WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy sciences department

  1. Department of Energy - Office of Science Early Career Research Program

    Horwitz, James

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Early Career Program began in FY 2010. The program objectives are to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the disciplines supported by the DOE Office of Science. Both university and DOE national laboratory early career scientists are eligible. Applicants must be within 10 years of receiving their PhD. For universities, the PI must be an untenured Assistant Professor or Associate Professor on the tenure track. DOE laboratory applicants must be full time, non-postdoctoral employee. University awards are at least 150,000 per year for 5 years for summer salary and expenses. DOE laboratory awards are at least 500,000 per year for 5 years for full annual salary and expenses. The Program is managed by the Office of the Deputy Director for Science Programs and supports research in the following Offices: Advanced Scientific and Computing Research, Biological and Environmental Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. A new Funding Opportunity Announcement is issued each year with detailed description on the topical areas encouraged for early career proposals. Preproposals are required. This talk will introduce the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research program and describe opportunities for research relevant to the condensed matter physics community. http://science.energy.gov/early-career/

  2. Energy secretary Spencer Abraham announces department of energy 20-year science facility plan

    2003-01-01

    "In a speech at the National Press Club today, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham outlined the Department of Energy's Office of Science 20-year science facility plan, a roadmap for future scientific facilities to support the department's basic science and research missions. The plan prioritizes new, major scientific facilities and upgrades to current facilities" (1 page).

  3. Science education programs and plans of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Stephens, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy has historically sponsored a range of university-level science education activities including summer and semester-length research appointments at DOE National Laboratories for university faculty, undergraduate and graduate students. The Department's involvement in precollege science education has significantly expanded over the past year. This talk will summarize the status of the Department's plans for university and precollege science education initiatives developed at the Berkeley Math/Science Education Action Conference held last October at the Lawrence Hall of Science and co-chaired by Dr. Glenn Seaborg and the Secretary of Energy, Admiral James Watkins

  4. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOIL AND GROUNDWATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY NEEDS, PLANS AND INITIATIVES

    Aylward, B; V. ADAMS, V; G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, G; T. L. STEWART, T

    2007-12-12

    This paper presents the process used by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program to collect and prioritize DOE soil and groundwater site science and technology needs, develop and document strategic plans within the EM Engineering and Technology Roadmap, and establish specific program and project initiatives for inclusion in the EM Multi-Year Program Plan. The paper also presents brief summaries of the goals and objectives for the established soil and groundwater initiatives.

  5. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  6. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  7. Strengthening Science Departments

    Campbell, Todd; Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Teachers do not work in a vacuum. They are, in most cases, part of a science department in which teachers and the chairperson have important roles in science education reform. Current reform is shaped by national standards documents that emphasize the pedagogical and conceptual importance of best practices framed by constructivism and focused on…

  8. Department of Energy's Virtual Lab Infrastructure for Integrated Earth System Science Data

    Williams, D. N.; Palanisamy, G.; Shipman, G.; Boden, T.; Voyles, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) produces a diversity of data, information, software, and model codes across its research and informatics programs and facilities. This information includes raw and reduced observational and instrumentation data, model codes, model-generated results, and integrated data products. Currently, most of this data and information are prepared and shared for program specific activities, corresponding to CESD organization research. A major challenge facing BER CESD is how best to inventory, integrate, and deliver these vast and diverse resources for the purpose of accelerating Earth system science research. This talk provides a concept for a CESD Integrated Data Ecosystem and an initial roadmap for its implementation to address this integration challenge in the "Big Data" domain. Towards this end, a new BER Virtual Laboratory Infrastructure will be presented, which will include services and software connecting the heterogeneous CESD data holdings, and constructed with open source software based on industry standards, protocols, and state-of-the-art technology.

  9. Department of energy technology

    1983-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. List of staff, publications and computer programs are included. (author)

  10. Department of Nuclear Energy

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The activities of Department was engaged in the selected topics in nuclear fission reactor science and engineering. Present and future industry competitiveness, economic prosperity and living standards within the world are strongly dependent on maintaining the availability of energy at reasonable prices and with security of supply. Also, protection of man and the environment from the harmful effects of all uses of energy is an important element of the quality of life especially in Europe. It is unrealistic to assume that the technology for renewable (hydro, wind, solar and biomass) available within a 20-30 year perspective could provide the production capacity to replace present use of nuclear power and at the same time substantially reduce the use of fossil fuels, especially when considering that energy demand in industrialized countries can be expected to continue to increase even within a framework of overall energy conservation and continued improvement of efficiency in energy usage. In the area of nuclear fission, we continue support to maintain and develop the competence needed to ensure the safety of existing and future reactors and other nuclear installations. In addition support is given to explore the potential for improving present fission technology from a sustainable development point of view. The focus on advanced modelling of improved reactor and fuel cycle concepts, including supporting experimental research, with a view to improving the utilisation of the inherent energy content of uranium and other nuclear fuels, whilst at the same time reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste produced. A common scientific understanding of the frequently used concept of ''reasonable assurance of safety'' for the long-term, post-closure phase of repositories for spent fuel and high-level waste developed in order to ensure reasonably equivalent legal interpretations in environmental impact assessment and licensing procedures. Also, research is

  11. 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Strength through Science Powering the 21st Century

    None,

    2000-09-01

    The Department of Energy conducts programs relating to energy resources, national nuclear security, environmental quality, and science. In each of these areas, the US is facing significant challenges. Our economic well-being depends on the continuing availability of reliable and affordable supplies of clean energy. Our Nation's security is threatened by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Our environment is under threat from the demands a more populated planet and the legacies of 20th-century activities. Science and the technology derived from it offer the promise to improve the Nation's health and well-being and broadly expand human knowledge. In conducting its programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) employs unique scientific and technical assets, including 30,000 scientists, engineers, and other technical staff, in a complex of outstanding national laboratories that have a capital value of over $45 billion. Through its multidisciplinary research and development activities and its formidable assemblage of scientific and engineering talent, DOE focuses its efforts on four programmatic business lines: (1) Energy Resources--promoting the development and deployment of systems and practices that provide energy that is clean, efficient, reasonably priced, and reliable. (2) National Nuclear Security--enhancing national security through military application of nuclear technology and by reducing global danger from the potential spread of weapons of mass destruction. (3) Environmental Quality--cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons and nuclear research activities, safely managing nuclear materials, and disposing of radioactive wastes. (4) Science--advancing science and scientific tools to provide the foundation for DOE's applied missions and to provide remarkable insights into our physical and biological world. In support of the above four business lines, DOE provides management services to ensure that the technical programs can run efficiently. Our

  12. Department of Physical Sciences

    USER

    2017-05-05

    May 5, 2017 ... ... of Physical Sciences, The Open University of Tanzania, P. O. Box ... bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the food chain. This research deals with human health risk assessment of metal contamination through the .... poisoning is untreatable (Faller, 2009). ... probability of adverse health effects in.

  13. Department of Energy: some aspects of basic research in the chemical sciences

    1979-01-01

    The basic research needs pertinent to DOE's specific mission are identified in the fields of combustion science, coal chemistry, reprocessing of reactor fuel and the disposal of radioactive waste, and analytical chemistry. Aspects of these fields which do not need DOE support are also identified in some cases. In addition recommendations are made on review procedures and funding, use of DOE laboratories by university and other extramural chemists, isotope availability, and critically evaluated data

  14. Technical progress report to the Department of Energy on the Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC)

    1995-01-01

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WNM)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also have been developed for studies on neutron scattering science, on ultrasmall devices, and on molecular routes to materials

  15. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    None

    2010-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM RESEARCH PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISIONING OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES

    Phillips, Ann Marie

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes fourteen basic science projects aimed at solving decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Funded by the Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP), these research projects address D and D problems where basic science is needed to expand knowledge and develop solutions to help DOE meet its cleanup milestones. EMSP uses directed solicitations targeted at identified Environmental Management (EM) needs to ensure that research results are directly applicable to DOE's EM problems. The program then helps transition the projects from basic to applied research by identifying end-users and coordinating proof-of-principle field tests. EMSP recently funded fourteen D and D research projects through the directed solicitation process. These research projects will be discussed, including description, current status, and potential impact. Through targeted research and proof-of-principle tests, it is hoped that EMSP's fourteen D and D basic research projects will directly impact and provide solutions to DOE's D and D problems

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM RESEARCH PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISIONING OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES

    Phillips, Ann Marie

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes fourteen basic science projects aimed at solving decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Funded by the Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP), these research projects address D&D problems where basic science is needed to expand knowledge and develop solutions to help DOE meet its cleanup milestones. EMSP uses directed solicitations targeted at identified Environmental Management (EM) needs to ensure that research results are directly applicable to DOE's EM problems. The program then helps transition the projects from basic to applied research by identifying end-users and coordinating proof-of-principle field tests. EMSP recently funded fourteen D&D research projects through the directed solicitation process. These research projects will be discussed, including description, current status, and potential impact. Through targeted research and proof-of-principle tests, it is hoped that EMSP's fourteen D&D basic research projects will directly impact and provide solutions to DOE's D&D problems.

  18. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    None

    2009-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology

  19. Final Report to the Department of the Energy for Project Entitled Rare Isotope Science Assessment Committee

    Shapero, Donald; Meyer, Timothy I.

    2007-01-01

    The Rare Isotope Science Assessment Committee (RISAC) was convened by the National Research Council in response to an informal request from the DOE's Office of Nuclear Physics and the White House Office of Management and Budget. The charge to the committee is to examine and assess the broader scientific and international contexts of a U.S.-based rare-isotope facility. The committee met for the first time on December 16-17, 2005, in Washington, DC, and held three subsequent meetings. The committee's's final report was publicly released in unedited, prepublication form on Friday, December 8, 2006. The report was published in full-color by the National Academies Press in April 2007. Copies of the report were distributed to key decision makers and stakeholders around the world.

  20. Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2006

    Edwards, A.; Majewski, S.; Woods, M.

    2006-01-01

    The BaBar drift chamber (DCH) is used to measure the properties of charged particles created from e + e - collisions in the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings by making precise measurements of position, momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx). In October of 2005, the PEP-II storage rings operated with a luminosity of 10 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 ; the goal for 2007 is a luminosity of 20 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , which will increase the readout dead time, causing uncertainty in drift chamber measurements to become more significant in physics results. The research described in this paper aims to reduce position and dE/dx uncertainties by improving our understanding of the BaBar drift chamber performance. A simulation program --called garfield--is used to model the behavior of the drift chamber with adjustable parameters such as gas mixture, wire diameter, voltage, and magnetic field. By exploring the simulation options offered in garfield, we successfully produced a simulation model of the BaBar drift chamber. We compared the time-to-distance calibration from BaBar to that calculated by garfield to validate our model as well as check for discrepancies between the simulated and calibrated time-to-distance functions, and found that for a 0 o entrance angle there is a very good match between calibrations, but at an entrance angle of 90 o the calibration breaks down. Using this model, we also systematically varied the gas mixture to find one that would optimize chamber operation, which showed that the gas mixture of 80:20 Helium:isobutane is a good operating point, though more calculations need to be done to confirm that it is the optimal mixture

  1. Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Sciences Network is the Department of Energy’s high-speed network that provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at national...

  2. U.S. Department of Energy physical protection upgrades at the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center, Latvia

    Haase, M.; Hine, C.; Robertson, C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately five years ago, the Safe, Secure Dismantlement program was started between the US and countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials. This would be accomplished by strengthening the material protection, control, and accounting systems within the FSU countries. Under the US Department of Energy''s program of providing cooperative assistance to the FSU countries in the areas of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A), the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center (LNRC) near Riga, Latvia, was identified as a candidate site for a cooperative MPC and A project. The LNRC is the site of a 5-megawatt IRT-C pool-type research reactor. This paper describes: the process involved, from initial contracting to project completion, for the physical protection upgrades now in place at the LNRC; the intervening activities; and a brief overview of the technical aspects of the upgrades

  3. Department of Energy multiprogram laboratories

    1982-09-01

    The Panel recommends the following major roles and missions for the laboratories: perform the Department's national trust fundamental research missions in the physical sciences, including high energy and nuclear physics, and the radiobiological sciences including nuclear medicine; sustain scientific staff core capabilities and specialized research facilities for laboratory research purposes and for use by other Federal agencies and the private sector; perform independent scientific and technical assessment or verification studies required by the Department; and perform generic research and development where it is judged to be in the public interest or where for economic or technical reasons industry does not choose to support it. Organizational efficiencies if implemented by the Department could contribute toward optimal performance of the laboratories. The Panel recommends that a high level official, such as a Deputy Under Secretary, be appointed to serve as Chief Laboratory Executive with authority to help determine and defend the research and development budget, to allocate resources, to decide where work is to be done, and to assess periodically laboratory performance. Laboratory directors should be given substantially more flexibility to deploy resources and to initiate or adapt programs within broad guidelines provided by the Department. The panel recommends the following actions to increase the usefulness of the laboratories and to promote technology transfer to the private sector: establish user groups for all major mission programs and facilities to ensure greater relevance for Department and laboratory efforts; allow the laboratories to do more reimbursable work for others (other Federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry) by relaxing constraints on such work; implement vigorously the recently liberalized patent policy; permit and encourage joint ventures with industry

  4. A report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee: 1992 review of the Basic Energy Sciences Program of the Department of Energy

    1993-09-01

    The general quality of BES research at each of the 4 laboratories is high. Diversity of management at the different laboratories is beneficial as long as the primary BES mission and goals are clearly identified and effectively pursued. External sources of personnel should be encouraged. DOE has been designing a new high flux research reactor, the Advanced Neutron Source, to replace DOE's two aging research reactors; BESAC conducted a panel evaluation of neutron sources for the future. The two new light sources, Advanced Light Source and Advanced Photon source will come on line well before all of their beamline instrumentation can be funded, developed, and installed. Appointment of a permanent director and deputy for OBES would enhance OBES effectiveness in budget planning and intra-DOE program coordination. Some DOE and DP laboratories have substantial infrastructure which match well industry development-applications needs; interlaboratory partnerships in this area are encouraged. Funding for basic science research programs should be maintained at FY1993 levels, adjusted for inflation; OBES plans should be updated and monitored to maintain the balance between basic research and facilities construction and operation. The recommendations are discussed in detail in this document

  5. Molecular Energy and Environmental Science: A Workshop Sponsored by The National Science Foundation and The Department of Energy May 26-27, 1999 in Rosemont, Illinois

    Stair, Peter C [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); DeSimone, Joseph M. [University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Frost, John W. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1999-05-26

    Energy and the environment pose major scientific and technological challenges for the 21st century. New technologies for increasing the efficiency of harvesting and utilizing energy resources are essential to the nation’s economic competitiveness. At the same time, the quality of life in the United States depends inherently on the environmental impact of energy production and utilization. This interdependence makes it imperative to develop a better understanding of the environment and new strategies for minimizing the impact of energy-related activities. Recent advances in techniques for the synthesis and characterization of chemicals and materials and for the molecular control of biological organisms make it possible, for the first time, to address this imperative. Chemistry, with its focus on the molecular level, plays a central role in addressing the needs for fundamental understanding and technology development in both the energy and environmental fields. Understanding environmental processes and consequences requires studying natural systems, rather than focussing exclusively on laboratory models. Natural systems and their complexity pose an enormous, perhaps the ultimate, challenge to chemists, and will provide them with varied and exciting new problems for years to come. In addition, the complexity of the underlying systems and processes often requires multi-disciplinary programs that bridge the interfaces between chemistry and other disciplines. (See Figure 1) This has ramifications in the approach to funding research and suggests needs for broadening the educational training of future scientists and engineers in these programs. Figure 1. NSF and DOE should consider sponsoring research centers and focused research groups organized to optimize their impact on Technological Challenges of national interest. The research will have significant impact if it addresses issues of fundamental molecular science in one or more Enabling Research Areas. Approximately 7

  6. Energy payback and CO2 gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES)

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research Strategic Data Roadmap for Earth System Science

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Palanisamy, Giri [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boden, Thomas A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Voyles, Jimmy W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-04-25

    Rapid advances in experimental, sensor, and computational technologies and techniques are driving exponential growth in the volume, acquisition rate, variety, and complexity of scientific data. This wealth of scientifically meaningful data has tremendous potential to lead to scientific discovery. However, to achieve scientific breakthroughs, these data must be exploitable—they must be analyzed effectively and efficiently and the results shared and communicated easily within the wider Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) community. The explosion in data complexity and scale makes these tasks exceedingly difficult to achieve, particularly given that an increasing number of disciplines are working across techniques, integrating simulation and experimental or observational results (see Table 5 in Appendix 2). Consequently, we need new approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization that provide research teams with easy-to-use and scalable end-to-end solutions. These solutions must facilitate (and where feasible, automate and capture) every stage in the data lifecycle (shown in Figure 1), from collection to management, annotation, sharing, discovery, analysis, and visualization. In addition, the core functionalities are the same across climate science communities, but they require customization to adapt to specific needs and fit into research and analysis workflows. To this end, the mission of CESD’s Data and Informatics Program is to integrate all existing and future distributed CESD data holdings into a seamless and unified environment for the acceleration of Earth system science.

  9. 14th September 2011 - US Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    2011-01-01

    CERN-HI-1109234 48, from left to right: ALICE Collaboration USA National Coordination J. Harris, ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin, Adviser for the US R. Voss, Special Assistant to Under Secretary for Science C. Lin, CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson and Spokesperson elect 2012-2013 J. Incandela and LHC Collaboration S. Stone.During his tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall he saw one of the superconducting inner-triplet magnets contributed by Fermilab to the LHC. His visit also included the CMS, ATLAS and ALICE experiments as well as the CERN Control Centre.

  10. Decadal Assessment and Outlook Report on Atomic Molecular and Optical Science. Final Progress Report to the Department of Energy

    Donald Shapero; Michael Moloney

    2006-01-01

    The committee was charged to produce a comprehensive report on the status of AMO Science. The committee was charged to produce a report that: 1. Reviewed the field of AMO science, emphasize recent accomplishments, and identify new opportunities and compelling scientific questions; 2. Identified the impact of AMO science on other scientific fields, emerging technologies, and national needs; 3. Identified future workforce, societal and educational needs for AMO science; and 4. Made recommendations on how the US research enterprise might realize the full potential of AMO science. The committee also produced an intermediate report addressing key research issues and themes facing the research community

  11. Aerial radiological survey of the United States Department of Energy's Battelle Nuclear Science Facility, West Jefferson, Ohio, date of survey: May 1977

    Feimster, E.L.

    1979-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the United States Department of Energy's Battelle Nuclear Science Facility located in West Jefferson, Ohio. Gamma ray data were collected over a 5.5 km 2 area centered on the facility by flying east-west lines spaced 61 m apart. Processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was primarily due to radionuclides currently being processed due to the hot lab operations. Off-site data showed the radioactivity to be due to naturally occurring background radiation consistent with variations due to geologic base terrain and land use of similar areas

  12. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

  13. Fission energy program of the U. S. Department of Energy

    1978-06-01

    The document describes programs managed by the Program Director for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, and under the cognizance of the Committee on Science and Technology, United States House of Representatives. The major portion of the document is concerned with civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977, but it also includes descriptions of the space applications and naval reactor programs.

  14. A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission.

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Simmons, Jerry Alvon; McIlroy, Andrew; Vook, Frederick L.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

    2011-08-01

    In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated by that Office. In comparison with Sandia's programs in technology and mission applications, however, Sandia's programs in fundamental science are small. Hence, Sandia's fundamental science has been strongly influenced by close interactions with technology and mission applications. In many instances, these interactions have been of great mutual benefit, with synergies akin to a positive 'Casimir's spiral' of progress. In this report, we review the history of Sandia's fundamental science programs supported by the Office of Science. We present: (a) a technical and budgetary snapshot of Sandia's current programs supported by the various suboffices within DOE-SC; (b) statistics of highly-cited articles supported by DOE-SC; (c) four case studies (ion-solid interactions, combustion science, compound semiconductors, advanced computing) with an emphasis on mutually beneficial interactions between science, technology, and mission; and (d) appendices with key memos and reminiscences related to fundamental science at Sandia.

  15. High Energy Physics Departments - Overview

    Bartke, J.

    1999-01-01

    Following the tradition, the activities of the seven new units created in 1997 on the basis of the former Department of High Energy Physics are presented under a common header, they are: Department of Particle Theory (Dept 5); Department of Leptonic Interactions (Dept 11); Department of Hadron Structure (Dept 12); Department of High Energy Nuclear Interactions (Dept 13); The ALICE Experiment Laboratory (NAL); The ATLAS Experiment Laboratory (NAT); High Energy Physics Detector Construction Group (PBD). The research covers a variety of problems of the experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics: the hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (characteristics of particle production, including heavy quark physics), e + e - interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as the spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles. Research on detectors and accelerator components as well as the development of the apparatus for the high energy physics experiments at future accelerators: LHC (CERN, Geneva), RHIC (Brookhaven), B-Factory (KEK, Tsukuba) and TESLA (DESY) is also presented. The technology of new materials with unique properties such as carbon-carbon composites is also worked on from the point of view of their application in high energy physics experiments. The Division is located in a separate building on the campus of the University of Mining and Metallurgy (UMM). This location, close to the Jagiellonian University (JU), facilitates the collaboration with the latter and with the UMM. The joint weekly seminars carried out for nearly 40 years prove this long term tradition. A substantial part of the activities is teaching and training students from the academic community in Cracow. Joint research, teaching and academic training in the high energy physics are carried out within the M. Miesowicz

  16. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Programs: Fiscal year 1996 authorization testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science

    Baldwin, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion energy is not as mature as the other energy options. However, in recent years fusion research has focused on its energy mission, and the progress has been impressive. Ten years ago, many observers questioned whether fusion in the laboratory was scientifically feasible. Today, few question fusion's basic feasibility, and the issues have shifted to its economic and environmental aspects. This is a measure of the progress the program has made. For the reasons outlined here, the author requests Congress to support at a minimum the Administration's FY96 budget request of $366 Million for fusion energy. This level permits the program to continue developing the tokamak as its principal fusion concept. The level is, however, insufficient to pursue meaningful development of specialized materials and non-tokamak alternatives which are sure to play important roles in enabling fusion to reach its highest potential attractiveness

  17. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    This guide describes record series that pertain to epidemiologic and health-related studies at the Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). These records document the health and safety monitoring of employees and contract employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE's Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI's role in the project, the history of the DOE and its epidemiologic research program, and the history of the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. It also furnishes information on the procedures that HAI sued to select, inventory, and describe pertinent records; the methodology used to produce the guide; the arrangement of the record series descriptions; the location of the records; and procedures for accessing records repositories

  18. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    NONE

    1995-07-17

    This guide describes record series that pertain to epidemiologic and health-related studies at the Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). These records document the health and safety monitoring of employees and contract employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and its epidemiologic research program, and the history of the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. It also furnishes information on the procedures that HAI sued to select, inventory, and describe pertinent records; the methodology used to produce the guide; the arrangement of the record series descriptions; the location of the records; and procedures for accessing records repositories.

  19. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Standards Program

    Silver, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The policy with respect to the development and use of standards in the Department of Energy (DOE) programs concerned with maintaining and developing the nuclear option for the civilian sector (both in the form of the currently used light water reactors and for advanced concepts including the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), is embodied in a Nuclear Standards Policy, issued in 1978, whose perspectives and philosophy are discussed

  20. Department of Energy – Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2011-12-21

    The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environ¬mental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 4: Physical Sciences

    Toburen, L.H.; Stults, B.R.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1990-04-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains 20 papers. Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report of 1989 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category and each Field Task proposal/agreement is introduced by an abstract that describes the projects reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1989. 74 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Hampshire College Center for Science Education. Final Report on Activities Supported by the Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER64256

    Stillings, Neil [Hampshire College, Amherst, MA (United States); Wenk, Laura [Hampshire College, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2009-12-30

    Hampshire College's Center for Science Education (Center) focuses on teacher professional development, curriculum development, and student enrichment programs. The Center also maintains research programs on teacher change, student learning and instructional effectiveness. The Center's work promotes learning that persists over time and transfers to new situations in and out of school. The projects develop the implications of the increasing agreement among teachers and researchers that effective learning involves active concept mastery and consistent practice with inquiry and critical thinking. The Center's objective is to help strengthen the pipeline of U.S. students pursuing postsecondary study in STEM fields. The Center achieves this by fostering an educational environment in which science is taught as an active, directly experienced endeavor across the K-16 continuum. Too often, young people are dissuaded from pursuing science because they do not see its relevance, instead experiencing it as dry, rote, technical. In contrast, when science is taught as a hands-on, inquiry-driven process, students are encouraged to ask questions grounded in their own curiosity and seek experimental solutions accordingly. In this way, they quickly discover both the profound relevance of science to their daily lives and its accessibility to them. Essentially, they learn to think and act like real scientists. The Center’s approach is multi-faceted: it includes direct inquiry-based science instruction to secondary and postsecondary students, educating the next generation of teachers, and providing new educational opportunities for teachers already working in the schools. Funding from the Department of Energy focused on the last population, enabling in-service teachers to explore and experience the pedagogy of inquiry-based science for themselves, and to take it back to their classrooms and students. The Center has demonstrated that the inquiry-based approach to science

  3. High Energy Physics Departments - Overview

    Bartke, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Following our long-time tradition we will present under a common header the activities of the seven new units created in 1997 on the basis of the former Department of High Energy Physics: Department of Particle Theory (Dept. V); Department of Leptonic Interactions (Dept XI); Department of Hadron Structure (Dept XII); Department of High Energy Nuclear Interactions (Dept XIII); The ALICE Experiment Laboratory (NAL); The ATLAS Experiment Laboratory (NAT); High Energy Physics Detector Construction Group (PBD). At the end we will list our common activities: lectures and courses as well as seminars. Our research covers a variety of problems of the experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics: the hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (characteristics of particle production, including heavy quark physics), e + e - interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluation of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as the spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles. Research on detectors and accelerator components as well as the development of the apparatus for the high energy physics experiments at future accelerators: LHC (CERN, Geneva), RHIC (Brookhaven), B-Factory (KEK, Tsukuba) and TESLA (DESY, Hamburg) is also carried out. The technology of new materials with unique properties such as carbon-carbon composites is also worked on from the point of view of their application in high energy physics experiments. The Division is located in a separate building on the campus of the University of Mining and Metallurgy. This location, close to the Jagiellonian University, facilitates the collaboration with the latter and with the University of Mining and Metallurgy. The joint weekly seminars carried out for nearly 40 years prove this long term tradition. A substantial part of our activities is teaching and training students from

  4. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  5. The Nuclear Science Facility at San Jose State University and the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry

    Ling, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Science Facility at SJSU was first opened for classes in 1975. It is designed primarily for undergraduate teaching of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, tracer techniques, and radiation safety. Utilizing nearly $1.5 million in counting equipment alone, but excluding a reactor or accelerator, it allows simultaneous use of multiple counting assemblages for up to 20 individual students, even for advanced experiments with Ge/MCA units. Current academic programs include a B.S. Degree in Radiochemistry, an M.S. in Radiological Health Physics, and community outreach to grade schools (nearly 2,000 student-experiments for grades 7-12 were performed in AY88/89). To encourage nuclear chemistry as a potential area of study in graduate school, the US Department of Energy funded a special national Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. This was first held at SJSU in 1984; summer 1990 will see the seventh such program taught

  6. Engineering science and mechanics department head named

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2004-01-01

    Ishwar K. Puri, professor of mechanical engineering and executive associate dean of engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago, will become the head of Virginia Tech•À_ó»s Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Aug. 1.

  7. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    Dart, Eli [ESNet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESNet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-09-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In December 2011, ESnet and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), of the DOE Office of Science (SC), organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by FES. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 2: Environmental Sciences

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PBL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1989. Research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of processes controlling the long-term fate and biological effects of fugitive chemicals and other stressors resulting from energy development. The report is organized by major research areas. Within this division, individual reports summarize the progress of projects in these areas. Additional sections summarize exploratory research, educational institutional interactions, technology transfer, and publications. The research, focused principally on subsurface contaminant transport and detection and management of human-induced changes in biological systems, forms the basis for defining and quantifying processes that affect humans and the environment at the local, regional, and global levels.

  9. 939 Department of Geology and Mineral Science

    USER

    2015-11-12

    Nov 12, 2015 ... Department of Geology and Mineral Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria P.M.B. 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria. 2. Department of Petroleum Engineering and Geosciences, Petroleum Training Institute, P.M.B.. 20, Effurun, Delta State, Nigeria. Abstract. Hydrochemical investigation of thirty groundwater samples ...

  10. Mixed reaction to science department proposal

    The recommendation last month by a presidential commission that a federal Department of Science and Technology be created to encompass “major civilian research and development (R&D) agencies” has elicited a mixed reaction from members of the geophysical sciences community.The Commission on Industrial Competitiveness, created by President Ronald Reagan in June 1983 to study ways to strengthen the ability of the United States to compete in a global marketplace, recommended establishment of a Cabinet-level science department “to promote national interest in and policies for research and technological innovation.” The commission, chaired by John A. Young, president of the Hewlett-Packard Company, was composed primarily of presidents and chief executive officers of major technology corporations but also included members of academia and government. Creation of a federal science and technology 'department is one of many suggestions contained in the commission's final report, Global Competition: The New Reality.

  11. Department of Energy licensing strategy

    Frei, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act) to site, design, construct, and operate mined geologic repositories for high-level radioactive wastes and is required to obtain licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to achieve that mandate. To this end the DOE has developed a licensing approach which defines program strategies and which will facilitate and ease the licensing process. This paper will discuss the regulatory framework within which the repository program is conducted, the DOE licensing strategy, and the interactions between DOE and NRC in implementing the strategy. A licensing strategy is made necessary by the unique technical nature of the repository. Such a facility has never before been licensed; furthermore, the duration of isolation of waste demanded by the proposed EPA standard will require a degree of reliance on probabilistic performance assessment as proof of compliance that is a first of a kind for any industry. The licensing strategy is also made necessary by the complex interrelationships among the many involved governmental agencies and even within DOE itself, and because these relationships will change with time. Program activities which recognize these relationships are essential for implementing the Act. The guiding principle in this strategy is an overriding commitment to safeguarding public health and safety and to protecting the environment

  12. 76 FR 48147 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2011-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of renewal of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. SUMMARY... that the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year period beginning July...

  13. 77 FR 5246 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2012-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Katie Perine; Office of Basic Energy Sciences; U.S. Department of Energy...

  14. 78 FR 6088 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2013-01-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat... INFORMATION CONTACT: Katie Perine, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy; SC-22...

  15. 78 FR 2259 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2013-01-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770... Energy Sciences; U.S. Department of Energy; 1000 Independence Avenue SW.; Washington, DC 20585-1290...

  16. United States Department of Energy: a history

    Holl, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    This pamphlet traces the origins of the Department of Energy and outlines the history of the Department as reflected in the energy policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan. It attempts to place recent energy policy into historical perspective by describing the evolution of the federal Government's role in energy research, development, and regulation.

  17. 1995 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Group (RMG) provides a forum for DOE and its contractor personnel to review and discuss subjects, issues, and concerns of common interest. This forum will include the exchange of information, and interpretation of requirements, and a dialog to aid in cost-effective management of the DOE Records Management program. Issues addressed by the RMG may result in recommendations for DOE-wide initiatives. Proposed DOE-wide initiatives shall be, provided in writing by the RMG Steering Committee to the DOE Records Management Committee and to DOE`s Office of ERM Policy, Records, and Reports Management for appropriate action. The membership of the RMG is composed of personnel engaged in Records Management from DOE Headquarters, Field sites, contractors, and other organizations, as appropriate. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  19. 76 FR 49757 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2011-08-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee will be... science, fusion science, and fusion technology related to the Fusion Energy Sciences program. Additionally...

  20. Leading Learning: Science Departments and the Chair

    Melville, Wayne; Campbell, Todd; Jones, Doug

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we have considered the role of the chair in leading the learning necessary for a department to become effective in the teaching and learning of science from a reformed perspective. We conceptualize the phrase "leading learning" to mean the chair's constitution of influence, power, and authority to intentionally impact…

  1. 75 FR 41838 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2010-07-19

    ... Basic Energy Sciences Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation Workshop Final Report... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic...

  2. Department of Energy Multiprogram Laboratories

    1982-09-01

    The Panel assessed DOE policies and procedures with respect to the laboratories as well as the effectiveness of the use DOE made of the laboratory capabilities in energy related areas. Recommendations are given for the appropriate roles and missions as opposed to the private sector; the scientific and technology transfer; organizational efficiencies; and contingency plans for coping with declining budgets

  3. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P. (eds.)

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  4. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P.

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  5. Department of Energy 1977--1994: A summary history

    Fehner, T.R.; Holl, J.M.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 created perhaps the most interesting and diverse agency in the Federal Government. The new department brought together for the first time not only most of the government`s energy programs but also defense responsibilities that included the design, construction, and testing of nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy incorporated a score of organizational entities from a dozen departments and agencies, each with its own history and traditions. Uniting these seemingly disparate entities and programs was a common commitment to performing first rate science and technology. The Department of Energy sought--and continues to seek--to be one of the Nation`s premier science and technology organizations. The Department of Energy, 1977--1994, is a summary history of the origins, goals, and achievements of the Department and selected major programs. Beginning with the various fuels policies on the energy side and the Manhattan project on the defense side, the study details how the Department was born of the energy crisis of the early and mid-1970s. The history then surveys the Department and its programs from the Carter through the Clinton administrations. As the energy crisis eased, the Department played a central role on issues as dissimilar as the Strategic Defense Initiative and the Superconducting Super Collider. With the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy further transformed itself, moving from the building of bombs to partial dismantlement of the nuclear weapons complex and to an increased emphasis on environmental activities and technology transfer efforts.

  6. Department of Energy (DOE) summary

    2001-01-01

    An overview was provided of the Generation IV Initiative to evaluate candidate technology concepts for a new generation of nuclear power plants. DOE presented the Generation IV goals, road map effort, and concept evaluation. The formation was discussed of a Near-Term Deployment Working Group (NTDG) formed to identify actions and evaluate options necessary for DOE to support new plants. DOE has established a Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to provide independent evaluation and feedback on the establishment of goals and objectives and progress in evaluating candidate nuclear energy concepts. DOE has also established a Generation IV Road map NERAC Subcommittee (GRNS) to serve as an advisory group in establishing the road map along with a Road map integration Team (RIT). Candidate technologies must be deployable by 2030. Nuclear systems are expected to meet sustainability goals (resource inputs, waste outputs, and nonproliferation), safety and reliability goals (operating maintainability excellence, limiting core damage risk, and reduced need for emergency response), and economic goals (reduced life-cycle costs and risk to capital). Criteria and metrics for each goal are being developed by an Evaluation Methodology Group (EMG), RIT, and the GRNS. DOE plans to evaluate ail candidate concepts equally without prejudice toward existing technologies (e.g., light-water reactors) but recognizes that most primary energy generators are likely to be fission based. DOE is presently considering 94 concepts. The output of the Generation IV Program is expected to be a research and development plan to support future commercialization of the best concepts

  7. Earth Sciences Department Annual Report, 1984

    Henry, A.L.; Donohue, M.L. (eds.)

    1985-09-01

    The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory comprises nine different disciplinary and programmatic groups that provide research in the geosciences, including nuclear waste management, containment of nuclear weapons tests, seismic treaty verification, stimulation of natural gas production by unconventional means, and oil shale retorting. Each group's accomplishments in 1984 are discussed, followed by a listing of the group's publications for the year.

  8. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2002-01-01

    a large scale preparations for the straw tube modules assembling is under way. Two of our colleagues work on the phenomenology of the quark-gluon plasma formation and of the low energy hadron-hadron reactions. Several physicists from our Department are actively involved in science popularization by contributing articles to newspapers and preparing www pages with information about our activities. We collaborate closely with the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in most of our experiments as well as take part in teaching and supervising diploma works. There is also a group of 13 PhD students.. (author)

  9. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2003-01-01

    large scale preparations for the straw tube modules assembling is under way. Two of our colleagues work on the phenomenology of the quark-gluon plasma formation and of low energy hadron-hadron reactions. Several physicists from our Department are involved in science popularization by contributing articles to newspapers and preparing www pages about our activities. We collaborate with the Institute of Experimental Physics of Warsaw University in most of our experiments as well as taking part in teaching and supervising diplomas. There is also a group of 13 PhD students. (author)

  10. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Nassalski, J.

    2000-01-01

    detector. Two of our colleagues work on the phenomenology of the quark-gluon plasma formation and of the low energy hadron-hadron reactions. Several physicists from our Department are actively involved in science popularization by contributing articles to newspapers and preparing www pages with information about our activities. We collaborate closely with the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in most of our experiments as well as take part in teaching and supervising diploma works. There is also a group of 10 PhD students. (author)

  11. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2001-01-01

    the prototypes for the alignment monitoring system for the Outer Tracker detector in the LHCb experiment. Two of our colleagues work on the phenomenology of the quark-gluon plasma formation and of the low energy hadron-hadron reactions. Several physicists from our Department are actively involved in science popularization by contributing articles to newspapers and preparing www pages with information about our activities. We collaborate closely with the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in most our experiments as well as take part in teaching and supervising diploma works. There is also a group of 10 PhD students. (author)

  12. 75 FR 6369 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2010-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, 86 Stat. 770...

  13. 78 FR 15937 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires that public notice of...

  14. 75 FR 8685 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2010-02-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770...

  15. 76 FR 41234 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2011-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, 86 Stat. 770...

  16. 78 FR 38696 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2013-06-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat...

  17. 77 FR 41395 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2012-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, 86 Stat. 770...

  18. 76 FR 8358 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2011-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, 86 Stat. 770...

  19. 76 FR 40714 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770...

  20. US Department of Energy nuclear energy research initiative

    Ross, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) that has been established to address and help overcome the principal technical and scientific issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  1. Science Ideals and Science Careers in a University Biology Department

    Long, David E.

    2014-01-01

    In an ethnographic study set within a biology department of a public university in the United States, incongruity between the ideals and practice of science education are investigated. Against the background of religious conservative students' complaints about evolution in the curriculum, biology faculty describe their political intents for…

  2. Wind Energy Department annual progress report 2003

    Johanse, B.D.; Riis. U. (eds.)

    2004-12-01

    This report covers the scientific work of the Wind Energy Department in 2003. It comprises departmental programmes as well as brief summaries of all non-conficential projects and a review of the key issues of 2003. (au)

  3. Wind Energy Department annual progress report 2002

    2004-01-01

    This report covers the scientific work of the Wind Energy Department in 2002. It contains departmental programmes as well as brief summaries of all non-confidential projects and a review of this year’s key issues.......This report covers the scientific work of the Wind Energy Department in 2002. It contains departmental programmes as well as brief summaries of all non-confidential projects and a review of this year’s key issues....

  4. Wind Energy Department annual progress report 2003

    2004-01-01

    This report covers the scientific work of the Wind Energy Department in 2003. It comprises departmental programmes as well as brief summaries of all non-confidential projects and a review of the key issues of 2003.......This report covers the scientific work of the Wind Energy Department in 2003. It comprises departmental programmes as well as brief summaries of all non-confidential projects and a review of the key issues of 2003....

  5. Quarterly status of Department of Energy projects

    1982-01-01

    This Quarterly Status of Department of Energy Projects is prepared by the Office of project and Facilities Management, MA-30. The report is designed to provide Department of Energy (DOE) management officials with a summary of the important baseline data that exists in the DOE project data base. This data base is maintained chiefly from periodic field management reports required by DOE Order 5700.4. Since most of the current estimates in this report are from field project managers, they do not necessarily have full Headquarters approval. The current budget data sheet estimates that appear in the report are considered appropriate for reporting external to the Department and reflect the President's FY 1983 Budget to Congress. Moneys allocated and estimated costs, and the construction status are tabulated for projects under the subject categories of: conservation and renewable energy; defense programs; environmental protection, safety and emergency preparedness; energy research; defense programs; nuclear energy; and management and administration

  6. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department's environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department's environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C

  7. The energy demand in the Narino Department

    Unidad de Planeacion Minero Energetica, UPME

    2000-01-01

    In the object of making a first approach of regional energy requirements analysis and the good way of satisfying them, the UPME undertook a global energy study for the Narino Department. In this study (UPME 1999) was carried out an analysis of the energy demand and of the socioeconomic factors that determine it; they were also studied the consumptions and the current energy offer and the alternatives of future evolution, with the purpose of having the basic tools of a departmental energy plan. The present article refers specifically to the analysis of the demand and it seeks to show the readers the complexity and the volume of necessary information to carry out the demand studies. They are multiple factors that determine the energy demand in the Narino Department. The size, growth populations, geographical distribution and cultural characteristic, the border condition, the faulty infrastructure of communications, the agricultural economic structure and the low entrance per capita

  8. Department of High Energy Physics - Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2006-01-01

    The activities of the Department are centered around experiments performed at large accelerator laboratories: I. At CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland: - Data taking experiments: COMPASS (Compact Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) - studies of the gluon polarization in the nucleon; - Experiments that finished data taking but continue the analysis: NA49 and WA98 - heavy ion experiments, study hadronic and nuclear interactions, searching for the quark-gluon plasma. II. The 'Pi of the Sky' experiment, searching for optical flashes associated with Gamma Ray Bursts takes data with a set of CCD cameras mounted in the Chile Observatory Station, and works on an extension of the system. III. WASA experiment, recently transferred from the CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala to Juelich, studies near threshold resonance production. IV. ZEUS experiment at HERA in Hamburg - studies of proton structure functions and diffractive interactions. V. Neutrino experiments at SuperKamiokande and K2K in Japan - studies of the neutrino oscillations. VI. Preparations for future experiments: a) ICARUS - in preparation for the neutrino beam from CERN, to study neutrino oscillations, b) Experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN: CMS - Compact Muon Solenoid, LHCb - study of b-quark production, ALICE - study of heavy ion collisions. A team of physicists, engineers and technicians, using our well equipped mechanical workshop, with 'clean room' (class 100 000) facilities has performed a large scale production of straw tube modules for the LHCb experiment. Preparations for LHC physics requires an active participation of the teams involved in the computer GRID implementation. There is also a small group involved in theoretical work on the phenomenology of quark-gluon plasma formation and the low energy hadronic reactions. Several physicists from our department are actively involved in science popularization. A close

  9. 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan

    None

    2011-05-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. Goal 1 is to catalyze the timely, material, and efficient transformation of the nation's energy system and secure U.S. leadership in clean energy technologies. Goal 2 is to maintain a vibrant U.S. effort in science and engineering as a cornerstone of our economic prosperity with clear leadership in strategic areas. Goal 3 is to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental efforts. Goal 4 is to establish an operational and adaptable framework that combines the best wisdom of all Department stakeholders to maximize mission success.

  10. Science as Content, Science as Context: Working in the Science Department

    Wildy, Helen; Wallace, John

    2004-01-01

    In this study we explored how the science department shaped the relationship between a science department head, Mr Greg, and a teacher, Ms Horton, as they grappled with their expectations of, and responsibilities for, teaching and leadership in the daily life in the department. We found that, from their life histories and their positions in the…

  11. Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons

  12. Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008

    None

    2008-09-01

    Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons

  13. Department of Biotechnology | Women in Science | Initiatives ...

    ... Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science ... Year: 2012 Innovative Young Biotechnologist Award ... Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali ... International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi ... Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh

  14. 78 FR 47677 - Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    2013-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... hereby given that the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (BESAC) charter will be renewed for a two-year period. The Committee will provide advice and recommendations to the Office of Science on the...

  15. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  16. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Nassalski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The main activity of our Department is experimental high energy physics with accelerators. Experiments are carried using large facilities: - at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, - at Celsius Storage Ring in Uppsala and - in DESY laboratory in Hamburg, where several groups of physicists from our Department are members of international collaborations. They are listed below together with the main physics interests: At CERN - Delphi at LEP - tests of the Standard Model, b-quark physics, SUSY search, - NA48 - CP-violation in K 0 decays, rare decays, - SMC - spin dependent nucleon structure function, the Bjorken sum, - NA49 and WA98 - heavy ion physics. At CELSIUS - WASA - threshold production of light mesons, rare meson decays. At DESY - ZEUS - proton and photon structure functions, diffractive production. In most of these experiments our Department also contributed to the instrumentation of detectors and is presently involved in data collection, detector supervision and in data analysis. At the same time the Department is also involved in preparation of new experiments: - CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and ALICE at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, - COMPASS (Compact Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) at the SPS at CERN, - WASA-Promice - an upgrade of the present detector at Celsius, - hyperfragment experiment at JINR, Dubna. The department has small workshop which was recently involved in an upgrade of the WASA detector. In our Department there are also two physicists working on the phenomenology of a quark-gluon plasma and on the low energy hadron-hadron interactions. Physicist from our Department collaborate with the Department of the Experimental Physics of Warsaw University. They are also involved in teaching and in supervision of diploma students. There is a group of 9 PhD students. (author)

  17. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    Kosinski, F.E.; Butturini, W.G.; Kurtz, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). The radioactive 235 U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF 6 -filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF 6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  18. Alternative futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories

    1995-02-01

    This Task Force was asked to propose alternate futures for the Department of Energy laboratories noted in the report. The authors` intensive ten months` study revealed multiple missions and sub-missions--traditional missions and new missions--programs and projects--each with factors of merit. They respectively suggest that the essence of what the Department, and particularly the laboratories, should and do stand for: the energy agenda. Under the overarching energy agenda--the labs serving the energy opportunities--they comment on their national security role, the all important energy role, all related environmental roles, the science and engineering underpinning for all the above, a focused economic role, and conclude with governance/organization change recommendations.

  19. Electrochemistry and energy science

    Vijh, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to delineate the structure of moder electrochemistry and to elucidate the manner in which electrochemical ideas and techniques contribute to the development of power sources and the the advancement of energy science. One example of such an application is the prevention of corrosion in the coolant circuit of a nuclear power station, or its decontamination; another is the use of electrolysis for final upgrading of heavy water. (N.D.H.)

  20. Basic Energy Sciences at NREL

    Moon, S.

    2000-01-01

    NREL's Center for Basic Sciences performs fundamental research for DOE's Office of Science. Our mission is to provide fundamental knowledge in the basic sciences and engineering that will underpin new and improved renewable energy technologies

  1. Individual and Collective Leadership in School Science Departments

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Mackay, Gail; Rigano, Donna L.

    2006-01-01

    Given that the subject department is recognised by subject specialist teachers as the central and immediate unit of organization in secondary schools it is surprising that so little attention has been paid by researchers to the leadership dynamics within science departments. The leadership dynamics within the science departments of two…

  2. Fiscal Year 1986 Department of Energy authorization (basic research programs). Volume II-B. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28, 1985

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Volume II-B of the hearing record contains Appendix 3 and Appendix 4 of Volume II-A. Appendix 3 provides supporting materials on the accomplishments and project summaries of the various departments under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This includes DOE supported work in engineering, chemistry, biology, mathematics, geology, and the energy sciences. Appendix 4 provides summaries of DOE supported work on high energy physics, which investigates the nature of matter and the behavior of matter and energy. Over 90% of the funding for this work comes from DOE, which is responsible for national planning in the effort to develop accelerator facilities, the superconducting super collider, and other physics programs

  3. 1994 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Group (RMG) provides a forum for DOE and its contractor personnel to review and discuss subjects, issues, and concerns of common interest. This forum will include the exchange of information, and interpretation of requirements, and a dialog to aid in cost-effective management of the DOE Records Management program. This report contains the contributions from this forum.

  4. Overview of Department of Energy programs

    Hill, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is presented of policies and standards of the US DOE in the protection of the public, government employees, and government property from damage caused by natural phenomena. Included are Department of Energy orders covering policy and standards for natural phenomena hazards mitigation and Office of Nuclear Safety projects related to natural phenomena hazards mitigation. National Federal programs, committees, and reports are listed. 18 references

  5. Energy, information science, and systems science

    Wallace, Terry C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mercer - Smith, Janet A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-02-01

    This presentation will discuss global trends in population, energy consumption, temperature changes, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy security programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory. LANL's capabilities support vital national security missions and plans for the future. LANL science supports the energy security focus areas of impacts of Energy Demand Growth, Sustainable Nuclear Energy, and Concepts and Materials for Clean Energy. The innovation pipeline at LANL spans discovery research through technology maturation and deployment. The Lab's climate science capabilities address major issues. Examples of modeling and simulation for the Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model (COSIM) and interactions of turbine wind blades and turbulence will be given.

  6. 1997 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan

    None,

    1997-09-01

    With the end of the Cold War and the election of President Clinton, the Department of Energy (DOE) set a new course which began with the publication of its first departmental strategic plan in April 1994. Entitled ``Fueling a Competitive Economy, it provided the framework and shared vision for meeting responsibilities in energy, national security, environmental quality, and science and technology. The strategic plan was the guidepost for the formulation of the Department`s FY 1996, FY 1997, and FY 1998 budgets and was critical to the development of the Department`s Strategic Alignment Initiative, designed to save $1.7 billion over five years. This current plan, which has been significantly improved through a very close consultation process with Congress and customers stakeholders, takes DOE to the next important performance level by being more directly linked to actions and results. It defines a strategic goal for each of the Department`s four business lines and, in the spirit of the Government Performance and Results Act and the National Performance Review, identifies a fifth goal addressing corporate management. Reengineering the business practices, managing for results, being open with neighbors and stakeholders, and ensuring the safety and health of DOE workers and the public are, and will continue to be, among the highest of priorities. Over the coming years, DOE plans to achieve their strategic goals through specific identifiable strategies. Each business line has clear objectives and straightforward ways of defining whether DOE has succeeded in meeting those objectives.

  7. Secondary School Science Department Chairs Leading Change

    Gaubatz, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary school department chairs are content area specialists in their schools and are responsible for providing students with the most appropriate curricula. However, most secondary school department chairs have limited authority to institute change unilaterally (Gmelch, 1993; Hannay & Erb, 1999). To explore how these educational leaders…

  8. Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy-related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user'' facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  9. Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study

  10. Wind Energy Department annual progress report 2002

    Johansen, B.D.; Riis, U. (eds.)

    2003-12-01

    Research and development activities of the Wind Energy Department range from boundary layer meteorology, fluid dynamics, and structural mechanics to power and control engineering as well as wind turbine loading and safety. The overall purpose of our work is to meet the needs for knowledge, methods and procedures from government, the scientific community, and the wind turbine industry in particular. Our assistance to the wind turbine manufacturers serve to pave the way for technological development and thus further the exploitation of wind energy worldwide. We do this by means of research and innovation, education, testing and consultancy. In providing services for the wind turbine industry, we are involved in technology development, design, testing, procedures for operation and maintenance, certification and international wind turbine projects s as well as the solution of problems encountered in the application of wind energy, e.g. grid connection. A major proportion of these activities are on a commercial basis, for instance consultancy, software development, accredited testing of wind turbines and blades as well as approval and certification in co-operation with Det Norske Veritas. The departments activities also include research into atmospheric physics and environmental issues related to the atmosphere. One example is the development of online warning systems for airborne bacteria and other harmful substances. The department is organized in programmes according to its main scientific and technical activities. Research programmes: 1) Aeroelastic Design, AED; 2) Atmospheric Phyrics, ATM; 3) Electrical DEsign and Control, EDS; 4) Wind Power Meteorology, VKM; 5) Wind Turbines, VIM; 6) Wind Turbine Diagnostics, VMD. Commercial programmes: 1) The Test Station for Large Wind Turbines, Hoevsoere, HOeV; 2) Risoe Wind Consult, INR; 3) Wind Turbine Testing; 4) Sparkaer Blade Test Centre.(au)

  11. Fission energy program of the U.S. Department of Energy

    1978-06-01

    The document describes programs managed by the Program Director for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, and under the cognizance of the Committee on Science and Technology, United States House of Representatives. The major portion of the document is concerned with civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977, but it also includes descriptions of the space applications and naval reactor programs

  12. Science Instructional Leadership: The Role of the Department Chair

    Peacock, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    With science teachers facing comprehensive curriculum reform that will shape science education for decades to come, high school department chairs represent a critical resource for instructional leadership and teacher support. While the historical literature on the department chair indicates that chairs are in prime positions to provide…

  13. Barbara Ryder to head Department of Computer Science

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Barbara G. Ryder, professor of computer science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, will become the computer science department head at Virginia Tech, starting in fall 2008. She is the first woman to serve as a department head in the history of the nationally ranked College of Engineering.

  14. Basic Energy Sciences Program Update

    None, None

    2016-01-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels to provide the foundations for new energy technologies and to support DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research disciplines covered by BES—condensed matter and materials physics, chemistry, geosciences, and aspects of physical biosciences— are those that discover new materials and design new chemical processes. These disciplines touch virtually every aspect of energy resources, production, conversion, transmission, storage, efficiency, and waste mitigation. BES also plans, constructs, and operates world-class scientific user facilities that provide outstanding capabilities for imaging and spectroscopy, characterizing materials of all kinds ranging from hard metals to fragile biological samples, and studying the chemical transformation of matter. These facilities are used to correlate the microscopic structure of materials with their macroscopic properties and to study chemical processes. Such experiments provide critical insights to electronic, atomic, and molecular configurations, often at ultrasmall length and ultrafast time scales.

  15. Department of High Energy Physics: Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The activities of the Department of High Energy Physics are centered around experiments performed at accelerators in the following laboratories: - At CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland: - DELPHI at LEP e + e - storage ring - the tests of the Standard Model, b-quark physics, gamma-gamma interactions and search for Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles; - NA4B - the CP-violation and rare K 0 decays; - COMPASS (Compact Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) - studies the gluon polarization in the nucleon; - NA49 and WA98 - heavy ion physics, looking for possible effects of the phase transition to the quark-gluon plasma state. At CELSIUS Storage Ring in Uppsala, Sweden: - WASA - a precise study of near threshold resonance production. - At RHIC - study of pp elastic scattering. - At DESY in Hamburg, Germany: - ZEUS - deep inelastic scattering of electrons and protons, proton structure functions, diffractive photon-photon interactions. - Super-Kamiokande and K2 K - a study of neutrino oscillations. The groups from our Department participated in the construction phase of the experiments, both in hardware and in development of the software used in data analysis. Presently they take part in the data collection, detector performance supervision and data analysis. The Department is also involved in the preparation of new experiments: - search for optical flashes of cosmic origin: ''π of the sky'' project - search for optical counterparts of γ ray bursts, - CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) at the LHC, - LHCb (b-quark production and CP-violation) at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN, - ALICE - experiment to study the heavy ion interactions at the LHC, - ICARUS - tests of a liquid argon TPC, in preparation for neutrino beam (CERN to Gran Sasso), and to be used for cosmic neutrino detection, - study of charge exchange processes in d-p collisions at Nuclotron in Dubna. A mechanical workshop attached to our

  16. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    Bingham, Michelle; Bala, Marsha; Beierschmitt, Kelly; Steele, Carolyn; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Bruozas, Meridith A.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  17. Home - Virginia Department of Forensic Science

    Collecting DNA Data Bank Samples Forensic Training Forensic Science Academy Short Course Schedule Forensic gross weights, marijuana food products and search warrant cases. Click anywhere on the image to open the -screen comparison software system to perform and document the comparison. Virginia DNA Data Bank

  18. Instructional leaders for all? High school science department heads and instructional leadership across all science disciplines

    Sanborn, Stephen

    Many high school science departments are responding to changes in state standards with respect to both curricular content and instructional practices. In the typical American high school organization, the academic department head is ideally positioned to influence change in the instructional practices of teachers within the department. Even though science department heads are well situated to provide leadership during this period of transition, the literature has not addressed the question of how well science department heads believe they can provide instructional leadership for all of the teachers in their department, whether they are teaching within and outside of the head's own sub-discipline. Nor is it known how science department heads view the role of pedagogical content knowledge in teaching different science disciplines. Using an online survey comprised of 26 objective questions and one open response question, a 54-respondent sample of science department heads provided no strong consensus regarding their beliefs about the role of pedagogical content knowledge in science instruction. However, science department heads expressed a significant difference in their views about their capacity to provide instructional leadership for teachers sharing their science content area compared to teachers instructing other science content areas. Given wide-spread science education reform efforts introduced in response to the Next Generation Science Standards, these findings may serve to provide some direction for determining how to best support the work of science department heads as they strive to provide instructional leadership for the teachers in their departments.

  19. Department of Defense Facilities Energy Conservation Policies and Spending

    Andrews, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    .... This report reviews energy conservation legislation and Executive Orders that apply to the Department of Defense, directives and instructions to the military departments and agencies on implementing...

  20. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Carr, F. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit trademark) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report

  1. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    Kennedy, R A; Mahaffey, J A; Carr, F Jr

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

  2. The Department of Energy's radon testing program

    Scott, H.L.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy recently completed an initial survey of indoor radon in its buildings in response to Public Law 100--551, the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988. Other federal agencies have also conducted radon surveys. This paper presents an overview of the results from radon testing of several thousand buildings ranging from 100 m 2 to over 10,000 M 2 in size. In addition, we have examined results from groups of buildings, classified according to ventilation and usage characteristics. So far, there is no apparent difference among building classes. The paper also discusses our proposal for phased radon surveys. We suggest that first-phase results can be used to identify facilities with radon problems. In the second phase, we suggest measurements be made at a much higher sampling density at facilities with radon problems. The results of the second phase are expected to identify all buildings in need of mitigation

  3. US Department of Energy radiological control manual

    1994-04-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE's positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements

  4. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  5. Basic Energy Sciences at NREL

    Moon, S.

    2000-12-04

    NREL's Center for Basic Sciences performs fundamental research for DOE's Office of Science. Our mission is to provide fundamental knowledge in the basic sciences and engineering that will underpin new and improved renewable energy technologies.

  6. Basic Science for a Secure Energy Future

    Horton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Anticipating a doubling in the world's energy use by the year 2050 coupled with an increasing focus on clean energy technologies, there is a national imperative for new energy technologies and improved energy efficiency. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research that provides the foundations for new energy technologies and supports DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research crosses the full spectrum of materials and chemical sciences, as well as aspects of biosciences and geosciences, with a focus on understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter and energy at electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. In addition, BES is the home for national user facilities for x-ray, neutron, nanoscale sciences, and electron beam characterization that serve over 10,000 users annually. To provide a strategic focus for these programs, BES has held a series of ``Basic Research Needs'' workshops on a number of energy topics over the past 6 years. These workshops have defined a number of research priorities in areas related to renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy -- as well as cross-cutting scientific grand challenges. These directions have helped to define the research for the recently established Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and are foundational for the newly announced Energy Innovation Hubs. This overview will review the current BES research portfolio, including the EFRCs and user facilities, will highlight past research that has had an impact on energy technologies, and will discuss future directions as defined through the BES workshops and research opportunities.

  7. DOE [Department of Energy] Epidemiologic Research Program

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and of the operation of DOE facilities. The program is divided into seven general areas of activity; the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 340 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliography is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by laboratory and by year and also summarizes the results from individual authors by journal

  8. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and of the operation of DOE facilities. The program is divided into seven general areas of activity; the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 340 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliography is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by laboratory and by year and also summarizes the results from individual authors by journal.

  9. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems. Volume 1 of 3 -- Report and Appendix A

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report is submitted in response to a Congressional request and is intended to communicate the nature, content, goals, and accomplishments of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to interested and affected parties in the Department and its contractors, at Federal agencies, in the scientific community, and in the general public. The EMSP was started in response to a request to mount an effort in longer term basic science research to seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective. Section 1, ``Background of the Program,`` provides information on the evolution of the EMSP and how it is managed, and summarizes recent accomplishments. Section 2, ``Research Award Selection Process,`` provides an overview of the ongoing needs identification process, solicitation development, and application review for scientific merit and programmatic relevance. Section 3, ``Linkages to Environmental Cleanup Problems,`` provides an overview of the major interrelationships (linkages) among EMSP basic research awards, Environmental Management problem areas, and high cost projects. Section 4, ``Capitalizing on Science Investments,`` discusses the steps the EMSP plans to use to facilitate the application of research results in Environmental Management strategies through effective communication and collaboration. Appendix A contains four program notices published by the EMSP inviting applications for grants.

  10. Bourdieu, Department Chairs and the Reform of Science Education

    Melville, Wayne; Hardy, Ian; Bartley, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Using the insights of the French sociologist, Pierre Bourdieu, this article considers the role of the science department chair in the reform of school science education. Using Bourdieu's 'thinking tools' of 'field', 'habitus' and 'capital', we case study the work of two teachers who both actively pursue the teaching and learning of science as inquiry. One teacher, Dan, has been a department chair since 2000, and has actively encouraged his department to embrace science as inquiry. The other teacher, Leslie, worked for one year in Dan's department before being transferred to another school where science teaching continues to be more traditional. Our work suggests that there are three crucial considerations for chairs seeking to lead the reform of science teaching within their department. The first of these is the development of a reform-minded habitus, as this appears to be foundational to the capital that can be expended in the leadership of reform. The second is an understanding of how to wield power and position in the promotion of reform. The third is the capacity to operate simultaneously and strategically within, and across, two fields; the departmental field and the larger science education field. This involves downplaying administrative logics, and foregrounding more inquiry-focused logics as a vehicle to challenge traditional science-teaching dispositions-the latter being typically dominated by concerns about curriculum 'coverage'.

  11. Energy Department radiation rhetoric, actions at odds

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Only months after Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary pledged that DOE would open-quotes come cleanclose quotes about past radiation abuses, the department is refusing to release individual exposure records of former workers at its heavily contaminated Fernald uranium plant. At the same time O'Leary was flying around the country to tout a new era of openness at the department, top DOE officials in January told attorneys representing the Fernald workers that individual exposure records would not be forthcoming. While agreeing to provide general health data, DOE specifically refused to disclose the names of the workers involved or their specific exposure histories at the plant, citing privacy concerns. The workers' attorneys contend the privacy concerns are spurious since every former Fernald worker contacted about possible overexposure has waived the privacy privilege and authorized DOE to release his or her records. The attorneys also note that DOE under the Bush administration released worker exposure information related to its Hanford, Wash., plant after the government and outside attorneys agreed to a protective order that assured privacy rights were not violated. The Fernald workers' attorneys maintain DOE is refusing to disclose the names of the workers to ensure that no additional workers are contacted by the attorneys and told about their possible overexposure - and the pending litigation seeking compensation for the alleged injuries. And as DOE remains silent, the attorneys say, the former Fernald workers are going without medical treatment for any possible radiation-related ailments they may have suffered as a result of working at the plant

  12. United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship

    Newton, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials

  13. Congress moves to reorganize Department of Energy labs

    Hanson, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two bills that would transform the missions and practices of the Department of Energy's research laboratories are moving forward in both branches of Congress. Each of the two is crafted to improve cooperative research between DOE and private industry, but the House bill goes further by making fundamental changes in lab administration. H.R. 1432 provides a clear statement of purpose for the labs. The eight missions outlined in the bill are as follows: Enhance the nation's understanding of energy production and use, with a goal of reducing reliance on imported sources of fuels; Advance nuclear science and technology for national security purposes; Assist with dismantlement of nuclear weapons and work to curb nuclear arms proliferation; Conduct fundamental research in energy-related science and technology; Assist in development of technologies for disposal of hazardous wastes, particularly nuclear waste; Work with private industry to develop generic green technologies; Conduct technology-transfer activities; and Work to improve the quality of science, math, and engineering education in the U.S

  14. Science Activities in Energy: Wind Energy.

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 12 activities related to wind energy for elementary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question. Topics include: (1) At what time of day is there enough wind to make electricity where you live?; (2) Where is the windiest spot on your schoolground?; and…

  15. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program. Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems. High out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 - Appendix C

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department's 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research

  16. FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).

    Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

  17. Department

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Kibabii University. Abstract. This study ... Key Words: Climate Change, Regional Circulation Model, PRECIS, Bungoma County ... by different computer models is much.

  18. Department of High Energy Physics - Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Department can be grouped into three parts: I. An ongoing analysis of data from large accelerator facilities. At CERN SPS: In the COMPASS experiment, the Warsaw team participated in the data taking and analysis related to the structure of the nucleon. 5 publications were prepared. The result concerning the polarization distribution of quarks and antiquarks in the nucleon with the flavour separation is new, important, and obtained with a significant contribution from the team. The collaboration is preparing for the next stage of the experiment, COMPASS , which will be realized in 2011. Two heavy ion experiments, WA98 and NA49, have finished data taking, but continue analysis. 4 publications have been published and one submitted. The wide purpose NA61 experiment has taken data, and the IPJ team worked on the measurement of the production cross sections of pions and kaons, which are important for the neutrino program. At COSY: The WASA experiment is dedicated to the search for a signal of the violations of basic chiral symmetries and testing perturbative theories in the light mesons decays produced in proton-proton, proton-deuteron and deuteron-deuteron collisions at different energies. A new limit of the extremely rare decay eta → e + e - within MS is being searched for. The branching ratio of the pi0→e + e - decay should be determined with better precision. 3 publications have been published and one submitted. II. Data taking and first analysis by the LHC experiments. Three teams work on LHC experiments: CMS, LHCb and ALICE. In 2010, the LHC accelerator provided proton-proton and Pb-Pb data and all LHC collaborations prepared dozens of publications on the detector performance and physics analysis, which have been published or submitted for publication. The CMS team worked on the muon trigger system, based on the resistive plate chamber RPC. The system was optimized and synchronized during data taking with high precision. The

  19. Department of High Energy Physics - Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Department can be grouped into four parts: I. An ongoing analysis of data from large accelerator facilities At CERN SPS: The Compass experiment, ' a flagship of the CERN fixed target program ', studies the structure of the nucleon. Gluon polarization analysis was the main subject this year. Compass is an active experiment, and there is an ongoing effort in data taking and detector development. Two heavy ion experiments, WA98 and NA49, have finished data taking, but continue analysis. In 2008, important results on transverse momentum spectra were published. At COSY: The WASA experiment works with low energy (up to 3.7 GeV) beams of protons and deuterons, studying rare decays of eta mesons. New limits on branching ratios for such decays have been determined. This information is important for the theory of C and CP symmetry, and chiral perturbation theory. II. Preparations for soon-to-be-operating experiments at the LHC Three teams work on LHC experiments: CMS, LHCb and ALICE. The CMS experiment is ready for data taking. The muon trigger system, based on resistive plate chambers RPC, has been installed and tested using cosmic ray muons. Simulations of physical processes predicted by some extensions of the Standard Model were performed. The LHCb experiment team has worked on the system of the Inner Detector positioning station Rasnik, and the beam phase and intensity monitor (together with a P-III team). Simulations of the B decays into vector mesons, for the High Level Trigger, were performed. The ALICE team has worked on the installation of the photon detector PHOS and tests with cosmic muons. Simulations of neutral pion reconstruction were performed. Preparation of the computing base for future large experiments - work within the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid was actively pursued by a dedicated team. In 2008, many activities were directed at information and popularization of LHC physics. Our department members actively

  20. Department of High Energy Physics - Overview

    Bialkowska, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Department can be grouped into four parts: I. An ongoing analysis of data from large accelerator facilities. At CERN SPS: The Compass experiment, 'a flagship of the CERN fixed target program', studies the structure of the nucleon. Gluon polarization analysis was the main subject of this year. Compass is an active experiment, and there is an ongoing effort on data taking and detector development. Two heavy ion experiments. WA98 and NA49. have finished data taking, but continue analysis. The wide purpose NA61 experiment has taken data, and our team works on the hadron-nucleus processes, important for the neutrino program. At COSY: The WASA experiment works with low energy (up to 3,7 GeV) beams of protons and deuterons. studying η → 3π 0 decays and leptonic decays of eta mesons. New limits on branching ratios for such decays have been determined. Production of M mesons in the pd interaction was measured for the first time in the near threshold energy range. Altogether 8 publications came from the experiment. II. Start of the LHC operation. Three teams work on LHC experiments: CMS, LHCb and ALICE. The CMS experiment is ready for data taking. The muon trigger system, based on the resistive plate chambers RFC, has been installed and tested. Three papers on the detector performance have been published, and 25 submitted for publication. The LHCb experiment team has worked on the system of the Inner Detector positioning station Rasnik, and the beam phase and intensity monitor (together with the (P-III team). Simulations of the B decays into vector mesons, for the High Level Trigger, were performed. The ALICE team has worked on the installation of the photon detector PHOS and tests with cosmic muons. Simulations for the neutral pion reconstruction were performed. The first very preliminary data on multiplicity from pp collisions at 900 GeV have been published. Preparation of the computing base for future large experiments - work

  1. Ecosystem monitoring two Department of Energy sites

    Gray, R.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site was established in southeastern Washington to produce plutonium during World War II. The Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle, originally used for loading conventional ammunition shells and bombs, was rehabilitated and enhanced in the 1950s to assemble nuclear weapons. Environmental monitoring has been ongoing at both locations for several decades. Monitoring objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of facility operations on air, surface and ground waters, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soils, and vegetation. Currently, measured concentrations of airborne radionuclides around the perimeters of both sites are below applicable guidelines. Concentrations of radionuclides and nonradiological water quality in the Columbia River at Hanford, and radiological and nonradiological water quality in the Ogallala Aquifer beneath the Pantex Plant are in compliance with applicable standards. Foodstuffs irrigated with river water downstream from the Hanford Site show levels of radionuclides that are similar to those found in foodstuffs from control areas. The low levels of 137 Cs and 9O Sr in some onsite Hanford wildlife samples and concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from onsite and offsite at both locations are typical of those attributable to naturally occurring radioactivity and to worldwide fallout. The calculated dose potentially received by a maximally exposed individual (i.e., based on hypothetical, worst-case assumptions for all routes of exposure) at both sites in 1993 was ≤ 0.03 mrem. Ironically, by virtue of its size (1450 km 2 [560 mi 2 ]), restricted public access, and conservative use of undeveloped land, the Hanford Site has provided a sanctuary for plant and animal populations that have been eliminated from, or greatly reduced on, surrounding agricultural and range lands. Ongoing studies will determine if this is also true at Pantex Plant

  2. Training courses run by the Department of Atomic Energy, India

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India, conducts a large number of courses covering a variety of fields, mainly concerned with nuclear energy and its applications. These courses are : (1) a comprehensive multidisciplinary course in nuclear sciences and engineering, (2) courses in safety aspects of: (a) the medical uses of radioisotopes, (b) research applications of ionising radiations, (c) the industrial applications of radiation sources, and (d) industrial radiography; (3) industrial radiographer's certification course, (4) course in hospital physics and radiological physics, (5) diploma course in radiation medicine, (6) courses in operation and maintenance of: (a) research reactors and facilities, (b) nuclear power reactors, and (7) course in exploration of atomic minerals. Detailed information on these courses, covering institutions of DAE conducting them, duration, academic requirements for admission to them, method of adimission, detailed syllabus, and general information such as fees, accommodation, stipend if any, etc. is given. (M.G.B.)

  3. Environmental Science and Technology department. Annual report 1991

    Jensen, A.; Gunderson, V.; Hansen, H.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    Selected activities in the Environmental Science and Technology Department during 1991 are presented. The research approach in the department is predominantly experimental. The research topics emphasized are introduced and reviewed in chapters one to seven: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmosphere, 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition, 5. Geochemistry, 6. Ecology, 7. Other activities. The Department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes is presented together with information about large facilities managed and used by the department. Information about the department`s education and training activities are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations. Further, names of the scientific and technical staff members, Ph.D. students and visiting scientists are listed. (au) (23 ills., 58 refs.).

  4. White House science council ponders measures to improve energy funding

    Jones, D

    2003-01-01

    "The business strategy of the Energy Department's Office of Science is largely based on its 20-year plan for constructing or upgrading 28 facilities, most of them at department laboratories, DOE science chief Raymond Orbach told members of a White House advisory panel last week" (1 page).

  5. The science of energy

    Newton, Roger G

    2012-01-01

    This book aims to describe the scientific concepts of energy. Accessible to readers with no scientific education beyond high-school chemistry, it starts with the basic notion of energy and the fundamental laws that govern it, such as conservation, and explains the various forms of energy, such as electrical, chemical, and nuclear. It then proceeds to describe ways in which energy is stored for very long times in the various fossil fuels (petroleum, gas, coal) as well as for short times (flywheels, pumped storage, batteries, fuel cells, liquid hydrogen). The book also discusses the modes of transport of energy, especially those of electrical energy via lasers and transmission lines, as well as why the latter uses alternating current at high voltages. The altered view of energy introduced by quantum mechanics is also discussed, as well as how almost all the Earth's energy originates from the Sun. Finally, the history of the forms of energy in the course of development of the universe is described, and how this ...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy FY 1994 and 1995 annual performance report

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This is the Department of Energy`s first Annual Performance Report. The topics of the report include a new era for the US DOE, sustainable energy, science and technology, national security--reducing the global nuclear danger, environmental quality, economic productivity through a competitive economy and the critical success factors--assessing the way the US DOE does business.

  7. On teaching computer ethics within a computer science department.

    Quinn, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    The author has surveyed a quarter of the accredited undergraduate computer science programs in the United States. More than half of these programs offer a 'social and ethical implications of computing' course taught by a computer science faculty member, and there appears to be a trend toward teaching ethics classes within computer science departments. Although the decision to create an 'in house' computer ethics course may sometimes be a pragmatic response to pressure from the accreditation agency, this paper argues that teaching ethics within a computer science department can provide students and faculty members with numerous benefits. The paper lists topics that can be covered in a computer ethics course and offers some practical suggestions for making the course successful.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy thermal energy storage research activities review: 1989 Proceedings

    Hoffman, H.W. [ed.] [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomlinson, J.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1989-03-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers the opportunity for the recovery and re-use of heat currently rejected to the ambient environment. Further, through the ability of TES to match an energy supply with a thermal energy demand, TES increases efficiencies of energy systems and improves capacity factors of power plants. The US Department of Energy has been the leader in TES research, development, and demonstration since recognition in 1976 of the need for fostering energy conservation as a component of the national energy budget. The federal program on TES R and D is the responsibility of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution within the US Department of Energy (DOE). The overall program is organized into three program areas: diurnal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat for use in residential and commercial buildings on a daily cycle; industrial--relating primarily to higher temperature heat for use in industrial and utility processes on an hourly to daily cycle; seasonal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat or chill for use in residential complexes (central supply as for apartments or housing developments), commercial (light manufacturing, processing, or retail), and industrial (space conditioning) on a seasonal to annual cycle. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Report on Project Action Sheet PP05 task 3 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Republic of Korea Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology (MEST).

    Snell, Mark Kamerer

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 3 of Project Action Sheet PP05 between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology (MEST) for Support with Review of an ROK Risk Evaluation Process. This task was to have Sandia National Laboratories collaborate with the Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) on several activities concerning how to determine the Probability of Neutralization, PN, and the Probability of System Effectiveness, PE, to include: providing descriptions on how combat simulations are used to determine PN and PE; comparisons of the strengths and weaknesses of two neutralization models (the Neutralization.xls spreadsheet model versus the Brief Adversary Threat-Loss Estimator (BATLE) software); and demonstrating how computer simulations can be used to determine PN. Note that the computer simulation used for the demonstration was the Scenario Toolkit And Generation Environment (STAGE) simulation, which is a stand-alone synthetic tactical simulation sold by Presagis Canada Incorporated. The demonstration is provided in a separate Audio Video Interleave (.AVI) file.

  10. Department of Energy WindSentinel Loan Program Description

    Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sturges, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns two AXYS WindSentinel buoys that collect a comprehensive set of meteorological and oceanographic data to support resource characterization for wind energy offshore. The two buoys were delivered to DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in September, 2014. After acceptance testing and initial performance testing and evaluation at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, the buoys have been deployed off the U.S. East Coast. One buoy was deployed approximately 42 km east of Virginia Beach, Virginia from December, 2014 through June, 2016. The second buoy was deployed approximately 5 km off Atlantic City, New Jersey in November, 2015. Data from the buoys are available to the public. Interested parties can create an account and log in to http://offshoreweb.pnnl.gov. In response to a number of inquiries and unsolicited proposals, DOE’s Wind Energy Technologies Office is implementing a program, to be managed by PNNL, to lend the buoys to qualified parties for the purpose of acquiring wind resource characterization data in areas of interest for offshore wind energy development. This document describes the buoys, the scope of the loans, the process of how borrowers will be selected, and the schedule for implementation of this program, including completing current deployments.

  11. Environmental Science and Technology department. Annual report 1991

    Jensen, A.; Gunderson, V.; Hansen, H.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H. (eds.)

    1992-06-01

    Selected activities in the Environmental Science and Technology Department during 1991 are presented. The research approach in the department is predominantly experimental. The research topics emphasized are introduced and reviewed in chapters one to seven: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmosphere, 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition, 5. Geochemistry, 6. Ecology, 7. Other activities. The Department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes is presented together with information about large facilities managed and used by the department. Information about the department's education and training activities are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations. Further, names of the scientific and technical staff members, Ph.D. students and visiting scientists are listed. (au) (23 ills., 58 refs.).

  12. Environmental Science and Technology department. Annual report 1991

    Jensen, A.; Gunderson, V.; Hansen, H.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.

    1992-06-01

    Selected activities in the Environmental Science and Technology Department during 1991 are presented. The research approach in the department is predominantly experimental. The research topics emphasized are introduced and reviewed in chapters one to seven: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmosphere, 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition, 5. Geochemistry, 6. Ecology, 7. Other activities. The Department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes is presented together with information about large facilities managed and used by the department. Information about the department's education and training activities are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations. Further, names of the scientific and technical staff members, Ph.D. students and visiting scientists are listed. (au) (23 ills., 58 refs.)

  13. Enviromental Science and Technology Department. Annual report 1990

    Jensen, A; Helms Joergensen, J; Nielsen, O J; Nilsson, K; Aarkrog, A

    1991-03-01

    Selected activities of the Environmental Science and Technology Department during 1990 are presented. The research in the department is predominantly experimental, and the research topics emphaized are introduced and reviewed in eight chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmospheric Environment, 3. Plant Genetics and Biology, 4. Nutrient Efficiency in Plant Production, 5. Chemistry of the Geosphere, 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling, 7. Other Acitvities, 8. Large Facilities. The department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes is presented together with information about large facilities managed and used by the department as well as activities within education and training. Lists of scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Ph.D. students, publications, lectures and poster presentations are included in the report. (author).

  14. Career Preparation and the Political Science Major: Evidence from Departments

    Collins, Todd A.; Knotts, H. Gibbs; Schiff, Jen

    2012-01-01

    We know little about the amount of career preparation offered to students in political science departments. This lack of information is particularly troubling given the state of the current job market and the growth of applied degree programs on university campuses. To address this issue, this article presents the results of a December 2010 survey…

  15. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1992

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A. [eds.

    1993-03-01

    Through basic and strategic research, the Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas for industrial and agricultural production thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department in predominantly experimental. Selected department research activities during 1992 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. The Atmospheric Environment. 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology. 4. Plant Nutrition and Mineral Cycling. 5. Chemistry of the Geosphere. 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling. 7. Other Activities. The department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes in presented in addition in formation about large research and development facilities used and management by the department. The department`s educational and training activities are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technological staff members, visiting scientists, Post. doctoral fellows, Ph.D. students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au).

  16. A Department of Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Hampton University

    Paterson, W. R.; McCormick, M. P.; Russell, J. M.; Anderson, J.; Kireev, S.; Loughman, R. P.; Smith, W. L.

    2006-12-01

    With this presentation we discuss the status of plans for a Department of Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Hampton University. Hampton University is a privately endowed, non-profit, non-sectarian, co-educational, and historically black university with 38 baccalaureate, 14 masters, and 4 doctoral degree programs. The graduate program in physics currently offers advanced degrees with concentration in Atmospheric Science. The 10 students now enrolled benefit substantially from the research experience and infrastructure resident in the university's Center for Atmospheric Sciences (CAS), which is celebrating its tenth anniversary. Promoting a greater diversity of participants in geosciences is an important objective for CAS. To accomplish this, we require reliable pipelines of students into the program. One such pipeline is our undergraduate minor in Space, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences (SEAS minor). This minor concentraton of study is contributing to awareness of geosciences on the Hampton University campus, and beyond, as our students matriculate and join the workforce, or pursue higher degrees. However, the current graduate program, with its emphasis on physics, is not necessarily optimal for atmospheric scientists, and it limits our ability to recruit students who do not have a physics degree. To increase the base of candidate students, we have proposed creation of a Department of Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, which could attract students from a broader range of academic disciplines. The revised curriculum would provide for greater concentration in atmospheric and planetary sciences, yet maintain a degree of flexibility to allow for coursework in physics or other areas to meet the needs of individual students. The department would offer the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and maintain the SEAS minor. The university's administration and faculty have approved our plan for this new department pending authorization by the university's board of trustees, which will

  17. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1994

    Jensen, A; Gissel Nielsen, G; Gundersen, V; Nielsen, O J; Oestergaard, H; Aarkrog, A [eds.

    1995-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department engage in research to improve the scientific basis for new methods in industrial and agricultural production. Through basic and applied research in chemistry, biology and ecology the department aspires to develop methods and technology for the future industrial and agricultural production exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The research approach in the department is predominantly experimental. The research activities are organized in five research programmes and supported by three special facility units. In this annual report the main research activities during 1993 are introduced and reviewed in eight chapters. Chapter 1. Introduction. The five research programmes are covered in chapter 2-7: 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Mineral Cycling, 5. Trace Analysis and reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, 7. Other Research Activities. The three special activity units in chapter 8. Special Facilities. The department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research projects and programmes is presented in addition to information about large research and development facilities used and managed by the department. The department`s educational and training activites are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. Names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, post. doctoral fellows, Ph.D. students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) (9 tabs., 43 ills., 167 refs.).

  18. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1993

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A. [eds.

    1994-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1993 are presented and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmospheric Environment, 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Applied Geochemistry, 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling, 7. Other Activities. The Department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about large experimental facilities used in the department. Information about the department`s contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc students are also listed. (au).

  19. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1995

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A. [eds.

    1996-03-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1995 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Trace analysis and Reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, and 7. Other Activities. The department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about large experimental facilities used in the department. Information about the department`s contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) 15 tabs., 40 ills., 163 refs.

  20. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  1. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Manowitz, B.

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications

  2. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Manowitz, B

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications.

  3. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B.

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  4. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report 1999

    2000-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A sum......-mary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  5. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  6. Enviromental Science and Technology Department. Annual report 1990

    Jensen, A.; Helms Joergensen, J.; Nielsen, O.J.; Nilsson, K.; Aarkrog, A.

    1991-03-01

    Selected activities of the Environmental Science and Technology Department during 1990 are presented. The research in the department is predominantly experimental, and the research topics emphaized are introduced and reviewed in eight chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmospheric Environment, 3. Plant Genetics and Biology, 4. Nutrient Efficiency in Plant Production, 5. Chemistry of the Geosphere, 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling, 7. Other Acitvities, 8. Large Facilities. The department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes is presented together with information about large facilities managed and used by the department as well as activities within education and training. Lists of scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Ph.D. students, publications, lectures and poster presentations are included in the report. (author)

  7. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1996

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O. J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A. [eds.

    1997-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The Department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the Department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1996 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Trace Analysis and Reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, and 7. Other Activities. The Department`s contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about the use of its large experimental facilities. Information about the Department`s contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) 15 tabs., 63 ills., 207 refs.

  8. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1992

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A.

    1993-03-01

    Through basic and strategic research, the Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas for industrial and agricultural production thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department in predominantly experimental. Selected department research activities during 1992 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. The Atmospheric Environment. 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology. 4. Plant Nutrition and Mineral Cycling. 5. Chemistry of the Geosphere. 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling. 7. Other Activities. The department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes in presented in addition in formation about large research and development facilities used and management by the department. The department's educational and training activities are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technological staff members, visiting scientists, Post. doctoral fellows, Ph.D. students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au)

  9. New curriculum at Nuclear Science Department, National University of Malaysia

    Shahidan bin Radiman; Ismail bin Bahari

    1995-01-01

    A new undergraduate curriculum at the Department of Nuclear Science, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia is discussed. It includes the rational and objective of the new curriculum, course content and expectations due to a rapidly changing job market. The major change was a move to implement only on one Nuclear Science module rather than the present three modules of Radiobiology, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Physics. This will optimise not only laboratory use of facilities but also effectiveness of co-supervision. Other related aspects like industrial training and research exposures for the undergraduates are also discussed

  10. Broad Overview of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Opportunities for Department of Defense Installations

    Anderson, E.; Antkowiak, M.; Butt, R.; Davis, J.; Dean, J.; Hillesheim, M.; Hotchkiss, E.; Hunsberger, R.; Kandt, A.; Lund, J.; Massey, K.; Robichaud, R.; Stafford, B.; Visser, C.

    2011-08-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Developmental Program (SERDP)/Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) is the Department of Defense?s (DOD) environmental science and technology program focusing on issues related to environment and energy for the military services. The SERDP/ESTCP Office requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide technical assistance with strategic planning by evaluating the potential for several types of renewable energy technologies at DOD installations. NREL was tasked to provide technical expertise and strategic advice for the feasibility of geothermal resources, waste-to-energy technology, photovoltaics (PV), wind, microgrids, and building system technologies on military installations. This technical report is the deliverable for these tasks.

  11. Mathematics education a spectrum of work in mathematical sciences departments

    Hsu, Pao-sheng; Pollatsek, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Many in the mathematics community in the U.S. are involved in mathematics education in various capacities. This book highlights the breadth of the work in K-16 mathematics education done by members of US departments of mathematical sciences. It contains contributions by mathematicians and mathematics educators who do work in areas such as teacher education, quantitative literacy, informal education, writing and communication, social justice, outreach and mentoring, tactile learning, art and mathematics, ethnomathematics, scholarship of teaching and learning, and mathematics education research. Contributors describe their work, its impact, and how it is perceived and valued. In addition, there is a chapter, co-authored by two mathematicians who have become administrators, on the challenges of supporting, evaluating, and rewarding work in mathematics education in departments of mathematical sciences. This book is intended to inform the readership of the breadth of the work and to encourage discussion of its val...

  12. PNNL Highlights for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (July 2013-July 2014)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Warren, Pamela M.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2014-08-13

    This report includes research highlights of work funded in part or whole by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as well as selected leadership accomplishments.

  13. Observations on gender equality in a UK Earth Sciences department

    Imber, Jonathan; Allen, Mark; Chamberlain, Katy; Foulger, Gillian; Gregory, Emma; Hoult, Jill; Macpherson, Colin; Winship, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The progress of women to senior positions within UK higher education institutes has been slow. Women are worst represented in science, engineering and technology disciplines, where, in 2011, only 15% of professors were female. The national position is reflected in the Department of Earth Sciences at Durham University. The Department's gender profile shows steadily increasing proportions of females from undergraduate (ca. 38%) to postgraduate (ca. 42%) to postdoctoral (ca. 45%) levels, before dropping sharply with increasing seniority to 33% (n=1), 14% (n=1), 14% (n=1) and 13% (n=2), respectively, of lecturers, senior lecturers, readers and professors. The data suggest there is no shortage of talented female postgraduates and postdoctoral researchers; however, females are not applying, not being shortlisted, or not being appointed to academic roles in the expected proportions. Analysis of applications to academic positions in the Department during the period 2010-2015 suggests that "head hunting" senior academics, in some cases driven by external factors such as the UK Research Excellence Framework, resulted in a small proportion (between 0% and 11%) of female applicants. These results can be explained by the small number of senior female Earth Scientists nationally and, probably, internationally. Junior lectureship positions attracted between 24% and 33% female applicants, with the greatest proportion of females applying where the specialism within Earth Sciences was deliberately left open. In addition to these externally advertised posts, the Department has had some success converting independent research Fellowships, held by female colleagues, into permanent academic positions (n=2 between 2010 and 2015). Data for academic promotions show there is a significant negative correlation between year of appointment to first academic position within the Department (r=0.81, n=19, pmentoring scheme for postdoctoral staff, and plan to extend the scheme to academic staff

  14. Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    Kidd, E.M.

    1995-03-01

    The Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC), is the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) centralized software management facility. It is operated under contract for the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ESTSC is authorized by DOE and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to license and distribute DOE-and NRC-sponsored software developed by national laboratories and other facilities and by contractors of DOE and NRC. ESTSC also has selected software from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) through a software exchange agreement that DOE has with the agency.

  15. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1994

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A.

    1995-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department engage in research to improve the scientific basis for new methods in industrial and agricultural production. Through basic and applied research in chemistry, biology and ecology the department aspires to develop methods and technology for the future industrial and agricultural production exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The research approach in the department is predominantly experimental. The research activities are organized in five research programmes and supported by three special facility units. In this annual report the main research activities during 1993 are introduced and reviewed in eight chapters. Chapter 1. Introduction. The five research programmes are covered in chapter 2-7: 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Mineral Cycling, 5. Trace Analysis and reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, 7. Other Research Activities. The three special activity units in chapter 8. Special Facilities. The department's contribution to national and international collaborative research projects and programmes is presented in addition to information about large research and development facilities used and managed by the department. The department's educational and training activites are included in the annual report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. Names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, post. doctoral fellows, Ph.D. students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) (9 tabs., 43 ills., 167 refs.)

  16. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1995

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A.

    1996-03-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1995 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Trace analysis and Reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, and 7. Other Activities. The department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about large experimental facilities used in the department. Information about the department's contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) 15 tabs., 40 ills., 163 refs

  17. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1993

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A.

    1994-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1993 are presented and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. The Atmospheric Environment, 3. Plant Genetics and Resistance Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Applied Geochemistry, 6. Ecology and Mineral Cycling, 7. Other Activities. The Department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about large experimental facilities used in the department. Information about the department's contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc students are also listed. (au)

  18. U. S. Department of Energy Aerial Measuring Systems

    J. J. Lease

    1998-10-01

    The Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) is an aerial surveillance system. This system consists of remote sensing equipment to include radiation detectors; multispectral, thermal, radar, and laser scanners; precision cameras; and electronic imaging and still video systems. This equipment, in varying combinations, is mounted in an airplane or helicopter and flown at different heights in specific patterns to gather various types of data. This system is a key element in the US Department of Energy's (DOE) national emergency response assets. The mission of the AMS program is twofold--first, to respond to emergencies involving radioactive materials by conducting aerial surveys to rapidly track and map the contamination that may exist over a large ground area and second, to conduct routinely scheduled, aerial surveys for environmental monitoring and compliance purposes through the use of credible science and technology. The AMS program evolved from an early program, begun by a predecessor to the DOE--the Atomic Energy Commission--to map the radiation that may have existed within and around the terrestrial environments of DOE facilities, which produced, used, or stored radioactive materials.

  19. U. S. Department of Energy Aerial Measuring Systems

    Lease, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) is an aerial surveillance system. This system consists of remote sensing equipment to include radiation detectors; multispectral, thermal, radar, and laser scanners; precision cameras; and electronic imaging and still video systems. This equipment, in varying combinations, is mounted in an airplane or helicopter and flown at different heights in specific patterns to gather various types of data. This system is a key element in the US Department of Energy's (DOE) national emergency response assets. The mission of the AMS program is twofold--first, to respond to emergencies involving radioactive materials by conducting aerial surveys to rapidly track and map the contamination that may exist over a large ground area and second, to conduct routinely scheduled, aerial surveys for environmental monitoring and compliance purposes through the use of credible science and technology. The AMS program evolved from an early program, begun by a predecessor to the DOE--the Atomic Energy Commission--to map the radiation that may have existed within and around the terrestrial environments of DOE facilities, which produced, used, or stored radioactive materials

  20. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    1991-01-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations

  1. Annual report 1997. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Madsen, P.H.; Dannemand Andersen, P.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. (au)

  2. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences

    Neilson, Hutch

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear fusion — the process that powers the sun — offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITER fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world’s population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW’s task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.)

  3. Environmental Science and Technology Department annual report 1996

    Jensen, A.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Gundersen, V.; Nielsen, O.J.; Oestergaard, H.; Aarkrog, A.

    1997-02-01

    The Environmental Science and Technology Department aspires to develop new ideas and methods for industrial and agricultural production through basic and applied research thus exerting less stress and strain on the environment. The Department endeavours to develop a competent scientific basis for future production technology and management methods in industrial and agricultural production. The research approach in the Department is mainly experimental. Selected departmental research activities during 1996 are introduced and reviewed in seven chapters: 1. Introduction, 2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution, 3. Gene Technology and Population Biology, 4. Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Cycling, 5. Trace Analysis and Reduction of Pollution in the Geosphere, 6. Ecology, and 7. Other Activities. The Department's contribution to national and international collaborative research programmes are presented together with information about the use of its large experimental facilities. Information about the Department's contribution to education and training are included in the report along with lists of publications, publications in press, lectures and poster presentations at international meetings. The names of the scientific and technical staff members, visiting scientists, Postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D students and M.Sc. students are also listed. (au) 15 tabs., 63 ills., 207 refs

  4. Basic science faculty in surgical departments: advantages, disadvantages and opportunities.

    Chinoy, Mala R; Moskowitz, Jay; Wilmore, Douglas W; Souba, Wiley W

    2005-01-01

    The number of Ph.D. faculty in clinical departments now exceeds the number of Ph.D. faculty in basic science departments. Given the escalating pressures on academic surgeons to produce in the clinical arena, the recruitment and retention of high-quality Ph.D.s will become critical to the success of an academic surgical department. This success will be as dependent on the surgical faculty understanding the importance of the partnership as the success of the Ph.D. investigator. Tighter alignment among the various clinical and research programs and between surgeons and basic scientists will facilitate the generation of new knowledge that can be translated into useful products and services (thus improving care). To capitalize on what Ph.D.s bring to the table, surgery departments may need to establish a more formal research infrastructure that encourages the ongoing exchange of ideas and resources. Physically removing barriers between the research groups, encouraging the open exchange of techniques and observations and sharing core laboratories is characteristic of successful research teams. These strategies can meaningfully contribute to developing successful training program grants, program projects and bringing greater research recognition to the department of surgery.

  5. Department of Atomic Energy, annual report, 1980-81

    1981-01-01

    The annual report of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India for the period of the fiscal year 1980-81 surveys the work of DAE, its various constituent units and aided institutions. The main thrust of the DAE's programme in the country is directed towards peaceful uses of atomic energy - primarily for generation of electric power and also for application of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine, agriculture, and industry. The research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) at Bombay, the major R and D establishment of DAE, in the fields of nuclear physics, solid state physics, chemistry and materials science, isotope and radiation applications, reactor technology and radioactive waste management are described in detail. The R and D activities of the Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam and the aided institutions such as the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and the Tata Memorial Centre, both at Bombay, and the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta are reviewed in brief. Progress of the MHD project, the heavy water plant projects, the thermal research reactor R-5 project at BARC and nuclear power plant projects at Narora and Kalpakkam is surveyed. Performance of industrial production units such as nuclear power stations at Tarapur and Kota, the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, Atomic Minerals Division, ISOMED - the radiation sterilisation plant for medical products, the Indian Rare Earths Ltd., the Electronics Corporation of India Ltd., and the Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., is reported. India's participation in the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency and collaboration with other countries are also mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  6. 75 FR 6651 - Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    2010-02-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of... Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Public Law 92- 463, 86 Stat. 770) requires...; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  7. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and high out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 -- Appendix C

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department`s 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research.

  8. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  9. Department of Energy workshops on industrial energy conservation reporting

    Harvey, Douglas G.

    1979-01-01

    A voluntary industrial energy-conservation program was initiated and now includes 50 trade organizations representing over 3,000 companies. Their current reporting system is an effort to respond to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act requirements, as now modified by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. DOE's Office of Industrial Programs held six workshops in various key locations between November 1978 and February 1979 to enable energy managers to develop ideas and make suggestions that would improve the current and future energy-reporting programs. This report is a summary of the wide range of recommendations that the workshop participants offered as a means of meeting the NECPA requirements and the criticism of the current reporting program. It also reflects industry's views on potential approaches to future reporting. (MCW)

  10. Department of Energy remedial action program annual conference: Proceedings

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial action at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites located throughout the United States. This volume contains 18 papers on the topics environmental restoration and hazardous/mixed waste characterization and remediation. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database

  11. Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies

    None

    2010-11-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  12. Energy Decision Science and Informatics | Integrated Energy Solutions |

    NREL Decision Science and Informatics Energy Decision Science and Informatics NREL utilizes and advances state-of-the-art decision science and informatics to help partners make well-informed energy decisions backed by credible, objective data analysis and insights to maximize the impact of energy

  13. 76 FR 34215 - Notice of Department of Energy-Quadrennial Technology Review Capstone Workshop

    2011-06-13

    ... Council of Advisors on Science & Technology. This Administration's national energy goals are to: Reduce..., 2011)], the Department requested public comment on the questions related to the DOE-QTR and the framing... framing document: In the mobile sector, these are vehicle efficiency, electrification, and advanced fuels...

  14. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems. Volume 1 of 3 - Report and Appendix A

    1998-04-01

    This report is submitted in response to a Congressional request and is intended to communicate the nature, content, goals, and accomplishments of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to interested and affected parties in the Department and its contractors, at Federal agencies, in the scientific community, and in the general public. The EMSP was started in response to a request to mount an effort in longer term basic science research to seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective. Section 1, ''Background of the Program,'' provides information on the evolution of the EMSP and how it is managed, and summarizes recent accomplishments. Section 2, ''Research Award Selection Process,'' provides an overview of the ongoing needs identification process, solicitation development, and application review for scientific merit and programmatic relevance. Section 3, ''Linkages to Environmental Cleanup Problems,'' provides an overview of the major interrelationships (linkages) among EMSP basic research awards, Environmental Management problem areas, and high cost projects. Section 4, ''Capitalizing on Science Investments,'' discusses the steps the EMSP plans to use to facilitate the application of research results in Environmental Management strategies through effective communication and collaboration. Appendix A contains four program notices published by the EMSP inviting applications for grants

  15. Personnel and working area monitoring at the Department of Nuclear Science, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

    Amran Abd Majid; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Che Rosli Che Mat

    1995-01-01

    Personnel (staff and student) and working area absorbed dose monitoring at the Department of Nuclear Science from 1984 until September 1993 is reported. Generally average absorbed dose received by the staff and working area were less than 0.5 and 2.0 mSv/yr respectively. The application of low activity of radioactive materials and complying the UKM (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia) and LPTA (AELB) - Atomic Energy Licensing Board regulations contributing to the low rate recorded. (author)

  16. Onsite assessments for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program

    McMahan, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    For Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, compliance with DOE Order 5480.11 became a requirement in January 1989. One of the requirements of this Order is that personal external dosimetry programs be accredited under the Department of Energy's Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) in Personnel Dosimetry. The accreditation process, from the facility's perspective, is two-fold: dosimeters must meet performance criteria in radiation categories appropriate for each facility, and personnel administering and carrying out the program must demonstrate good operating practices. The DOELAP onsite assessment is designed to provide an independent evaluation of the latter

  17. Overview. Department of High Energy Physics. Section 5

    Coghen, T.

    1995-01-01

    The activities of Department of High Energy Physics in 1994 have been presented. They cover a variety of problems of experimental and theoretical high energy elementary particle physics: hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (mainly characteristics of particle production , including heavy quark physics), e + e - interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluations of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles.Research on detectors and development of apparatus for high energy physics experiments at future accelerators such as LHC or RHIC were also carried out. The short information about personnel employed in the Department, seminars, publication, conferences and reports is also given

  18. Overview. Department of High Energy Physics. Section 5

    Coghen, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The activities of Department of High Energy Physics in 1994 have been presented. They cover a variety of problems of experimental and theoretical high energy elementary particle physics: hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (mainly characteristics of particle production , including heavy quark physics), e{sup +} e{sup -} interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluations of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles.Research on detectors and development of apparatus for high energy physics experiments at future accelerators such as LHC or RHIC were also carried out. The short information about personnel employed in the Department, seminars, publication, conferences and reports is also given.

  19. Overview. Department of High Energy Physics. Section 5

    Coghen, T [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The activities of Department of High Energy Physics in 1994 have been presented. They cover a variety of problems of experimental and theoretical high energy elementary particle physics: hadronic and leptonic interactions with nucleons and nuclei (mainly characteristics of particle production , including heavy quark physics), e{sup +} e{sup -} interactions and tests of the Standard Model (also evaluations of radiative corrections), ultrarelativistic heavy ion interactions and search for the quark-gluon plasma, as well as spectra, composition and interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles.Research on detectors and development of apparatus for high energy physics experiments at future accelerators such as LHC or RHIC were also carried out. The short information about personnel employed in the Department, seminars, publication, conferences and reports is also given.

  20. Special Report "The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Department of Energy"

    None

    2009-03-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law on February 17, 2009, as a way to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in science and health, and invest in the Nation's energy future. This national effort will require an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to ensure that U.S. citizens know where their tax dollars are going and how they are being spent. As part of the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive more than $38 billion to support a number of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. Additionally, the Department's authority to make or guarantee energy-related loans has increased to about $127 billion. The Department plans to disburse the vast majority of the funds it receives through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other financial instruments. The supplemental funding provided to the Department of Energy under the Recovery Act dwarfs the Department's annual budget of about $27 billion. The infusion of these funds and the corresponding increase in effort required to ensure that they are properly controlled and disbursed in a timely manner will, without doubt, strain existing resources. It will also have an equally challenging impact on the inherent risks associated with operating the Department's sizable portfolio of missions and activities and, this is complicated by the fact that, in many respects, the Recovery Act requirements represent a fundamental transformation of the Department's mission. If these challenges are to be met successfully, all levels of the Department's structure and its many constituents, including the existing contractor community; the national laboratory system; state and local governments; community action groups and literally thousands of other contract, grant, loan and cooperative agreement recipients throughout the Nation will have to strengthen existing or

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  2. Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program

    1996-08-01

    This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970's, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department's planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date

  3. Design of the Information Science and Systems (IS Curriculum in a Computer and Information Sciences Department

    Behrooz Seyed-Abbassi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous technological changes have resulted in a rapid turnover of knowledge in the computing field. The impact of these changes directly affects the computer-related curriculum offered by educational institutions and dictates that curriculum must evolve to keep pace with technology and to provide students with the skills required by businesses. At the same time, accreditations of curricula from reviewing organizations provide additional guidelines and standardization for computing science as well as information science programs. One of the areas significantly affected by these changes is the field of information systems. This paper describes the evaluation and course structure for the undergraduate information science and systems program in the Computer and Information Sciences Department at the University of North Florida. A list of the major required and elective courses as well as an overview of the challenges encountered during the revision of the curriculum is given.

  4. Guidelines for DOE Long Term Civilian Research and Development. Volume III. Basic Energy Sciences, High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    1985-12-01

    The Research Panel prepared two reports. This report reviews the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics programs. The second report examines the Environment, Health and Safety programs in the Department. This summary addresses the general value and priority of basic research programs for the Department of Energy and the nation. In addition, it describes the key strategic issues and major recommendations for each program area

  5. Wind Energy Department: Scientific and technical progress 1999-2000

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Wind Energy Department fall within boundary layer meteorology, atmospheric turbulence, aerodynamics, aero-acoustics, structural dynamics, machine and construction technology and design of power systems and power system controls. Theobjective is to develop methods for design......; test and siting of wind turbines; prediction of wind loads and wind resources as well as methods to determine the dispersion, transformation and effect of air pollution. The present report describes theorganisation of the department and presents selected scientific highlights and results from the two...

  6. Wind energy department: Scientific and technical progress 1999 - 2000

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, G.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Wind Energy Department fall within boundary layer meteorology, atmospheric turbulence, aerodynamics, aero-acoustics, structural dynamics, machine and construction technology and design of power systems and power system controls. The objective is to develop methods for design; test and siting of wind turbines; prediction of wind loads and wind resources as well as methods to determine the dispersion, transformation and effect of air pollution. The present report describes the organisation of the department and presents selected scientific highlights and results from the two-year period 1999-2000. (au)

  7. Scientific conference at the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences

    Rybakova, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    Review of reports at the scientific conference of the department of biomedical sciences of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, held in April, 1997, on the topic of Novel techniques in biomedical studied. Attention was paid to the creation and uses of rapid diagnosis instruments in micro devices, to the development of electron-photon, immuno enzyme and radionuclide techniques and their realization in automatic special equipment. Delay of native industry in creation of scientific-capacious highly efficient products, especially in the field of radiodiagnosis and instruments for laboratory studies was marked

  8. Developing an emergency department crowding dashboard: A design science approach.

    Martin, Niels; Bergs, Jochen; Eerdekens, Dorien; Depaire, Benoît; Verelst, Sandra

    2017-08-30

    As an emergency department (ED) is a complex adaptive system, the analysis of continuously gathered data is valuable to gain insight in the real-time patient flow. To support the analysis and management of ED operations, relevant data should be provided in an intuitive way. Within this context, this paper outlines the development of a dashboard which provides real-time information regarding ED crowding. The research project underlying this paper follows the principles of design science research, which involves the development and study of artifacts which aim to solve a generic problem. To determine the crowding indicators that are desired in the dashboard, a modified Delphi study is used. The dashboard is implemented using the open source Shinydashboard package in R. A dashboard is developed containing the desired crowding indicators, together with general patient flow characteristics. It is demonstrated using a dataset of a Flemish ED and fulfills the requirements which are defined a priori. The developed dashboard provides real-time information on ED crowding. This information enables ED staff to judge whether corrective actions are required in an effort to avoid the adverse effects of ED crowding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reinventing Emergency Department Flow via Healthcare Delivery Science.

    DeFlitch, Christopher; Geeting, Glenn; Paz, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare system flow resulting in emergency departments (EDs) crowding is a quality and access problem. This case study examines an overcrowded academic health center ED with increasing patient volumes and limited physical space for expansion. ED capacity and efficiency improved via engineering principles application, addressing patient and staffing flows, and reinventing the delivery model. Using operational data and staff input, patient and staff flow models were created, identifying bottlenecks (points of inefficiency). A new flow model of emergency care delivery, physician-directed queuing, was developed. Expanding upon physicians in triage, providers passively evaluate all patients upon arrival, actively manage patients requiring fewer resources, and direct patients requiring complex resources to further evaluation in ED areas. Sustained over time, ED efficiency improved as measured by near elimination of "left without being seen" patients and waiting times with improvement in door to doctor, patient satisfaction, and total length of stay. All improvements were in the setting on increased patient volume and no increase in physician staffing. Our experience suggests that practical application of healthcare delivery science can be used to improve ED efficiency. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Department of Energy. Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program

    Riley, Jon [National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-05-05

    local large manufacturers (OEMs) who could provide pull to encourage SMMs (current and future suppliers) to participate. Central to this entire effort was the opportunity that this Final Report documents corresponding to the specific tasks associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded component of the InnoState Jobs Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program.

  11. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries

    None

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for more than 1,400 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2012 at some 180 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES Divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  12. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2014 Research Summaries

    None

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for more than 1,200 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2014 at some 200 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES Divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  13. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2011 Research Summaries

    None

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts for more than 1,300 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2011 at some 180 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  14. The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program

    Felty, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

  15. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: An overview

    Eyman, L.D.; Swiger, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the national Department of Energy (DOE) program for managing hazardous waste. An overview of the DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), including its mission, organizational structure, and major program elements, is given. The paper focuses on the contractor support role assigned to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the establishment of the HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office (SCO). The major SCO programs are described, and the organization for managing the programs is discussed. The HAZWRAP SCO approaches to waste management planning and to technology research, development, and demonstration are presented. The role of the SCO in the DOE Environmental Restoration Program and the development of the DOE Waste Information network are reviewed. Also discussed is the DOE Work for Others Program, where waste management decentralized support, via interagency agreements between DOE and the Department of Defense and DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency, is provided for those sponsors planning remedial response actions. 2 refs

  16. Human factors at the Department of Energy National Laboratories

    Pond, D.J.; Waters, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    After World War II, a system of national laboratories was created to foster a suitable environment for scientific research. This paper reports that today, human factors activities are in evidence at most of the nine U.S. Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories as well as at a number of special program facilities. This paper provides historical and future perspectives on the DOE's human factors programs

  17. Energy Forecasting Models Within the Department of the Navy.

    1982-06-01

    standing the climatic conditions responsible for the results. Both models have particular advantages in parti- cular applications and will be examined...and moving average processes. A similar notation for a model with seasonality . .- considerations will be ARIMA (p d j)(P Q) 3=12, where the upper...AD-A12l 950 ENERGY FORECASTING MODELS WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE 1/4 NAYY(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA L &I BUTTOIPH JUN 82

  18. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste disposal concepts

    Ozaki, C.; Page, L.; Morreale, B.; Owens, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy manages its low-level waste (LLW), regulated by DOE Order 5820.2A by using an overall systems approach. This systems approach provides an improved and consistent management system for all DOE LLW waste, from generation to disposal. This paper outlines six basic disposal concepts used in the systems approach, discusses issues associated with each of the concepts, and outlines both present and future disposal concepts used at six DOE sites

  19. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation

  20. Using Mathematics in Science: Working with Your Mathematics Department

    Lyon, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Changes to the mathematics and science curriculums are designed to increase rigour in mathematics, and place greater emphasis on mathematical content in science subjects at key stages 3, 4 and 5 (ages 11-18). One way to meet the growing challenge of providing increased emphasis on mathematics in the science curriculum is greater collaboration…

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Report on the First Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR)

    Quadrennial Technology Review Team

    2011-09-01

    Access to clean, affordable, secure, and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of American’s economic growth. Yet, today the Nation’s systems that produce, store, transmit, and use energy are falling short of U.S needs. The Department of Energy’s (DOE) first Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR), launched at the recommendation of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), addresses these facts. The report details today’s energy landscape and the associated energy security, economic and environmental challenges; provides a framework for presenting six strategies to address those challenges encompassing vehicle efficiency, deployment of alternative hydrocarbon fuels, increased building and industrial efficiency, modernization of the grid, and deployment of clean electricity; addresses priorities among activities in DOE’s energy-technology programs; and explains the roles that DOE, the broader government, the private sector, the national laboratories, and academia play in energy transformation.

  2. Education activities of the US Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    King, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that science education has long been a critical element in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. OCRWM has developed educational programs aimed at improving the science literacy of students from kindergarten through college and post-graduate levels, enhancing the skills of teachers, encouraging careers in science and engineering, and developing a keener awareness of science issues among the general population. Activities include interaction with educators in the development of curricula material; workshops for elementary and secondary students; cooperative agreements and projects with universities; OCRWM exhibit showings at technical and non-technical meetings and at national and regional teacher/educator conferences; the OCRWM Fellowship Program; and support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

  3. New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future

    None

    2008-12-01

    Over the past five years, the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences has engaged thousands of scientists around the world to study the current status, limiting factors and specific fundamental scientific bottlenecks blocking the widespread implementation of alternate energy technologies. The reports from the foundational BESAC workshop, the ten 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and the panel on Grand Challenge science detail the necessary research steps (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html). This report responds to a charge from the Director of the Office of Science to the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee to conduct a study with two primary goals: (1) to assimilate the scientific research directions that emerged from these workshop reports into a comprehensive set of science themes, and (2) to identify the new implementation strategies and tools required to accomplish the science. From these efforts it becomes clear that the magnitude of the challenge is so immense that existing approaches - even with improvements from advanced engineering and improved technology based on known concepts - will not be enough to secure our energy future. Instead, meeting the challenge will require fundamental understanding and scientific breakthroughs in new materials and chemical processes to make possible new energy technologies and performance levels far beyond what is now possible.

  4. Meteorology and Wind Energy Department annual report 1996

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Dannemand Andersen, P.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    1997-07-01

    In 1996 the Meteorology and Wind Energy Department has performed research within the programme areas: (1) wind energy and (2) atmospheric processes. The objectives are through research in boundary layer meteorology, fluid dynamics, aerodynamics and structural mechanics to contribute with new knowledge within (1) wind energy in relation to development, manufacturing, operation and export as well as testing and certification of wind turbines, and (2) aspects of boundary-layer meteorology related to environmental and energy problems of society. The work is supported by the research programs of the Ministry of Environment and Energy, the Nordic Council of Ministers, EU as well as by industry. Through our research and development work we develop and provide methodologies including computer models for use by industry, institutions, and governmental authorities. In the long view we are developing facilities and programs enabling us to serve as a national and European centre for wind-energy and boundary-layer meteorological research. A summary of our activities in 1996 is presented. (au) 4 tabs., 5 ills.

  5. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... personnel management demonstration project for eligible TARDEC employees. Within that notice the table...

  6. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  7. Solar energy sciences and engineering applications

    Enteria, Napoleon

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is available all over the world in different intensities. Theoretically, the solar energy available on the surface of the earth is enough to support the energy requirements of the entire planet. However, in reality, progress and development of solar science and technology depends to a large extent on human desires and needs. This is due to the various barriers to overcome and to deal with the economics of practical utilization of solar energy.This book will introduce the rapid development and progress in the field of solar energy applications for science and technology: the advanc

  8. Implementing robotics in the Department of Energy Dismantlement Program

    Jones, A.T.

    1997-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war, as our nuclear stockpile has decreased, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been working rapidly to safely dismantle weapons returned by the military. In order to be retired, weapons must be returned to the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. There they are reduced to their component parts. Although many of these parts are not hazardous, some, including certain explosive assemblies and radioactive materials, are sufficiently hazardous so that special handling systems are necessary. This paper will describe several of these systems developed by Sandia for Pantex and their technical basis

  9. Maintaining Department of Energy facilities general design criteria

    Metzler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A General Design Criteria (GDC) Planning Board has been established in the Department of Energy to streamline the improvement and maintenance of the GDC Manual. This Planning Board, composed of a membership from field organizations and Headquarters programmatic offices, started work on 15 enhancements to the GDC Manual. One of those enhancements details natural phenomena hazards criteria. In the past year the Planning Board submitted a major recommendation which has been implemented into what is known as the GDC Improvements project. The result of this project pledges to dramatically increase the GDC Manual's utilization and effectiveness

  10. The US department of energy programme on hydrogen production

    Paster, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Clean forms of energy are needed to support sustainable global economic growth while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and impacts on air quality. To address these challenges, the U.S. President's National Energy Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Plan call for expanding the development of diverse domestic energy supplies. Working with industry, the Department developed a national vision for moving toward a hydrogen economy - a solution that holds the potential to provide sustainable clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy. In February 2003, President George W. Bush announced a new Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to achieve this vision. To realize this vision, the U.S. must develop and demonstrate advanced technologies for hydrogen production, delivery, storage, conversion, and applications. Toward this end, the DOE has worked with public and private organizations to develop a National Hydrogen Energy Technology Road-map. The Road-map identifies the technological research, development, and demonstration steps required to make a successful transition to a hydrogen economy. One of the advantages of hydrogen is that it can utilize a variety of feedstocks and a variety of production technologies. Feedstock options include fossil resources such as coal, natural gas, and oil, and non-fossil resources such as biomass and water. Production technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic and photolytic processes. Energy needed for these processes can be supplied through fossil, renewable, or nuclear sources. Hydrogen can be produced in large central facilities and distributed to its point of use or it can be produced in a distributed manner in small volumes at the point of use such as a refueling station or stationary power facility. In the shorter term, distributed production will play an important role in initiating the use of hydrogen due to its lower capital investment. In the longer term, it is likely that centralized

  11. HEPA filter testing - Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Facilities

    Sherwood, G.L. Jr. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper provides the background of, and some results from, a review of HEPA filter testing during 1993 at selected Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Recommendations for improvements in standards resulting from the review are also presented.

  12. The Department of Food Science at Aarhus University

    2014-01-01

    The Dept. of Food Science at Aarhus University is all about food and food quality. Everyone has an expertise in food whether they are focused on taste, health-promoting qualities, sustainable food production or developing new food products. At Dept. of Food Science we carry out research on a high...

  13. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Matthews, Kelly E.; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. PMID:28232589

  14. HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND MATERIALS PROCESSING

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Department of Metal Technology was established in 1945 year. For its 70th year existence the department has passed all of the major stages of development with its alma mater and it is Dnepropetrovsk Civil Engineering Institute (DCEI, then Prydniprovs’ka State Academy of Civil Engineering and Architecture (PGASA since 1994 year.

  15. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    McCarthy, K.A.; Williams, D.L.; Reister, R.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is focused on enabling the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. Decisions on life extension will be made by commercial power plant owners - the information provided by the research and development activities in the LWRS Program will reduce the uncertainty (and therefore the risk) associated with making those decisions. The LWRS Program encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables. (author)

  16. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services

  17. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation`s uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services.

  18. Technology application analyses at five Department of Energy Sites

    1995-05-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), a division of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., managing contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was tasked by the United States Air Force (USAF) through an Interagency Agreement between DOE and the USAF, to provide five Technology Application Analysis Reports to the USAF. These reports were to provide information about DOE sites that have volatile organic compounds contaminating soil or ground water and how the sites have been remediated. The sites were using either a pump-and-treat technology or an alternative to pump-and-treat. The USAF was looking at the DOE sites for lessons learned that could be applied to Department of Defense (DoD) problems in an effort to communicate throughout the government system. The five reports were part of a larger project undertaken by the USAF to look at over 30 sites. Many of the sites were DoD sites, but some were in the private sector. The five DOE projects selected to be reviewed came from three sites: the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Kansas City Site, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). SRS and LLNL provided two projects each. Both provided a standard pump-and-treat application as well as an innovative technology that is an alternative to pump-and-treat. The five reports on these sites have previously been published separately. This volume combines them to give the reader an overview of the whole project

  19. Program summaries for 1979: energy sciences programs

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the objectives of the various research programs being conducted by the Chemical Sciences, Metallurgy and Materials Science, and Process Science divisions of the BNL Dept. of Energy and Environment. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1979 are also reported along with plans for 1980. Some of the topics under study include porphyrins, combustion, coal utilization, superconductors, semiconductors, coal, conversion, fluidized-bed combustion, polymers, etc. (DLC)

  20. Fusion Energy Sciences Program at LANL

    Leeper, Ramon J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This presentation provides a strategic plan and description of investment areas; LANL vision for existing programs; FES portfolio and other specifics related to the Fusion Energy Sciences program at LANL.

  1. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments.

    Drinkwater, Michael J; Matthews, Kelly E; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. © 2017 M. J. Drinkwater et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Department of Defense Laboratory Civilian Science and Engineering Workforce - 2013

    2013-10-01

    Aerospace Engineering 1,995 2,207 2,166 -41 -1.9% Electrical Engineering 982 1,193 1,413 220 18.4% Chemistry 744 873 804 -69 -7.9% Operations Research...1313 Geophysics 180 Psychology 690 Industrial Hygiene 1315 Hydrology 184 Sociology 701 Veterinary Medical Science 1320 Chemistry 190 General...Engineering 1520 Mathematics 470 Soil Science 861 Aerospace Engineering 1529 Mathematical Statistician 471 Agronomy 871 Naval Architecture 1530

  3. Laser fusion and high energy density science

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2005-01-01

    High-power laser technology is now opening a variety of new fields of science and technology using laser-produced plasmas. The laser plasma is now recognized as one of the important tools for the investigation and application of matter under extreme conditions, which is called high energy density science. This chapter shows a variety of applications of laser-produced plasmas as high energy density science. One of the more attractive industrial and science applications is the generation of intense pulse-radiation sources, such as the generation of electro-magnetic waves in the ranges of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) to gamma rays and laser acceleration of charged particles. The laser plasma is used as an energy converter in this regime. The fundamental science applications of high energy density physics are shown by introducing laboratory astrophysics, the equation of state of high pressure matter, including warm dense matter and nuclear science. Other applications are also presented, such as femto-second laser propulsion and light guiding. Finally, a new systematization is proposed to explore the possibility of the high energy density plasma application, which is called high energy plasma photonics''. This is also exploration of the boundary regions between laser technology and beam optics based on plasma physics. (author)

  4. Mission and status of the US Department of Energy's battery energy storage program

    Quinn, J. E.; Hurwitch, J. W.; Landgrebe, A. R.; Hauser, S. G.

    1985-05-01

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's battery research program has evolved to reflect the changing conditions of the world energy economy and the national energy policy. The battery energy storage program supports the goals of the National Energy Policy Plan (FY 1984). The goals are to provide an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs, minimize federal control and involvement in the energy marketplace, promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system, and facilitate technology transfer from the public to the private sector. This paper describes the history of the battery energy storage program and its relevance to the national interest. Potential market applications for battery energy storage are reviewed, and each technology, its goals, and its current technical status are described. The paper concludes by describing the strategy developed to ensure effective technology transfer to the private sector and reviewing past significant accomplishments.

  5. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  6. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993

  7. Department of Energy programs and objectives: energy conservation in agricultural production

    1977-12-01

    This document describes the current Department of Energy agriculture research program as it relates to the research recommendations submitted by a 1976 workshop on energy conservation in agricultural production. In-depth discussions on fertilizers, irrigation, crop drying, fuel substitution, crop and animal production systems, greenhouses, materials handling, and transport systems are included. (MCW)

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home Implementation

    VonThoma, E. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership; Mosiman, G. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership

    2017-07-01

    This report documents the process and outcomes involved in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program certification standards while helping homebuilders in Climate Zones 5 and 6 in the Upper Midwest achieve ZERH certification.

  9. BUILDING STRONGER STATE ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Kate Burke

    2002-11-01

    This technical progress report includes an update of the progress during the second year of cooperative agreement DE-FC26-00NT40802, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. The report also describes the barriers in conduct of the effort, and our assessment of future progress and activities.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Projects

    Migliore, P.G.; Calvert, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind-turbine development activities in the Unites States and relates those activities to market conditions and projections. Several factors are responsible for a surge in wind energy development in the United States, including a federal production tax credit, ''green power'' marketing, and improving cost and reliability. More development is likely, as approximately 363 GW of new capacity will be needed by 2020 to meet growing demand and replace retiring units. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping two companies develop next-generation turbines intended to generate electricity for $0.025/kWh or less. We expect to achieve this objective through a combination of improved engineering methods and configuration advancements. This should ensure that wind power will compete effectively against advanced combined-cycle plants having projected generating costs of $0.031/kWh in 2005. To address the market for small and intermediate-size wind turbines, DOE is assisting five companies in their attempts to develop new turbines having low capital cost and high reliability. Additional information regarding U.S. wind energy programs is available on the internet site www.nrel.gov/wind/. E-mail addresses for the turbine manufacturers are found in the Acknowledgements

  11. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  12. Wind energy: Science or fiction?

    Sisouw de Zilwa, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The energy policy of the Dutch government is aimed at the use of different energy sources (diversification). Therefore the Dutch government supports the implementation of wind turbines and stimulates product improvement and research by means of the TWIN-program (a program to support the application of wind energy in the Netherlands). The purpose of the program is to commercialize efficient wind turbines. Without subsidies it is not yet possible to exploit wind turbines in an efficient way. Around the year 2000 a capacity of 1000 MW must be realized. 1 fig., 1 ill., 5 tabs., 1 ref

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical

  14. A Case Study of a School Science Department: A Site for Workplace Learning?

    Heighes, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive and illuminative case study of one science department in a successful, urban, secondary school in the south of England considers the science department as a site of workplace learning and the experience of beginning teachers in this context. Policy change in initial teacher training (ITT) has given schools a major role in the recruitment of trainees and emphasized the schools’ role in their training. Additionally, there continue to be significant challenges to recruit science...

  15. M. D. Faculty Salaries in Psychiatry and All Clinical Science Departments, 1980-2006

    Haviland, Mark G.; Dial, Thomas H.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare trends in the salaries of physician faculty in academic departments of psychiatry with those of physician faculty in all academic clinical science departments from 1980-2006. Methods: The authors compared trend lines for psychiatry and all faculty by academic rank, including those for department chairs, by graphing…

  16. Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy

    Marks, Kate

    2011-09-30

    This final technical report details the results of total work efforts and progress made from October 2007 – September 2011 under the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) cooperative agreement DE-FC26-07NT43264, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. Major topical project areas in this final report include work efforts in the following areas: Energy Assurance and Critical Infrastructure, State and Regional Technical Assistance, Regional Initiative, Regional Coordination and Technical Assistance, and International Activities in China. All required deliverables have been provided to the National Energy Technology Laboratory and DOE program officials.

  17. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-01-01

    Background and objective: It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The

  18. Optimization (ALARA) of radiation protection at Department of Energy facilities

    Weadock, A.A.; Jones, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Maintaining worker and public exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is a key objective of the Department of Energy (DOE). Responsibility for occupational ALARA program policy and guidance resides within the DOE Office of Health. Current Office of Health initiatives related to ALARA include the development of additional regulatory guidance related to ALARA program implementation at DOE contractor facilities, the review of ALARA program status at various facilities and the production of technical reports summarizing this status, and the support of various mechanisms to improve communication among the DOE ALARA community. The Office of Health also monitors revisions to radiogenic risk estimates and radiation protection recommendations to evaluate adequacy of current DOE limits and impacts of potentially revised limits. (author)

  19. Department of Atomic Energy [India]: Annual report 1979-1980

    1980-01-01

    The work of the research establishments, projects undertaken and public sector undertakings of the Department of Atomic Energy during the financial year 1979-80 is surveyed. The research and development activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay, the Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research at Bombay, the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta and the Tata Memorial Centre at Bombay are described. An account of the progress of heavy water production plant projects, the Madras and Narora Atomic Power Projects, the MHD project and the 100 MW thermal research reactor R-5 Project at Trombay is given. Performance of the Tarapur and Rajasthan Atomic Power Stations, Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, Atomic Minerals Division, ISOMED (the radiation sterilisation plant for medical products) at Bombay, the Indian Rare Earths Ltd., the Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., and the Electronics Corporation of India Ltd., Hyderabad is reported. (M.G.B.)

  20. Innovative environmental monitoring technologists developed by the Department of Energy

    Roelant, D.; Purdy, C.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to characterize approximately 3,700 contaminated sites, 1.5 million barrels of stored waste, 385,000 m 3 of high-level radioactive waste in tanks, and between 1,700 and 7,000 facilities before site remediation, waste treatment, and facility deactivation and decontamination (D and D) operations commence. Specifically, characterization technologies are being developed to address five major problem areas: mixed waste treatment, facility D and D, mapping and treatment of contaminant plumes in soil and groundwater, landfill stabilization, retrieval and remediation, and retrieval and treatment of high-level radioactive waste from underground storage tanks. DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Management is entirely focused on projects to address these five areas

  1. US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1

    1994-04-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

  2. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  3. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standards list (TSL) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31) on the basis of currently available technical information. Periodic updates of this TSL will be issued as additional information is received on standardization documents being issued, adopted, or canceled by DOE. This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other standards-related documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  4. Review of Department of Energy HEPA filter test activities

    McIntyre, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Filter Test Facilities (FTFs) and the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) continue to provide services to the Department of Energy (DOE). Additional tasks relating to the HEPA filter cycle have been added to the TSG. The tasks include the quality assessment review for the in-place testing of HEPA filters at DOE sites and the formation of an in-place testing standards writing group. Summary of ongoing FTFs and TSG activities for FY 1990-FY 1992 including the technical input for implementation of the High Flow Alternative Test System (HFATS), update of the DOE Standards, the status of the quality assessment review and in-place testing standards writing group are discussed

  5. US Department of Energy transportation programs: computerized techniques

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.; Fore, C.S.; Peterson, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently sponsoring the development of four specialized computer-based transportation programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The programs function as research tools that provide unique computerized techniques for planning the safe shipment of radioactive and hazardous materials. Major achievements include the development of interactive rail and highway routing models, an emergency response assistance program, a data base focusing on legislative requirements, and a resource file identifying key state and local contacts. A discussion of the programs and data bases is presented, and several examples reflecting each project's applications to the overall DOE transportation program are provided. The interface of these programs offers a dynamic resource of data for use during preshipment planning stages. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. An update on the Department of Energy's photovoltaic program

    Benner, John P.; Fitzgerald, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Funding for the terrestrial photovoltaic's program is $78 million in 1994. This is more than double the minimum level reached in 1989 and runs counter to the general trend of decreasing budgets for Department of Energy (DOE) programs. During the past five years, the program has expanded its mission from research and development to also address manufacturing technology and commercialization assistance. These new activities are directed toward revitalizing the market to reinstate the rapid rate of sales growth needed to attract investment. The program is approaching balance among efforts in each of the three areas. This translates to a reduction in some of the R & D activities of most relevance to the space power community. On the other hand, some of the advancements in manufacturing may finally bring thin-film technologies to reality for space arrays. This talk will describe the status and direction of DOE program with an eye toward highlighting its impact on technology of interest for space.

  7. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  8. Radionuclide air emissions at Department of Energy facilities

    Duvall, K. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Facilities operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) handle and process radioactive materials in conjunction with their research, nuclear materials production, remediation and waste disposal activities. Radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere from DOE facilities are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H for emissions other than radon. Subpart H requires DOE to monitor emissions from stacks and calculate a potential offsite dose to an individual using EPA approved methods and procedures. DOE has applied to EPA for approval to use alternative methods for some of the EPA requirements for continuous monitoring. The use of alternative methods such as single-point sampling with a shrouded probe will have an impact at several major DOE facilities. These facilities are identified.

  9. Natural phenomena hazards project for Department of Energy sites

    Coats, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. In the final phase, it is anticipated that the DOE will use the hazard models to establish uniform criteria for the design and evaluation of critical facilities. 13 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  10. NRC assessment of the Department of Energy annealing demonstration project

    Jackson, D.A.; Malik, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal annealing is the only known method for mitigating the effects of neutron irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. In May 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Westinghouse, Cooperheat, Electric Power Research Institute (with participating utilities), Westinghouse Owner's Group, Consumers Power, Electricite' de France, Duquesne Light and the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (Japan) sponsored an annealing demonstration project (ADP) at Marble Hill. The Marble Hill Plant, located in Madison, Indiana, is a Westinghouse 4 loop design. The plant was nearly 70% completed when the project was canceled. Hence, the RPV was never irradiated. The paper will present highlights from the NRCs independent evaluation of the Marble Hill Annealing Demonstration Project

  11. Nuclear waste: Department of Energy's program for financial assistance

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy's existing grant guidelines for financial assistance to first and second repository states do not clearly establish a basis for determining who is funded, what activities are funded, and how much funding is provided each activity. Because the guidelines do not cover all funding circumstances, DOE has interpreted them differently when making both mandatory and discretionary grant decisions. In addition, DOE has not considered state and Indian tribe needs in establishing its budget request for grant awards. Instead, the requests are based on the amounts of grants awarded in prior years and DOE planned activities. Finally, both grantee compliance with certain reporting requirements of DOE's financial assistance regulations and DOE's enforcement of them has been inconsistent

  12. DOE [Department of Energy]-Nuclear Energy Standards Program annual assessment, FY 1990

    Williams, D.L. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    To meet the objectives of the programs funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This standards program is carried out in accordance with the principles in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980. The purposes of this effort, as set forth in three subtasks, are to (1) manage the NE Standards Program, (2) manage the development and maintenance of NE standards, and (3) operate an NE Standards Information Program. This report assesses the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) activities in terms of the objectives of the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) funded programs. To meet these objectives, PAPO administers a nuclear standards program and related activities and fosters the development and application of standards. This task is carried out in accordance with the principles set forth in DOE Order 1300.2, Department of Energy Standards Program, December 18, 1980, and DOE memorandum, Implementation of DOE Orders on Quality Assurance, Standards, and Unusual Occurrence Reporting for Nuclear Energy Programs, March 3, 1982, and with guidance from the DOE-NE Technology Support Programs. 1 tab. (JF)

  13. Department of Energy security program needs effective information systems

    1991-10-01

    Although security is an important, nearly billion-dollar-a-year function in the Department of Energy (DOE), key information systems that hold important data about security weaknesses and incidents have limited analytical capabilities and contain unreliable information. The resultant difficulty in identifying patterns and trends reduces managers' ability to ensure the effectiveness of the security program. Resources are also wasted because DOE has deployed incompatible systems that are unable to electronically share or transfer data, often forcing employees to manually re-enter data that are already stored in computers elsewhere. Finally, continuing data problems with other important security information systems, such as those used to track security clearances and classified documents, indicate that information system deficiencies are extensive. A major reason for these problems is that DOE has not done a comprehensive, strategic assessment of its information and information technology needs of the security program. DOE's efforts are fragmented because it has not assigned to any organization the leadership responsibility to determine security information needs and to plan and manage security information resources Department-wide. This paper reports that a number of changes are needed to correct these problems and take advantage of information technology to help strengthen the security program

  14. US Department of Energy automated transportation management system

    Thomas, T.M.; Frost, D.M.; Lopez, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80 facilities throughout the United States that specialize in either scientific research, engineering, technology, production, and/or waste management activities. These facilities can best be described as Government Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) sites, and vary in size from very small laboratories to large industrial plant type facilities. Each of these GOCO's have varying needs for transportation of materials into and/or out of their facility. Therefore, Traffic Management operations will differ from site to site due to size and the internal or site specific mission. The DOE Transportation Management Division (TMD) has the corporate responsibility to provide a well managed transportation management program for the safe, efficient, and economical transportation of all DOE-owned materials. To achieve this mission, TMD provides oversight, and when necessary, resources to assist in ensuring regulatory compliance in the packaging and shipment of DOE-owned materials. A large part of TMD's responsibility is to develop, administer, and provide policies and guidance concerning department-wide transportation and packaging operations. This responsibility includes overall Transportation Management policies and programs for the packaging and movement of all DOE materials, including radioactive materials, other hazardous materials/substances, and hazardous wastes. TMD formulates policies and guidance that assist the DOE Field Elements and GOCO's in meeting TMD's goal for safe, efficient and economical transportation. Considering there are at least 80 shipping and receiving sites, the challenge encountered by TMD has been the difficulty in managing such a diverse transportation community

  15. The United States Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration Program

    Whitfield, P.; Lehr, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) operates a large industrial complex which includes various production, processing, testing, and research and development installations across the country. This complex has generated, and continues to generate, significant quantities of radioactive, hazardous, and mixtures of radioactive and hazardous (mixed) waste. Over the past 40 + years of operation, the waste generated by this complex has been managed to then-current standards of technology and regulation. However, some of these waste management practices have subsequently been proven to be inadequate for long-term environmental protection. To improve these practices, DOE must first manage the tasks of characterizing and remediating waste sites and facilities at more than 120 locations in 34 states and one location in Puerto Rico. To accomplish this mission, DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established in 1989, when DOE's top priority changed from nuclear weapons production to environmental cleanup. The ER Program was created to ensure that risks to human health and the environment posed by DOE's past operations are eliminated or reduced to prescribed, safe levels. This paper gives details on the philosophy of the Environmental Restoration Program. It includes information on how the Department is managing this Program to assure cost efficiency and good stewardship of the taxpayer's dollars

  16. Fiscal year 1985 Department of Energy authorization (high-energy and nuclear physics). Volume II-B. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 22, 1984

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Volume II-B of the DOE authorization hearings for fiscal year 1985 covers testimony on high-energy and nuclear physics programs. The volume opens with a continuation of Appendix I, which contains questions directed at Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece and his responses on research at several laboratories and four construction projects. The latter include general plant projects, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Transfer Line, and the University Accelerator Upgrade at the University of Washington and Yale. Two 1983 DOE/National Science Foundation reports make up Appendix II. The volume concludes with the text of the 1985 budget request for $746,105,000 and a breakdown of line item expenditures

  17. Science and Technology of Nanostructures in the Department of Defense

    Murday, James S.

    1999-01-01

    The United States Department of Defense maintains a research and development program in nanostructures with special attention to miniaturization of information technology devices, nanostructured materials, and nanobiotechnology for detection of biological agents. This article provides a brief guide to those DoD funding officers and research scientists actively interested in nanostructures

  18. Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses

  19. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  20. Department of Atomic Energy [India]: Annual report 1978-79

    1979-01-01

    The research and development activities and achievements of the research organizations of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE, India), progress of various DAE projects underway and performance of nuclear power plants and other public sector underking of DAE have been reported. The report covers the financial year 1978-79. Some of the major achievements during the year have been: (1) development of a portable local vacuum electron beam welding machine, (2) commissioning of the Variable Energy Cyclotron, Calcutta for obtaining an external beam of 30 MeV alphas, (4) locating minute leaks by tracer techniques on the 140 km. Koyali-Viramgam Oil pipeline and (5) investigation by tracer technique of geological fault at the Lakya dam site of the Kudremukh Iron Ore Project in Karnataka. The R and D work of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay; Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam; Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay; Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta, Tata Memorial Centre and Cancer Research Centre both at Bombay is summarised. (M.G.B.)

  1. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program: Selected bibliography

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and from the operation of DOE facilities. The program has been divided into seven general areas of activity: the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the genetic aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 380 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliograhpy is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by national laboratory and by year. Multi-authored studies are indicated only once, according to the main supporting laboratory.

  2. Information resources for US Department of Energy pollution prevention programs

    Peterson, K.L.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) pollution prevention efforts being conducted under the aegis of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked with evaluating pollution prevention information resources. The goal of this activity was to improve the effectiveness of DOE`s pollution prevention activities through improved information flow, both within the complex, and more specifically, between DOE and other organizations that share similar pollution prevention challenges. This report presents our findings with respect to the role of information collection and dissemination within the complex, opportunities for teaming from successes of the private sector, and specific information needs of the DOE pollution prevention community. These findings were derived from a series of interviews with pollution prevention coordinators from across the DOE complex, review of DOE site and facility pollution prevention plans, and workshops with DOE information users as well as an information resources workshop that brought together information specialists from private industry, non-profit organizations, as well as state and regional pollution prevention assistance programs.

  3. The US Department of Energy - investing in clean transport

    Chalk, Steven G.; Milliken, JoAnn; Miller, James F.; Venkateswaran, S. R.

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), together with six other federal agencies and America's three largest car makers, are jointly investing in the development of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells as a clean and efficient technology for automotive propulsion under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). (PEM is sometimes referred to as `proton exchange membrane'. The correctness, or otherwise, of that interpretation will depend on the mechanism of apparent proton transfer in the membrane implied). It is anticipated that the successful development of PEM fuel cells (and other long-term technologies) to meet automotive requirements will extend beyond the PNGV's 2004 timeframe for achieving 80 miles per gallon in production prototypes. Given the extraordinary promise of large energy, environmental and economic benefits to the nation from fuel cells and other long-term technologies, the PNGV partners will continue to invest in these technologies beyond 2004. The DOE's Transportation Fuel Cells Program has recently announced US$50 million of new contract awards for focused R&D to overcome critical technical barriers such as fuel-flexible fuel processing technology. The progress achieved toward automotive goals through these and past investments will also enable nearer-term application of fuel cells (e.g. in buses). This paper describes the status of the PNGV program and the key role and technical accomplishments of the DOE Transportation Fuel Cells Program. The DOE's recent investments in new fuel cell R&D activities will be discussed.

  4. Department of Atomic Energy: Annual report, 1983-84

    1984-01-01

    The annual report of the Department of Atomic Energy for the financial year 1983-84 describes its activities under the headings: Nuclear Power, Research and Development, Public Sector Undertakings, and Other Activities. The report surveys: (1) the performance of nuclear power plants at Tarapur, Kota and Kalpakkam, heavy water plants, fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants, and waste management facilities, (2) the research and development activities of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and its constituent units at various locations in the country, Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam, the aided institutes, namely, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and Tata Memorial Centre, both at Bombay, and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta, (3) performance of public sector undertakings: Indian Rare Earths Ltd., Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., and Electronics Corporation of India Ltd., (4) progress of nuclear power projects at Narora and Kakrapar, Orissa Sand Complex Project, MHD project at Tiruchirapalli, DHRUVA (formerly known as R-5) project at Bombay, Fast Breeder Test Reactor and 500 MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor projects at Kalpakkam, and heavy water projects at Thal-Vaishet and Manuguru, and (5) other activities including technology transfer; training; service to industry, agriculture and medicine in use of radioisotopes and radiation, export of radioisotopes, allied products and nuclear instruments; international relations; countrywide radiation safety programme, exploration of atomic minerals; information and publicity etc. An Atomic Energy Regulatory Board was established during the report year for the special purpose of carrying out regulatory and safety functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act of the Government of India. (M.G.B.)

  5. Characteristics Identified for Success by Restorative Dental Science Department Chairpersons.

    Wee, Alvin G; Weiss, Robert O; Wichman, Christopher S; Sukotjo, Cortino; Brundo, Gerald C

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the characteristics that current chairpersons in restorative dentistry, general dentistry, prosthodontics, and operative dentistry departments in U.S. dental schools feel are most relevant in contributing to their success. The secondary aim was to determine these individuals' rankings of the importance of a listed set of characteristics for them to be successful in their position. All 82 current chairs of the specified departments were invited to respond to an electronic survey. The survey first asked respondents to list the five most essential characteristics to serve as chair of a department and to rank those characteristics based on importance. Participants were next given a list of ten characteristics in the categories of management and leadership and, without being aware of the category of each individual item, asked to rank them in terms of importance for their success. A total of 39 chairpersons completed the survey (47.6% response rate; 83.3% male and 16.2% female). In section one, the respondents reported that leadership, vision, work ethic, integrity, communication, and organization were the most essential characteristics for their success. In section two, the respondents ranked the leadership characteristics as statistically more important than the management characteristics (psuccessful in their positions.

  6. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy. Science

    Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hirata, Chris [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roodman, Aaron [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seljak, Uroš [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Slosar, Anže [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Trodden, Mark [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  7. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Science

    Dodelson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Slosar, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heitmann, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hirata, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Honscheid, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roodman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seljak, U. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trodden, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  8. Energy challenge and nano-sciences

    Romulus, Anne-Marie; Chamelot, Pierre; Chaudret, Bruno; Comtat, Maurice; Fajerwerg, Katia; Philippot, Karine; Geoffron, Patrice; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; Abanades, Stephane; Flamant, Gilles; HUERTA-ORTEGA, Benjamin; Cezac, Pierre; Lincot, Daniel; Roncali, Jean; Artero, Vincent; GuiLLET, Nicolas; Fauvarque, Jean-Francois; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    This book first describes the role of energy in the development of nano-sciences, discusses energy needs, the perception of nano-sciences by societies as far as the energy challenge is concerned, describes the contribution of nano-catalyzers to energy and how these catalyzers are prepared. A second part addresses the new perspectives regarding carbon: production of biofuels from biomass, process involved in CO 2 geological storage, improvement of solar fuel production with the use of nano-powders. The third part describes the new orientations of solar energy: contribution of the thin-layer inorganic sector to photovoltaic conversion, perspectives for organic photovoltaic cells, operation of new dye-sensitized nanocrystalline solar cells. The fourth part addresses the hydrogen sector: credibility, contribution of biomass in hydrogen production, production of hydrogen by electrochemistry, new catalyzers for electrolyzers and fuel cells. The last part address improved electrochemical reactors

  9. US Department of Energy Automated Transportation Management System

    Portsmouth, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation Management Division (TMD) is responsible for managing its various programs via a diverse combination of Government-Owned/Contractor-Operated facilities. TMD is seeking to update it automation capabilities in capturing and processing DOE transportation information. TMD's Transportation Information Network (TIN) is an attempt to bring together transportation management, shipment tracking, research activities and software products in various stages of development. The TMD's Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) proposes to assist the DOE and its contractors in performing their daily transportation management activities and to assist the DOE Environmental Management Division in its waste management responsibilities throughout the DOE complex. The ATMS system will center about the storage, handling and documentation involved in the environmental clean-up of DOE sites. Waste shipments will be moved to approved Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) facilities and/or nuclear material repositories. An additional investment in shipping samples to analytical laboratories also involves packaging and documentation according to all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) or International Air Transport Association (IATA) regulations. The most immediate goal of effectively managing DOE transportation management functions during the 1990's is an increase in automation capabilities of the DOE and its contractors. Subject-matter experts from various DOE site locations will be brought together to develop and refine these capabilities through the maximum use of computer applications. A major part of this effort will be the identification of the most economical modes of transportation and enhanced management reporting capabilities for transportation analysis. The ATMS system will also provide for increased strategic and shipment analysis during the 1990's and beyond in support of the DOE environmental mission

  10. Conducting and publishing design science research : Inaugural essay of the design science department of the Journal of Operations Management

    van Aken, Joan; Chandrasekaran, Aravind; Halman, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The new Design Science department at the Journal of Operations Management invites submissions using a design science research strategy for operations management (OM) issues. The objective of this strategy is to develop knowledge that can be used in a direct and specific way to design and implement

  11. Fusion energy science: Clean, safe, and abundant energy through innovative science and technology

    2001-01-01

    Fusion energy science combines the study of the behavior of plasmas--the state of matter that forms 99% of the visible universe--with a vision of using fusion--the energy source of the stars--to create an affordable, plentiful, and environmentally benign energy source for humankind. The dual nature of fusion energy science provides an unfolding panorama of exciting intellectual challenge and a promise of an attractive energy source for generations to come. The goal of this report is a comprehensive understanding of plasma behavior leading to an affordable and attractive fusion energy source

  12. The mission and status of the U.S. Department of Energy's battery energy storage program

    Quinn, J. E.; Landgrebe, A. R.; Hurwitch, J. W.; Hauser, S. G.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Energy's battery energy storage program history, assessing the importance it has had in the national interest to date in industrial, vehicular, and electric utility load leveling applications. The development status of battery technology is also evaluated for the cases of sodium-sulfur, zinc-bromine, zinc-ferricyanide, nickel-hydrogen, aluminum-air, lithium-metal disulfide, and fuel cell systems. Development trends are projected into the foreseeable future.

  13. Energy and nuclear sciences international who's who. 4. ed.

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    For this fourth edition the directory has been reformatted to A4 size to allow for the restructuring of both the biological data and the cover. The fourth edition contains details of over 3,500 including 400 for the first time, scientists and engineers concerned with new and improved methods of generating electricity. A wide range of people used the information provided in the last edition, among them information scientists, administrators, conference organizers, market researchers, financiers seeking technical advice, embassy staff, consultants, biochemists and engineers. Biographical enquiry forms were sent to officers in scientific societies in each nation, to directors and section leaders in industrial and official institutions where significant numbers of scientists relating to power and energy research are employed to heads of relevant academic departments, and to editorial board members of relevant journals. Part one lists biographical profiles of scientists in alphabetical order of surname. The subject index by country in Part two centres around nuclear and energy sciences divided into the following areas; electrical power engineering, energy conservation, energy planning, energy storage, fuel production, fusion technology, geothermal energy, nuclear sciences, high energy physics, low energy physics, wind and/or ocean energy. This allows the reader to locate experts in each of the above topic areas in around 90 countries. (Author)

  14. Department of Energy assessment of the Large Hadron Collider

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the conclusions of the committee that assessed the cost estimate for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This proton-proton collider will be built at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics near Geneva, Switzerland. The committee found the accelerator-project cost estimate of 2.3 billion in 1995 Swiss francs, or about $2 billion US, to be adequate and reasonable. The planned project completion date of 2005 also appears achievable, assuming the resources are available when needed. The cost estimate was made using established European accounting procedures. In particular, the cost estimate does not include R and D, prototyping and testing, spare parts, and most of the engineering labor. Also excluded are costs for decommissioning the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) that now occupies the tunnel, modifications to the injector system, the experimental areas, preoperations costs, and CERN manpower. All these items are assumed by CERN to be included in the normal annual operations budget rather than the construction budget. Finally, contingency is built into the base estimate, in contrast to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that explicitly identify contingency. The committee's charge, given by Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Directory of the DOE Office of Energy Research, was to understand the basis for the LHC cost estimate, identify uncertainties, and judge the overall validity of the estimate, proposed schedule, and related issues. The committee met at CERN April 22--26, 1996. The assessment was based on the October 1995 LHC Conceptual Design Report or ''Yellow Book,'' cost estimates and formal presentations made by the CERN staff, site inspection, detailed discussions with LHC technical experts, and the committee members' considerable experience

  15. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE's commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex

  16. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  17. Bench-scale magnetic separation of Department of Energy wastes

    Hoegler, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    Criteria were developed for selection of candidate wastes for testing magnetic separation of uranium and/or other paramagnetic materials. A survey of Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous wastes was conducted to determine good candidates for bench-scale magnetic separation tests. Representatives of 21 DOE sites were contacted, and 11 materials were identified as potential candidates for magnetic separation. To date, seven samples have been obtained and tested for separability of uranium with a bench-scale magnetic assaying device. The samples tested have been obtained from the K-1401B and K-1401C ponds in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; from waste piles in Maywood, New Jersey; from North and South Ponds in Richland, Washington; and from magnesium fluoride drums in Fernald, Ohio. The magnetic device utilized in these tests can be used in an open-gradient mode with dry particulate or liquid-suspended materials. Uranium separation from magnesium fluoride has shown exceptionally good performance in both open- and high-gradient modes and could be an important application of the technology

  18. Security issues at the Department of Energy and records management

    NUSBAUM, ANNA W.

    2000-01-01

    In order to discuss the connection between security issues within the Department of Energy and records management, the author covers a bit of security history and talks about what she calls ''the Amazing Project''. Initiated in late May 1999, it was to be a tri-laboratory (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, California, Los Alamos National Laboratory of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California) project. The team that formed was tasked to develop the best set of security solutions that still enabled weapon mission work to get done and the security solutions were to be the same set for everyone. The amazing project was called ''The Integrated Security Management Project'', or ''ISecM' for short. She'll describe why she thinks this project was so amazing and what it accomplished. There's a bit of sad news about the project, but then she'll move onto discuss what was learned at Sandia as a result of the project and what they're currently doing in records management

  19. An overview of the Department of Energy's soil washing workshop

    1991-09-01

    The Soil Washing Workshop was convened in Las Vegas, Nevada, on August 28--29, 1990 at the request of C.W. Frank, Associate Director, Office of Technology Development, US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the workshop was to determine the status of existing soil washing technologies and their applicability to specific soil contamination problems at DOE sites and at Superfund sites of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). From the workshop deliberations, a course of action would be recommended in developing soil washing technologies. Presentations were given describing the soil contamination problems at various DOE sites. The factors addressed for each site included: type of contamination (organic, heavy metals, radionuclides, etc.), sources of contamination (leaking tanks, ponds, soil columns, pipes, etc.), types of soils that are contaminated, magnitude of the problem, current site activities (remediation), other considerations that impact the use of soil washing technology (e.g., environmental, site policies, etc.), and regulations and standards the sites are required to meet. Major findings and presentations of the workshop are presented

  20. United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office

    1980-01-01

    The Grand Junction Office (GJO), US Department of Energy (DOE), develops and administers programs for evaluating domestic uranium resources and the production capability of industry; for developing resource planning information for DOE; and for advancing geologic and geophysical exploration concepts and techniques. In addition, GJO administers the leasing of mineral lands under DOE control, and carries out activities relating to the environmental aspects of uranium mining and milling, including remedial programs. The Office is staffed by administrative and technical program-management personnel. Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) is the DOE operating contractor at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Government-owned/contractor-operated (GOCO) facility. The technical staffs of both GJO and Bendix are primarily geoscience-oriented. Specifically during 1980, uranium resource assessment on 135 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles was completed, along with other specific studies, to yield October 1980 national resource estimates. In addition, updated uranium supply analysis and production capability projections were completed. Another key aspect of this successful program was the development of improved geophysical and geochemical equipment and techniques in support of uranium resource assessment. Much of the hardware and know-how developed was turned over to the public and to the uranium industry at large for application to uranium exploration and the assessment of uranium company resources. The Grand Junction Office also participated actively during 1980 in international cooperative research on uranium exploration techniques and on the geology of uranium deposits

  1. Department of Energy's process waste assessment graded approach methodology

    Pemberton, S.E.

    1994-03-01

    As the initial phase of the formal waste minimization program, the Department of Energy requires assessments of all its waste-generating operations. These assessments, called process waste assessments (PWAs), are a tool which helps achieve the pollution prevention goals. The DOE complex is comprised of numerous sites located in many different states. The facilities as a whole represent a tremendous diversity of technologies, processes, and activities. Due to this diversity, there are also a wide variety and number of waste streams generated. Many of these waste streams are small, intermittent, and not of consistent composition. The PWA graded approach methodology addresses these complexities and recognizes that processes vary in the quantity of pollution they generate, as well as in the perceived risk and associated hazards. Therefore, the graded approach was developed to provide a cost-effective and flexible methodology which allows individual sites to prioritize their local concerns and align their efforts with the resources allocated. This presentation will describe a project sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Waste Minimization Division, which developed a graded approach methodology for use throughout the DOE. This methodology was initiated in FY93 through a combined effort of the following DOE/Defense Program sites: Kansas City Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories. This presentation will describe the process waste assessment tool, benefits achieved through the completion of PWAs, DOE's graded approach methodology, and an update on the project's current status

  2. Overview of the department of energy carbon dioxide research program

    Riches, M.R.; Koomanoff, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Dioxide Research Program is to identify possible policy options for government action in response to effects of increased CO 2 . The achievement of this goal requires a significant increase in our scientific knowledge of the atmosphere, the biosphere, the oceans, and the cryosphere-their interactions and the effects that increasing atmospheric CO 2 and other trace gases will have on them. To identify and specify valid choices, a program of directed research is required. The research areas include: Projection of future atmospheric CO 2 concentrations Estimation of Co 2 -induced global/regional climate changes Estimation of crop and ecosystem response to CO 2 -induced changes Estimation of the effect of CO 2 -induced climate changes on sea level, fisheries, and human health. This paper describes the present DOE plan to address the questions related to the global and regional rate of CO 2 -induced climate change. The objective of the plan is to define the key questions in such a way that research is directed at experiments where answers are needed rather than at experiments where answers can be easily obtained. Only through this kind of focus can we expect to provide the climate-change estimates required for the policy process

  3. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    Peters, R.; Lucerna, J.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development

  4. Chemical process safety management within the Department of Energy

    Piatt, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Although the Department of Energy (DOE) is not well known for its chemical processing activities, the DOE does have a variety of chemical processes covered under OSHA's Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (the PSM Standard). DOE, like industry, is obligated to comply with the PSM Standard. The shift in the mission of DOE away from defense programs toward environmental restoration and waste management has affected these newly forming process safety management programs within DOE. This paper describes the progress made in implementing effective process safety management programs required by the PSM Standard and discusses some of the trends that have supported efforts to reduce chemical process risks within the DOE. In June of 1994, a survey of chemicals exceeding OSHA PSM or EPA Risk Management Program threshold quantities (TQs) at DOE sites found that there were 22 processes that utilized toxic or reactive chemicals over TQs; there were 13 processes involving flammable gases and liquids over TQs; and explosives manufacturing occurred at 4 sites. Examination of the survey results showed that 12 of the 22 processes involving toxic chemicals involved the use of chlorine for water treatment systems. The processes involving flammable gases and liquids were located at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Naval petroleum Reserve sites

  5. Department of Energy safety management: A need for change

    McCoy, F.B. III

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) approach to safety management is undergoing fundamental change that should improve effective implementation of requirements throughout the complex. The most significant conveyor of this change is the open-quotes necessary and sufficientclose quotes closure process. The necessary and sufficient closure process draws upon the many and varied laws, requirements, and standards that exist in today's world to systematically derive a necessary and sufficient set of requirements for the particular work at hand to provide adequate protection for the associated hazards. The set is implemented through a system of management controls that convey fundamental safety principles and include design and analyses, engineered safety features, and procedures for the particular work. Assurance that an adequate level of protection is afforded by the set demands a need for competent, disciplined, and rigorous implementation. When properly done, the necessary and sufficient closure process enables such implementation. The focus of this paper is to provide an understanding of why the necessary and sufficient closure process is a necessary safety management program change and how integrity of this process can be assured

  6. United States Department of Energy solar receiver technology development

    Klimas, P. C.; Diver, R. B.; Chavez, J. M.

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Sandia National Laboratories, has been conducting a Solar Thermal Receiver Technology Development Program, which maintains a balance between analytical modeling, bench and small scale testing, and experimentation conducted at scales representative of commercially-sized equipment. Central receiver activities emphasize molten salt-based systems on large scales and volumetric devices in the modeling and small scale testing. These receivers are expected to be utilized in solar power plants rated between 100 and 200 MW. Distributed receiver research focuses on liquid metal refluxing devices. These are intended to mate parabolic dish concentrators with Stirling cycle engines in the 5 to 25 kW(sub e) power range. The effort in the area of volumetric receivers is less intensive and highly cooperative in nature. A ceramic foam absorber of Sandia design was successfully tested on the 200 kW(sub t) test bed at Plataforma Solar during 1989. Material integrity during the approximately 90-test series was excellent. Significant progress has been made with parabolic dish concentrator-mounted receivers using liquid metals (sodium or a potassium/sodium mixture) as heat transport media. Sandia has successfully solar-tested a pool boiling reflux receiver sized to power a 25 kW Stirling engine. Boiling stability and transient operation were both excellent. This document describes these activities in detail and will outline plans for future development.

  7. A safeguards program for implementing Department of Energy requirements

    Erkkila, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a new materials control and accountability (MC ampersand A) order 5633.3 in February of 1988. This order contains all of the requirements for an effective MC ampersand A (safeguards) program for facilities that control and account for nuclear materials in their operations. All contractors were expected to come into compliance with the order by April 30, 1989, or obtain approval for exceptions and/or extensions. The order also contains various performance requirements that are not in effect until the DOE issues the guidelines to the performance requirements. After evaluations were completed in February 1989, it was determined there were several deficiencies in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) safeguards program. Documentation of policy and procedures needed correction before LANL could be in compliance with the new MC ampersand A order. Differences between the old and new orders were addressed. After this determination, action teams were established to corrected LANL's safeguards program. Compliance with the DOE requirements was the goal of this activity. The accomplishments of the action teams are the subject of this paper

  8. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. [comps.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  9. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. (comps.)

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  10. The Gender and Race-Ethnicity of Faculty in Top Science and Engineering Research Departments

    Beutel, Ann M.; Nelson, Donna J.

    This study examines the gender and racial-ethnic composition of faculty in top research departments for science and engineering "S-E - disciplines. There are critical masses of at least 15% women in top research departments in biological sciences, psychology, and social sciences but not in physical sciences and engineering. Blacks and Hispanics together make up only 4.1% of the faculty in our study. Black and Hispanic females are the most poorly represented groups; together, they make up only 1% of the faculty in top S-E research departments. For most S-E disciplines, less than 15% of full professors in top research departments are women or non-Whites.

  11. Performance report of the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab

    Jefferson Lab

    1999-01-01

    Jefferson Lab, the newest of the US Department of Energy's 16 national laboratories, has been functioning effectively since its inception in 1984, first during construction and later during operations. As shown in this report, JLab aligns itself directly with DOE's strategic planning, both in terms of laboratory visions and plans and in terms of actual laboratory performance. Most importantly, JLab contributes significantly to DOE's Science and Technology mission in the area of nuclear physics, under the Office of Science. The laboratory practices continuous improvement and has made a number of important effectiveness and efficiency enhancements in recent years. Laboratory performance has been demonstrated by completion of the construction phase on cost and schedule, by exceeding technical specifications when coming on-line for physics research, and then - during operations in the mid- and late- 1990's - by the application of the performance measures in the laboratory's performance-based contract with DOE

  12. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  13. Recommendations for a Department of Energy. Nuclear energy R and D agenda volume 1

    1997-12-01

    On January 14, 1997, the President requested that his Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) make ''recommendations ... by October 1, 1997 on how to ensure that the United States has a program that addresses its energy and environmental needs for the next century.'' In its report, Federal Energy Research and Development for the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century, the PCAST Panel stated that ''the United States faces major energy-related challenges as it enters the twenty-first century'' and links these challenges to national economic and environmental well-being as well as to national security. The Panel concluded that ''Fission belongs in the R and D portfolio.'' In conjunction with this activity, the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, together with seven of the national laboratories, undertook a study to recommend nuclear energy R and D responses to the challenges and recommendations identified by the PCAST Panel. This seven-laboratory study included an analysis of past and present nuclear energy policies, current R and D activities, key issues, and alternative scenarios for domestic and global nuclear energy R and D programs and policies. The results are summarized. Nuclear power makes important contributions to the nation's well-being that can be neither ignored nor easily replaced without significant environmental and economic costs, particularly in an energy future dominated by global energy growth but marked by significant uncertainties and potential instabilities. Future reliance on these contributions requires continuing past progress on the issues confronting nuclear power today: safety, waste management, proliferation, and economics. A strong nuclear energy agenda will enable the U.S. government to meet its three primary energy responsibilities: (1) respond to current needs; (2) prepare the country for anticipated future developments; and (3) safeguard the country from unexpected future events

  14. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    Cizewski, J.A., E-mail: cizewski@rutgers.edu

    2014-06-15

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  15. The energy in France (without French overseas departments) in 2002

    2005-01-01

    This document brings tables and maps of 2002 statistical data on the primary energy consumption in french regions, the final energy consumption by type of energy, the final energy consumption by consumption sectors and the final consumption by residents. It provides also, for each french region, more details concerning the economic indicators (Gross domestic Product, transportation sector, lifestyle...) and energy indicators for the different energy sources. (A.L.B.)

  16. 75 Breakthroughs by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories; Breakthroughs 2017

    None

    2017-01-01

    Born at a time when the world faced a dire threat, the National Laboratory System protects America through science and technology. For more than 75 years, the Department of Energy’s national laboratories have solved important problems in science, energy and national security. Partnering with industry and academia, the laboratories also drive innovation to advance economic competitiveness and ensure our nation’s future prosperity. Over the years, America's National Laboratories have been changing and improving the lives of millions of people and this expertise continues to keep our nation at the forefront of science and technology in a rapidly changing world. This network of Department of Energy Laboratories has grown into 17 facilities across the country. As this list of breakthroughs attests, Laboratory discoveries have spawned industries, saved lives, generated new products, fired the imagination and helped to reveal the secrets of the universe.

  17. United States Department of Energy Automated Transportation Management System

    Portsmouth, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) 80 transportation facilities, each contractor's transportation management operation has different internal and site specific procedures, and reports to a DOE regional Field Office Traffic Manager (FOTM). The DOE Transportation Management Program (TMP) has the responsibility to manage a transportation program for safe, efficient, and economical transportation of DOE-owned materials. The TMP develops and administers transportation/traffic operations management policies and programs for materials; including radioactive materials, other hazardous materials, hazardous substances, and hazardous wastes, pursuant to applicable federal regulations, such as the Code of Federal Register, Sections 40 and 49. Transportation management has become an increasingly critical primarily because of transportation issues regarding the shipment of radioactive materials and hazardous wastes that are frequently the focus of public concerns. A large shipments and requiring millions of business transactions necessitates the establishment of automated systems, programs, procedures, and controls to ensure that the transportation management process in being handled in a safe, efficient, and economical manner. As the mission of many DOE facilities changes from production of special nuclear materials for defense purposes to environmental restoration and waste management, the role of transportation management will become even more important to the safe and efficient movement of waste materials to prescribed locations. In support of this role, the Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) was conceived to assist the DOE and its contractors in the performance of their day-to-day transportation management activities. The ATMS utilizes the latest in technology and will supply state-of-the-art automated transportation management for current and future DOE transportation requirements

  18. Department of Energy contract/business management initiatives

    Fisher, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    More than 40 years ago the Department of Energy (DOE) developed a unique contractual instrument called a management and operating contract, to be used for the operation of our weapons production plants and the national laboratories. The contracts are very broad in scope. There is no output objective set forth in the contract. There are no cost targets, nor any contractually motivated cost objectives. Performance is measured against criteria which is often subjective. The time has come to make changes in the structure of these contracts to reflect changes in the work being performed and to make the contractors more accountable. DOE's work now, at these sites, and for years to come, consists largely of major project-type work such as environmental restoration which lends itself to a more definitized structure. DOE is in the process of implementing a work order authorization control system (task order contracting) under its management and operating contracts. Target date for implementation for our for-profit contractors is FY 1992, and for the non-profit contractors is FY 1993. Under this system, requirements will be contracted for as entities of work and contractors will be held accountable for performance, schedules and costs. Billings, payments and award fee will be tied to the specific planning objectives set forth in the tasks, including costs and schedules. Incentives will be provided for outstanding performance, fee may be withheld if performance is unacceptable. These changes will necessitate more DOE oversight of contractor operations and sound business support systems, as well as effective management disciplines. US DOE will perform business management reviews to assure contractors' systems are adequate and to support this form of contracting. The Contractor Procurement Systems Review Program will be enhanced to assure good subcontractor procurement practices

  19. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study

    Sauthoff, N.; Navratil, G.; Bangerter, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report

  20. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study; TOPICAL

    N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE[Department of Energy] and the FESAC[Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will

  1. Annual report 1985-86 [of the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India

    1986-01-01

    The performance and activities during the financial year 1985-86 of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India and its various units are reported. The various units of the DAE can broadly be categorised into groups: research establishments, production units and public sector undertakings. After taking a general survey, the detailed report is presented under the chapters entitled: (1) nuclear power, (2) research and development, (3) Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, (4) public sector undertakings, and (5) other activities. Some of the other activities include international relations in the field of nuclear energy, information services, organization of training courses to meet the requirements of programmes of the DAE, technology transfer, financial support to institutions and universities for research in nucler science, and sponsoring of conferences, symposia etc. in the field of nuclear science and its applications. Major achievements of the DAE during the report period are: (1) attainment of criticality by the indigenously designed and built 100 MWt research reactor DHRUVA at Trombay, Bombay, (2) attainment of criticality by the Fast Breeder Test Reactor at Kalpakkam, (3) commissioning of the second unit of the Madras Atomic Power Station and its subsequent synchronisation with the power grid, (4) commissioning of the vitrification plant for management of high level radioactive wastes at Tarapur, and (5) successful testing of a 5 mwt MHD pilot at Tiruchirapalli. (author)

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Region Clean Energy Application Center (PCEAC)

    Lipman, Tim [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kammen, Dan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); McDonell, Vince [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Samuelsen, Scott [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Beyene, Asfaw [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States); Ganji, Ahmad [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Region Clean Energy Application Center (PCEAC) was formed in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission to provide education, outreach, and technical support to promote clean energy -- combined heat and power (CHP), district energy, and waste energy recovery (WHP) -- development in the Pacific Region. The region includes California, Nevada, Hawaii, and the Pacific territories. The PCEAC was operated as one of nine regional clean energy application centers, originally established in 2003/2004 as Regional Application Centers for combined heat and power (CHP). Under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, these centers received an expanded charter to also promote district energy and waste energy recovery, where economically and environmentally advantageous. The centers are working in a coordinated fashion to provide objective information on clean energy system technical and economic performance, direct technical assistance for clean energy projects and additional outreach activities to end users, policy, utility, and industry stakeholders. A key goal of the CEACs is to assist the U.S. in achieving the DOE goal to ramp up the implementation of CHP to account for 20% of U.S. generating capacity by 2030, which is estimated at a requirement for an additional 241 GW of installed clean technologies. Additional goals include meeting the Obama Administration goal of 40 GW of new CHP by 2020, key statewide goals such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in each state, California’s greenhouse gas emission reduction goals under AB32, and Governor Brown’s “Clean Energy Jobs Plan” goal of 6.5 GW of additional CHP over the next twenty years. The primary partners in the PCEAC are the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Energy and Resources Group (ERG) at UC Berkeley, the Advanced Power and Energy Program (APEP) at UC Irvine, and the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC

  4. 75 FR 44929 - Request for Information Regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs for Department of Energy...

    2010-07-30

    ... alcohol in the workplace? Please provide evidence to support your answers. 10. The use of alcohol, even in... Information Regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs for Department of Energy Contractors AGENCY: Office... Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) requests information and comments on issues related to workplace...

  5. MARGINALIZATION OF DEPARTMENTS OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND LANGUAGES IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN DENPASAR

    I Wayan Winaja

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning should be focused on the social and cultural development of intellectual ability, and encourage the learner’s comprehension and knowledge in order to produce intelligent and educated society. From the data collected from Public Senior High School 1 Denpasar and Dwijendra Senior High School Denpasar, it was found that the departments of social sciences and languages were seriously marginalized, indicated by the time allocated for social sciences and languages. The time allocated for Natural Sciences such as chemistry, physics, and biology averaged three hours a week. The additional ‘extra’ time allocated for Natural Sciences made the overall time allocated for them double the overall time allocated for Social Sciences such as economics, history sociology, and geography. Furthermore, the time allocated for one of them was one hour a week. The knowledge presented by the books of Natural Sciences was highly “instrumentalist-positivistic”; unlike the books of social sciences which only provided academic normative information. The modernity contained in “instrumentative positivism” was the philosophy which gave more priority to practical things and hard work with financial success as the main criterion. It was concluded that the marginalization of the departments of social sciences and languages in Public Senior High School 1 Denpasar and Dwijendra Senior High School Denpasar resulted from modernism, the culture of image, and the image that natural sciences were more advantageous than social sciences and languages.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy photovoltaic energy program overview, fiscal year 1999

    Weis-Taylor, P.; Moon, S.

    2000-02-28

    This ``annual report'' details the FY 1999 achievements of the US Department of Energy PV Program in the categories of Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. Highlights include development of a record-breaking concentrator solar cell that is 32.3% efficient; fabrication of a record CIGS (copper indium gallium diselenide) cell at 18.8% efficiency; sharing an R and D 100 award with Siemens Solar Industries and the California Energy Commission for development and deployment of commercial CIS thin-film modules; and support for the efforts of the PV Industry Roadmap Workshop.

  7. Fiscal year 2013 energy department budget: Proposed investments in clean energy research

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-03-01

    Energy and environmental research programs generally fared well in President Barack Obama's proposed budget for the Department of Energy (DOE) for fiscal year (FY) 2013. In his State of the Union address, Obama called for the United States to pursue an "all of the above" energy strategy that includes fossil fuels, as well as a variety of renewable sources of energy. The DOE budget request supports that strategy, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said in a 13 February press briefing announcing the budget proposal. The proposed budget gives DOE 27.2 billion overall, a 3.2% increase from the FY 2012 enacted budget (see Table 1). This budget "reflects some tough choices," Chu said. The proposed budget would cut 4 billion in subsidies for oil and gas companies; many Republican members of Congress have already indicated that they oppose such cuts, suggesting that congressional approval of this budget may run into stumbling blocks. The budget would also cut funding for research and development projects that are already attracting private-sector investment or that are not working, and would reduce some of the department's operational costs.

  8. Alternative energy resources for the Missouri Department of Transportation.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates environmentally friendly alternative energy sources that could be used by MoDOT in various areas, and develops applicable and sustainable strategies to implement those energy sources.

  9. The US department of energy's research and development plans for the use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    Henderson, A.D.; Pickard, P.S.; Park, C.V.; Kotek, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and for stationary power applications has generated significant interest in the United States. President George W. Bush has set the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' as one of the Administration's highest priorities. A key element of an environmentally-conscious transition to hydrogen is the development of hydrogen production technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases or other air pollutants. The Administration is investing in the development of several technologies, including hydrogen production through the use of renewable fuels, fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. The US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology initiated the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative to develop hydrogen production cycles that use nuclear energy. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative has completed a Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan to identify candidate technologies, assess their viability, and define the R and D required to enable the demonstration of nuclear hydrogen production by 2016. This paper gives a brief overview of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, describes the purposes of the Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan, explains the methodology followed to prepared the plan, presents the results, and discusses the path forward for the US programme to develop technologies which use nuclear energy to produce hydrogen. (author)

  10. Institutional origins of the Department of Energy: the Office of Military Application. Energy History Series Volume 1, No. 1

    Anders, R.M.

    1980-08-01

    The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 brought together for the first time in one department most of the government's energy programs. With these programs came a score of organizational entities, each with its own history and traditions, from a dozen departments and independent agencies. This report traces the history of the Office of Military Application, from its inception as the Division of Military Application in the Atomic Energy Commission, through the Energy Research and Development Administration to its present status as an office in the Department of Energy

  11. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  12. Announcement of the agreement between the Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Department of Energy of the United States about the exchange of information in the area of energy. As of November 30, 1994; Bekanntmachung der Vereinbarung zwischen dem Bundesministerium fuer Bildung, Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technologie der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und dem Department of Energy der Vereinigten Staaten ueber den Austausch von Informationen auf dem Energiegebiet. Vom 30. November 1994

    NONE

    1995-01-11

    The contracting parties establish under this agreement for the benefit of both sides and as support for their research and development work in the field of energy and exchange of information in the area of energy. This exchange includes publicly available scientific-technical information, concluded energy research and development projects, current energy research and development projects, relevant facts and figures as well as research in the area of information technology. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Die Vertragsparteien richten im Rahmen dieser Vereinbarung zum beiderseitigen Nutzen und zur Ergaenzung ihrer Forschungs- und Entwicklungsarbeiten auf dem Energiesektor einen Austausch von Informationen auf dem Energiegebiet ein. Dieser Austausch umfasst oeffentlich zugaengliche wissenschaftlich-technische Informationen ueber abgeschlossene Energieforschungs- und -entwicklungsvorhaben, laufende Energieforschungs- und -entwicklungsvorhaben, einschlaegige Fakten und Zahlen sowie informationstechnische Forschung. (orig./HP)

  13. Energy balance at a crossroads: translating the science into action.

    Manore, Melinda M; Brown, Katie; Houtkooper, Linda; Jakicic, John; Peters, John C; Smith Edge, Marianne; Steiber, Alison; Going, Scott; Gable, Lisa Guillermin; Krautheim, Ann Marie

    2014-07-01

    One of the major challenges facing the United States is the high number of overweight and obese adults and the growing number of overweight and unfit children and youth. To improve the nation's health, young people must move into adulthood without the burden of obesity and its associated chronic diseases. To address these issues, the American College of Sports Medicine, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the US Department of Agriculture/Agriculture Research Service convened an expert panel meeting in October 2012 titled "Energy Balance at a Crossroads: Translating the Science into Action." Experts in the fields of nutrition and exercise science came together to identify the biological, lifestyle, and environmental changes that will most successfully help children and families attain and manage energy balance and tip the scale toward healthier weights. Two goals were addressed: 1) professional training and 2) consumer/community education. The training goal focused on developing a comprehensive strategy to facilitate the integration of nutrition and physical activity (PA) using a dynamic energy balance approach for regulating weight into the training of undergraduate and graduate students in dietetics/nutrition science, exercise science/PA, and pre-K-12 teacher preparation programs and in training existing cooperative extension faculty. The education goal focused on developing strategies for integrating dynamic energy balance into nutrition and PA educational programs for the public, especially programs funded by federal/state agencies. The meeting expert presenters and participants addressed three key areas: 1) biological and lifestyle factors that affect energy balance, 2) undergraduate/graduate educational and training issues, and 3) best practices associated with educating the public about dynamic energy balance. Specific consensus recommendations were developed for each goal.

  14. The energy efficiency and demand side management programs as implemented by the energy efficiency division of the department of energy

    Anunciacion, Jesus C.

    1997-01-01

    The thrust of the Philippine energy sector. specifically the government side, is to involve the active participation of not only all the government agencies involved in energy activities but the private sector as well. This participation shall mean technical and financial participation, directly and indirectly. The Department of Energy is on the process involving the continuing update and development of a Philippine Energy Plan (PEP) which has a 30-year time scope, which will help the country monitor and determine energy supply and demand vis-a-vis the growing demands of an industrializing country like the Philippines. Among the most vital component of the PEP is the thrust to pursue national programs for energy efficiency and demand-side management. Seven energy efficiency sub-programs have been identified for implementation, with a target savings of 623 million barrels of fuel oil equivalent (MMBFOE). A cumulative net savings of 237 billion pesos shall be generated against a total investment cost of 54.5 billion pesos. The Philippine energy sector will continue to develop and implement strategies to promote the efficient utilization of energy which will cover all aspects of the energy industry. The plan is focussed on the training and education of the various sectors on the aspects involved in the implementation of energy efficiency and demand-side management elements on a more aggressive note. The implementation of technical strategies by the department will continue on a higher and more extensive level, these are: energy utilization monitoring, consultancy and engineering services, energy efficiency testing and labelling program, and demand-side management programs for each sector. In summary, the PEP, as anchored in energy efficiency and demand-side management tools, among others, will ensure a continuous energy supply at affordable prices while incorporating environmental and social considerations. (author)

  15. The Department of Energy`s Solar Industrial Program: 1995 review

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    During 1995, the Department of Energy`s Solar Industrial (SI) Program worked to bring the benefits of solar energy to America`s industrial sector. Scientists and engineers within the program continued the basic research, applied engineering, and economic analyses that have been at the heart of the Program`s success since its inception in 1989. In 1995, all three of the SI Program`s primary areas of research and development--solar detoxification, advanced solar processes, and solar process heat--succeeded in increasing the contribution made by renewable and energy-efficient technologies to American industry`s sustainable energy future. The Solar Detoxification Program develops solar-based pollution control technologies for destroying hazardous environmental contaminants. The Advanced Solar Processes Program investigates industrial uses of highly concentrated solar energy. The Solar Process Heat Program conducts the investigations and analyses that help energy planners determine when solar heating technologies--like those that produce industrial-scale quantities of hot water, hot air, and steam--can be applied cost effectively. The remainder of this report highlights the research and development conducted within in each of these subprograms during 1995.

  16. Combustion Research Facility | A Department of Energy Office of Science

    Collaborative Research Facility Back to Sandia National Laboratory Homepage Combustion Research Search the CRF Combustion Chemistry Flame Chemistry Research.Combustion_Chemistry.Flame_Chemistry Theory and Modeling Theory and Modeling Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry Chemistry of Autoignition

  17. Interest of the Department of Energy in production and development of short-lived radionuclides

    Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy has developed production of potentially useful radionuclides for applications in medicine. The Department's financial commitment and the short-lived radionuclide production program, with emphasis on iodine-123, is discussed

  18. 78 FR 39279 - United States Department of Energy; Bonneville Power Administration; Notice of Petition for...

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ13-10-000] United States Department of Energy; Bonneville Power Administration; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice... (OATT) and a Petition for Declaratory Order requesting the Commission find that Bonneville's OATT, as...

  19. Defense Infrastructure: Department of Defense Renewable Energy Initiatives

    2010-04-26

    Operational 2005 No 2009 10 280 Dept Navy NAVFAC Hawaii HI Solar Water Heating Systems, Fort Kamehameha WWTF Solar Thermal Fully Operational 2006 Yes... Kamehameha WWTF 0.00 50.00 Reduces fossil fuel use, increases energy security Supports 10 USC 2911 renewable energy goal Supports 10 USC 2911...renewable energy goal Solar Water Heating Systems, Fort Kamehameha WWTF 281 Dept Navy NAVFAC Hawaii HI Solar Water Heating System, Building X-11

  20. Atomic energy and science disclosure in Cordoba

    Martin, Hugo R.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2009, considering the existing interest in public communication of scientific activities that are developed locally, a group of researchers and communicators from Córdoba, decided to form the Network of Outreach of Córdoba. Its stated objectives of the Constitutive Act are presented in this paper along with the main activities undertaken to date and plans for the future. Since that time, the Management of Institutional Relations of the CNEA in Córdoba became involved in public circulation of scientific knowledge, in what has proven to be a framework that ensures an adequate level of debate to present nuclear national activities. This will involve collaborative efforts with professional institutions involved in research, teaching and communicating science. The main objective was to encourage the transfer of knowledge to optimize available resources, improving the methodological approaches and generating creative products tailored to regional needs, in order to promote the democratization of science and nuclear technology. This paper consists of two parts. On the one hand describes the activities of the Network during the year 2011 shows results with particular emphasis on topics related to atomic energy, and secondly, shows the desirability of promoting such activities in the CNEA. Among the main actions considered, highlighting the institutional participation in the official Ministry of Science and Technology Fair participation in Science and Technology Provincial Cordoba 2011, issue of the radio program 'Green Light: Science and technology everyday life' by National Technological University Radio and a network of forty provincial stations, and active participation in the Course of Specialization in Public Communication of Science and Scientific Journalism, organized by the School of Information Sciences and the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, National University of Cordoba, among others. (author) [es

  1. Progress report to the Department of Energy in support of basic energy and policy research

    1981-01-01

    This progress report describes the accomplishments of the first and second years of the three year institutional grant received from the Department of Energy and describes the activities now envisioned for year three. Attachments detailing the highlights of the first and second years' accomplishments are included. Research areas include: light path of carbon reduction in photosynthesis; heat transfer in coal-ash slags; mechanism of plant cell enlargement in Gymnosperms, emulsion stability in enhanced oil recovery; selective transfer phenomenon in friction and wear; conceptual design of the Purdue Compact Torus/Passive Liner Fusion Reactor; integration of farm level alcohol production consistent with the economic and labor constraints of a farming operation, and newsmedia coverage of selected energy policy proposals. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected attachments for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  2. Energy department under fire on pace of reforms

    MacIlwain, C

    1998-01-01

    The US DoE has been heavily criticized at a meeting of the House Science Committee for not responding quickly enough to the 1995 Galvin report. This report criticized the efficiency of the DoE's large network of research laboratories (1 page).

  3. Resolving environmental issues in energy development: roles for the Department of Energy and its field offices

    Ellickson, P.L.; Merrow, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    This study asks what the Department of Energy (DOE) might do to resolve environmental conflicts that arise during the implementation of energy projects or programs. We define implementation as efforts to establish an energy facility at a specific site. The environmental concerns surrounding implementation serve as touchstones of the relevance and feasibility of national energy policies. We have analyzed geothermal development in California and oil shale development in Colorado and Utah and addressed the following questions: By what processes are energy and environmental tradeoffs made. In what circumstances can DOE participation in these processes lead to a more satisfactory outcome. What options does DOE have for resolving environmetal issues and how can it choose the best option. How can DOE establish an effective working relationship with both the governmental and private groups affected by the siting and operation of energy projects. The government's most effective role in resolving environmental conflicts and uncertainties is to improve communications among the concerned parties. This role requires flexibility and evenhandedness from the government as well as an understanding of the local conditions and a commitment to appropriate local solutions. Involving local sources at every stage of the environmental impact analysis will reduce the probability of conflicts and make those that do arise more easily resolvable.

  4. Proceedings of the fifteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Fifteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 14-15, 1997, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was organized into eight technical sessions, which included 32 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. The topics of the eight sessions are: multiphase flows 1; multiphase flows 2; mostly optics; fluid mechanics; nonlinear fields; welding and cracks; materials; and controls. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. It has the prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation`s future energy options will have to be identified, developed, and built. It is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary for the solution of present and future problems of energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, consistent with respect for the environment. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for contributions to this Symposium.

  5. Annual report of the Department of Atomic Energy 1977-78

    1978-01-01

    The activities during the financial year 1977-78 of the research organizations and laboratories, various projects underway and public sector undertakings of the Department of Atomic Energy (India) have been reported. The R and D Work of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay and Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam in the fields of nuclear physics, radio- and radiation chemistry and other physical sciences; biological sciences including nuclear medicine, food irradiation and plant breeding by radiation mutation; reactor engineering and application of radiation and radioisotopes has been surveyed. The progress of heavy water projects, MHD project, nuclear power plant projects and 100 Mw thermal research reactor R-5 project has been described. Performance of Tarapur and Rajasthan Atomic Power Stations, Nuclear Fuel Complex and Electronics Corporation of India Ltd., both at Hyderabad, Uranium Corporation of India Ltd. at Jaduguda and Indian Rare Earths Ltd. has been reported. Major achievements during the period of report are : (1) completion of construction work of the Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur and (2) Commissioning of the Variable Energy Cyclotron, Calcutta for the internal circulating beam of alpha particles. (M.G.B.)

  6. Final Report to t he Department of Energy Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

    Gaughen, Shasta

    2018-03-30

    The Pala Band of Mission Indians was awarded a DOE-EERE Solar Energy Grant for FY 2016 and 2017. The project involved installing a 94.8 kW DC photovoltaic (PC) solar system on the Pala Fire Station to offset up to 95% of grid-derived energy and reduce overall CO2 generation from the facility. Pala successfully installed rooftop and carport-mounted solar panels at the fire station, and to date has generated of 219,227 kWh of energy and offset 274,034 pounds of CO2. The project was successfully executed, and we recommend other tribes to undertake similar projects if they are located in areas with sufficient solar exposure. DOE should continue to make these funds available to tribes.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs. Underrepresented minorities in U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify those particular aspects of US Department of Energy (DOE) research participation programs for undergraduate and graduate students that are most associated with attracting and benefiting underrepresented minority students and encouraging them to pursue careers in science, engineering, and technology. A survey of selected former underrepresented minority participants, focus group analysis, and critical incident analysis serve as the data sources for this report. Data collected from underrepresented minority participants indicate that concerns expressed and suggestions made for conducting student research programs at DOE contractor facilities are not remarkably different from those made by all participants involved in such student research participation programs. With the exception of specific suggestions regarding recruitment, the findings summarized in this report can be interpreted to apply to all student research participants in DOE national laboratories. Clearly defined assignments, a close mentor-student association, good communication, and an opportunity to interact with other participants and staff are those characteristics that enhance any educational program and have positive impacts on career development.

  8. Department of Energy perspective on high-level waste standards for Yucca Mountain

    Brocoum, S.J.; Gil, A.V.; Van Luik, A.E.; Lugo, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a regulatory perspective from the viewpoint of the potential licensee, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on Yucca Mountain standards issued in August 1995, and on how the recommendations in that report should be considered in the development of high-level radioactive waste standards applicable to Yucca Mountain. The paper first provides an overview of the DOE perspective and then discusses several of the issues that are of most importance in the development of the regulatory framework for Yucca Mountain, including both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) implementing regulation. These issues include: the regulatory time frame, the risk/dose limit, the definition of the reference biosphere, human intrusion, and natural processes and events

  9. Audit of the management and cost of the Department of Energy`s protective forces

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s safeguards and security program is designed to provide appropriate, efficient, and effective protection of the Department`s nuclear weapons, nuclear materials, facilities, and classified information. These items must be protected against theft, sabotage, espionage, and terrorist activity, with continuing emphasis on protection against the insider threat. The purpose of the audit was to determine if protective forces were efficiently managed and appropriately sized in light of the changing missions and current budget constraints. The authors found that the cost of physical security at some sites had grown beyond those costs incurred when the site was in full production. This increase was due to a combination of factors, including concerns about the adequacy of physical security, reactions to the increase in terrorism in the early 1980s with the possibility of hostile attacks, and the selection of security system upgrades without adequate consideration of cost effectiveness. Ongoing projects to upgrade security systems were not promptly reassessed when missions changed and levels of protection were not determined in a way which considered the attractiveness of the material being protected. The authors also noted several opportunities for the Department to improve the operational efficiency of its protective force operations, including, eluminating overtime paid to officers prior to completion of the basic 40-hour workweek, paying hourly wages of unarmed guards which are commensurate with their duties, consolidating protective force units, transferring law enforcement duties to local law agencies, eliminating or reducing paid time to exercise, and standardizing supplies and equipment used by protective force members.

  10. Department of Energy Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study

    1987-05-01

    This Study, the Emergency Management Functional Requirements Study (EMFRS), identifies the physical environment, information resources, and equipment required in the DOE Headquarters Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to support the DOE staff in managing an emergency. It is the first step toward converting the present Forrestal EOC into a practical facility that will function well in each of the highly diverse types of emergencies in which the Department could be involved. 2 figs

  11. Science in the service of energy

    2013-01-01

    Meetings on the subject of energy have marked the past two weeks at CERN. The first was on how we use energy, the second on how we might generate it in the future. Both are important, not just for CERN, but for society as a whole.   Let’s take a look at the first of those gatherings. It was the second in a series of workshops on energy for sustainable science, organised by CERN in collaboration with the European Spallation Source (ESS), which hosted the first, and ERF, the European association of national research facilities. The way we use energy is increasingly important, and constitutes a substantial fraction of CERN's operating budget. We consume 1.2 TeraWatt-hours (TWh) of energy per year. To put that in to context, the canton of Geneva consumes 3TWh per year. It is therefore incumbent on a laboratory like CERN to ensure that we use energy in the most efficient, responsible and sustainable way possible. Since the first workshop in 2011, much progress has been made in te...

  12. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Science for Our Nation's Energy Future, September 2016

    None, None

    2016-09-01

    As world demand for energy rapidly expands, transforming the way energy is collected, stored, and used has become a defining challenge of the 21st century. At its heart, this challenge is a scientific one, inspiring the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) to establish the Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) program in 2009. The EFRCs represent a unique approach, bringing together creative, multidisciplinary scientific teams to perform energy-relevant basic research with a complexity beyond the scope of single-investigator projects. These centers take full advantage of powerful new tools for characterizing, understanding, modeling, and manipulating matter from atomic to macroscopic length scales. They also train the next-generation scientific workforce by attracting talented students and postdoctoral researchers interested in energy science. The EFRCs have collectively demonstrated the potential to substantially advance the scientific understanding underpinning transformational energy technologies. Both a BES Committee of Visitors and a Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force have found the EFRC program to be highly successful in meeting its goals. The scientific output from the EFRCs is impressive, and many centers have reported that their results are already impacting both technology research and industry. This report on the EFRC program includes selected highlights from the initial 46 EFRCs and the current 36 EFRCs.

  13. Fossil Energy Research and Development Program of the U. S. Department of Energy, FY 1979

    None

    1978-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses energy Research and Development efforts on new and promising ways to provide for our future energy needs. This document focuses on DOE's programs and projects related to the nation's Fossil Energy resources: coal, oil, natural gas and oil shale. Fossil Energy programs have grown rapidly from about $58 million in FY 1973 to the $802 million requested for FY 1979. As those programs have matured, there have been significant shifts in emphasis. For example, by FY 1979, gasification technologies will have matured sufficiently to enter the demonstration phase. Then we will have to make critical decisions as to which candidate processes to pursue and to encourage industry's active participation as early as possible. We will present the rationale for those changes and others at the beginning of each section describing a particular grouping of similar projects, e.g., coal liquefaction. We will then discuss each project and present its current status along with past and future milestones. Emphasis is on projects with early payoff potential, particularly the direct utilization of coal. However, this near-term emphasis will not overshadow the need for a stong technological base for development of longer-term promising technologies and the need for a strong environmental concern.

  14. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy photovoltaic energy program contract summary, fiscal year 1999

    Surek, T.; Hansen, A.

    2000-02-17

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) and US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program from October 1, 1998, through September 30, 1999 (FY 1999). The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy as an industry and an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the US industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the US industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV is part of the National PV Program and provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy photovoltaic energy program contract summary, fiscal year 1999

    Surek, T.; Hansen, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) and US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program from October 1, 1998, through September 30, 1999 (FY 1999). The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy as an industry and an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the US industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the US industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV is part of the National PV Program and provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals

  17. Graduate performance of science education department in implementing conservation-based science teaching

    Parmin; Savitri, E. N.; Amalia, A. V.; Pratama, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to measure the performance of graduates in implementing conservation-based science teaching. The study employed a qualitative method by collecting the self-assessment data from alumni and the performance assessment from the headmasters of schools where the graduates are currently teaching. There are nine indicators of conservation insight examined in this study. The study concluded that the 78 alumni, who have become teachers when the study was conducted, perform well in implementing conservative science lessons.

  18. University Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Accelerator Applications Program

    Beller, Denis E.; Ward, Thomas E.; Bresee, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY-01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of transmutation of nuclear waste. An Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF), which may be built during the first decade of the 21. Century, is a major component of this effort. The ADTF would include a large, state-of-the-art charged-particle accelerator, proton-neutron target systems, and accelerator-driven R and D systems. This new facility and its underlying science and technology will require a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians. In addition, other applications of nuclear science and engineering (e.g., proliferation monitoring and defense, nuclear medicine, safety regulation, industrial processes, and many others) require increased academic and national infrastructure and student populations. Thus, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project to support the infrastructure requirements of nuclear energy, science and technology fields as well as the special needs of the DOE transmutation program. In this paper we describe university programs that have supported, are supporting, and will support the R and D necessary for the AAA Project. Previous work included research for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, current (FY-01) programs include graduate fellowships and research for the AAA Project, and it is expected that future programs will expand and add to the existing programs. (authors)

  19. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    None

    2010-12-01

    The Critical Materials Strategy builds on the Department’s previous work in this area and provides a foundation for future action. This Strategy is a first step toward a comprehensive response to the challenges before us. We hope it will also encourage others to engage in a dialogue about these issues and work together to achieve our Nation’s clean energy goals.

  20. US Department of Energy Nuclear Research and Development Program

    Griffith, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The presentation includes a discussion of nuclear power in the United States with respect to public opinion, energy consumption, economics, technology, and safety. The focus of the presentation is the advanced light water reactor strategy, liquid metal cooled reactor program, the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor program, and DOE research and test reactor facilities utilization. The discussion includes programmatic status and planning

  1. NREL: News - Energy Department Honors Solar Decathlon Winners

    maximum energy production and efficiency. In appearance, the homes are a mix of traditional and modern . Teams from 14 universities competed by building homes that blend aesthetics and modern conveniences with education, government advocacy, community redevelopment and public outreach activities, the AIA and its

  2. 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Discovering the Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    None,

    2006-10-11

    The Department of Energy Organization Act, which created DOE, was enacted in 1977 and DOE officially came into existence in October of that year. That law brought together for the first time, not only most of the government’s energy programs, but also science and technology programs and defense responsibilities that included the design, construction, and testing of nuclear weapons. Over its history, DOE has shifted its emphasis and focus as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. Today, DOE stands at the forefront of helping the Nation meet our energy, scientific, environmental, and national security goals. These include developing and deploying new energy technologies, reducing our dependence on foreign energy sources, protecting our nuclear weapons stockpile, and ensuring that America remains competitive in the global marketplace. To help achieve these goals, President Bush has launched two key initiatives: the American Competitiveness Initiative (ACI) and the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI). The President launched these initiatives recognizing that science, technology, and engineering hold the answers to many of the critical challenges our world faces. These new initiatives to spur scientific innovation and technology development expand DOE’s continuing support for the competitive energy markets, both domestically and internationally, and of policies that facilitate continued private investment in the energy sector. In addition, DOE supports the demonstration and deployment of energy technologies through collaborative efforts with the private sector and public sector entities.

  3. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings

    1993-01-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases

  4. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  5. Women Accuse Rutgers Political-Science Department of Bias and Hostility

    Moser, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Female faculty members and graduate students at Rutgers University in New Brunswick's political-science department feel unfairly compensated and shut out of leadership positions by their male counterparts, says an internal university report obtained by "The Chronicle." In at least one case, a woman has been afraid to complain about…

  6. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro [eds.

    2000-01-01

    The tandem accelerator established at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 1982 has been one of the most prominent electrostatic accelerators in the world. The accelerator has been serving for many researches planned by not only JAERI staff but also researchers of universities and national institutes. After the completion of the tandem booster in 1993, four times higher beam energy became available. These two facilities, the tandem accelerator and the booster, made great strides in heavy ion physics and a lot of achievements have been accumulated until now. The research departments of JAERI were reformed in 1998, and the accelerators section came under the Department of Materials Science. On this reform of the research system, the symposium 'Heavy Ion Science in Tandem Energy Region' was held in cooperation with nuclear and solid state physicists although there has been no such symposium for many years. The symposium was expected to stimulate novel development in both nuclear and solid state physics, and also interdisciplinary physics between nuclear and solid state physics. The 68 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  8. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  9. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report for 2000

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems...

  10. Health sciences libraries' subscriptions to journals: expectations of general practice departments and collection-based analysis.

    Barreau, David; Bouton, Céline; Renard, Vincent; Fournier, Jean-Pascal

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to (i) assess the expectations of general practice departments regarding health sciences libraries' subscriptions to journals and (ii) describe the current general practice journal collections of health sciences libraries. A cross-sectional survey was distributed electronically to the thirty-five university general practice departments in France. General practice departments were asked to list ten journals to which they expected access via the subscriptions of their health sciences libraries. A ranked reference list of journals was then developed. Access to these journals was assessed through a survey sent to all health sciences libraries in France. Adequacy ratios (access/need) were calculated for each journal. All general practice departments completed the survey. The total reference list included 44 journals. This list was heterogeneous in terms of indexation/impact factor, language of publication, and scope (e.g., patient care, research, or medical education). Among the first 10 journals listed, La Revue Prescrire (96.6%), La Revue du Praticien-Médecine Générale (90.9%), the British Medical Journal (85.0%), Pédagogie Médicale (70.0%), Exercer (69.7%), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (62.5%) had the highest adequacy ratios, whereas Family Practice (4.2%), the British Journal of General Practice (16.7%), Médecine (29.4%), and the European Journal of General Practice (33.3%) had the lowest adequacy ratios. General practice departments have heterogeneous expectations in terms of health sciences libraries' subscriptions to journals. It is important for librarians to understand the heterogeneity of these expectations, as well as local priorities, so that journal access meets users' needs.

  11. Automatic energy expenditure measurement for health science.

    Catal, Cagatay; Akbulut, Akhan

    2018-04-01

    It is crucial to predict the human energy expenditure in any sports activity and health science application accurately to investigate the impact of the activity. However, measurement of the real energy expenditure is not a trivial task and involves complex steps. The objective of this work is to improve the performance of existing estimation models of energy expenditure by using machine learning algorithms and several data from different sensors and provide this estimation service in a cloud-based platform. In this study, we used input data such as breathe rate, and hearth rate from three sensors. Inputs are received from a web form and sent to the web service which applies a regression model on Azure cloud platform. During the experiments, we assessed several machine learning models based on regression methods. Our experimental results showed that our novel model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression in conjunction with the median aggregation technique provides the best result among other five regression algorithms. This cloud-based energy expenditure system which uses a web service showed that cloud computing technology is a great opportunity to develop estimation systems and the new model which applies Boosted Decision Tree Regression with the median aggregation provides remarkable results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Department of Energy Photovoltaics Technology Plan (2003-2007)

    2003-09-01

    This 10-page brochure provides the R&D targets in 10 technical areas within the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program's PV Subprogram for 2003 to 2007. This R&D work is set in the context of the progress made in PV during the last 50 years, as shown in a timeline. The brochure briefly describes the basic focus within each of the technical areas. The last section explains aspects of managing the DOE work, including the use of partnerships with industry, universities, and national labs, as well as the development of a systems-driven approach for directing various activities.

  13. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Southern California (USC) Department of Earth Sciences

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Metadata describing geological samples curated by Earth Sciences Department of the University of Southern California (USC) collected during the period from 1922 to...

  14. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) Department of Marine Geosciences.

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) Department of Marine Geosciences made a one-time contribution of data describing geological samples...

  15. Fiscal Year 1985 Department of Energy Authorization: magnetic fusion energy. Volume V. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 23, 29, 1984

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Volume V of the hearing record covers two days of testimony on the fusion energy program, with a focus on the Tokamak fusion core experiment (TFCX) and the need for the US to retain leadership in the field. DOE Research Director Trivelpiece reviewed the program on the first day. Progress reports from research laboratories and associated industries supported the request for additional funding for the TFCX. The threat of funding cuts due to the federal deficit was a major point of concern, while the potential for industrial participation was seen as a positive development. Two appendices with additional statements and responses to questions follow the testimony of 13 witnesses

  16. The Department of Energy's safeguards and security technology development program

    Smith, G.D.; Pocratsky, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The US DOE has had a program that develops technologies to protect sensitive nuclear weapons facilities for more than thirty years. The mission of the program is overwhelmingly diverse, as it must be to protect an array of assets such as nuclear weapons, special nuclear material in various forms, components of nuclear weapons, and classified nuclear weapons design information. Considering that the nuclear weapons complex consists of dozens of facilities that are scattered all over the US, the technology development mission is very challenging. Complicating matters further is the ever uncertain future of the DOE. Some examples of dramatic Departmental mission changes that directly impact their security technology development program are given. A few development efforts are highlighted as examples of efforts currently being sponsored. They are: automated sensor testing devices to help reduce the requirement for personnel to enter vaults containing highly radioactive nuclear materials; a vehicle inspection portal to screen vehicles for hidden passengers, nuclear material, explosives, and other contraband; non-lead and short-range ammunition as an environmentally safe alternative to lead ammunition; a complex-wide visitor access control system to allow all DOE employees to travel to all sites with a commonly recognized credential; automated nuclear material monitoring technologies to provide assurance that material in storage has not been tampered with; laser radar as a potential solution to early warning deficiencies throughout the Department; performance testing standards for many security products to include an automated and consistent standard for assessing the quality of video; low temperature pyrotechnic smoke as a possible adversary delay mechanism; modular vaults to provide temporary protection for nuclear material during D and D activities, and a protection approach for restricted passage areas such as the volume above a tiled ceiling or within a crawl space

  17. Office of Basic Energy Sciences: 1984 summary report

    1984-11-01

    Subprograms of the OBES discussed in this document include: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, engineering and geosciences, advanced energy projects, biological energy research, carbon dioxide research, HFBR, HFIR, NSLS, SSRL, IPNS, Combustion Research Facility, high-voltage and atomic resolution electron microscopic facilities, Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, Dynamitron Accelerator, calutrons, and Transuranium Processing Plant. Nickel aluminide and glassy metals are discussed

  18. Fiscal year 1986, Department of Energy authorization (magnetic fusion energy and departmental administration and supporting services activities). Volume V. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, March 8, 18, 1985

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Volume V of the hearing record covers testimony given over two days on budgets for research on magnetic fusion energy and on the administration and support services of the DOE. The principal witness on the first day was Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece of DOE, who described adjustments in fusion funding that resulted from federal budget cuts. These led to delay and deferments in the program, and raised the issue of how to maintain balance in the program and still meet program goals. Trivelpiece emphasized that cuts for fusion research were consistent with other DOE reductions. Testimony on the second day came from representatives of fusion laboratories and the nuclear industry. Two appendices with additional questions and answers submitted for the record follow the testimony of the 16 witnesses

  19. Annual report 1982-83 [of the Department of Atomic Energy, India

    1983-01-01

    The annual report of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India for the financial year 1982-83 surveys the work of its various establishments. The major thrust of the DAE's programme is directed towards peaceful uses of atomic ener%y - primarily for electric power generation and applications of radiation and radioisotopes in medicine, agriculture and industry. The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay is the major R and D establishment of the DAE and its activities in the fields of nuclear physics, chemistry and materials science, radiochemistry, nuclear fuels, reactor engineering, radiation protection, radioactive waste management and applications of radiation and radioactive isotopes are described in detail. The R and D activities of the Reactor Research Centre at Kanpakkam, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and the Tata A1emorial Centre, both at Bombay, and the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta are described in brief. The performance of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station, the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station, the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, the Atomic Minerals Division, Uranium Corporation of India Ltd at Jaduguda, various heavy water plants and other industrial units of DAE is reported. Progress of nuclear power projects at Narora and Kakrapar, R-5 Project at Bombay and FBTR Project at Kalpakkam is described. India's participation in the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency is also mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  20. 78 FR 16275 - Extension of the Duration of Programmatic Agreements Based on the Department of Energy Prototype...

    2013-03-14

    ... Based on the Department of Energy Prototype Programmatic Agreement for Its Weatherization Assistance... Department of Energy Prototype Programmatic Agreement for its Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy... under the prototype Programmatic Agreement (PA) for the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental...

  1. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Center for Electrical Energy

    Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Research Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical

  2. Staff evaluation of US Department of Energy proposal for monitored retrievable storage

    1986-03-01

    As directed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the US Department of Energy has prepared a proposal for the US Congress for a facility that can be used for the monitored retrievable storage of spent fuel from commercial users. This report describes the evaluation performed by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the design concepts for the monitored retrievable storage facility proposed by the Department of Energy. On February 5, 1986 the NRC submitted its principal comments to the Department of Energy in the letter shown on the following pages. 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Delegation of Authority to Review Leases of Property at Department of Energy Weapon Production Facilities Under the Department of Energy Organization Act

    The purpose of this memorandum is to request that the Human Resources Staff for OSWER and OECA start the Green Border review process for the attached draft delegation of authority, which delegates the authority of the Administrator to review leases of property at Department of Energy (DOE) weapon production facilities to the Assistant Administrator for OSWER and Regional Administrators.

  4. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, August 31, 1991--August 29, 1992

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  5. The Effect of a State Department of Education Teacher Mentor Initiative on Science Achievement

    Pruitt, Stephen L.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a southern state's department of education program to improve science achievement through embedded professional development of science teachers in the lowest performing schools. The Science Mentor Program provided content and inquiry-based coaching by teacher leaders to science teachers in their own classrooms. The study analyzed the mean scale scores for the science portion of the state's high school graduation test for the years 2004 through 2007 to determine whether schools receiving the intervention scored significantly higher than comparison schools receiving no intervention. The results showed that all schools achieved significant improvement of scale scores between 2004 and 2007, but there were no significant performance differences between intervention and comparison schools, nor were there any significant differences between various subgroups in intervention and comparison schools. However, one subgroup, economically disadvantaged (ED) students, from high-level intervention schools closed the achievement gap with ED students from no-intervention schools across the period of the study. The study provides important information to guide future research on and design of large-scale professional development programs to foster inquiry-based science.

  6. Nuclear energy system department annual report. April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002

    Nakajima, Hajime; Ohnuki, Akira; Kunii, Katsuhiko

    2003-03-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Nuclear Energy System during the fiscal year of 2001 (April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002). The Department has been organized from April 1998. The main research activity is aimed to build the basis of the development of future nuclear energy systems. The research activities of the Department cover basic nuclear data evaluation, conceptual design of a reduced-moderation water reactor, reactor physics experiments and development of the reactor analysis codes, experiment and analysis of thermal-hydrodynamics, energy system analysis and assessment, development of advanced materials for a reactor, lifetime reliability assessment on structural material, development of advanced nuclear fuel, design of a marine reactor and the research for a nuclear ship system. The maintenance and operation of reactor engineering facilities belonging to the Department are undertaken. The activities of the research committees to which the Department takes a role of secretariat are also summarized in this report. (author)

  7. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 2

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy transition issues. The topics of the report include: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Defense Programs; New Production Reactors; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; energy research; environment, safety and health; fossil energy; General Counsel; hearings and appeals, Inspector General, international affairs and energy emergencies; management and administration, minority economic impact; nuclear energy; policy, planning and analysis, radioactive waste management; and power marketing administrations: Bonneville Power Administration, Western Area Power Administration, Alaska Power Administration, Southeastern Power Administration, and Southwestern Power Administration.

  8. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    1980-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems

  9. 20 years' 'Department of Energy Conversion' and its contribution to the use of nuclear energy in the GDR

    Schramm, G.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Energy Conversion at the Dresden University of Technology has been founded 20 years ago. After briefly elucidating the tasks of the department, a review of scientific achievements carried out to the use of nuclear energy in the power economy of the GDR in this period is given. Results include specific problems of nuclear technology and machine engineering, measurement technology, automation, process design, thermodynamics as well. Further information may be found in the 100 detailed references quoted. (author)

  10. Department of Energy: Opportunities Exist to Improve Los Alamos' Equipment Purchasing Practices

    2001-01-01

    In fiscal year 2000, the Department of Energy (DOE) received $13.2 million in supplemental funding to replace equipment lost in the May 2000 Cerro Grande fire that damaged the Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  11. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the General Accounting Office's views on three bills designed to improve worker and nuclear facility safety and health as well as to enhance security for the Department of Energy (DOE...

  12. Department of energy technology annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1986

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1987-02-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1986 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  13. 77 FR 13109 - Petition for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy...

    2012-03-05

    ... for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy Residential Refrigerator... the Samsung Electronics America, Inc. (Samsung) petition for waiver (hereafter, ``petition'') from... consumption of electric refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. In its petition, Samsung provides an...

  14. Department of Energy Technology. Annual progress report 1 Jan - 31 Dec 1987

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1988-03-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1987 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications and included. 13 ills., 24 refs. (author)

  15. Safety analysis and review system: a Department of Energy safety assurance tool

    Rosenthal, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of the Safety Analysis and Review System is not new. It has been used within the Department and its predecessor agencies, Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), for over 20 years. To minimize the risks from nuclear reactor and power plants, the AEC developed a process to support management authorization of each operation through identification and analysis of potential hazards and the measures taken to control them. As the agency evolved from AEC through ERDA to the Department of Energy, its responsibilities were broadened to cover a diversity of technologies, including those associated with the development of fossil, solar, and geothermal energy. Because the safety analysis process had proved effective in a technology of high potential hazard, the Department investigated the applicability of the process to the other technologies. This paper describes the system and discusses how it is implemented within the Department

  16. Department of Energy Technology annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1985

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1986-02-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1985 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  17. Department of energy technology. Annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1983

    1984-01-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1983 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  18. U.S. Department of Energy defense waste management program implementation plan

    Jordan, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Program Implementation Plan describes the Department of Energy's current approach to managing its defense high-level, low-level, and transuranic radioactive waste. It documents implementation of the policies described in the 1983 Defense Waste Management Plan

  19. U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories: Printing Case Study

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), New Mexico quantified the costs associated with individual desktop printing devices, for comparison with costs associated with using networked copiers as printers

  20. United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    1993-12-01

    This reports contains documentation of presentations given at the United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting held December 14--15, 1993 in Alexandria, Virginia.

  1. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotope Programs

    Carty, J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotopes Program. The charter of the Isotope Programs covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services

  2. Department of Energy Technology. Annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1989

    Micheelsen, B.; Hoejerup, C.F.

    1990-09-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1989 is presented. This year was the last one for the department, as organizational changes at the beginning of 1990 caused a split-up of the sections of the department. The activities within the major fields are described in some detail and lists of staff and publicaltions are included. (author) 10 ills., 29 refs

  3. Energy conservation attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors in science laboratories

    Kaplowitz, Michael D.; Thorp, Laurie; Coleman, Kayla; Kwame Yeboah, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Energy use per square foot from science research labs is disproportionately higher than that of other rooms in buildings on campuses across the nation. This is partly due to labs’ use of energy intensive equipment. However, laboratory management and personnel behavior may be significant contributing factors to energy consumption. Despite an apparent increasing need for energy conservation in science labs, a systematic investigation of avenues promoting energy conservation behavior in such labs appears absent in scholarly literature. This paper reports the findings of a recent study into the energy conservation knowledge, attitude and behavior of principle investigators, laboratory managers, and student lab workers at a tier 1 research university. The study investigates potential barriers as well as promising avenues to reducing energy consumption in science laboratories. The findings revealed: (1) an apparent lack of information about options for energy conservation in science labs, (2) existing operational barriers, (3) economic issues as barriers/motivators of energy conservation and (4) a widespread notion that cutting edge science may be compromised by energy conservation initiatives. - Highlights: ► Effective energy conservation and efficiency depend on social systems and human behaviors. ► Science laboratories use more energy per square foot than any other academic and research spaces. ► Time, money, quality control, and convenience overshadow personnel’s desire to save energy. ► Ignorance of conservation practices is a barrier to energy conservation in labs.

  4. Audit of the US Department of Energy`s consolidated financial statements for Fiscal Year 1996

    NONE

    1997-02-24

    The Office of Inspector General audited the Department`s Consolidated Statement of Financial position as of September 30, 1996, and the related Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position for the year ended. Results are described.

  5. Department of Energy Technology. Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1982

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risø during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risø during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  6. The U.S. Department of Energy Program in low-dose food irradiation

    Krenz, D.L.; McMullen, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Byproducts Utilization Program (BUP) seeks to develop and encourage the widespread beneficial commercial use of waste byproducts produced by Department of Energy (DOE) programs. These byproducts are generally radioactive to varying degrees and consist of fission products resulting from irradiation of nuclear reactor fuel for production of special nuclear material at DOE facilities in Richland, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina

  7. The role of BNDES' Energy Department (DEENE) on natural gas area

    Drummond, P.H.; Abreu Filho, J. de

    1988-01-01

    This work describes the activities of BNDES' Energy Department (DEENE) as the main financing agent of the brazilian energy sector, with particular emphasis on natural gas - which has not played an important role yet, despite DEENE's disposition and expectancy in participating of projects in this area. The work also outlines the department's plan at short and medium term concerning natural gas, and presents the Bank's financing conditions to this sector. (author)

  8. The Perceptions of Globalization at a Public Research University Computer Science Graduate Department

    Nielsen, Selin Yildiz

    Based on a qualitative methodological approach, this study focuses on the understanding of a phenomenon called globalization in a research university computer science department. The study looks into the participants' perspectives about the department, its dynamics, culture and academic environment as related to globalization. The economic, political, academic and social/cultural aspects of the department are taken into consideration in investigating the influences of globalization. Three questions guide this inquiry: 1) How is the notion of globalization interpreted in this department? 2) How does the perception of globalization influence the department in terms of finances, academics, policies and social life And 3) How are these perceptions influence the selection of students? Globalization and neo-institutional view of legitimacy is used as theoretical lenses to conceptualize responses to these questions. The data include interviews, field notes, official and non-official documents. Interpretations of these data are compared to findings from prior research on the impact of globalization in order to clarify and validate findings. Findings show that there is disagreement in how the notion of globalization is interpreted between the doctoral students and the faculty in the department. This disagreement revealed the attitudes and interpretations of globalization in the light of the policies and procedures related to the department. How the faculty experience globalization is not consistent with the literature in this project. The literature states that globalization is a big part of higher education and it is a phenomenon that causes the changes in the goals and missions of higher education institutions (Knight, 2003, De Witt, 2005). The data revealed that globalization is not the cause for change but more of a consequence of actions that take place in achieving the goals and missions of the department.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Photovoltaic Energy Program Contract Summary: Fiscal Year 2000

    Surek, T.

    2001-02-21

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program from October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000 (FY 2000). The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy-as an industry and an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV is part of the National PV Program and provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals. This Contract Summary for fiscal year (FY) 2000 documents some 179 research projects supported by the PV Program, performed by 107 organizations in 32 states, including 69 projects performed by universities and 60 projects performed by our industry partners. Of the total FY 2000 PV Program budget of $65.9 million, the industry and university research efforts received $36.9 million, or nearly 56%. And, of this amount, more than 93% was for contractors selected on a competitive basis. Much of the funding to industry was matched by industry cost-sharing. Each individual effort described in this summary represents another step toward improving PV manufacturing, performance, cost, and applications, and another step toward accomplishing the DOE PV Program's overall mission.

  10. 75 FR 29993 - Department of Commerce: Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee Renewable Energy and Energy...

    2010-05-28

    ... Coordinating Committee Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Export Strategy To Support the National Export... Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee's (TPCC) Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Working Group is developing a U.S. Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Export Strategy (the Strategy) to guide U.S...

  11. Collaboration versus communication: The Department of Energy's Amchitka Island and the Aleut Community

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Pletnikoff, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly managers and scientists are recognizing that solving environmental problems requires the inclusion of a wide range of disciplines, governmental agencies, Native American tribes, and other stakeholders. Usually such inclusion involves communication at the problem-formulation phase, and at the end to report findings. This paper examines participatory research, the differences between the traditional stakeholder involvement method of communication (often one-way, at the beginning and the end), compared to full collaboration, where parties are actively involved in the scientific process. Using the Department of Energy's (DOE) Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study, we demonstrate that the inclusion of Aleut people throughout the process resulted in science that was relevant not only to the agency's needs and to the interested and affected parties, but that led to a solution. Amchitka Island was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971, and virtually no testing of radionuclide levels in biota, subsistence foods, or commercial fish was conducted after the 1970s. When DOE announced plans to close Amchitka, terminating its managerial responsibility, without any further testing of radionuclide levels in biota, there was considerable controversy, which resulted in the development of a Science Plan to assess the potential risks to the marine environment from the tests. The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) was the principle entity that developed and executed the science plan. Unlike traditional science, CRESP embarked on a process to include the Alaskan Natives of the Aleutian Islands (Aleuts), relevant state and federal agencies, and other stakeholders at every phase. Aleuts were included in the problem-formulation, research design refinement, the research, analysis of data, dissemination of research findings, and public communication. This led to agreement with the results, and to developing a

  12. Model Diagnostics for the Department of Energy's Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) Project

    Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, eight Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, four academic institutions, one company, and the National Centre for Atmospheric Research combined forces in a project called Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) with the goal to speed Earth system model development for climate and energy. Over the planned 10-year span, the project will conduct simulations and modeling on DOE's most powerful high-performance computing systems at Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Berkeley Leadership Compute Facilities. A key component of the ACME project is the development of an interactive test bed for the advanced Earth system model. Its execution infrastructure will accelerate model development and testing cycles. The ACME Workflow Group is leading the efforts to automate labor-intensive tasks, provide intelligent support for complex tasks and reduce duplication of effort through collaboration support. As part of this new workflow environment, we have created a diagnostic, metric, and intercomparison Python framework, called UVCMetrics, to aid in the testing-to-production execution of the ACME model. The framework exploits similarities among different diagnostics to compactly support diagnosis of new models. It presently focuses on atmosphere and land but is designed to support ocean and sea ice model components as well. This framework is built on top of the existing open-source software framework known as the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT). Because of its flexible framework design, scientists and modelers now can generate thousands of possible diagnostic outputs. These diagnostics can compare model runs, compare model vs. observation, or simply verify a model is physically realistic. Additional diagnostics are easily integrated into the framework, and our users have already added several. Diagnostics can be generated, viewed, and manipulated from the UV-CDAT graphical user interface, Python command line scripts and programs

  13. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004

    FOX,K.J.

    2004-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  14. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003

    FOX,K.J.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  15. Internal evaluation of public health department of Semnan university of medical sciences

    Behrad Pour- Mohammadi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Internal evaluation is a fundamental determinant to quality development in teachingdepartments and faculties. The purpose of this study was an internal departmental evaluation in the publichealth department of Semnan university of medical sciences (SUMS.Materials and Methods: This work was performed (during 2008-2009 in department of public health ofSUMS utilizing an accreditation model. The assessment covered 9 areas, namely: educational missions andobjectives, management and organization, educational programs, scientific board, students, educationalresources, research activities, assessment and evaluation, and graduates. Questionnaires were developed bythe scientific members of the department. After collecting the data, results were categorized according toGourman scoring scale, from unsatisfied class to very strong class, with the range of 1-5 scores.Results: The mean scores in the 9 evaluation areas were obtained and the rankings were as below:Educational programs area was in strong ranking; educational missions and objectives, scientific board,and assessment and evaluation areas were in good ranking; management and organization area was in morethan satisfied ranking; students area was in satisfied ranking; educational resources and research activitiesareas were in borderline ranking; and finally, the department was ranked as unsatisfied in the graduatesarea.Conclusions: Results showed that by achieved mean of 3.19 in whole of the evaluation areas, the publichealth department has placed in "more than satisfied" class. Although the overall status is acceptable, thereis a need to modify the weak points in the suboptimal areas to improve the educational quality in thisdepartment.

  16. Audit of the US Department of Energy`s consolidated statement of financial position as of September 30, 1995

    NONE

    1996-02-29

    In preparation for fulfilling our responsibilities under the Government Management Reform Act of 1994, we planned to conduct an audit of the Department of Energy`s FY 1995 Consolidated Statement of Financial Position. As discussed in the accompanying reports, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) could not express an opinion on the reasonableness of the value of assets and liabilities of the Department because of matters outside the control of the auditors that restricted the scope of their work. Although the OIG could not express an opinion, the audit disclosed reportable conditions in the Department`s internal control structure that adversely affected its ability to manage and account for its assets and liabilities. Corrective management actions on these reportable conditions should help the Department in preparing its Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 Statement of Financial Position.

  17. United States Department Of Energy Office Of Environmental Management Technology Development Report Fiscal Year 2010

    Bush, S.

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  18. Department of Energy standard for the performance testing of personnel dosimetry systems

    1986-12-01

    This standard is intended to be used in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems. It is based on the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) ''Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance,'' ANSI N13.11-1983, recommendations made to DOE in ''Guidelines for the Calibration of Personnel Dosimeters,'' Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)-4515 and comments received during peer review by DOE and DOE contractor personnel. The recommendations contained in PNL-4515 were based on an evaluation of ANSI N13.11 conducted for the Office of Nuclear Safety, DOE, by PNL. Parts of ANSI N13.11 that did not require modification were used essentially intact in this standard to maintain consistency with nationally recognized standards. Modifications to this standard have resulted from several DOE/DOE contractor reviews and a pilot testing session. An initial peer review by selected DOE and DOE contractor representatives on technical content was conducted in 1983. A review by DOE field offices, program offices, and contractors was conducted in mid-1984. A pilot performance testing session sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety was conducted in early 1985 by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Idaho Falls. Results of the pilot test were reviewed in late 1985 by a DOE and DOE contractor committee. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums

  2. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  3. The RWE combine - notes on its reorganization and Energy-Department-to-RWE-Energie-AG re-formation

    1990-01-01

    As the holding in charge of the combine, RWE AG soon will be managing legally self-sufficient controlling companies at its own responsibility. While the Energy Department (electric power, gas, heat, water) will be re-formed to become RWE Energie AG, the newly established RWE Entsorgung AG will be responsible for waste disposal and waste management. (DG) [de

  4. U.S. Department of Energy fiscal year 1998 accountability report

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This report, the Department of Energy`s first Accountability Report, is part of an effort to better measure how the Department of Energy is serving the American taxpayers; the results achieved; and the cost-effectiveness of the work. By integrating the Department`s FY 1998 performance results, financial status, and management controls, this report is a useful tool and provides a status report on the Department`s performance in FY 1998. It presents a clearer picture of the return on the investment of the resources entrusted to this agency. After thorough review by the Office of the Inspector General, with one exception, the financial statements have been found to present fairly the financial position of the Department in conformity with Federal accounting standards. Overall, the Department has reasonable assurance that DOE has management controls in place to ensure that operational activities are efficient and effective and comply with the law. Ten challenges where management controls can be strengthened have been identified.

  5. The Department of Energy/American Chemical Society Summer School in Nuclear and Radiochemistry at San Jose State University

    Kinard, W.F.; Silber, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    A Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy and the American Chemical Society has been held at San Jose State University for the past 20 years. The intent of the program is to introduce outstanding college students to the field of nuclear and radiochemistry with the goal that some of these students will consider careers on nuclear science. The program features radiochemistry experiments along with radiation safety training, guest lectures by well known nuclear scientists and field trips to nuclear chemistry facilities in the San Francisco area. (author)

  6. 78 FR 15941 - Petition for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy...

    2013-03-13

    ... for Waiver of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From the Department of Energy Residential Refrigerator... receipt of a petition for waiver from Samsung Electronics America, Inc. (Samsung) seeking an exemption... energy consumption of electric refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. Samsung asks that it be permitted...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy facilities needed to advance nuclear power.

    Ahearne, John F

    2011-01-01

    This talk is based upon a November 2008 report by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC). The report has two parts, a policy section and a technology section. Here extensive material from the Technical Subcommittee section of the NEAC report is used. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  8. Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993

    Shepherd, P

    1994-07-01

    US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

  9. The challenge of achieving professionalism and respect of diversity in a UK Earth Sciences department

    Imber, Jonathan; Taylor, Michelle; Callaghan, Mark; Castiello, Gabriella; Cooper, George; Foulger, Gillian; Gregory, Emma; Herron, Louise; Hoult, Jill; Lo, Marissa; Love, Tara; Macpherson, Colin; Oakes, Janice; Phethean, Jordan; Riches, Amy

    2017-04-01

    The Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, has a balanced gender profile at undergraduate, postgraduate and postdoctoral levels (38%, 42% and 45% females, respectively), but one of the lowest percentages, relative to the natural applicant pool, of female academic staff amongst UK geoscience departments. There are currently 9% female academic staff at Durham, compared with a median value (in November 2015) of 20% for all Russell Group geoscience departments in the UK. Despite the fact that the female staff group is relatively senior, the Department's current academic management is essentially entirely male. The Department has an informal working culture, in which academics operate an "open door" policy, and staff and students are on first name terms. This culture, open plan office space, and our fieldwork programme, allow staff and students to socialise. A positive outcome of this culture is that > 95% of final year undergraduate students deemed the staff approachable (National Student Survey 2016). Nevertheless, a survey of staff and research student attitudes revealed significant differences in the way males and females perceive our working environment. Females are less likely than males to agree with the statements that "the Department considers inappropriate language to be unacceptable" and "inappropriate images are not considered acceptable in the Department". That anyone could find "inappropriate" language and images "acceptable" is a measure of the challenge faced by the Department. Males disagree more strongly than females that they "have felt uncomfortable because of [their] gender". The Department is proactively working to improve equality and diversity. It held a series of focus group meetings, divided according to gender and job role, to understand the differences in male and female responses. Female respondents identified examples of inappropriate language (e.g. sexual stereotyping) that were directed at female, but not male, colleagues. Males

  10. A perspective on the states` role in the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management budget process

    Carter, J.P.; Hinman, P. [Carter, Brock & Hinman, Boise, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Responding in 1994 to proposed budget reductions and predicted funding shortfalls, the Office of Environmental Management at the Department of Energy began working closely with its regulators and stakeholders to prioritize activities. In a series of national and site specific meetings held with representatives of states, the Environmental Protection Agency, Indian tribes and the public, the Department of Energy brought regulators and other stakeholders into its budget development process in a {open_quotes}bottoms up{close_quotes} approach to the prioritization of activities at each of its sites. This paper presents an overview of this process which began last year and will highlight its unique cooperative nature. This paper will assess ways of institutionalizing this process. It also identifies issues to be addressed in resolving matters related to future budgets. Areas of concern to the Department of Energy`s host states and their regulators will be identified as they relate to waste management, cleanup and facility transition activities.

  11. Evaluation of Students' Energy Conception in Environmental Science

    Park, Mihwa; Johnson, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    While significant research has been conducted on students' conceptions of energy, alternative conceptions of energy have not been actively explored in the area of environmental science. The purpose of this study is to examine students' alternative conceptions in the environmental science discipline through the analysis of responses of first year…

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Belize; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Belize, a Central American country bordering Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the west and south, and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Although not an island nation, Belize is included in this energy snapshot series because it is a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), an alliance of 15 Caribbean nations in the region.

  13. Annual report 1986-87 (of the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India)

    1987-01-01

    The activities of the various constituent units of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) (India) during the fiscal year 1986-87 are reported. The main thrust of the DAE's various activities is directed towards peaceful applications of nuclear energy - for generation of electric power in particular and for applications of radioisotopes and radiations in agriculture, medicine and industry in general. The various constituent units of DAE consist of research establishments, nuclear power plants, heavy water plants, nuclear fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants, industrial undertakings in public sector field which manufacture electronic equipment, and rare earth products from beach sands, uranium mines and uranium ore processing plants, regulatory and safety bodies and survey unit for exploration of atomic minerals. In addition DAE also fully funds the research programmes of the Institute of Physics at Bhubaneswar, the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics at Calcutta, the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and the Tata Memorial Centre both at Bombay. The report is presented in chapters entitled: (1) general survey, (2) nuclear power, (3) research and development, (4) regulatory and safety functions, (5) public sector undertakings, and (6) other activities such as international relations in the field of nuclear science and technology, financial assistance to research organization and universities, sponsoring of conferences, symposia, workshops etc. The work on three nuclear power plants at Narora, Kakrapar and Kaiga and two heavy water plants at Manuguru and Hazira is in various stages of construction. Some of the highlights of DAE's activities during the year are generation of 7273 million units of electric power by nuclear power stations, opening of a new uranium mine at Bhatin, completion of a heavy water plant at Thal, successful plasma run of the experimental MHD plant at Tiruchirapalli and commissioning of Orissa Sand Complex (OSCOM) plant which produces

  14. Abstracts of reports published in the environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment, January-December 1978

    None

    1979-05-01

    This 1978 Annual Abstracts represents the publishing experience over the past year of the three divisions and one group that make up the Environmental Sciences area of the Department of Energy and Environment. The abstracts are grouped according to the organization of the authors under the Atmospheric Sciences, Environmental Chemistry, and Oceanographic Sciences Division and the Land and Fresh Water Environmental Sciences Group. The range of interests and the interdisciplinary nature of the activities within Environmental Programs are demonstrated by these abstracts. Most of these activities relate in some way to the environmental effects or potential effects of energy generation. The major areas involved include: coastal meteorology; physical, biological, and chemical oceanography of the coastal shelf; analysis of marine, fresh water, and terrestrial ecosystems; effects of acid rain and other pollutants on aquatic and terrestrial systems; Multistate Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S), including transport and transformation experiments, data management, and modeling and analysis; atmospheric diagnostics including the study of the chemistry of pollutants in plumes and ambient atmosphere; basic and applied studies of atmospheric aerosol generation, composition, and behavior; and development of atmospheric tracer systems and real-time instrumentation.

  15. Abstracts of reports published in the environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment, January-December 1978

    1979-05-01

    This 1978 Annual Abstracts represents the publishing experience over the past year of the three divisions and one group that make up the Environmental Sciences area of the Department of Energy and Environment. The abstracts are grouped according to the organization of the authors under the Atmospheric Sciences, Environmental Chemistry, and Oceanographic Sciences Division and the Land and Fresh Water Environmental Sciences Group. The range of interests and the interdisciplinary nature of the activities within Environmental Programs are demonstrated by these abstracts. Most of these activities relate in some way to the environmental effects or potential effects of energy generation. The major areas involved include: coastal meteorology; physical, biological, and chemical oceanography of the coastal shelf; analysis of marine, fresh water, and terrestrial ecosystems; effects of acid rain and other pollutants on aquatic and terrestrial systems; Multistate Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S), including transport and transformation experiments, data management, and modeling and analysis; atmospheric diagnostics including the study of the chemistry of pollutants in plumes and ambient atmosphere; basic and applied studies of atmospheric aerosol generation, composition, and behavior; and development of atmospheric tracer systems and real-time instrumentation

  16. Office of Inspector General report on inspection of the Department of Energy`s conference policies and practices

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is a recognized world leader in technological breakthroughs brought about by its many research and development programs. To further these technical and scientific achievements, the Department and its contractors conduct numerous conferences, meetings and symposiums every year. This inspection sampled conferencing practices at the Department`s National Laboratories and evaluated the adequacy of Departmental conference policies and procedures. The Department has not developed adequate policies and procedures regarding the conduct of its conference activities and the conference activities of its contractors. Guidance issued by the President, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and by the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) requires that the Department minimize conference costs by establishing or revising existing procedures to ensure such costs are kept to a minimum. However, the inspection found that the Department does not have consistent Department-wide procedures in place to ensure that conference costs are minimized. As a result, weaknesses were found in some conference practices of the Department`s contractors.

  17. U.S. Department of the Interior South Central Climate Science Center strategic science plan, 2013--18

    Winton, Kim T.; Dalton, Melinda S.; Shipp, Allison A.

    2013-01-01

    The Department of the Interior (DOI) recognizes and embraces the unprecedented challenges of maintaining our Nation’s rich natural and cultural resources in the 21st century. The magnitude of these challenges demands that the conservation community work together to develop integrated adaptation and mitigation strategies that collectively address the impacts of climate change and other landscape-scale stressors. On September 14, 2009, DOI Secretary Ken Salazar signed Secretarial Order 3289 (amended February 22, 2010) entitled, “Addressing the Impacts of Climate Change on America’s Water, Land, and Other Natural and Cultural Resources.” The Order establishes the foundation for two partner-based conservation science entities to address these unprecedented challenges: Climate Science Centers (CSCs and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs). CSCs and LCCs are the Department-wide approach for applying scientific tools to increase understanding of climate change and to coordinate an effective response to its impacts on tribes and the land, water, ocean, fish and wildlife, and cultural-heritage resources that DOI manages. Eight CSCs have been established and are managed through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC); each CSC works in close collaboration with their neighboring CSCs, as well as those across the Nation, to ensure the best and most efficient science is produced. The South Central CSC was established in 2012 through a cooperative agreement with the University of Oklahoma, Texas Tech University, Louisiana State University, the Chickasaw Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab; hereafter termed the ”Consortium” of the South Central CSC. The Consortium has a broad expertise in the physical, biological, natural, and social sciences to address impacts of climate change on land, water, fish and wildlife, ocean, coastal, and

  18. The Hudson's Bay Company as a context for science in the Columbia Department.

    Schefke, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to elucidate and analyze the links between science, specifically natural history, and the imperialist project in what is now the northwestern United States and western Canada. Imperialism in this region found its expression through institutions such as the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC). I examine the activities of naturalists such as David Douglas and William Tolmie Fraser in the context of the fur trade in the Columbia Department. Here I show how natural history aided Britain in achieving its economic and political goals in the region. The key to this interpretation is to extend the role of the HBC as an imperial factor to encompass its role as a patron for natural history. This gives a better understanding of the ways in which imperialism--construed as mercantile, rather than military--delineated research priorities and activities of the naturalists who worked in the Columbia Department.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

  20. Promotion: Study of the Library of the department of library and information science and book

    Andreja Nagode

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution presents basic information about academic libraries and their promotion. Librarians should have promotion knowledge since they have to promote and market their libraries. The paper presents the definition of academic libraries, their purpose, objectives and goals. Marketing and promotion in academic libraries are defined. The history of academic libraries and their promotion are described. The contribution presents results and the interpretation of the research, based on the study of users of the Library of the Department of Library and Information Science and Book studies. A new promotion plan for libraries based on the analysis of the academic library environment is introduced.

  1. The Prevalence of Pemphigus (Razi Hospital and Department of Oral Pathology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Eshghyar N

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this retrospective statistical study was to determine the prevalcence and frequency of"nage and sex distributions of pemphigus disease. Pemphigus disease classified as autoimmune bullous"ndermatoses which is a chronic mucocutaneous disease."nThis study was performed in Razi Hospital and department of oral pathology of dental school, Tehran"nUniversity of Medical Sciences. The most frequently effected area was buccal moucosa of oral cavity. The"nmost rate of recurrence was found in oral cavity which being more common in middle age females (25-44"nyears.

  2. US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program: Accomplishments and opportunities

    White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-17

    The US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program supports many activities and projects that enhance the process by which utilities assess demand and supply options and, subsequently, evaluate and select resources. The US Department of Energy program coordinates integrated resource planning in risk and regulatory analysis; utility and regional planning; evaluation and verification; information transfer/technological assistance; and demand-side management. Professional staff from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories collaborate with peers and stakeholders, in particular, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, and conduct research and activities for the US Department of Energy. Twelve integrated resource planning activities and projects are summarized in this report. The summaries reflect the diversity of planning and research activities supported by the Department. The summaries also reflect the high levels of collaboration and teaming that are required by the Program and practiced by the researchers. It is concluded that the Program is achieving its objectives by encouraging innovation and improving planning and decision making. Furthermore, as the Department continues to implement planned improvements in the Program, the Department is effectively positioned to attain its ambitious goals.

  3. 2 CFR 901.1010 - Suspending official (Department of Energy supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180...

    2010-01-01

    ... DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION Definitions § 901.1010 Suspending official (Department of Energy supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.1010). The suspending official for the Department of Energy... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspending official (Department of Energy...

  4. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  5. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Lagos, Leonel E.

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  6. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Bonaire; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Bonaire, a special municipality of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Bonaire’s utility rates are approximately $0.35 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  8. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Curacao; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Curacao, an autonomous member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela. Curacao’s utility rates are approximately $0.26 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  9. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  10. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro

    2003-10-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to advancing heavy ion science researches in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking advantage of its prominent performances in providing various heavy ions. This meeting, as well as the previous ones held twice, offered scientists from the fields of heavy ion science, including nuclear physics, solid-state physics and cross-field physics, an opportunity to have active discussions among them, as well as to review their research accomplishments in the last two years. Oral presentations were selected from a wider scope of prospective fields, expecting a new step of advancing in heavy ion science. Main topics of the meeting were the status of the JAERI-KEK joint project of developing a radioactive nuclear beam (RNB) facility and research programs related to the RNB. This meeting was held at Advanced Science Research Center in JAERI-Tokai on January 8th and 9th in 2003, and successfully carried out with as many as 190 participants and a lot of sincere discussions. The proceedings are presented in this report. The 51 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, September 1982-August 1983

    Brenizer, J.S.; Benneche, P.E.

    1984-03-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics and is used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia and at other area colleges and universities. The University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) is the highest power (two megawatts thermal power) and most utilized (total power production in 1982 was over 5500 megawatt-hours) research reactor in the mid-Atlantic states. In addition, a second, small (50 watt) reactor is also available for use in educational and research programs. A major objective of this facility is to expand its support of educational programs in the region. The University of Virginia has received support under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program every year since 1978 to assist in meeting this objective. This report documents the major educational accomplishments under the Reactor Sharing Program for the period September 1982 through August 1983

  12. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    Brenizer, J.S.; Benneche, P.E.

    1982-12-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics and is used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia and at other area colleges and universities. The University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) is the highest power (two megawatts thermal power) and most utilized (total power production in 1981 and nearly 5000 megawatt-hours) research reactor in the mid-Atlantic States. In addition, a second, small (50 watt) reactor is also available for use in educational programs in the region. The University of Virginia has received support under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program every year since 1978 to assist in meeting this objective. This report documents the major educational accomplishments under the Reactor Sharing Program for the period September 1981 through August 1982

  13. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, September 1983-August 1984

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.

    1984-11-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics and is used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia and at other area colleges and universities. The University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) is the highest power (two megawatts thermal power) and most utilized (total power production in 1983 was over 6000 megawatt-hours) research reactor in the mid-Atlantic states. In addition, a second, small (50 watt) reactor is also available for use in educational and research programs. A major objective of this facility is to expand its support of educational programs in the region. The University of Virginia has received support under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor sharing Program every year since 1978 to assist in meeting this objective. This report documents the major educational accomplishments under the Reactor Sharing Program for the period September 1983 through August 1984

  14. Audit Report on "Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information"

    None

    2009-08-01

    The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to prevent misuse of the information for inappropriate purposes. Industry experts have reported that more than 203 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past three years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and Federal agencies. The loss of personal and other sensitive information can result in substantial financial harm, embarrassment, and inconvenience to individuals and organizations. Therefore, strong protective measures, including data encryption, help protect against the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive information. Prior reports involving the loss of sensitive information have highlighted weaknesses in the Department's ability to protect sensitive data. Our report on Security Over Personally Identifiable Information (DOE/IG-0771, July 2007) disclosed that the Department had not fully implemented all measures recommended by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and required by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to protect PII, including failures to identify and encrypt PII maintained on information systems. Similarly, the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the Department had not yet installed encryption technology to protect sensitive data on the vast majority of laptop computers and handheld devices. Because of the potential for harm, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors adequately safeguarded sensitive electronic information. The Department had taken a number of steps to improve protection of PII. Our review, however

  15. Nuclear energy system department annual report. April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Nuclear Energy System during the fiscal year of 1999 (April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000). The Department has been organized from April 1998. The main research activity is aimed to build the basis of the development of a future nuclear energy system. The research activities of the fiscal year cover basic nuclear and atomic and molecular data evaluation, conceptual design of a reduced-moderation water reactor, reactor physics experiments and development of the reactor analysis codes, experiment and analysis of thermal-hydrodynamics, development of advanced materials for a reactor, lifetime reliability assessment on structural material, development of advanced nuclear fuel, design of a marine reactor and the research for a nuclear ship system. The maintenance and operation of reactor engineering facilities belonging to the Department are undertaken. The activities of the research committee to which the Department takes a role of secretariat are also summarized in this report. (author)

  16. The U.S. department of energy program on hydrogen production

    Henderson, David; Paster, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Clean forms of energy are needed to support sustainable global economics growth while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and impacts on air quality. To address these challenges, the U.S. President's National Energy Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Plan call for expanding the development of diverse domestic energy supplies. Working with industry, the Department developed a national vision roadmap for moving toward a hydrogen economy-a solution that holds the potential to provide sustainable clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy. DOE has examined and organized its hydrogen activities in pursuit of this national vision. This includes the development of fossil and renewable sources, as well as nuclear technologies capable of economically producing large quantities of hydrogen. (author)

  17. Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (A 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    Burns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    'Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides' was submitted by the EFRC for Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. MSA is directed by Peter Burns at the University of Notre Dame, and is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  18. Materials science symposium 'heavy ion science in tandem energy region'

    Iwamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Suehiro

    2001-11-01

    The facility of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster has been contributing to obtain plenty of fruitful results in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, atomic and solid state physics and materials science, taking an advantage of its prominent performances of heavy ion acceleration. The previous meeting held in 1999 also offered an opportunity to scientists from all over the heavy ion science fields, including nuclear physics, solid state physics and cross-field physics to have active discussions. This meeting included oral presentations with a new plan and with a new scope of fields expected from now on, as an occasion for opening the 21st century in heavy ion science. The 50 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Understanding Engagement: Science Demonstrations and Emotional Energy

    Milne, Catherine; Otieno, Tracey

    2007-01-01

    Although beloved of some chemists and physicists, science demonstrations have been criticized for stifling inquiry and assisting teachers to maintain a power differential between themselves and students in the classroom. This interpretive study reports the unexpected positive learning outcomes for urban science students in two chemistry classes…

  20. Nuclear Energy System Department annual report. (April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2003)

    Nakajima, Hajime; Shibata, Keiichi; Kugo, Teruhiko

    2003-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Nuclear Energy System during the fiscal year of 2002 (April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2003). The Department has carried out researches and developments (R and Ds) of innovative nuclear energy system and their related fundamental technologies to ensure the long-term energy supply in Japan. The report deals with the R and Ds of an innovative water reactor, called Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR), which has the capability of multiple recycling and breeding of plutonium using light water reactor technologies. In addition, as basic studies and fundamental researches of nuclear energy system in general, described are intensive researches in the fields of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, nuclear data, nuclear fuels, and materials. These activities are essential not only for the R and Ds of innovative nuclear energy systems but also for the improvement of safety and reliability of current nuclear energy systems. The maintenance and operation of reactor engineering facilities belonging to the Department support experimental activities. The activities of the research committees to which the Department takes a role of secretariat are also summarized. (author)

  1. The Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes [United Kingdom

    1991-08-01

    This Consultation Document reviews how the United Kingdom Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes support the Government's nuclear policy and reaches preliminary conclusions about their future direction. It describes the changes the Department has adopted, and is proposing, to ensure that it is better informed about the nuclear R and D it commissions and that the work is carried out cost-effectively. The areas of research reviewed are: safety; radiological protection; safeguards; reactor technology; fusion; decommissioning and waste management. (author)

  2. US Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of program administration by the Office of Energy Research

    NONE

    1995-08-02

    The objective of the audit was to determine whether Energy Research had established performance expectations, including performance criteria and metrics, and used these expectations to monitor progress for basic and applied research performed at the Department`s national laboratories. Congressional and Departmental initiatives envision improved contract and program performance by requiring program managers to set measurable performance expectations. Even though research outcomes are inherently unpredictable, performance expectations can and should be established for scopes of work, milestones, resource limits and deliverables. However, Energy Research generally did not clearly specify--at either an aggregated program or individual task level--such expectations for research at the Department`s national laboratories. While information was available in the contractor`s research proposals, Energy Research essentially relied on the contractors to initiate and execute the research without agreement on expectations. This practice provided the Department with little basis to measure and evaluate contractor performance. Energy Research agreed in part with the finding and will take action on the recommendations in the report.

  3. The US Department of Energy Nuclear Data and Low Energy Physics Programs: Aspects of current operational status and future direction

    Whetstone, S.L.; Meyer, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Data and Low-Energy Programs are operated within the Division of Nuclear Physics of the US Department of Energy. The data program supports a range of activities including large scale data measurements, nuclear cross section modelling, and nuclear data compilation and dissemination. The US nuclear data needs and prospects for the future of this effort are currently being addressed and its present status is reviewed. Possibilities for the next generation nuclear data accessibility will be discussed and examples presented. The Low-Energy Nuclear Physics Program supports investigations into low-energy nuclear structure and neutrino physics. Among examples of the latter that are covered is the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  4. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  5. CSIR ScienceScope: An Energy-secure South Africa

    CSIR

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available issues, especially as buildings use more than 25% of national energy consumption. "An Energy-secure South Africa" the theme of this ScienceScope, features a multidisciplinary projects of the R&D work done on alternative energy solutions, clean and cleaner...

  6. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 1

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy organization and projects. The topics of the report include: (1) DOE organization and overview; (2) Headquarters Offices: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Contract Appeals; Defense Programs; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; Energy Research; Environment, Safety and Health; Fossil Energy; General Counsel; Hearings and Appeals; Inspector General; International Affairs and Energy Emergencies; Management and Administration; Minority Economic Impact; New Production Reactors; Nuclear Energy; Policy, Planning and Analysis; Radioactive Waste Management; (3) Operations Offices: Albuquerque Operations Office; Chicago Operations Office; Idaho Operations Office; Nevada Operations Office; Oak Ridge Operations Office; Richland Operations Office; San Francisco Operations Office; Savannah River Operations Office; Laboratories; and (4) Power Administrations: Bonneville Power Administration; Western Area Power Administration.

  7. Becoming allies: Combining social science and technological perspectives to improve energy research and policy making

    Diamond, Rick; Moezzi, Mithra

    2002-07-01

    Within the energy research community, social sciences tends to be viewed fairly narrowly, often as simply a marketing tool to change the behavior of consumers and decision makers, and to ''attack market barriers''. As we see it, social sciences, which draws on sociology, psychology, political science, business administration, and other academic disciplines, is capable of far more. A social science perspective can re-align questions in ways that can lead to the development of technologies and technology policy that are much stronger and potentially more successful than they would be otherwise. In most energy policies governing commercial buildings, the prevailing R and D directives are firmly rooted in a technology framework, one that is generally more quantitative and evaluative than that fostered by the social sciences. To illustrate how social science thinking would approach the goal of achieving high energy performance in the commercial building sector, they focus on the US Department of Energy's Roadmap for commercial buildings (DOE 2000) as a starting point. By ''deconstructing'' the four strategies provided by the Roadmap, they set the stage for proposing a closer partnership between advocates of technology-based and social science-based approaches.

  8. Standardization and integration of ecological and human risk assessments at Department of Energy national laboratories

    Breckenridge, R.P.; Berry, D.

    1995-01-01

    In 1990, the directors of twelve national laboratories operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) chartered a steering group to address DOE's concerns about the effectiveness of any regulations driving the cost of environmental restoration and waste management. The goal of this presentation is to inform and to seek collaboration on the challenge of standardizing ecological and human health risk assessment approaches and development of an approach to address the differences between environmental remediation and restoration activities at DOE's waste management sites across the country. Recent changes in risk related regulations and budget cuts have prompted significant changes in DOE's approach to conducting and standardizing risk-based approaches for waste management. The steering group was established in 1990 to organize a broad, long-term educational outreach and research program focused on better science and public understanding of the risks associated with hazardous agents (chemical, biological, radiological, and physical) in the environment and the workplace. This presentation discusses the group's goal to (1) act as one resource for providing the technical basis for health and environmental standards; (2) catalyze a national effort to improve public understanding of risk and the importance of cost benefit analysis in evaluating mitigation of risk; (3) catalyze improvements in understanding of health and environmental effects of hazardous agents; and (4) analyze with regulatory agencies, industry, and the public the potential for evolution of risk-based consensus standard into federal and state environmental and occupational/public health regulations. Major accomplishments will be presented along with the group's agenda for standardizing risk, environmental, and occupational/public health standards

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012. Student Summary

    Hutzel, Margaret [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Siegrist, Lindsey [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Wilson, Natalie [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Kloepfer, Daniel [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The report that follows is a summary of the U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER), regarding PORTS located near Piketon, Ohio. The summary has been compiled by the 2015 WHS Environmental Science class, made up of juniors and seniors at WHS during the 2014-2015 school year. Even with most of the class having lived in this region for their entire lives, it became apparent how little of the workings of the plant were known by the members of the class. In the process of putting this summary together, we were able to gain a better understanding of the history, function, and possible future of the site. The presentations provided by Ohio University, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth LLC (FBP), U.S. DOE, and Rio Grande University were greatly appreciated and provided invaluable understanding of the materials which we were asked to summarize. Not only did we learn from the presentations, but we greatly enjoyed the opportunities to participate in the field studies that gave us a glimpse into what is being done at the plant site to ensure the environmental safety of people and wildlife of this region. Our goal from this summary has been to make the information concerning the monitoring and cleanup of the PORTS facility better understood by the people who it most affects. We hope that this summary makes the information useful to you and that you can gain a better understanding of the cleanup processes that are going on around the site to ensure your safety. Though it has been hard work, we appreciate the opportunity that we have been presented with to learn and share with the people of our community.

  10. 10 CFR 70.11 - Persons using special nuclear material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory...

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Persons using special nuclear material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. 70.11 Section 70.11 Energy NUCLEAR... using special nuclear material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  11. 10 CFR 30.12 - Persons using byproduct material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory...

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Persons using byproduct material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. 30.12 Section 30.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Persons using byproduct material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  12. 10 CFR 40.11 - Persons using source material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory...

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Persons using source material under certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. 40.11 Section 40.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... certain Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracts. Except to the extent that...

  13. Department of Energy Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex, Aktau, Republic of Kazakhstan

    Case, R.; Berry, R.B.; Eras, A.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program, the US Department of Energy and Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC), Aktau, Republic of Kazakstan have cooperated to enhance existing MAEC MPC and A features at the BN-350 liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor. This paper describes the methodology of the enhancement activities and provides representative examples of the MPC and A augmentation implemented at the MAEC

  14. Energy: can science change the deal?

    Papon, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This document briefly presents a book in which the author tries to identify which will be the technological breakthroughs for the emergence of new energy productions or new modes of energy consumption. He notably addresses the issue of future engines and of new fuels, nuclear energy, the photovoltaic sector, electricity storage and electricity distribution by means of adapted grids; and the relationship between tomorrow's energy and tomorrow's society

  15. Recommendations for a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy R and D Agenda Volume 2 Appendices

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The current US nuclear energy policy is primarily formulated as part of the nation`s overall energy policy. In addition, nuclear energy policy is impacted by other US policies, such as those for defense and environment, and by international obligations through their effects on nuclear weapons dismantlement and stewardship, continued reliance on space and naval nuclear power sources, defense waste cleanup, and on nuclear nonproliferation. This volume is composed of the following appendices: Appendix 1--Objectives of the Federal Government Nuclear Energy Related Policies and Research and Development Programs; Appendix 2--Nuclear Energy and Related R and D in the US; Appendix 3--Summary of Issues That Drive Nuclear Energy Research and Development; Appendix 4: Options for Policy and Research and Development; Appendix 5--Pros and Cons of Objectives and Options; and Appendices 6--Recommendations.

  16. Recommendations for a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy R and D Agenda Volume 2 Appendices

    1997-01-01

    The current US nuclear energy policy is primarily formulated as part of the nation's overall energy policy. In addition, nuclear energy policy is impacted by other US policies, such as those for defense and environment, and by international obligations through their effects on nuclear weapons dismantlement and stewardship, continued reliance on space and naval nuclear power sources, defense waste cleanup, and on nuclear nonproliferation. This volume is composed of the following appendices: Appendix 1--Objectives of the Federal Government Nuclear Energy Related Policies and Research and Development Programs; Appendix 2--Nuclear Energy and Related R and D in the US; Appendix 3--Summary of Issues That Drive Nuclear Energy Research and Development; Appendix 4: Options for Policy and Research and Development; Appendix 5--Pros and Cons of Objectives and Options; and Appendices 6--Recommendations

  17. Special audit report on the Department of Energy`s Arms and military-type equipment

    Layton, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    Based on the activities associated with the recent recovery of the eight armored personnel carriers, a review was conducted of the Department`s controls over arms and military-type equipment in its possession. The objects were to determine whether (1) the quantity of arms and military-type equipment on hand was justified by mission needs, (2) inventory listings of arms were accurate, (3) property disposals were properly controlled and executed, and (4) loans and borrowed equipment were appropriate and accounted for accurately. The purpose of this report is to summarize the most significant issues identified and point out where the Department needs stronger controls over its inventory of arms and military-type property.

  18. Environmental control technology activities of the Department of Energy in FY 1977

    1977-11-01

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the research, development, and demonstration of emerging energy technologies and the promotion of energy conservation. An integral and significant part of that responsibility includes the balancing of energy goals with environmental requirements to protect and enhance the general health, safety, and welfare of the nation. This requires that environmental effects be considered and mitigating measures be taken in all energy processes through incorporation of environmental and safety controls which are developed as an integral part of energy system design. This inventory of environmental control technology activities was initiated by the Administrator, ERDA, prior to the incorporation of that administration within the Department of Energy. This compilation of total Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) environmental control technology activities, and associated funding, related to environmental control technology identifies the resources committed by ERDA to demonstrate its objective to protect and enhance the general health, safety, and welfare of the nation in the research, development, and demonstration of energy systems. Only ERDA research, development, and demonstration activities are covered in this report. The compilation for FY 1978 will encompass all of the DOE activities

  19. A Look at the Definition, Pedagogy, and Evaluation of Scientific Literacy within the Natural Science Departments at a Southwestern University

    Flynn, Deborah Kay

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the promotion of scientific literacy within the natural science departments and how faculty within these departments define, incorporate, and evaluate scientific literacy in their courses. The researcher examined data from participant interviews, observations, and archival material from courses taught by the participants. The…

  20. Assessment that Matters: Integrating the "Chore" of Department-Based Assessment with Real Improvements in Political Science Education

    Deardorff, Michelle D.; Folger, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment requirements often raise great concerns among departments and faculty: fear of loss of autonomy, distraction from primary departmental goals, and the creation of alien and artificial external standards. This article demonstrates how one political science department directly responded to their own unique circumstances in assessing their…

  1. 78 FR 23550 - Department of Energy's (DOE) Participation in Development of the International Energy...

    2013-04-19

    ... building energy codes by periodically reviewing the technical and economic basis of the voluntary building... and modification of such codes. (42 U.S.C. 6836(b)) B. Background The IECC serves as a model building... building energy codes is through participation in the IECC development process. DOE participates in the ICC...

  2. Nuclear energy system department annual report. April 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001

    Osugi, Toshitaka; Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunii, Katsuhiko

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Nuclear Energy System during the fiscal year of 2000 (April 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001). The Department has been organized from April 1998. The main research activity is aimed to build the basis of the development of future nuclear energy systems. The research activities of the Department cover basic nuclear and atomic and molecular data evaluation, conceptual design of a reduced-moderation water reactor, reactor physics experiments and development of the reactor analysis codes, experiment and analysis of thermal-hydrodynamics, energy system analysis and assessment, development of advanced materials for a reactor, lifetime reliability assessment on structural material, development of advanced nuclear fuel, study of nuclear transmutation systems, design of a marine reactor and the research for a nuclear ship system. The maintenance and operation of reactor engineering facilities belonging to the Department are undertaken. The activities of the research committees to which the Department takes a role of secretariat are also summarized in this report. (author)

  3. Department of Defense energy policy and research: A framework to support strategy

    Strakos, Joshua K.; Quintanilla, Jose A.; Huscroft, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) is the major consumer of energy within the Federal government, and it has been directed to implement cost cutting measures related to energy dependence through numerous Executive Orders and Congressional legislation. As a result, the DOD released an Energy Strategy which outlines ways to reduce energy requirements in order to meet both Presidential and Congressional mandates for energy security. With this research, we provide a historical review (1973–2014) of energy policy, legislation, and research. Additionally we identify gaps between strategy and research. The results show that DOD energy research lacks a unifying structure and guiding framework. We propose a knowledge management framework to unify and guide research efforts in direct support of the DOD Energy Strategy. - Highlights: •Unification of effort is needed to support strategic goals. •Provides the current state of DOD energy research. •Proposes a framework to guide DOD energy research. •Frames the DOD energy research context and landscape. •Promotes a unifying structure for DOD energy research.

  4. Fission energy program of the U.S. Department of Energy. FY 1980

    1979-04-01

    This document presents the baseline implementation program plan as of January 1979 and is derived from the National Energy Plan and other major policy documents. The document discusses civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977 and the National Energy Act of 1978. It derives the fission energy policy and program objectives from the National Energy Plan and Act, describes the overall program strategy, and presents the overall budget. The approach used in managing the program, including the program structure and methods used for program control, is explained. The civilian fission power development implementation programs are described in detail. Other considerations affecting civilian nuclear power development are also discussed

  5. U.S. Department of Energy awards $200 million for next-generation

    , U.S. Congressman Bill Foster, Cray V.P. Marketing & Development Barry Bolding, and Argonne Science and Energy Lynn Orr, U.S. Congressman Bill Foster, Cray V.P. Marketing & Development Barry details on today's announcement. Please monitor Argonne's social media channels at http://www.anl.gov/news

  6. Radioactive solid waste inventories at United States Department of Energy burial and storage sites

    Watanabe, T.

    1987-06-01

    Radioactive solid waste inventories are given for United States Department of Energy (DOE) burial and storage sites. These data are obtained from the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) and reflect the inventories as of the end of the calendar year 1986. 4 figs., 7 tabs

  7. U.S. Department of Energy, defense waste management program implementation plan

    Chee, T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that the program implementation plan describes the Department of Energy's current approach to managing its defense high-level, low-level, and transuranic radioactive waste. It documents implementation of the policies described in the 1983 Defense Waste Management Plan

  8. Implementation plan for Hanford Site compliance with US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A

    1989-04-01

    This document is the plan of the Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to achieve compliance with DOE 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management. The plan describes activities, costs, and completion dates to achieve compliance with requirements for the management of radioactive and mixed wastes. 26 refs., 7 figs

  9. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotope Programs

    Carty, J.

    2004-10-05

    This presentation provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotopes Program. The charter of the Isotope Programs covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Global Change Fellowships, 1991-2006: Participant Follow-Up

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2006-09-01

    This report provides information on the impact of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs supporting graduate study related to global change. The information was obtained from former fellows in the two programs, and the report examines their subsequent careers and the benefits of program participation.

  11. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    Vine, Edward

    2002-05-01

    Increasing the energy efficiency of end-use equipment in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can reduce air pollution emissions and greenhouse gases significantly. Because energy efficiency is an effective means of reducing multi-pollutant emissions, it is important to ensure that energy efficiency is a fully engaged component of emission-reduction programs. However, while energy-efficiency measures are perceived by many stakeholders to be important options for improving air quality, some members in the air quality community are concerned about the ability of these measures to fit in a regulatory framework-in particular, the ability of emissions reductions from energy-efficiency measures to be real, quantifiable, certifiable, and enforceable. Hence, there are few air quality programs that include energy efficiency as a tool for complying with air quality regulations. This paper describes the connection between energy consumption and air quality, the potential role of energy-efficiency measures to meet air quality regulations, the barriers and challenges to the use of these measures in the air quality regulatory environment, and the potential role that the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Building Technology, State and Community Programs (EERE-Buildings) could play in this area. EERE-Buildings can play a very important role in promoting energy efficiency in the air quality community, in ways that are fully consistent with its overall mission. EERE-Buildings will need to work with other stakeholders to aggressively promote energy efficiency via multiple means: publications, analytical tools, pilot programs, demonstrations, and program and policy analysis and evaluation. EERE-Buildings and state energy officials have considerable experience in implementing and monitoring energy-savings projects, as well as in designing documentation and verification requirements of energy-efficiency improvements

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, China: Energy.

    1988-02-10

    bedrock growth anticlines, buried hill fault blocks, rolling anticlines, compression anticlines, draped anticlines, volcanic diapers and others. The...development and utilization of solar , wind, geothermal and other energy resources, the energy conservation capacity and newly-added energy resources were...equivalent to 20 million tons of standard coal. The firewood-saving capacity in wood and coal-saving stoves, biogas pits and solar cookers alone was

  13. Materials science for solar energy conversion systems

    Granqvist, CG

    1991-01-01

    Rapid advances in materials technology are creating many novel forms of coatings for energy efficient applications in solar energy. Insulating heat mirrors, selective absorbers, transparent insulation and fluorescent concentrators are already available commercially. Radiative cooling, electrochromic windows and polymeric light pipes hold promise for future development, while chemical and photochemical processes are being considered for energy storage. This book investigates new material advances as well as applications, costs, reliability and industrial production of existing materials. Each c

  14. U.S. Department of Energy fiscal year 1997 annual report

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Government Management Reform Act and the Government Performance and Results Act both have the objective of ensuring that Federal government agencies are accountable to American taxpayers. This report provides a clear accounting of the return on the investment entrusted to the Department of Energy. Unlike previous annual reports prepared by the Department, this report is fashioned along the lines of a corporate report to the shareholders. Not only does this report contain audited financial statements for the fiscal year but it also describes what the shareholders, American taxpayers, received in the way of services and contributions to the important National goals this Administration and the Department have promised to provide. This report provides a progress report on how the Department is serving the country and how they are doing it for much lower cost.

  15. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    1996-09-01

    The DIII-D research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is aimed at developing the knowledge base for an economically and environmentally attractive energy source for the nation and the world. The DIII-D program mission is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and improve the tokamak concept. The DIII-D scientific objectives are: (1) Advance understanding of fusion plasma physics and contribute to the physics base of ITER through extensive experiment and theory iteration in the following areas of fusion science - Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability - Plasma turbulence and transport - Wave-particle interactions - Boundary physics plasma neutral interaction (2) Utilize scientific understanding in an integrated manner to show the tokamak potential to be - More compact by increasing plasma stability and confinement to increase the fusion power density (Βτ) - Steady-state through disruption control, handling of divertor heat and particle loads and current drive (3) Acquire understanding and experience with environmentally attractive low activation material in an operating tokamak. This report contains the research conducted over the past year in search of these scientific objectives

  16. Audit Report "Department of Energy Efforts to Manage Information Technology Resources in an Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Responsible Manner"

    None

    2009-05-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 emphasizes energy efficiency and conservation as critical to the Nation's economic vitality; its goal of reducing dependence on foreign energy sources; and, related efforts to improve the environment. The Act highlights the significant use of various forms of energy in the Federal sector and promotes efforts to improve the energy efficiency of Federal operations. One specific area of interest is the increasing demand for Federal sector computing resources and the corresponding increase in energy use, with both cost and environmental implications. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reported that, without aggressive conservation measures, data center energy consumption alone is expected to double over the next five years. In our report on Management of the Department's Data Centers at Contractor Sites (DOE/IG-0803, October 2008) we concluded that the Department of Energy had not always improved the efficiency of its contractor data centers even when such modifications were possible and practical. Despite its recognized energy conservation leadership role, the Department had not always taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption associated with its information technology resources. Nor, had it ensured that resources were managed in a way that minimized impact on the environment. In particular: (1) The seven Federal and contractor sites included in our review had not fully reduced energy consumption through implementation of power management settings on their desktop and laptop computers; and, as a consequence, spent $1.6 million more on energy costs than necessary in Fiscal Year 2008; (2) None of the sites reviewed had taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption, enhance cyber security, and reduce costs available through the use of techniques, such as 'thin-client computing' in their unclassified environments; and, (3) Sites had not always taken the

  17. Large-Scale Power Production Potential on U.S. Department of Energy Lands

    Kandt, Alicen J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elgqvist, Emma M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gagne, Douglas A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hillesheim, Michael B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Walker, H. A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Jeff [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Boak, Jeremy [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Washington, Jeremy [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Sharp, Cory [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-03

    This report summarizes the potential for independent power producers to generate large-scale power on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and export that power into a larger power market, rather than serving on-site DOE loads. The report focuses primarily on the analysis of renewable energy (RE) technologies that are commercially viable at utility scale, including photovoltaics (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), wind, biomass, landfill gas (LFG), waste to energy (WTE), and geothermal technologies. The report also summarizes the availability of fossil fuel, uranium, or thorium resources at 55 DOE sites.

  18. Low-level waste research and development activities of the Department of Energy

    Barainca, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the technical activities of the Department of Energy's Defense and Nuclear Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Programs (LLWPs). Although each Program was established with a different purpose, the technologies developed and demonstrated by each are transferable for use in both the commercial and DOE sectors. This paper presents an overview of the technical activities being pursued through both the Defense and Nuclear Energy LLWP's. These technologies have been placed in the following categories; Criteria and Standards, Systems Analysis, Information and Technology Transfer, Waste Treatment and Wast Form, Improved Near Surface Disposal, Greater Confinement Disposal, Corrective Measures, and Monitoring

  19. US Department of Energy reservior research activities Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Railsback, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) does not directly manage large reservoirs, but DOE laboratories conduct research on reservoir monitoring, assessment, and enhancement under several activities. These activities include (1) studies and remedial actions for reservoirs affected by releases from DOE facilities, (2) industry- sponsored research on reservoir and stream fish, (3) climate change research, (4) hydropower impact assessment studies conducted for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and (5) the DOE hydropower program. These activities fall under DOE's missions of providing support for environmentally sound energy technologies and managing the legacies of past waste disposal practices at DOE facilities. 9 refs

  20. Department of Defense Operational Energy Strategy: A Content Analysis of Energy Literature from 1973-2014

    2014-03-27

    energy labels among others. These Corporate Average Fuel Economy ( CAFE ) standards were an initial means in improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles...Independence and Security Act of 2007 as a way to address the country’s energy security concerns (Scofield, 2009). Two key provisions enacted are the CAFE ...truth is that, according to a 2006 JASON report, “DoD is not a sufficiently large customer to drive the domestic market for demand and consumption of