hinshaw, D A; Hobbs, J D; Hobson, P R; Hochman, D; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Hughes-Jones, R E; Humbert, R; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ihssen, H; Imrie, D C; Janissen, A C; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, M; Jones, R W L; Jovanovic, P; Jui, C; Karlen, D A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; King, J; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kral, J F; Kowalewski, R V; Von Krogh, J; Kroll, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lafoux, H; Lahmann, R; Lamarche, F; Lauber, J; Layter, J G; Leblanc, P; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lehto, M H; Lellouch, Daniel; Leroy, C; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lorah, J M; Lorazo, B; Losty, Michael J; Lou, X C; Ludwig, J; Luig, A; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; Maur, U; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McNutt, J R; Meijers, F; Menszner, D; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mildenberger, J L; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Moisan, C; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Nellen, B; Nguyen, H H; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pansart, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Paschievici, P; Patrick, G N; Paz-Jaoshvili, N; Pearce, M J; Pfister, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Pitman, D; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Pritchard, T W; Przysiezniak, H; Quast, G; Redmond, M W; Rees, D L; Richards, G E; Rison, M; Robins, S A; Robinson, D; Rollnik, A; Roney, J M; Ros, E; Rossberg, S; Rossi, A M; Rosvick, M; Routenburg, P; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sasaki, M; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schappert, W; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schmitt, B; von der Schmitt, H; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Schwiening, J; Scott, W G; Settles, M; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Smith, T J; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stegmann, C; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tarem, S; Tecchio, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tesch, N; Thomson, M A; Torrente-Lujan, E; Towers, S; Tranströmer, G; Tresilian, N J; Tsukamoto, T; Turner, M F; Van den Plas, D; Van Kooten, R; VanDalen, G J; Vasseur, G; Wagner, A; Wagner, D L; Wahl, C; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weber, M; Weber, P; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; Whalley, M A; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Winterer, V H; Wlodek, T; Wolf, G; Wotton, S A; Wyatt, T R; Yaari, R; Yeaman, A; Yekutieli, G; Yurko, M; Zeuner, W; Zorn, G T

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of $B^{0}-\\overline{B}^{0}$ Mixing, $\\Gamma(Z^{0} \\to b\\overline{b}) / \\Gamma (Z^{0} \\to$ Hadrons) and Semileptonic Branching Ratios for $b$-Flavoured Hadrons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

  3. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO4 using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Khalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO 4 by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygen concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of 16 O 2 + ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (∼33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO 4 . Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O 2 loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency. - Highlights: • Laser wavelength and pulse energy affect accuracy of APT analysis of LiFePO 4 . • Oxygen deficiency observed for UV laser; stronger at higher laser energies. • Selective loss of Li with green laser due to dc evaporation. • Saxey plots reveal prevalent formation of O 2 neutrals. • Quantification of molecular dissociations cannot account for O deficiency

  4. Universal kinematic scaling as a probe of factorized long-distance effects in high-energy quarkonium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccioli, Pietro; Seixas, Joao [LIP and IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Lourenco, Carlos; Araujo, Mariana [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    Dimensional analysis reveals general kinematic scaling rules for the momentum, mass, and energy dependence of Drell-Yan and quarkonium cross sections. Their application to mid-rapidity LHC data provides strong experimental evidence supporting the validity of the factorization ansatz, a cornerstone of non-relativistic QCD, still lacking theoretical demonstration. Moreover, data-driven patterns emerge for the factorizable long-distance bound-state formation effects, including a remarkable correlation between the S-wave quarkonium cross sections and their binding energies. Assuming that this scaling can be extended to the P-wave case, we obtain precise predictions for the not yet measured feed-down fractions, thereby providing a complete picture of the charmonium and bottomonium feed-down structure. This is crucial information for quantitative interpretations of quarkonium production data, including studies of the suppression patterns measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions. (orig.)

  5. Phonon spectrum of single-crystalline FeSe probed by high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Khalil; Engelhardt, Tobias; Le Tacon, Matthieu; Wolf, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Utilizing high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) we measure the phonon frequencies of β-FeSe(001), cleaved under ultra-high vacuum conditions. At the zone center (Γ bar-point) three prominent loss features are observed at loss energies of about ≃ 20.5 and 25.6 and 40 meV. Based on the scattering selection rules we assign the observed loss features to the A1g, B1g, and A2u phonon modes of β-FeSe(001). The experimentally measured phonon frequencies do not agree with the results of density functional based calculations in which a nonmagnetic, a checkerboard or a strip antiferromagnetic order is assumed for β-FeSe(001). Our measurements suggest that, similar to the other Fe-based materials, magnetism has a profound impact on the lattice dynamics of β-FeSe(001).

  6. Pump--probe measurements of state-to-state rotational energy transfer rates in N2 (v=1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitz, G.O.; Farrow, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    We report direct measurements of the state-to-state rotational energy transfer rates for N 2 (υ=1) at 298 K. Stimulated Raman pumping of Q-branch (υ=1 left-arrow 0) transitions is used to prepare a selected rotational state of N 2 in the υ=1 state. After allowing an appropriate time interval for collisions to occur, 2+2 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization is used (through the a 1 Π g left-arrow X 1 Σ + g transition) to detect the relative population of the pumped level and other levels to which rotational energy transfer has occurred. We have performed a series of measurements in which a single even rotational level (J i =0--14) is excited and the time-dependent level populations are recorded at three or more delay times. This data set is then globally fit to determine the best set of state-to-state rate constants. The fitting procedure does not place any constraints (such as an exponential gap law) on the J or energy dependence of the rates. We compare our measurements and best-fit rates with results predicted from phenomenological rate models and from a semiclassical scattering calculation of Koszykowski et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 41 (1987)]. Excellent agreement is obtained with two of the models and with the scattering calculation. We also test the validity of the energy-corrected sudden (ECS) scaling theory for N 2 by using our experimental transfer rates as basis rates (J=L→0), finding that the ECS scaling expressions accurately predict the remaining rates

  7. Förster-type energy transfer as a probe for changes in local fluctuations of the protein matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, B; Matkó, J; Papp, S; Hevessy, J; Welch, G R; Damjanovich, S

    1984-07-17

    Much evidence, on both theoretical and experimental sides, indicates the importance of local fluctuations (in energy levels, conformational substates, etc.) of the macromolecular matrix in the biological activity of proteins. We describe here a novel application of the Förster-type energy-transfer process capable of monitoring changes both in local fluctuations and in conformational states of macromolecules. A new energy-transfer parameter, f, is defined as an average transfer efficiency, [E], normalized by the actual average quantum efficiency of the donor fluorescence, [phi D]. A simple oscillator model (for a one donor-one acceptor system) is presented to show the sensitivity of this parameter to changes in amplitudes of local fluctuations. The different modes of averaging (static, dynamic, and intermediate cases) occurring for a given value of the average transfer rate, [kt], and the experimental requirements as well as limitations of the method are also discussed. The experimental tests were performed on the ribonuclease T1-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate conjugate (a one donor-one acceptor system) by studying the change of the f parameter with temperature, an environmental parameter expectedly perturbing local fluctuations of proteins. The parameter f increased with increasing temperature as expected on the basis of the oscillator model, suggesting that it really reflects changes of fluctuation amplitudes (significant changes in the orientation factor, k2, as well as in the spectral properties of the fluorophores can be excluded by anisotropy measurements and spectral investigations). Possibilities of the general applicability of the method are also discussed.

  8. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouicer Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quarkantiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT, for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.

  9. ISW-galaxy cross correlation: a probe of dark energy clustering and distribution of dark matter tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosravi, Shahram; Mollazadeh, Amir [Department of Astronomy and High Energy Physics, Faculty of Physics, Kharazmi University, Mofateh Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baghram, Shant, E-mail: khosravi_sh@khu.ac.ir, E-mail: amirmollazadeh@khu.ac.ir, E-mail: baghram@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Cross correlation of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal (ISW) with the galaxy distribution in late time is a promising tool for constraining the dark energy properties. Here, we study the effect of dark energy clustering on the ISW-galaxy cross correlation and demonstrate the fact that the bias parameter between the distribution of the galaxies and the underlying dark matter introduces a degeneracy and complications. We argue that as the galaxy's host halo formation time is different from the observation time, we have to consider the evolution of the halo bias parameter. It will be shown that any deviation from ΛCDM model will change the evolution of the bias as well. Therefore, it is deduced that the halo bias depends strongly on the sub-sample of galaxies which is chosen for cross correlation and that the joint kernel of ISW effect and the galaxy distribution has a dominant effect on the observed signal. In this work, comparison is made specifically between the clustered dark energy models using two samples of galaxies. The first one is a sub-sample of galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, chosen with the r-band magnitude 18 < r < 21 and the dark matter halo host of mass M ∼10{sup 12} M {sub ⊙} and formation redshift of z {sub f} ∼ 2.5. The second one is the sub-sample of Luminous Red galaxies with the dark matter halo hosts of mass M ∼ 10{sup 13} M {sub ⊙} and formation redshift of z {sub f} ∼ 2.0. Using the evolved bias we improve the χ{sup 2} for the ΛCDM which reconciles the ∼1σ-2σ tension of the ISW-galaxy signal with ΛCDM prediction. Finally, we study the parameter estimation of a dark energy model with free parameters w {sub 0} and w {sub a} in the equation of state w {sub de} = w {sub 0} + w {sub az} /(1+ z ) with the constant bias parameter and also with an evolved bias model with free parameters of galaxy's host halo mass and the halo formation redshift.

  10. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  11. Probing the interaction of Rh, Co and bimetallic Rh-Co nanoparticles with the CeO2 support: catalytic materials for alternative energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, E; Pusztai, P; Óvári, L; Oszkó, A; Erdőhelyi, A; Papp, C; Steinrück, H-P; Kónya, Z; Kiss, J

    2015-10-28

    The interaction of CeO2-supported Rh, Co and bimetallic Rh-Co nanoparticles, which are active catalysts in hydrogen production via steam reforming of ethanol, a process related to renewable energy generation, was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Furthermore, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) of adsorbed CO as a probe molecule was used to characterize the morphology of metal particles. At small loadings (0.1%), Rh is in a much dispersed state on ceria, while at higher contents (1-5%), Rh forms 2-8 nm particles. Between 473-673 K pronounced oxygen transfer from ceria to Rh is observed and at 773 K significant agglomeration of Rh occurs. On reduced ceria, XPS indicates a possible electron transfer from Rh to ceria. The formation of smaller ceria crystallites upon loading with Co was concluded from XRD and HRTEM; for 10% Co, the CeO2 particle size decreased from 27.6 to 10.7 nm. A strong dissolution of Co into ceria and a certain extent of encapsulation by ceria were deduced by XRD, XPS and LEIS. In the bimetallic system, the presence of Rh enhances the reduction of cobalt and ceria. During thermal treatments, reoxidation of Co occurs, and Rh agglomeration as well as oxygen migration from ceria to Rh are hindered in the presence of cobalt.

  12. Design of an assessment to probe teachers' content knowledge for teaching: An example from energy in high school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia; Gitomer, Drew; Iaconangelo, Charles; Phelps, Geoffrey; Seeley, Lane; Vokos, Stamatis

    2018-06-01

    Research into teacher learning and practice over the last three decades shows that the teachers of a specific subject need to possess knowledge that is different from the knowledge of other content experts. Yet this specialized version of content knowledge that teachers need to plan instruction, respond to student ideas, and assess student understanding in real time is a theoretically elusive construct. It is crucial for the fields of precollege teacher preparation, teacher professional education, and postsecondary faculty professional development to (a) clarify the construct that underlies this specialized content knowledge, (b) operationalize it in some domain, (c) measure it in both static contexts and as it is enacted in the classroom, and (d) correlate its presence with "richness" of classroom instruction and its effect on student learning. This paper documents a piece of a multiyear, multi-institutional effort to investigate points (a)-(d) in the domain of energy in the first high school physics course. In particular, we describe the framework that we developed to clarify content knowledge for teaching in the context of high school energy learning. We then outline the process through which we developed, tested, and refined a "paper-and-pencil" assessment administered on a computer and discuss the substantive and psychometric features of several items based on a field test of the final form of the assessment. We choose to discuss these items for a dual purpose: to illustrate the application of our general framework and to present performance findings from a sample of 362 practicing high school teachers of physics.

  13. Design of an assessment to probe teachers’ content knowledge for teaching: An example from energy in high school physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Etkina

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Research into teacher learning and practice over the last three decades shows that the teachers of a specific subject need to possess knowledge that is different from the knowledge of other content experts. Yet this specialized version of content knowledge that teachers need to plan instruction, respond to student ideas, and assess student understanding in real time is a theoretically elusive construct. It is crucial for the fields of precollege teacher preparation, teacher professional education, and postsecondary faculty professional development to (a clarify the construct that underlies this specialized content knowledge, (b operationalize it in some domain, (c measure it in both static contexts and as it is enacted in the classroom, and (d correlate its presence with “richness” of classroom instruction and its effect on student learning. This paper documents a piece of a multiyear, multi-institutional effort to investigate points (a–(d in the domain of energy in the first high school physics course. In particular, we describe the framework that we developed to clarify content knowledge for teaching in the context of high school energy learning. We then outline the process through which we developed, tested, and refined a “paper-and-pencil” assessment administered on a computer and discuss the substantive and psychometric features of several items based on a field test of the final form of the assessment. We choose to discuss these items for a dual purpose: to illustrate the application of our general framework and to present performance findings from a sample of 362 practicing high school teachers of physics.

  14. SNLS3: CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY COMBINING THE SUPERNOVA LEGACY SURVEY THREE-YEAR DATA WITH OTHER PROBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.; Hook, I. M.; Guy, J.; Regnault, N.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Conley, A.; Carlberg, R. G.; Perrett, K. M.; Basa, S.; Fouchez, D.; Howell, D. A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Pritchet, C. J.; Balam, D.; Baumont, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present observational constraints on the nature of dark energy using the Supernova Legacy Survey three-year sample (SNLS3) of Guy et al. and Conley et al. We use the 472 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in this sample, accounting for recently discovered correlations between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy properties, and include the effects of all identified systematic uncertainties directly in the cosmological fits. Combining the SNLS3 data with the full WMAP7 power spectrum, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxy power spectrum, and a prior on the Hubble constant H 0 from SHOES, in a flat universe we find Ω m = 0.269 ± 0.015 and w = -1.061 +0.069 - 0 .068 (where the uncertainties include all statistical and SN Ia systematic errors)-a 6.5% measure of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. The statistical and systematic uncertainties are approximately equal, with the systematic uncertainties dominated by the photometric calibration of the SN Ia fluxes-without these calibration effects, systematics contribute only a ∼2% error in w. When relaxing the assumption of flatness, we find Ω m = 0.271 ± 0.015, Ω k = -0.002 ± 0.006, and w = -1.069 +0.091 -0.092 . Parameterizing the time evolution of w as w(a) = w 0 + w a (1 - a) gives w 0 = -0.905 ± 0.196, w a = -0.984 +1.094 -1.097 in a flat universe. All of our results are consistent with a flat, w = -1 universe. The size of the SNLS3 sample allows various tests to be performed with the SNe segregated according to their light curve and host galaxy properties. We find that the cosmological constraints derived from these different subsamples are consistent. There is evidence that the coefficient, β, relating SN Ia luminosity and color, varies with host parameters at >4σ significance (in addition to the known SN luminosity-host relation); however, this has only a small effect on the cosmological results and is currently a subdominant systematic.

  15. DELPHI results on the Z0 → bb-bar partial width and on the average B hadrons semileptonic branching ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.

    1992-05-01

    Results from DELPHI on the Z 0 → bb-bar partial width (Γ ( bb-bar)) and on the average B hadron semileptonic branching ratio (B s.l. ) are reviewed. Prospects are given for improving these measurements, using different complementary techniques. A new and potentially powerful method for extracting the branching ratio R b with minimal errors is suggested, based on using the redundancy provided by two independent discriminators for bb-bar events. (R.P.) 12 refs., 3 figs

  16. Hadroproduction of heavy flavors at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1979-11-01

    The possibility of detecting the top quark in hadron interactions at collider energies is investigated. The production of bound and naked t-quarks for m/sub t/ = 15 - 100 GeV, and the experimental signatures from their leptonic and semileptonic decay modes are studied. The background to any leptonic signature is expected to be severe, suggesting the requirement of simultaneous detection of hadrons

  17. THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR SYMMETRY ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PASTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429-3011 (United States); Murphy, Kyleah [Umpqua Community College, Roseburg, OR 97470 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal ''nuclear pasta''. Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L ≲ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M ≳ 1.65 M {sub ☉}, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 ≲ L ≲ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L ≲ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii ≲ 11 km.

  18. Probing the rate-determining region of the potential energy surface for a prototypical ion-molecule reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Liu, Xinguo; Sweeny, Brendan C; Miller, Thomas M; Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-13

    We report a joint experimental-theoretical study of the F -  + HCl → HF + Cl - reaction kinetics. The experimental measurement of the rate coefficient at several temperatures was made using the selected ion flow tube method. Theoretical rate coefficients are calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory method on a newly developed global potential energy surface, obtained by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points with augmentation of long-range electrostatic terms. In addition to good agreement between experiment and theory, analyses suggest that the ion-molecule reaction rate is significantly affected by shorter-range interactions, in addition to the traditionally recognized ion-dipole and ion-induced dipole terms. Furthermore, the statistical nature of the reaction is assessed by comparing the measured and calculated HF product vibrational state distributions to that predicted by the phase space theory.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  19. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-01-01

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates μ- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k ∼ 4 Mpc –1 . Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of μ and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  20. D{sub sJ}(2860) from the semileptonic decays of B{sub s} mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Long-Fei, E-mail: lfgan@nudt.edu.cn; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Huang, Ming-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun; Liu, Jian-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Bo [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, 410073, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of (China)

    2015-05-27

    In the framework of heavy quark effective theory, the leading-order Isgur–Wise form factors relevant to semileptonic decays of the ground state b{sup -bar}s meson B{sub s} into orbitally excited D-wave c{sup -bar}s mesons, including the newly observed narrow D{sub s1}{sup ∗}(2860) and D{sub s3}{sup ∗}(2860) states by the LHCb Collaboration, are calculated with the QCD sum rule method. With these universal form factors, the decay rates and branching ratios are estimated. We find that the decay widths are Γ(B{sub s}→D{sub s1}{sup ∗}ℓν{sup -bar})=1.25{sub -0.60}{sup +0.80}×10{sup -19} GeV , Γ(B{sub s}→D{sub s2}{sup ′}ℓν{sup -bar})=1.49{sub -0.73}{sup +0.97}×10{sup -19} GeV , Γ(B{sub s}→D{sub s2}ℓν{sup -bar})=4.48{sub -0.94}{sup +1.05}×10{sup -17} GeV , and Γ(B{sub s}→D{sub s3}{sup ∗}ℓν{sup -bar})=1.52{sub -0.31}{sup +0.35}×10{sup -16} GeV . The corresponding branching ratios are B(B{sub s}→D{sub s1}{sup ∗}ℓν{sup -bar})=2.85{sub -1.36}{sup +1.82}×10{sup -7}, B(B{sub s}→D{sub s2}{sup ′}ℓν{sup -bar})=3.40{sub -1.66}{sup +2.21}×10{sup -7}, B(B{sub s}→D{sub s2}ℓν{sup -bar})=1.02{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24}×10{sup -4}, and B(B{sub s}→D{sub s3}{sup ∗}ℓν{sup -bar})=3.46{sub -0.70}{sup +0.80}×10{sup -4}. The decay widths and branching ratios of corresponding B{sub s}{sup ∗} semileptonic processes are also predicted.

  1. Clinopyroxenes still trapped in diamonds: high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a chemical probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Wilhelm, Heribert; Kleppe, Annette; Nimis, Paolo; Harris, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxenes are mainly Ca-Na-Fe-Mg-silicates constituting a significant portion of the Earth's upper mantle up to 20% of such shell of our planet. They could be found as typical mineral inclusions in diamonds being diopsidic and omphacitic in composition and, together with garnets, cover a key role in providing indications concerning the source rock in which the diamond crystallize. In detail, it is well known that eclogitic diamonds are characterized by clinopyroxenes with omphacitic compositions (about Ca0.5Na0.5Mg0.5Al0.5Si2O6) whereas peridotitic diamonds show clinopyroxenes very rich in the diopside end-member (CaMgSi2O6). In order to get direct chemical composition on the inclusions, and therefore on the diamond origin source, it is obviously necessary to extract them breaking and/or polishing the diamond host. However, a non-destructive investigation of an inclusion still trapped in a diamond is useful and important for different reasons: (1) the inclusions could be under pressure and their crystal structure can be modified if the pressure is released by the extraction; (2) the residual pressure on the inclusion can provide information about the formation pressure of the diamond (e.g. Nestola et al. 2011 and references therein); (3) the morphology and growth relationships of the inclusion with the host diamond can provide indications about its protogenetic vs. syngenetic and/or epigenetic nature; and (4) preservation of the diamond surface growth features can maintain crucial information on late oxidation processes (Fedortchouk et al. 2011). However the available methods to measure the composition of the inclusions implies to destroy the sample. The aim of this work is to obtain chemical information on the inclusions still trapped in their diamond host and therefore to indicate the diamond origin without extracting the inclusions. The work was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction using a new experimental approach by high energy synchrotron

  2. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  3. Interaction and energy transfer studies between bovine serum albumin and CdTe quantum dots conjugates: CdTe QDs as energy acceptor probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotresh, M G; Inamdar, L S; Shivkumar, M A; Adarsh, K S; Jagatap, B N; Mulimani, B G; Advirao, G M; Inamdar, S R

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a systematic investigation of the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with water-soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes capped with carboxylic thiols is presented based on steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was observed to occur from BSA donor to CdTe acceptor as noted from reduction in the fluorescence of BSA and enhanced fluorescence from CdTe QDs. FRET parameters such as Förster distance, spectral overlap integral, FRET rate constant and efficiency were determined. The quenching of BSA fluorescence in aqueous solution observed in the presence of CdTe QDs infers that fluorescence resonance energy transfer is primarily responsible for the quenching phenomenon. Bimolecular quenching constant (k q ) determined at different temperatures and the time-resolved fluorescence data provide additional evidence for this. The binding stoichiometry and various thermodynamic parameters are evaluated by using the van 't Hoff equation. The analysis of the results suggests that the interaction between BSA and CdTe QDs is entropy driven and hydrophobic forces play a key role in the interaction. Binding of QDs significantly shortened the fluorescence lifetime of BSA which is one of the hallmarks of FRET. The effect of size of the QDs on the FRET parameters are discussed in the light of FRET parameters obtained. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A simple and sensitive resonance Rayleigh scattering-energy transfer method for amino acids coupling its Ruhemann's purple and graphene oxide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yanghe [School of Food and Bioengineering, Hezhou University, Hezhou 542899 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology of Rare and Endangered Species and Environmental Protection of Ministry Education, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control Theory and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Li, Chongnin; Qin, Aimian [Key Laboratory of Ecology of Rare and Endangered Species and Environmental Protection of Ministry Education, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control Theory and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Liang, Aihui, E-mail: ahliang2008@163.com [Key Laboratory of Ecology of Rare and Endangered Species and Environmental Protection of Ministry Education, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control Theory and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Jiang, Zhiliang, E-mail: zljiang@mailbox.gxnu.edu.cn [School of Food and Bioengineering, Hezhou University, Hezhou 542899 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology of Rare and Endangered Species and Environmental Protection of Ministry Education, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control Theory and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2017-05-15

    In pH 7.2 KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-NaOH buffer solution, graphene oxide (GO) has strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) effect at 400 nm, and amino acid reacted with ninhydrin to form blue-violet complex Ruhemann's purple (RP) with a absorption peak at 400 nm. RPs can strongly adsorbed on the surface of GO, and the RRS donor of GO probes coupled with the receptor of RP that reduced the RRS intensity at 400 nm due to the RRS-energy transfer (RRS-ET) from the GO to RP. With the increase of amino acid concentration, the RRS intensity quenched linearly at 400 nm due to the RRS-ET enhancing. The quenched intensity responds linearly with glutamic acid concentration in the range of 0.2–200 μmol L{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 0.08 µmol L{sup −1}. This simple and sensitive RRS-ET method was used to detect the content of amino acid in oral liquid, with satisfactory results.

  5. Comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures in Al-Mg-Si(-Li) alloys by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshino, Yuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Kozuka, Masaya [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Hirosawa, Shoichi, E-mail: hirosawa@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Aruga, Yasuhiro [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Microalloying addition of Li enhances the age-hardening response of Al-Mg-Si alloys. • Size and number density of nanoclusters or precipitates are increased by Li addition. • Mg and Si contents within the aggregates are inversely decreased by Li addition. • Microalloying Li accelerates heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates. - Abstract: In this study, comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atom probe tomography (APT) has been performed for Al-0.55 wt%Mg-0.89 wt%Si(-0.043 wt%Li) alloys aged at 433 K for 1.2 ks (under aging) and 36 ks (peak aging). Quantitative estimation of nanometer-scale clusters (nanoclusters) and β″ precipitates by TEM and APT revealed that microalloying addition of Li increases the size and number density of these Mg-Si aggregates, resulting in the enhanced age-hardening response. Positive evidence by APT for the segregation of Li suggests that heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates with the aid of Li is attributed to the modified precipitate microstructures and thus improved mechanical strength of this alloy system.

  6. Analysis of atomic distribution in as-fabricated Zircaloy-2 claddings by atom probe tomography under high-energy pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawabe, T., E-mail: sawabe@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Sonoda, T.; Kitajima, S. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Kameyama, T. [Tokai University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kitakaname 4-1-1, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The properties of second-phase particles (SPPs) in Zircaloy-2 claddings are key factors influencing the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The chemical compositions of Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs were investigated by means of pulsed laser atom probe tomography. In order to prevent specimen fracture and to analyse wide regions of the specimen, the pulsed laser energy was increased to 2.0 nJ. This gave a high yield of average of 3 × 10{sup 7} ions per specimen. The Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} SPPs contained small amounts of Ni and Si atoms, while in Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs almost all the Si was concentrated and the ratio of Zr: (Fe + Ni + Si) was 2:1. Atomic concentrations of the Zr-matrix and the SPPs were identified by two approaches: the first by using all the visible peaks of the mass spectrum and the second using the representative peaks with the natural abundance of the corresponding atoms. It was found that the change in the concentration between the Zr-matrix and the SPPs can be estimated more accurately by the second method, although Sn concentration in the Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs is slightly overestimated.

  7. Iron speciation of airborne subway particles by the combined use of energy dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Sobanska, Sophie; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    2013-11-05

    Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), known as low-Z particle EPMA, and Raman microspectrometry (RMS) were applied in combination for an analysis of the iron species in airborne PM10 particles collected in underground subway tunnels. Iron species have been reported to be a major chemical species in underground subway particles generated mainly from mechanical wear and friction processes. In particular, iron-containing particles in subway tunnels are expected to be generated with minimal outdoor influence on the particle composition. Because iron-containing particles have different toxicity and magnetic properties depending on their oxidation states, it is important to determine the iron species of underground subway particles in the context of both indoor public health and control measures. A recently developed analytical methodology, i.e., the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and RMS, was used to identify the chemical species of the same individual subway particles on a single particle basis, and the bulk iron compositions of airborne subway particles were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The majority of airborne subway particles collected in the underground tunnels were found to be magnetite, hematite, and iron metal. All the particles collected in the tunnels of underground subway stations were attracted to permanent magnets due mainly to the almost ubiquitous ferrimagnetic magnetite, indicating that airborne subway particles can be removed using magnets as a control measure.

  8. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  9. Ion distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: first measurements with the 2D ion energy spectrometer CORALL on the INTERBALL/Tail-probe satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Yermolaev

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the ion distribution function near the Earth's bow shock is studied on the basis of quasi-3D measurements of ion energy spectra in the range of 30–24200 eV/q with the Russian-Cuban CORALL instrument on the INTERBALL/Tail-probe satellite. The instrument was designed for observations of magnetospheric plasma and measures ions, in an angular range of 36°–144° from the Earth-Sun direction. Ion populations generated by the Earth bow shock are often observed upstream from the bow shock. In the solar-wind stream compressed and heated by the passing of very dense magnetic cloud (CME, two types of these ion populations were measured upstream and before the bow shock crossing on 25 August 1995 at 07:37 UT. Both populations were observed in the energy range above 2 keV. At ~06:20 UT, when the angle between the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field and normal to the bow shock VBn was ≃ 43° the instrument observed a narrow, fast (~800 km/s field-aligned beam moving from the Earth. At ~07:30, when Bn ≃ 28°, the wide ion pitch-angle distribution was observed. A similar suprathermal ion population is observed in the magnetosheath simultaneously with the solar-wind ion population being heated and deflected from the Sun-Earth direction. The similarity of observations during the mentioned time-interval and under usual solar-wind conditions allows us to conclude that types of suprathermal ion populations upstream and downstream from the bow shock do not depend on the solar-wind disturbance generated by magnetic cloud.

  10. Radiative and semi-leptonic B-meson decay spectra: Sudakov resummation beyond logarithmic accuracy and the pole mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardi, Einan

    2004-04-01

    The inclusive spectra of radiative and semi-leptonic B-meson decays near the endpoint is computed taking into account renormalons in the Sudakov exponent (Dressed Gluon Exponentiation). In this framework we demonstrate the factorization of decay spectra into hard, jet and soft functions and discuss the universality of the latter two. Going beyond perturbation theory the soft function, which we identify as the longitudinal momentum distribution in an on-shell b quark, is replaced by the b-quark distribution in the B meson. The two differ by power corrections. We show how the resummation of running-coupling effects can be used to perform consistent separation to power accuracy between perturbative and non-perturbative contributions. In particular, we prove that the leading infrared renormalon ambiguity in the Sudakov exponent cancels against the one associated with the definition of the pole mass. This cancellation allows us to identify the non-perturbative parameter that controls the shift of the perturbative spectrum in the heavy-quark limit as the mass difference between the meson and the quark.

  11. Measurement of charged kaon semileptonic decay branching fractions and their ratio at the NA-48/2 experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, Anne Evelyn

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the ratios of charged kaon decay rates for Ke3/K2 π, K μ 3/K2 π and K μ 3/Ke3 are presented. These measurements are based on charged kaon decays collected in a dedicated run in 2003 by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN. The results obtained are Ke3/K2 π = 0.2470 ± 0.0009 ( stat ) ± 0.0004 ( syst ) and K μ 3/K2 π = 0.1637 ± 0.0006 ( stat ) ± 0.0003 ( syst ). Using the PDG average for the K2pi normalization mode, both values are found to be larger than the current values given by the Particle Data Book and lead to a larger magnitude of the V us parameter in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix than previously accepted. When combined with the latest Particle Data Book value of | V ud |, | V us | is in agreement with unitarity of the CKM matrix. A new measured value of the ratio of the semileptonic decay rates, K μ 3/Ke3 = 0.663 ± 0.003(stat) ± 0.001(syst) is compared to semi-empirical predictions based on the latest form factor measurements.

  12. Semileptonic form factors D{yields}{pi},K and B{yields}{pi},K from a fine lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haydari, A.; Ali Khan, A. [Taiz Univ. (Yemen). Dept. of Physics; Braun, V.M.; Collins, S.; Goeckeler, M.; Schaefer, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Lacagnina, G.N. [INFN, Milan (Italy); Panero, M. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Schierholz, G. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    We extract the form factors relevant for semileptonic decays of D and B mesons from a relativistic computation on a fine lattice in the quenched approximation. The lattice spacing is a=0.04 fm (corresponding to a{sup -1}=4.97 GeV), which allows us to run very close to the physical B meson mass, and to reduce the systematic errors associated with the extrapolation in terms of a heavy quark expansion. For decays of D and D{sub s} mesons, our results for the physical form factors at q{sup 2}=0 are as follows: f{sub +}{sup D{yields}}{sup {pi}}(0)=0.74(6)(4), f{sub +}{sup D{yields}}{sup K}(0)=0.78(5)(4) and f{sub +}{sup D{sub s}{yields}}{sup K}(0)=0.68(4)(3). Similarly, for B and B{sub s} we find: f{sub +}{sup B{yields}}{sup {pi}}(0)=0.27(7)(5), f{sub +}{sup B{yields}}{sup K}(0)=0.32(6)(6) and f{sub +}{sup B{sub s}{yields}}{sup K}(0)=0.23(5)(4). We compare our results with other quenched and unquenched lattice calculations, as well as with lightcone sum rule predictions, finding good agreement. (orig.)

  13. Testing the electroweak model using semileptonic decays of b quarks in the L3 detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, M.

    1992-01-01

    The partial decay width Γ bbar b for Z 0 → b bar b, the forward-backward asymmetry A bbar b , and the B 0 -bar B 0 mixing parameter χ B are determined using a sample of 430K hadronic Z 0 decay events collected by the L3 detector at LEP during 1990 and 1991. The partial width Γ cbar c and asymmetry A cbar c for charm are also determined. Heavy quarks are tagged via their semileptonic decays into high momentum and high p perpendicular muons or electrons. The decay lepton's charge is used to determine the charge of the parent quark. An unbinned, maximum-likelihood fit to the two-dimensional p and p perpendicular distributions in single-lepton events and the four-dimensional p and p perpendicular distributions for dilepton events yields the values Γ bbar b = 382 ± 3 (stat) ± (sys) GeV; Γ cbar c = 293 ± 10 (stat) ± 98 (sys) GeV A bbar b = 0.090 ± 0.015 (stat) ± 0.007 (sys); A cbar c = 0.083 ± 0.038 (stat) ± 0.027 (sys) and χ B = 0.124 ± 0.017 (stat) ± 0.010 (sys). All of these values are seen to be consistent with Standard Model expectations

  14. D → π and D → K semileptonic form factors with Nf = 2 + 1 + 1 twisted mass fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubicz, Vittorio; Riggio, Lorenzo; Salerno, Giorgio; Simula, Silvano; Tarantino, Cecilia

    2018-03-01

    We present a lattice determination of the vector and scalar form factors of the D → π(K)lv semileptonic decays, which are relevant for the extraction of the CKM matrix elements |Vcd| and |Vcs| from experimental data. Our analysis is based on the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf = 2 + 1 +1 flavors of dynamical quarks. We simulated at three different values of the lattice spacing and with pion masses as small as 210 MeV. The matrix elements of both vector and scalar currents are determined for a plenty of kinematical conditions in which parent and child mesons are either moving or at rest. Lorentz symmetry breaking due to hypercubic effects is clearly observed in the data and included in the decomposition of the current matrix elements in terms of additional form factors. After the extrapolations to the physical pion mass and to the continuum limit the vector and scalar form factors are determined in the whole kinematical region from q2 = 0 up to qmax2 = (MD - Mπ(K))2 accessible in the experiments, obtaining a good overall agreement with experiments, except in the region at high values of q2 where some deviations are visible.

  15. Measurements of low-$p_{T}$ electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adamova, Dagmar; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Al-turany, Mohammad; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Ali, Yasir; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Anaam, Mustafa Naji; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Angeletti, Massimo; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Apadula, Nicole; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhaduri, Partha Pratim; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhatt, Himani; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Antonio; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Soto Camacho, Rabi; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chang, Wan; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Dani, Sanskruti; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Delsanto, Silvia; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Arteche Diaz, Raul; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Ding, Yanchun; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dudi, Sandeep; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dukhishyam, Mallick; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Ersdal, Magnus Rentsch; Espagnon, Bruno; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faggin, Mattia; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiorenza, Gabriele; Flor, Fernando; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guittiere, Manuel; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Habib, Michael Karim; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamid, Mohammed; Hamon, Julien Charles; Hannigan, Ryan; Haque, Md Rihan; Harlenderova, Alena; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Gonzalez Hernandez, Emma; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hota, Jyotishree; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Chun-lu; Hughes, Charles; Huhn, Patrick; Humanic, Thomas; Hushnud, Hushnud; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iddon, James Philip; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Jena, Chitrasen; Jercic, Marko; Jevons, Oliver; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jin, Muqing; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Ahsan Mehmood; Khan, Shaista; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taejun; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Varga-kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konopka, Piotr Jan; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kreis, Lukas; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kruger, Mario; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvapil, Jakub; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Larionov, Pavel; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xing Long; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Liu, Alwina; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malik, Qasim Waheed; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Jacobb Lee; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Toledo Matuoka, Paula Fernanda; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Soncco Meza, Carlos; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Micheletti, Luca; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Auro Prasad; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Mrnjavac, Teo; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Arratia Munoz, Miguel Ignacio; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nassirpour, Adrian Fereydon; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Neskovic, Gvozden; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oh, Hoonjung; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parkkila, Jasper Elias; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pisano, Silvia; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rode, Sudhir Pandurang; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogalev, Roman; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Roslon, Krystian; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Amal; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schaefer, Brennan; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Meenakshi; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shirinkin, Sergey; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singh, Randhir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Topilskaya, Nataliya; Toppi, Marco; Rojas Torres, Solangel; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzcinski, Tomasz Piotr; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vermunt, Luuk; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wegrzynek, Adam; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Xu, Ran; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zherebchevskii, Vladimir; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Ya; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2018-01-01

    Transverse-momentum ($p_{T}$) differential yields of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays have been measured in the most central (0-10%) and in semi-central (20-40%) Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. The corresponding production cross section in pp collisions has been measured at the same energy with substantially reduced systematic uncertainties with respect to previously published results. The modification of the yield in Pb-Pb collisions with respect to the expectation from an incoherent superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions is quantified at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.8) in the $p_{T}$ interval 0.5-3 GeV/c via the nuclear modification factor, $R_{AA}$. This paper extends the $p_{T}$ reach of the $R_{AA}$ measurement towards significantly lower values with respect to a previous publication. In Pb-Pb collisions the $p_{T}$-differential measurements of yields at low $p_{T}$ are essential to investigate the scaling of heavy-flavour production with the number of binary ...

  16. Measurements of the branching fractions for the semileptonic decays Ds+→ϕ e+νe , ϕ μ+νμ , η μ+νμ and η'μ+νμ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, S.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, K. J.; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Magnoni, A. S.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rolo, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B. T.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    By analyzing 482 pb-1 of e+e- collision data collected at the center-of-mass energy √{s }=4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the branching fractions for the semi-leptonic decays Ds+→ϕ e+νe, ϕ μ+νμ, η μ+νμ and η'μ+νμ to be B (Ds+→ϕ e+νe)=(2.26 ±0.45 ±0.09 )%, B (Ds+→ϕ μ+νμ)=(1.94 ±0.53 ±0.09 )% , B (Ds+→η μ+νμ)=(2.42 ±0.46 ±0.11 )% and B (Ds+→η'μ+νμ)=(1.06 ±0.54 ±0.07 )%, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The branching fractions for the three semi-muonic decays Ds+→ϕ μ+νμ,η μ+νμ and η'μ+νμ are determined for the first time and that of Ds+→ϕ e+νe is consistent with the world average value within uncertainties.

  17. The time domain triple probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, M.A.; Hallock, G.A.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    A new Langmuir probe technique based on the triple probe method is being developed to provide simultaneous measurement of plasma temperature, potential, and density with the temporal and spatial resolution required to accurately characterize plasma turbulence. When the conventional triple probe method is used in an inhomogeneous plasma, local differences in the plasma measured at each probe introduce significant error in the estimation of turbulence parameters. The Time Domain Triple Probe method (TDTP) uses high speed switching of Langmuir probe potential, rather than spatially separated probes, to gather the triple probe information thus avoiding these errors. Analysis indicates that plasma response times and recent electronics technology meet the requirements to implement the TDTP method. Data reduction techniques of TDTP data are to include linear and higher order correlation analysis to estimate fluctuation induced particle and thermal transport, as well as energy relationships between temperature, density, and potential fluctuations

  18. Measurement of B -> D Form Factors in the Semileptonic Decay B -> D* l nu at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Mandeep Singh; /SLAC

    2006-01-27

    We present here the results of a measurement of the three semileptonic form factors involved in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{ell}{nu}, where {ell} is one of the two light charged leptons (i.e. an electron or muon--though the final results in this work are determined only for {ell} = electron). This measurement uses the Babar 2000-2002 data set, which is altogether approximately 85 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B}-pairs in 78 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The D*{sup +} was reconstructed in the channel D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}, and the D{sup 0} in the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This analysis was based ultimately on {approx} 16,386 reconstructed events with an estimated background contamination of {approx} 15%. The method of the measurement was to perform a unbinned maximum likelihood fit in the four kinematic variables that describe the decay for the three form factor parameters R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, and {rho}{sup 2}. The results obtained for the form factor ratios are R{sub 1} = 1.328 {+-} 0.055 {+-} 0.025 {+-} 0.025 and R{sub 2} = 0.920 {+-} 0.044 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.013 for the ratios and {rho}{sup 2} = 0.769 {+-} 0.039 {+-} 0.019 {+-} 0.032 for the form factor slope. The errors given are statistical, Monte Carlo statistical and systematic respectively.

  19. An Investigation of the Neutral Cascade Muon Semileptonic Decay and its Observation at KTeV, Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Ricardo Avelino [Univ. of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The authors report an investigation of the semileptonic decay Ξ0 → Σ+ μ-$\\bar{v}$μ. This decay was observed for the first time with nine identified events using the KTeV beam line and detector at Fermilab. The decay is normalized to the Ξ0 beta decay mode and yields a value for the ratio of decay rates Γ(Ξ0 → Σ0 μ-$\\bar{v}$μ)/Γ(Ξ0 → Σ+e-$\\bar{v}$e) of (1.8$+0.7\\atop{-0.5}$(stat.) ± 0.2(syst.)) x 10-0 at the 68.27% confidence level, being the official measurement of KTeV Collaboration. They also used the dominant decay Ξ0 → Γπ0(Γ → pπ-) as normalization mode in an independent analysis which corroborated with the main result. In addition, a new measurement of the Ξ0 → Σ+ e-$\\bar{v}$e branching ratio is presented, based on 1139 events and normalized to the Ξ0 → Γπ0(Γ → pπ-) decay mode. The results are in agreement with the SU(3) flavor symmetric quark model.

  20. Measurement of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonschior, Alexey; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Pujol Teixido, Jordi; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2012-01-01

    The differential production cross section of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays has been measured at mid-rapidity (|y|<0.5) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 7 TeV with ALICE at the LHC. Data were obtained in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < $p_t$ < 8 GeV/c. Predictions from a fixed order perturbative QCD calculation with next-to-leading-log resummation agree with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties.

  1. Measurement of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavor hadron decays in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; 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De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Esposito, Marco; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gumbo, Mervyn; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kadyshevskiy, Vladimir; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; 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Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Okatan, Ali; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Sahoo, Pragati; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palmeri, Armando; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; 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Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sanchez Rodriguez, Fernando Javier; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Segato, Gianfranco; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wagner, Vladimir; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Xiang, Changzhou; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-01-07

    The $p_{\\rm T}$-differential production cross section of electrons from semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons has been measured at mid-rapidity in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 2.76$ TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < $p_{\\rm T}$ < 12 GeV/$c$ with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The analysis was performed using minimum bias events and events triggered by the electromagnetic calorimeter. Predictions from perturbative QCD calculations agree with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties.

  2. Study of the B-bard0 meson semileptonic decay into D*+ meson and measurement of |Vcb| with the Delphi detector at Lep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.A.

    1997-04-01

    Semileptonic decays anti-B d 0 → D *+ l - anti-ν l were selected from a sample of 3.1 million hadronic Z decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. A measurement of the Standard Model parameter |V cb | has been performed using these decays. In addition, a search for production of narrow orbitally excited D mesons in semileptonic B decays is also presented. The measurement of |V cb | is based on the precise determination of the q 2 (m B - m D * ) 2 spectrum of the reconstructed events. An exclusive reconstruction of anti-B d 0 → D *+ l - anti-ν l decays was done in the channel D *+ → D 0 π + followed by D 0 → K - π + and D 0 → K - π + π - π + . The distribution was fitted over the full momentum transfer range to extract the product of |V cb | times the normalization of the decay form factor. Using HQET predictions of the form factor the value of |V cb | was extracted. This thesis begins by a description of the role of the |V cb | matrix element in the Standard Model. The theoretical tools used to determine |V cb | are also described. A brief overview of the performances of the DELPHI detector is given in the second part. Then the different steps of the analysis are detailed: event selection, background study, Br(anti-B d 0 → D *+ l - anti-ν l ) measurement which is the first step of |V cb | measurement, determination of a q 2 estimator. The fitting procedure is then discussed. The obtained results are: Br(anti-B 0 → D *+ l - anti-ν l (5,17 ± 0,49(stat) ± 0,71(syst))%; and |V cb | = (38,7 ± 3,4(stat) ± 2,9(syst) ± 1,2(th)) *10 -3 . A good agreement with previous measurements from LEP and B factories (CESR,DESY) is found. The search for narrow orbitally excited charm mesons in semileptonic B decays has led to the measurement of the branching fraction Br(b → D J 0 lX)*Br(D J 0 → D *+ π - ) (6,0 +1,7-1,5(stat) ± 0.8(syst))*10 -3 , where D J 0 corresponds to the sum of the two narrow states D 1 0 and D 2 *0 . This measurement

  3. A Measurement of the lifetime and mixing frequency of neutral B mesons with semileptonic decays in the BABAR detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, C H

    2003-01-01

    The neutral B meson, consisting of a b quark and an anti-d quark, can mix (oscillate) to its own anti-particle through second-order weak interactions. The measurement of the mixing frequency can constrain the quark mixing matrix in the Standard Model of particle physics. The PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center provides a very large data sample that enables us to make measurements with much higher precisions than previous measurements, and to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. The lifetime of the neutral B meson tau sub B sub 0 and the B sup 0 -(bar B) sup 0 mixing frequency DELTA m sub d are measured with a sample of approximately 14,000 exclusively reconstructed B sup 0 -> D* sup - (ell) sup +nu sub e sub l sub l signal events, selected from 23 million B(bar B) pairs recorded at the UPSILON(4S)resonance with the BABAR detector at the asymmetric-energy e sup + e sup - collider, PEP-II. The decay position of the exclusively reconstructed B is determined by the charged tracks in the...

  4. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  5. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  6. Synthesizing Nanomaterials for Energy Applications: Probing Activity as a Function of Composition, Morphology and Purity to Address Key Issues Associated with Fuel Cells and Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Megan Elaine

    With the growing need to find alternative clean energy sources to fossil fuels, research into developing efficient fuel cells and batteries stands at the forefront of this grand effort. However, before mass commercialization, fundamental key issues need to be addressed. For example, fuel cells are subject to high catalyst costs and poor durability of the underlying carbon support. As a way to alleviate these issues, we have synthesized ultrathin one-dimensional (1D) alloy nanowires to probe the effect of composition, purity, and one-dimensionality upon the observed overall activity, performance, and durability. In terms of chemical composition, crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) ('M' = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, and Au) were generated and subsequently evaluated for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Additionally, ternary-based catalysts were synthesized (PtRuFe) in order to analyze how chemical composition influences CO tolerance as well as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR) activities. In both cases, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method for the fabrication of chemically pure and crystalline systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy NWs. Moreover, in these studies, our NW systems exhibit favorable synergistic electronic effects with respect to controls. To address another fundamental issue associated with the durability of fuel cells, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Specifically, we have demonstrated favorable metal support interactions between the Pt NPs and the SrRuO3 NP supports, which lead to increased MOR activity as compared with not only the other metal oxide supports tested but also the commercial Pt NP/C standard. In terms of Li-ion batteries, LiFePO4 materials have become increasingly popular as a cathode material due to the many benefits they possess

  7. Detection of subgenomic mRNA of feline coronavirus by real-time polymerase chain reaction based on primer-probe energy transfer (P-sg-QPCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyák, Akos; Bálint, Adám; Farsang, Attila; Balka, Gyula; Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Blomberg, Jonas; Belák, Sándor

    2012-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is one of the most severe devastating diseases of the Felidae. Upon the appearance of clinical signs, a cure for the infected animal is impossible. Therefore rapid and proper diagnosis for both the presence of the causative agent, feline coronavirus (FCoV) and the manifestation of feline infectious peritonitis is of paramount importance. In the present work, a novel real-time RT-PCR method is described which is able to detect FCoV and to determine simultaneously the quantity of the viral RNA. The new assay combines the M gene subgenomic messenger RNA (sg-mRNA) detection and the quantitation of the genome copies of FCoV. In order to detect the broadest spectrum of potential FCoV variants and to achieve the most accurate results in the detection ability the new assay is applying the primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET) principle. This technology was chosen since PriProET is very robust to tolerate the nucleotide substitutions in the target area. Therefore, this technology provides a very broad-range system, which is able to detect simultaneously many variants of the virus(es) even if the target genomic regions show large scale of variations. The detection specificity of the new assay was proven by positive amplification from a set of nine different FCoV strains and negative from the tested non-coronaviral targets. Examination of faecal samples of healthy young cats, organ samples of perished animals, which suffered from feline infectious peritonitis, and cat leukocytes from uncertain clinical cases were also subjected to the assay. The sensitivity of the P-sg-QPCR method was high, since as few as 10 genome copies of FCoV were detected. The quantitative sg-mRNA detection method revealed more than 10-50,000 times increase of the M gene sg-mRNA in organ materials of feline infectious peritonitis cases, compared to those of the enteric FCoV variants present in the faeces of normal, healthy cats. These results indicate the applicability of

  8. Thermal Bremsstrahlung probing nuclear multifragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy; Bremsstrahlung thermique comme sonde de la multifragmentation nucleaire dans les collisions noyau-noyau aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Enterria, D.G

    2000-05-15

    The thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter at moderate temperatures and densities, in the vicinity of the predicted nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, are studied using as experimental probe the hard-photons (E{sub {gamma}} > 30 MeV) emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Photon and charged-particle production in four different heavy-ion reactions (Ar{sup 36} + Au{sup 197}, Ag{sup 107}, Ni{sup 58}, C{sup 12} at 60 A*MeV) is measured exclusively and inclusively coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with two charged-particle and intermediate-mass-fragment detectors covering nearly 4{pi}. We confirm that Bremsstrahlung emission in first-chance (off-equilibrium) proton-neutron collisions (pn{gamma}) is the dominant origin of hard photons. We also firmly establish the existence of a thermal radiation component emitted in second-chance proton-neutron collisions. This thermal Bremsstrahlung emission takes place in semi-central and central nucleus-nucleus reactions involving heavy targets. We exploit this observation i) to demonstrate that thermal equilibrium is reached during the reaction, ii) to establish a new thermometer of nuclear matter based on Bremsstrahlung photons, iii) to derive the thermodynamical properties of the excited nuclear sources and, in particular, to establish a 'caloric curve' (temperature versus excitation energy), and iv) to assess the time-scales of the nuclear break-up process. (author)

  9. Semi-inclusive studies of semileptonic B-s decays at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, Christian; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, M-C; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Huschle, Matthias J.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, Y.; Gioi, LL; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, CP; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, Xiaolong; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-22

    We present an analysis of the semi-inclusive decays B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu and B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu, where X denotes a final state that may consist of additional hadrons or photons and l is an electron or muon. The studied Bs decays are contained in the 121.4 fb(-1) Upsilon(5S) data sample collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider. The branching fractions of the decays are measured to be B(B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu) = [8.2 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.6(syst) +/- 1.4(ext)] % and B(B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu) = [5.4 +/- 0.4(stat) +/- 0.4(syst) +/- 0.9(ext)] %, where the first two uncertainties are statistical and systematic and the last is due to external parameters. The measurement also provides an estimate of the B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*()) production cross section, sigma(e(+)e(-) -> B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*())) = 53.8 +/- 1.4(stat) +/- 4.0(syst) +/- 3.4(ext)] pb, at the center-of-mass energy root s = 10.86 GeV.

  10. Search for massive long-lived particles decaying semileptonically in the LHCb detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Adeva, B. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). H.H. Wills Physics Lab.; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration; and others

    2017-04-15

    A search is presented for massive long-lived particles decaying into a muon and two quarks. The dataset consists of proton-proton interactions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 and 2 fb{sup -1}, respectively. The analysis is performed assuming a set of production mechanisms with simple topologies, including the production of a Higgs-like particle decaying into two long-lived particles. The mass range from 20 to 80 GeV/c{sup 2} and lifetimes from 5 to 100 ps are explored. Results are also interpreted in terms of neutralino production in different R-Parity violating supersymmetric models, with masses in the 23-198 GeV/c{sup 2} range. No excess above the background expectation is observed and upper limits are set on the production cross-section for various points in the parameter space of theoretical models. (orig.)

  11. Study of no-charmed semi-leptonic decays of B mesons and measurement of the V{sub ub} term of the CKM matrix in the experiment BABAR; Etude des desintegrations semi-leptoniques non charmees des mesons B et mesure de l'element V{sub ub} de la matrice CKM dans l'experience BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfass, B

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the accuracy of the measurement of the |V{sub ub}| term of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. |V{sub ub}| has been determined from the branching ratio of the decay: B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}l{sup +}{nu} and experimental data from 22 millions BB-bar pairs has been used. We propose: branching ratio = (3.79{+-}0.41{sub -0.64}{sup +0.53}{+-}0.41).10{sup -4} and |V{sub ub}| = (3.83{+-}0.20{sub -0.34}{sup +0.26}{+-}0.60).10{sup -3}. The first part of this work explains how an accurate value of |V{sub ub}| can allow the standard model to be tested. The second part gives a description of the PEP-II collider and of the BABAR detector. The measurement of |V{sub ub}| is based on semi-leptonic decays, so an appropriate identification of leptons is required. This identification is made by the electromagnetic calorimeter and by the instrumented flux return (IFR) for electrons and muons respectively. The third part presents the analysis of exclusive semi-leptonic decays and the extraction of |V{sub ub}|. 5 modes of decay have been selected, the main difficulties rise from the presence of a neutrino that can not be detected and from the decay: b {yields} cl{nu} for which the branching ratio is about 100 times greater than that of decay: b {yields} ul{nu}. The quark c being heavier than the quark u, this implies the existence of an energy range for leptons that is not accessible to charmed decays. (A.C.)

  12. B→D** lνbar semileptonic decays in the frame of covariant models of Bakamjian-Thomas-type form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morenas, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The study of semileptonic decays is of crucial importance for the physics of beauty. It was usually believed that the rates of these reactions were saturated by the channels leading to the production of ground state D and D * mesons only. Yet, experimental results have shown recently that the contribution of orbitally excited mesons are not that small. In these thesis it is presented a study of the semileptonic decays of B mesons into the first orbitally excited charmed states D ** : by using the formalism of Bakamjian-Thomas to construct the mesonic states, together with the hypothesis of infinite mass limit of the heavy quark, we provide a covariant description of the hadronic transition amplitude; moreover, all the 'good' properties of the heavy quark symmetries are naturally fulfilled. We then fixed the dynamics of the bound states of quarks by introducing four spectroscopic models and made numerical predictions, which are discussed and compared to other theoretical and experimental data when available. Finally, we also applied this formalism to the study of annihilation processes: the transition amplitude are then also written in a covariant way and the properties of heavy quark symmetries fulfilled. Numerical predictions of decay constants were made with the same four spectroscopic models. (author)

  13. Measurement of the semi-leptonic and hadronic branching ratios and mass of Bs0 with the ALEPH detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nief, Jean-Yves

    1997-01-01

    Since the discovery of the b quark in 1977 the physics of the beauty has known an important development. Among the main aspects of this field, one can find the measurement of the branching ratios and the mass of the beauty mesons. This study allows a confrontation between the experimental results on one hand and predictions given by phenomenological models on the other hand. This thesis is dedicated to the study of the B s 0 meson, which contains both a beauty quark and a strange quark. This analysis uses 4 millions hadronic events taken by the ALEPH experiment between 1991 and 1995 on the electron-positron collider LEP located at CERN. From these events the B s 0 meson is searched in two types of decays: semi-leptonic and hadronic decays. This study allows to extract various branching ratios of B s 0 . From the fully reconstructed candidates in the hadronic channels a measurement of the B s 0 is carried out. The measurements are in agreement with the predictions of the phenomenological models available at present. This thesis is also on the tracking and identification upgrade of the charged particles in the ALEPH detector, especially the Kalman Filter (tracking part) at a complementary measurement of the specific ionization, dE/dx (identification part). Tests carried out in the field of B d 0 semi-leptonic decays shows that these improvements will be rewarding in the future. (author)

  14. First Measurements of Spin Correlation Using Semi-leptonic $t\\bar{t}$ Events at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmer, Boris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The top quark decays before it hadronizes. Before its spin state can be changed in a process of strong interaction, it is directly transferred to the top quark decay products. The top quark spin can be deduced by studying angular distributions of the decay products. The Standard Model predicts the top/anti-top quark ($t\\bar{t}$) pairs to have correlated spins. The degree is sensitive to the spin and the production mechanisms of the top quark. Measuring the spin correlation allows to test the predictions. New physics effects can be reflected in deviations from the prediction. The measurement of the spin correlation of $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, produced at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and reconstructed with the ATLAS detector, is presented. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 $\\textrm{fb}^{-1}$. $t\\bar{t}$ pairs are reconstructed in the $\\ell$+jets channel using a kinematic likelihood fit offering the identification of light up- and down-type quarks from the $t \\righ...

  15. Search for massive long-lived particles decaying semileptonically in the LHCb detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Gándara, M Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, H; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, T; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-01-01

    A search is presented for massive long-lived particles decaying into a muon and two quarks. The dataset consists of proton-proton interactions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 and 2[Formula: see text], respectively. The analysis is performed assuming a set of production mechanisms with simple topologies, including the production of a Higgs-like particle decaying into two long-lived particles. The mass range from 20 to 80 [Formula: see text] and lifetimes from 5 to 100[Formula: see text] are explored. Results are also interpreted in terms of neutralino production in different R-Parity violating supersymmetric models, with masses in the 23-198 GeV/[Formula: see text] range. No excess above the background expectation is observed and upper limits are set on the production cross-section for various points in the parameter space of theoretical models.

  16. Probing the global potential energy minimum of (CH2O)2: THz absorption spectrum of (CH2O)2 in solid neon and para-hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Voute, A.; Mihrin, Dmytro

    2017-01-01

    conformations of Cs and C2h symmetry have almost identical energies. The present work demonstrates how the class of large-amplitude hydrogen bond vibrational motion probed in the THz region provides excellent direct spectroscopic observables for these weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motifs....... The combination of concentration dependency measurements, observed isotopic spectral shifts associated with H/D substitutions and dedicated annealing procedures, enables the unambiguous assignment of three large-amplitude infrared active hydrogen bond vibrational modes for the non-planar Cs configuration of (CH2O...

  17. Neutral helium beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  18. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  19. Production and semileptonic decays of heavy quarks at LEP with the ALEPH detector; Production et desintegrations semileptoniques des quarks lourds au LEP avec le detecteur ALEPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteil, St.

    1996-05-15

    The four LEP experiments have collected nearly 16 million Z. These very high statistics allow to perform a large field of precision tests of the standard model of electroweak interactions with a very high accuracy. One of the most promising channel in order to observe a deviation with respect to the SM predictions is the study of the b quark production in the Z boson decay. Two observables are of interest in that respect: the Z partial decay width in b quarks, denoted R{sub b} and the b forward-backward asymmetry. A measurement of R{sub b} using both the long lifetime of b hadrons and the kinematical properties of the leptons coming from the semileptonic decays of b hadrons is presented in the first part of this document. The c partial decay width, denoted R{sub c}, is simultaneously measured. 1.3 million of Z have been analyzed and the following results have been obtained: R{sub b} = 21.82 {+-}0.25{+-}0.24%; R{sub c} = 16.02{+-}0.56{+-}1.41%. The former error is statistical and the latter systematics. These two results are in good agreement with the SM predictions. The semileptonic branching ratios of the b hadrons, denoted Br(b {yields} l{sup -}) for the primary decay and Br(b {yields} c {yields} l{sup +}), for the cascade decay, on one hand, and the B{sup 0} {r_reversible} B-bar{sup 0} mixing parameter, denoted X, on another hand are needed in the b asymmetry measurement with the leptons. The second part of this document is devoted to their measurement. This is done by using both lifetime of b hadrons and kinematical characteristics of the leptons coming from semileptonic decays of b hadrons. The following results have been obtained: Br(b {yields} l) 11.03 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.21 + 0.24%- 0.17%; Br(b {yields} C {yields} l) 7.84 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.30 + 0.34% - 0.43%; X 12.62 {+-} 0.56 {+-} 0.24 + 0.42% - 0.41%. Those results are found in a good agreement with the heavy quark theory predictions. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  1. Energy loss effects on heavy quark production in heavy-ion collisions at sq root s = 5.5 A TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Zi Wei

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of energy loss on charm and bottom quarks in high-energy heavy-ion collisions including hadronization, longitudinal expansion and partial thermalization. We consider in detail the detector geometry and single lepton energy cuts of the ALICE and CMS detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to show the large suppression of high P sub T heavy quarks and the consequences on their semileptonic decays.

  2. Semileptonic Form Factor ratio Bs → Ds/B → D and Its Application to BR(Bs0 → μ+μ-)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Daping; DeTar, Carleton; Kronfeld, Andreas; Laiho, Jack; Meurice, Yannick; Qiu, Si-wei

    2011-01-01

    We present a (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculation of the form factor ratio between the semileptonic decays (bar B) s 0 → D s + l - (bar ν) and (bar B) 0 → D + l - (bar ν). This ratio is an important theoretical input to the hadronic determination of the B meson fragmentation fraction ratio f s /f d which enters in the measurement of BR(B s 0 → μ + μ - ). Small lattice spacings and high statistics enable us to simulate the decays with a dynamic final D meson of small momentum and reliably extract the hadronic matrix elements at nonzero recoil. We report our preliminary result for the form factor ratio at the corresponding momentum transfer of the two decays f 0 (s) (M π 2 )/f 0 (d) (M K 2 ).

  3. Cross section measurement of the bottom-quark-pair associated top-quark-pair production in the semi-leptonic channel with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidemann, Fabian; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We present a cross section measurement of the top-quark-pair-production with two bottom quarks which is the dominant background process to top-quark-pair associated Higgs Boson production. The semi-leptonic channel of top-quark decays is used due to its combination of a relatively large branching ratio and small QCD contamination. The analysis method relies on Standard Model Monte Carlo simulations of all relevant physics processes. Template distributions are created with Boosted Decision Tree classifiers on the simulated data. Subsequently, the composition of these templates is fitted to the data distribution to obtain the signal strength relative to the Standard Model prediction. A Bayesian interference method is used to perform the fit, in which systematic uncertainties are incorporated as nuisance parameters.

  4. t anti t cross section measurement in the semi-leptonic channel at 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannoura, Arwa; Maettig, Peter [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A precise measurement of the top quark properties is of great importance. In this analysis, the top pair production cross section in the semi-leptonic channel is measured using event shape based observables that discriminate t anti t events from the backgrounds. These variables are fed into an artificial neural network (ANN) in order to improve the separation strength between the signal and the backgrounds. The ANN output templates for all processes are then fitted to data using a binned maximum likelihood method. In this context, the main background which is W+jets is estimated completely from data using a new approach. Also, new ideas are proposed to constrain systematic uncertainties in order to improve the precision of the measurement.

  5. Probe-diverse ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, I., E-mail: isaac.russellpeterson@rmit.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, the University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    We propose an extension of ptychography where the target sample is scanned separately through several probes with distinct amplitude and phase profiles and a diffraction image is recorded for each probe and each sample translation. The resulting probe-diverse dataset is used to iteratively retrieve high-resolution images of the sample and all probes simultaneously. The method is shown to yield significant improvement in the reconstructed sample image compared to the image obtained using the standard single-probe ptychographic phase-retrieval scheme.

  6. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  7. Traversing probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  8. Lasers probe the atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.

    1986-01-01

    The article is contained in a booklet on the Revised Nuffield Advanced Physics Course, and concentrates on two techniques to illustrate how lasers probe the atomic nucleus. Both techniques employ resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for obtaining atomic transition energies. The first uses lasers to determine the change in the nuclear charge radius with isotope, the second concerns the use of lasers for ultrasensitive detection of isotopes and elements. The application of lasers in resonance ionization spectroscopy and proton decay is also described. (UK)

  9. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  10. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis

  11. Lateral distribution of NBD-PC fluorescent lipid analogs in membranes probed by molecular dynamics-assisted analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loura, Luís M S

    2012-11-08

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be potentially useful as they provide direct detailed information on transverse probe localization, relative probe orientation, and membrane surface area, all of which are required for analysis of FRET data. This is illustrated here for the FRET pairs involving 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as donor and either 1-palmitoyl,2-(6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] hexanoyl)- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C6-NBD-PC) or 1-palmitoyl,2-(12-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12-NBD-PC) as acceptors, in fluid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (DPPC, 50 °C). Incorporation of results from MD simulations improves the statistical quality of model fitting to the experimental FRET data. Furthermore, the decay of DPH in the presence of moderate amounts of C12-NBD-PC (>0.4 mol%) is consistent with non-random lateral distribution of the latter, at variance with C6-NBD-PC, for which aggregation is ruled out up to 2.5 mol% concentration. These conclusions are supported by analysis of NBD-PC fluorescence self-quenching. Implications regarding the relative utility of these probes in membrane studies are discussed.

  12. A MEASUREMENT OF THE LIFETIME AND MIXING FREQUENCY OF NEUTRAL B MESONS WITH SEMILEPTONIC DECAYS IN THE BABAR DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2003-08-29

    The neutral B meson, consisting of a b quark and an anti-d quark, can mix (oscillate) to its own anti-particle through second-order weak interactions. The measurement of the mixing frequency can constrain the quark mixing matrix in the Standard Model of particle physics. The PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center provides a very large data sample that enables us to make measurements with much higher precisions than previous measurements, and to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. The lifetime of the neutral B meson {tau}{sub B0} and the B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing frequency {Delta}m{sub d} are measured with a sample of approximately 14,000 exclusively reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} signal events, selected from 23 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S)resonance with the BABAR detector at the asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, PEP-II. The decay position of the exclusively reconstructed B is determined by the charged tracks in the final state, and its b-quark flavor at the time of decay is known unambiguously from the charge of the lepton. The decay position of the other B is determined inclusively, and its b-quark flavor at the time of decay is determined (tagged) with the charge of tracks in the final state, where identified leptons or kaons give the most information. The decay time difference of two B mesons in the event is calculated from the distance between their decay vertices and the Lorentz boost of the center of mass. Additional samples of approximately 50,000 events are selected for studies of background events. The lifetime and mixing frequency, along with wrong-tag probabilities and the time-difference resolution function, are measured simultaneously with an unbinned maximum-likelihood fit that uses, for each event, the measured difference in B decay times ({Delta}t), the calculated uncertainty on {Delta}t, the signal and background probabilities, and b

  13. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  14. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range

  15. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  16. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, C.J.A.P.

    2009-01-01

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  17. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  18. Construction of a remote probe for a spectrometer using NaI(TI) detector and X-ray fluorescence by energy dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandão Junior, Francisco Antônio

    2014-01-01

    This research project aims the utilization of NaI(Tl) cylindrical detectors with different sensitive volumes in the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN) of the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UFMG (DEN-UFMG) for construction of spectrometers using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Conical coupling devices between the crystal detectors and the photomultiplier valve (VMF) were designed and constructed using easily handled material, joined by an optical fiber cable (FO) for driving the luminescence from the detector crystal to the VFM, allowing greater flexibility and accessibility to the device using the aforementioned technique. The cable connections were adapted to the cones that have a system with adjustable convergent lens to maximize level of luminescence (input and output). The photon beam is conducted by FO from the crystal detector to the VFM. This remote probe may bring new solutions for use not only in EDXRF technique but also in other future applications using the NaI(Tl) detector. The SR was designed and built based on the FO properties to conduct the light by total reflection with minimal loss; the first SR qualitative tests were performed and the results demonstrate that the system works properly. (author)

  19. Correlations between isospin dynamics and Intermediate Mass Fragments emission time scales: a probe for the symmetry energy in asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, E; Cardella, G; Guidara, E La; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Amorini, F; Colonna, M; Gianì, S; Grassi, L; Han, J; Maiolino, C; Auditore, L; Minniti, T; Baran, V; Berceanu, I; Geraci, E; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I

    2013-01-01

    We show new data from the 64 Ni+ 124 Sn and 58 Ni+ 112 Sn reactions studied in direct kinematics with the CHIMERA detector at INFN-LNS and compared with the reverse kinematics reactions at the same incident beam energy (35 A MeV). Analyzing the data with the method of relative velocity correlations, fragments coming from statistical decay of an excited projectile-like (PLF) or target-like (TLF) fragments are discriminated from the ones coming from dynamical emission in the early stages of the reaction. By comparing data of the reverse kinematics experiment with a stochastic mean field (SMF) + GEMINI calculations our results show that observables from neck fragmentation mechanism add valuable constraints on the density dependence of symmetry energy. An indication is found for a moderately stiff symmetry energy potential term of EOS.

  20. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.; Ott, F.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the current energy economy in Austria. The Austrian political aims of sustainable development and climate protection imply a reorientation of the Austrian energy policy as a whole. Energy consumption trends (1993-1998), final energy consumption by energy carrier (indexed data 1993-1999), comparative analysis of useful energy demand (1993 and 1999) and final energy consumption of renewable energy sources by sector (1996-1999) in Austria are given. The necessary measures to be taken in order to reduce the energy demand and increased the use of renewable energy are briefly mentioned. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  1. Hyperfine structure in 229gTh3+ as a probe of the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloy, K

    2014-02-14

    We identify a potential means to extract the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy from precision microwave spectroscopy of the 5F(5/2,7/2) hyperfine manifolds in the ion 229gTh3+. The hyperfine interaction mixes this ground fine structure doublet with states of the nuclear isomer, introducing small but observable shifts to the hyperfine sublevels. We demonstrate how accurate atomic structure calculations may be combined with the measurement of the hyperfine intervals to quantify the effects of this mixing. Further knowledge of the magnetic dipole decay rate of the isomer, as recently reported, allows an indirect determination of the nuclear excitation energy.

  2. Probing a gravitational cat state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastopoulos, C; Hu, B L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the nature of a gravitational two-state system (G2S) in the simplest setup in Newtonian gravity. In a quantum description of matter a single motionless massive particle can in principle be in a superposition state of two spatially separated locations. This superposition state in gravity, or gravitational cat state, would lead to fluctuations in the Newtonian force exerted on a nearby test particle. The central quantity of importance for this inquiry is the energy density correlation. This corresponds to the noise kernel in stochastic gravity theory, evaluated in the weak field nonrelativistic limit. In this limit quantum fluctuations of the stress–energy tensor manifest as the fluctuations of the Newtonian force. We describe the properties of such a G2S system and present two ways of measuring the cat state for the Newtonian force, one by way of a classical probe, the other a quantum harmonic oscillator. Our findings include: (i) mass density fluctuations persist even in single particle systems, and they are of the same order of magnitude as the mean; (ii) a classical probe generically records a non-Markovian fluctuating force; (iii) a quantum probe interacting with the G2S system may undergo Rabi oscillations in a strong coupling regime. This simple prototypical gravitational quantum system could provide a robust testing ground to compare predictions from alternative quantum theories, since the results reported here are based on standard quantum mechanics and classical gravity. (paper)

  3. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of energy production, energy conversion, atomic energy and renewable energy. The development of the energy consumption in Austria for the years 1993 to 1999 is given for the different energy types. The development of the use of renewable energy sources in Austria is given, different domestic heat-systems are compared, life cycles and environmental balance are outlined. (a.n.)

  4. Investigation of influence of the wavelength of probing optical emission on the conditions of visualization of the flow's phase structures in the energy-technique elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volevatyj, A.A.; Tolkach, A.V.; Bykovskij, Yu.M.

    2002-01-01

    Certain problems of objective visualization of two-phases flows in the energy-technique elements at the investigations by means of photo-, cinema- and video-registration are considered. It is shown an advisability of using of the more long-wave illumination of the medium at the high steam-content values in the flow

  5. Probing the very-high-energy gamma-ray spectral curvature in the blazar PG 1553+113 with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J.L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M.V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Will, M; Zanin, R; D'Ammando, F; Lähteenmäki, A; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Richards, J.L

    2015-01-01

    PG 1553+113 is a very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter classified as a BL Lac object. Its redshift is constrained by intergalactic absorption lines in the range 0.40.2). The observed curvature is compatible with the extragalactic background light (EBL) imprint predicted by the current generation of EBL models assuming a redshift z~0.4. New constraints on the redshift were derived from the VHE spectrum. These constraints are compatible with previous limits and suggest that the source is most likely located around the optical lower limit, z=0.4. Finally, we find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model gives a satisfactory description of the observed multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution during the flare.

  6. Spin transport in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a probe of in-medium spin–orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Jun, E-mail: xujun@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Bao-An [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429-3011 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Shen, Wen-Qing [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The spin up-down splitting of collective flows in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a result of the nuclear spin–orbit interaction is investigated within a spin- and isospin-dependent Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck transport model SIBUU12. Using a Skyrme-type spin–orbit coupling quadratic in momentum, we found that the spin splittings of the directed flow and elliptic flow are largest in peripheral Au+Au collisions at beam energies of about 100–200 MeV/nucleon, and the effect is considerable even in smaller systems especially for nucleons with high transverse momenta. The collective flows of light clusters of different spin states are also investigated using an improved dynamical coalescence model with spin. Our study can be important in understanding the properties of in-medium nuclear spin–orbit interactions once the spin-dependent observables proposed in this work can be measured.

  7. Probing medium-induced energy loss with direct jet reconstruction in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.-S.

    2009-01-01

    We present the application of a new jet reconstruction algorithm that uses a Gaussian filter to locate and reconstruct the jet energy to p+p and heavy ion data from the PHENIX detector. This algorithm is combined with a fake jet rejection scheme that provides efficient jet reconstruction with an acceptable fake rate. We show our first results on the measured jet spectra, and on jet-jet angular correlation in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions.

  8. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  9. Measurement of WW/WZ production in semileptonic decay channels and search for anomalous gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector at 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of the production of two massive vector gauge bosons represent an important test of the Standard Model of particle physics since they probe the structure of the triple gauge boson couplings as well as test of higher-order calculations in quantum chromodynamics. In this talk, a new measurement of the production of WW or WZ boson pairs with one W decaying leptonically and one W or Z decaying hadronically is presented. The cross-section is measured in proton-proton collision data taken with the ATLAS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The hadronic boson decay is reconstructed in two ways: as two resolved small-radius jets, and as a single large-radius jet. The transverse-momentum distribution of the hadronically-decaying boson is used to search for new physics, proving limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  10. Molecular dynamics and MM/GBSA-integrated protocol probing the correlation between biological activities and binding free energies of HIV-1 TAR RNA inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-02-01

    The interaction of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its cognate transactivation response (TAR) RNA has emerged as a promising target for developing antiviral compounds and treating HIV infection, since it is a crucial step for efficient transcription and replication. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/GBSA calculations have been performed on a series of neamine derivatives in order to estimate appropriate MD simulation time for acceptable correlation between ΔG bind and experimental pIC 50 values. Initially, all inhibitors were docked into the active site of HIV-1 TAR RNA. Later to explore various conformations and examine the docking results, MD simulations were carried out. Finally, binding free energies were calculated using MM/GBSA method and were correlated with experimental pIC 50 values at different time scales (0-1 to 0-10 ns). From this study, it is clear that in case of neamine derivatives as simulation time increased the correlation between binding free energy and experimental pIC 50 values increased correspondingly. Therefore, the binding energies which can be interpreted at longer simulation times can be used to predict the bioactivity of new neamine derivatives. Moreover, in this work, we have identified some plausible critical nucleotide interactions with neamine derivatives that are responsible for potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we also provide some insights into a new class of oxadiazole-based back bone cyclic peptides designed by incorporating the structural features of neamine derivatives. On the whole, this approach can provide a valuable guidance for designing new potent inhibitors and modify the existing compounds targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA.

  11. Probing high scale physics with top quarks at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe

    With the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) running at TeV scale, we are expecting to find the deviations from the Standard Model in the experiments, and understanding what is the origin of these deviations. Being the heaviest elementary particle observed so far in the experiments with the mass at the electroweak scale, top quark is a powerful probe for new phenomena of high scale physics at the LHC. Therefore, we concentrate on studying the high scale physics phenomena with top quark pair production or decay at the LHC. In this thesis, we study the discovery potential of string resonances decaying to t/tbar final state, and examine the possibility of observing baryon-number-violating top-quark production or decay, at the LHC. We point out that string resonances for a string scale below 4 TeV can be detected via the t/tbar channel, by reconstructing center-of-mass frame kinematics of the resonances from either the t/tbar semi-leptonic decay or recent techniques of identifying highly boosted tops. For the study of baryon-number-violating processes, by a model independent effective approach and focusing on operators with minimal mass-dimension, we find that corresponding effective coefficients could be directly probed at the LHC already with an integrated luminosity of 1 inverse femtobarns at 7 TeV, and further constrained with 30 (100) inverse femtobarns at 7 (14) TeV.

  12. Probing cycle stability and reversibility in thermochemical energy storage – CaC_2O_4·H_2O as perfect match?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, Christian; Müller, Danny; Artner, Werner; Welch, Jan M.; Werner, Andreas; Harasek, Michael; Weinberger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CaC_2O_4·H_2O dehydration is fully reversible between 25 °C and 200 °C. • Isothermal cycling between hydrate and anhydrate phase can be triggered by the water vapour concentration. • High reaction rates and full reversibility demonstrated over 100 cycles. • Material shows no ageing effects or reactivity decrease. - Abstract: The dehydration and subsequent rehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate has yet to find application in thermochemical energy storage. Unlike for many other salt hydrates, complete reversibility of the dehydration-rehydration reaction was observed. Additionally, it was found that the rehydration temperature is strongly affected by the water vapour concentration: Full reversibility is not only achieved at room-temperature, but, depending on the water vapour concentration, at up to 200 °C. This allows isothermal switching of the material between charging and discharging by a change of the H_2O-partial pressure. Cycle stability of the material was tested by a long-term stress experiment involving 100 charging and discharging cycles. No signs of material fatigue or reactivity loss were found. In-situ powder X-ray diffraction showed complete rehydration of the material within 300 s. The experimental findings indicate that the CaC_2O_4·H_2O/CaC_2O_4 system is perfectly suited for technical application as a thermochemical energy storage medium.

  13. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Object of sciences and technologies, energy plays a major part in economics and relations between nations. Jean-Louis Bobin, physicist, analyses the relations between man and energy and wonders about fears that delivers nowadays technologies bound to nuclear energy and about the fear of a possible shortage of energy resources. (N.C.). 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  15. Lattice Calculation of D- and B-meson Semileptonic Decays, using the Clover Action at beta=6.0 on APE

    CERN Document Server

    Allton, C R; Lubicz, V; Martinelli, G; Rapuano, F; Stella, N; Vladikas, A; Bartoloni, A; Battista, C; Cabasino, S; Cabibbo, Nicola; Panizzi, E; Paolucci, P S; Sarno, R; Todesco, G M; Torelli, M; Vicini, P

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a high statistics lattice calculation of hadronic form factors relevant for $D-$ and $B-$meson semi-leptonic decays into light pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The results have been obtained by averaging over 170 gauge field configurations, generated in the quenched approximation, at $\\beta=6.0$, on a $18^3 \\times 64$ lattice, using the $O(a)$-improved SW-Clover action.From the study of the matrix element $$, we obtain $f_+ (0)=0.78\\pm 0.08$ and from the matrix element $$ we obtain $V(0)=1.08\\pm 0.22$, $A_1(0)=0.67\\pm 0.11$ and $A_2(0)=0.49\\pm 0.34$. We also obtain the ratios $V(0)/A_1(0)=1.6\\pm 0.3$ and $A_2(0)/A_1(0)= 0.7\\pm 0.4$. Our predictions for the different form factors are in good agreement with the experimental data, although, in the case of $A_2(0)$, the errors are still too large to draw any firm conclusion. With the help of the Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we have also extrapolated the lattice results to $B$-meson decays. The form factors follow a behaviour compat...

  16. Identification of electrons from semileptonic b quark decays. Determination of Γsub(banti b)/Γhad at the Z0 resonance with the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollnik, A.

    1992-05-01

    A procedure for the identification of electrons in multihadronic Z 0 decays with the OPAL Detector has been developed. With this method electrons with high momentum and high transverse momentum to the closest jet can be identified in the barrel region (vertical stroke cos vertical stroke 4 GeV/c and p t > 0.8 GeV/c. In a total of 136000 multihadronic Z 0 decays recorded with the OPAL detector in 1990 about 1300 electrons were registered. Using the semileptonic branching ratio Br(b → e) as determined by CLEO at the Υ (4S) resonance, we obtain a value of Γsub(banti b) = 394 ± 13 (stat.) ± 32 (sys.) MeV. The precise knowlegde of the momenta of charged paticles is an important input to most of the OPAL physics analysis. To guarantee a good momentum resolution over a long period of time, calibration and monitoring of the tracking chambers an efficient optical system with two UV-Lasers was installed. In each half of the 24 sectors two parallel beams with a relative distance of 10 mm are provided. The system for the active control of the beam positions and also the method for recording calibration events during regular ε + ε - data taking are described. (orig.) [de

  17. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  18. A computerized Langmuir probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilling, L.S.; Bydder, E.L.; Carnegie, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    For low pressure plasmas it is important to record entire single or double Langmuir probe characteristics accurately. For plasmas with a depleted high energy tail, the accuracy of the recorded ion current plays a critical role in determining the electron temperature. Even for high density Maxwellian distributions, it is necessary to accurately model the ion current to obtain the correct electron density. Since the electron and ion current saturation values are, at best, orders of magnitude apart, a single current sensing resistor cannot provide the required resolution to accurately record these values. We present an automated, personal computer based data acquisition system for the determination of fundamental plasma properties in low pressure plasmas. The system is designed for single and double Langmuir probes, whose characteristics can be recorded over a bias voltage range of ±70 V with 12 bit resolution. The current flowing through the probes can be recorded within the range of 5 nA-100 mA. The use of a transimpedance amplifier for current sensing eliminates the requirement for traditional current sensing resistors and hence the need to correct the raw data. The large current recording range is realized through the use of a real time gain switching system in the negative feedback loop of the transimpedance amplifier

  19. A computerized Langmuir probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, L. S.; Bydder, E. L.; Carnegie, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    For low pressure plasmas it is important to record entire single or double Langmuir probe characteristics accurately. For plasmas with a depleted high energy tail, the accuracy of the recorded ion current plays a critical role in determining the electron temperature. Even for high density Maxwellian distributions, it is necessary to accurately model the ion current to obtain the correct electron density. Since the electron and ion current saturation values are, at best, orders of magnitude apart, a single current sensing resistor cannot provide the required resolution to accurately record these values. We present an automated, personal computer based data acquisition system for the determination of fundamental plasma properties in low pressure plasmas. The system is designed for single and double Langmuir probes, whose characteristics can be recorded over a bias voltage range of ±70 V with 12 bit resolution. The current flowing through the probes can be recorded within the range of 5 nA-100 mA. The use of a transimpedance amplifier for current sensing eliminates the requirement for traditional current sensing resistors and hence the need to correct the raw data. The large current recording range is realized through the use of a real time gain switching system in the negative feedback loop of the transimpedance amplifier.

  20. Active Probing of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    ft. shuttle wake mlay also a kect the optration (if mi’:nc di.tg. Ibk Prwwattr of ,frttirw 844 I. %rvaom ’itbi h" $od iy radlet 6�va of IkeA dtm t...probe had a specially designed inner shaft caused by the existence of some ballistic electrons after made with .pring sleel tubing. By externally...potential to the electron thermal energy i(s distances downstream of the body (see Fig. 1). This (e OIT,) was on the order of 10 in steady state. design

  1. Gold Nanoclusters@Ru(bpy)₃²⁺-Layered Double Hydroxide Ultrathin Film as a Cathodic Electrochemiluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingchang; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Meining

    2015-08-04

    Herein, it is the first report that a cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) resonance energy transfer (ERET) system is fabricated by layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic assembly of CoAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets with a mixture of blue BSA-gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and Ru(bpy)3(2+) (denoted as AuNCs@Ru) on an Au electrode. The possible ECL mechanism indicates that the appearance of CoAl-LDH nanosheets generates a long-range stacking order of the AuNCs@Ru on an Au electrode, facilitating the occurrence of the ERET between BSA-AuNC donors and Ru(bpy)3(2+) acceptors on the as-prepared AuNCs@Ru-LDH ultrathin films (UTFs). Furthermore, it is observed that the cathodic ECL intensity can be quenched efficiently in the presence of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in a linear range of 2.5-100 nM with a detection limit of 1.0 nM. On the basis of these interesting phenomena, a facile cathodic ECL sensor has successfully distinguished 6-MP from other thiol-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine and glutathione) in human serum and urine samples. The proposed sensing scheme opens a way for employing the layered UTFs as a platform for the cathodic ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+).

  2. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  3. Influence of unharmonic changes of plasma potential on the Langmuir probe characteristics for a grounded probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surda, V.

    1990-01-01

    A theory is presented of the deformation of Langmuir probe characteristics by the presence of a.c. plasma potential oscillations at the space charge layer around the probe, making allowance for the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic. It is applicable particularly to the determination of the electron temperature in actual high-frequency discharges with a Maxwellian electron energy distribution. The effect of an a.c. signal on the ion current is also treated. (author). 8 figs., 14 refs

  4. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  5. Interferometric probes of ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, S.S. (Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Gyulassy, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1991-04-01

    We suggest that pion and kaon interferometry are complementary probes that help differentiate hadronic resonance gas from plasma dynamical models. We also discuss how interferometry could be used to test the presence of resonances at AGS energies. Finally, we study the A dependence of interferometry in the resonance model at 200 A GeV. (orig.).

  6. Interferometric probes of ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.; Gyulassy, M.

    1991-01-01

    We suggest that pion and kaon interferometry are complementary probes that help differentiate hadronic resonance gas from plasma dynamical models. We also discuss how interferometry could be used to test the presence of resonances at AGS energies. Finally, we study the A dependence of interferometry in the resonance model at 200 A GeV. (orig.)

  7. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  8. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    On the occasion of the World Environment Day the Norwegian Ministry for the Environment held a conference on growth problems in energy consumption. The themes which were treated were energy conservation, hydroelectric power, the role of nuclear power, radioactive waste disposal, fossil fuel resources, ecological limits, pollution and international aspects. Nuclear energy forms the main theme of one lecture and an aspect of several others. (JIW)

  9. Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Torriti, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energy policy measures has been assessed with various appraisal and evaluation tools since the 1960s. Decision analysis, environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment are all notable examples of progenitors of Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) in the assessment of energy policies, programmes and projects. This chapter provides overview of policy tools which have been historically applied to assess the impacts of energy policies, programmes and projects....

  10. Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  11. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  12. Theory of NMR probe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnall, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The NMR probe is the intrinsic part of the NMR system which allows transmission of a stimulus to a sample and the reception of a resulting signal from a sample. NMR probes are used in both imaging and spectroscopy. Optimal probe design is important to the production of adequate signal/moise. It is important for anyone using NMR techniques to understand how NMR probes work and how to optimize probe design

  13. Measurement of the semileptonic charge asymmetry in B.sup.0./sup. meson mixing with the D0 detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 7 (2012), "072009-1"-"072009-21" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047; GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 * detector * asymmetry * mesons Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.072009

  14. Preliminary Physics Summary: Measurements of low-$p_{\\rm T}$ electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    The transverse-momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) differential production cross section of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavour hadron decays has been measured in the interval $0.5 < p_{\\rm T} < 4.0$ GeV/$c$ at mid-rapidity ($|y| < 0.8$) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with ALICE at the LHC. Statistical and systematic uncertainties have been reduced by a factor of about three with respect to previously published results. Predictions from a fixed order perturbative QCD calculation with next-to-leading-log resummation describe the data within theoretical and experimental uncertainties.

  15. Probes for edge plasma studies of TFTR (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manos, D.M.; Budny, R.V.; Kilpatrick, S.; Stangeby, P.; Zweben, S.

    1986-01-01

    Tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) probes are designed to study the interaction of the plasma with material surfaces such as the wall and limiters, and to study the transport of particles and energy between the core and edge. Present probe heads have evolved from prototypes in Princeton large torus (PLT), poloidal divertor experiment (PDX) [Princeton BETA experiment (PBX)], and the initial phase of TFTR operation. The newest heads are capable of making several simultaneous measurements and include Langmuir probes, heat flux probes, magnetic coils, rotating calorimeter fast ion probes, and sample exposure specimens. This paper describes these probe heads and presents some of the data they and their prototypes have acquired. The paper emphasizes measurement of transient plasma effects such as fast ion loss during auxiliary heating, the evolution of the edge plasma during heating, compression, and free expansion, and fluctuations in the edge plasma

  16. Reactive probing of macroscopically quantum mechanical SQUID rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prance, R.J.; Clark, T.D.; Whiteman, R.; Diggins, J.; Ralph, J.F.; Prance, H.; Spiller, T.P.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the energy level structure of ultra small capacitance SQUID rings can be probed adiabatically at radio frequency using both dynamical and quasistatic reactive techniques. ((orig.))

  17. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  18. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  19. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General ... Author Affiliations. Ashok Ambastha1. Joint In-Charge Udaipur Solar Observatory Physical Research laboratory P.O. Box No. 198 Udaipur 313 001, India ...

  20. Flexible position probe assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The combination of a plurality of tubular transducer sections and a flexible supporting member extending through the tubular transducer sections forms a flexible elongated probe of a design suitable for monitoring the level of an element, such as a nuclear magnetically permeable control rod or liquid. 3 claims, 23 figures

  1. Some aspects of hadron-hadron collisions in high energy interactions (B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing oscillations in semileptonic decay at D0 experiment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we report the study on one such particle called the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson made up of a bottom and a strange quark. B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are currently produced in a great numbers only at the Tevatron and we report a study done to measure the mixing parameter Δms between the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson and its anti-particle $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$. Mixing is the ability of a very few neutral mesons to change from their particle to their antiparticle and vice versa. Until recently there existed only a lower limit on this measurement, here we report an upper bound and a most probable value for the mixing parameter. In the following chapter, we discuss the theoretical motivation behind this study. The measurement technique and the different factors that effect the measurement are also given. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the experimental setup needed to perform the study. In Chapter 4, we present a new initial state flavor tagging algorithm using electrons and measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing parameter Δmd with the new technique. Details of the combined initial state tagging used in the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing study are also given. A detailed description of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the results are covered in Chapter 5. And finally the results from all the three channels and a bound on the mixing parameter are presented in Chapter 6.

  2. The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanany, Shaul; Inflation Probe Mission Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins will map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background over the entire sky with unprecedented sensitivity. It will search for gravity wave signals from the inflationary epoch, thus probing quantum gravity and constraining the energy scale of inflation; it will test the standard model of particle physics by measuring the number of light particles in the Universe and the mass of the neutrino; it will elucidate the nature of dark matter and search for new forms of matter in the early Universe; it will constrain star formation history over cosmic time; and it will determine the mechanisms of structure formation from galaxy cluster to stellar scales. I will review the status of design of this probe-scale mission.

  3. Single-particle characterization of summertime Antarctic aerosols collected at King George Island using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskey, Shila; Geng, Hong; Song, Young-Chul; Hwang, Heejin; Yoon, Young-Jun; Ahn, Kang-Ho; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-08-01

    Single-particle characterization of Antarctic aerosols was performed to investigate the impact of marine biogenic sulfur species on the chemical compositions of sea-salt aerosols in the polar atmosphere. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis was used to characterize 2900 individual particles in 10 sets of aerosol samples collected between March 12 and 16, 2009 at King Sejong Station, a Korean scientific research station located at King George Island in the Antarctic. Two size modes of particles, i.e., PM(2.5-10) and PM(1.0-2.5), were analyzed, and four types of particles were identified, with sulfur-containing sea-salt particles being the most abundant, followed by genuine sea-salt particles without sulfur species, iron-containing particles, and other species including CaCO(3)/CaMg(CO(3))(2), organic carbon, and aluminosilicates. When a sulfur-containing sea-salt particle showed an atomic concentration ratio of sulfur to sodium of >0.083 (seawater ratio), it is regarded as containing nonsea-salt sulfate (nss-SO(4)(2-)) and/or methanesulfonate (CH(3)SO(3)(-)), which was supported by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared imaging measurements. These internal mixture particles of sea-salt/CH(3)SO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-) were very frequently encountered. As nitrate-containing particles were not encountered, and the air-masses for all of the samples originated from the Pacific Ocean (based on 5-day backward trajectories), the oxidation of dimethylsulfide (DMS) emitted from phytoplanktons in the ocean is most likely to be responsible for the formation of the mixed sea-salt/CH(3)SO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-) particles.

  4. Optimal observable analysis for the decay b → s plus missing energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcuttawala, Zaineb; Kundu, Anirban [University of Calcutta, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India); Nandi, Soumitra; Patra, Sunando Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Guwahati (India)

    2017-09-15

    The decay b → sν anti ν has received comparatively less attention than the semileptonic decay b → sl{sup +}l{sup -}, because neutrinos pass undetected and hence the process offers lesser number of observables. We show how the decay b → s + invisible(s) can shed light, even with a limited number of observables, on possible new physics beyond the Standard Model and also show, quantitatively, the reach of future B factories like SuperBelle to uncover such new physics. Depending on the operator structure of new physics, different channels may act as the best possible probe. We show, using the optimal observable technique, how almost the entire parameter space allowed till now can successfully be probed at a high-luminosity B factory. (orig.)

  5. Versatile Gaussian probes for squeezing estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigovacca, Luca; Farace, Alessandro; Souza, Leonardo A. M.; De Pasquale, Antonella; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Adesso, Gerardo

    2017-05-01

    We consider an instance of "black-box" quantum metrology in the Gaussian framework, where we aim to estimate the amount of squeezing applied on an input probe, without previous knowledge on the phase of the applied squeezing. By taking the quantum Fisher information (QFI) as the figure of merit, we evaluate its average and variance with respect to this phase in order to identify probe states that yield good precision for many different squeezing directions. We first consider the case of single-mode Gaussian probes with the same energy, and find that pure squeezed states maximize the average quantum Fisher information (AvQFI) at the cost of a performance that oscillates strongly as the squeezing direction is changed. Although the variance can be brought to zero by correlating the probing system with a reference mode, the maximum AvQFI cannot be increased in the same way. A different scenario opens if one takes into account the effects of photon losses: coherent states represent the optimal single-mode choice when losses exceed a certain threshold and, moreover, correlated probes can now yield larger AvQFI values than all single-mode states, on top of having zero variance.

  6. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  7. Millimeter-wave active probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza; Bloom, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  8. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  9. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  10. Plutonium helps probe protein, superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists are finding that plutonium can be a useful research tool that may help them answer important questions in fields as diverse as biochemistry and solid-state physics. This paper reports that U.S. research involving plutonium is confined to the Department of Energy's national laboratories and centers around nuclear weapons technology, waste cleanup and disposal, and health effects. But at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists also are using plutonium to probe the biochemical behavior of calmodulin, a key calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium-regulated processes in biological systems. At Argonne National Laboratory, another team is trying to learn how a superconductor's properties are affected by the 5f electrons of an actinide like plutonium

  11. First measurement of the B$0\\atop{2}$ semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited d$**\\atop{s}$ state, Br(B$0\\atop{2}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Jason [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2007-12-08

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536)has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.5(syst) MeV/c2 via the decay mode B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX followed by D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536) → DK$0\\atop{S}$. By normalizing to the known branching ratio Br($\\bar{b}$ → D*- μ+vX) and to the number of reconstructed D* mesons with an associated identified muon, a first-ever measurement is made of the product branching ratio ($\\bar{b}$ →} D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) • Br(D$-\\atop{s1}$ → D*-K$0\\atop{S}$). Assuming that D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B$0\\atop{s}$, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) is made. Comparisons are made with theoretical expectations.

  12. Observation of $B^0_s$-$\\bar{B}^0_s$ mixing and measurement of mixing frequencies using semileptonic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Andrianala, F; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vervink, K; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-12-04

    The $B^0_s$ and $B^0$ mixing frequencies, $\\Delta m_s$ and $\\Delta m_d$, are measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV during 2011. Around 1.8x10$^{6}$ candidate events are selected of the type $B^0_{(s)} \\to D^-_{(s)} \\mu^+$(+anything), where about half are from peaking and combinatorial backgrounds. To determine the $B$ decay times, a correction is required for the momentum carried by missing particles, which is performed using a simulation-based statistical method. Associated production of muons or mesons allows us to tag the initial-state flavour and so to resolve oscillations due to mixing. We obtain \\begin{align} &\\Delta m_s = ( 17.93 \\pm 0.22\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.15\\,\\textrm{(syst)}) \\,\\textrm{ps}^{-1} \

  13. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  14. Measurement of the boosted WW+WZ production cross section in the semileptonic decay channel with ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spettel, Fabian M.

    2017-02-01

    This thesis presents the first measurement of the combined WW+WZ production cross section in the boosted regime with one W boson decaying via the electron or muon channel and the remaining W or Z boson decaying to hadrons. The event selection targets events where the hadronic decay products are highly collimated as a result of a large transverse momentum of the decaying boson. The data that were used consist of the entire dataset of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during the 2012 data taking period. The integrated luminosity of this dataset corresponds to 20.3 fb{sup -1}. The main background processes to the WW+WZ signal are W+jets, Z+jets, top quarks and QCD multijet production. The latter is estimated using a dedicated data-driven technique while the other backgrounds are modeled by Monte Carlo simulation. In total 383 signal events are observed in data with an overall estimated background of 12452 events. The corresponding measured fiducial cross section yields: σ{sup meas}{sub fid}(WW+WZ)=(31.7±10.4(stat.)±22.1(syst.)) fb. This result is compatible within the errors with the Standard Model next-to-leading-order prediction of σ{sup SM}{sub WW+WZ}=(57.7±2.9) fb. The observed transverse momentum spectrum of the hadronically decaying boson is used to search for new physics via anomalous triple gauge boson couplings at WWZ and WWγ vertices. The observations are consistent with the Standard Model and confidence intervals are calculated for the parameters describing the anomalous couplings.

  15. B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K semileptonic decay from an Omnès improved constituent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertus, C. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Nuclear y Molecular e Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Avenida de Fuentenueva s/n, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Hernández, E. [Departamento de Física Fundamental e IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Hidalgo-Duque, C.; Nieves, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-11-10

    We study the f{sup +} form factor for the semileptonic B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K{sup +}ℓ{sup −}ν{sup ¯}{sub ℓ} decay in a constituent quark model. The valence quark estimate is supplemented with the contribution from the B{sup ¯⁎} pole that dominates the high q{sup 2} region. We use a multiply-subtracted Omnès dispersion relation to extend the quark model predictions from its region of applicability near q{sub max}{sup 2}=(M{sub B{sub s}}−M{sub K}){sup 2}∼23.75 GeV{sup 2} to all q{sup 2} values accessible in the physical decay. To better constrain the dependence of f{sup +} on q{sup 2}, we fit the subtraction constants to a combined input from previous light cone sum rule by Duplancic and Melic (2008) [11] and the present quark model results. From this analysis, we obtain Γ(B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K{sup +}ℓ{sup −}ν{sup ¯}{sub ℓ})=(5.47{sub −0.46}{sup +0.54})|V{sub ub}|{sup 2}×10{sup −9} MeV, which is about 10% and 20% higher than the predictions based on Lattice QCD and QCD light cone sum rules respectively. The former predictions, for both the form factor f{sup +}(q{sup 2}) and the differential decay width, lie within the 1σ band of our estimated uncertainties for all q{sup 2} values accessible in the physical decay, except for a quite small region very close to q{sub max}{sup 2}. Differences with the light cone sum results for the form factor f{sup +} are larger than 20% in the region above q{sup 2}=15 GeV{sup 2}.

  16. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  17. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  18. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative ele