WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy revolution 2008-a

  1. Energy [R]evolution 2008-a sustainable world energy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewitt, Wolfram; Teske, Sven; Simon, Sonja; Pregger, Thomas; Graus, Wina; Blomen, Eliane; Schmid, Stephan; Schaefer, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The Energy [R]evolution 2008 scenario is an update of the Energy [R]evolution scenario published in 2007. It takes up recent trends in global socio-economic developments, and analyses to which extent they affect chances for achieving global climate protection targets. The main target is to reduce global CO 2 emissions to 10 Gt per year in 2050, thus limiting global average temperature increase to 2 deg. C and preventing dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. A review of sector and region specific energy efficiency measures resulted in the specification of a global energy demand scenario incorporating strong energy efficiency measures. The corresponding energy supply scenario has been developed in an iterative process in close cooperation with stakeholders and regional counterparts from academia, NGOs and the renewable energy industry. The Energy [R]evolution scenario shows that renewable energy can provide more than half of the world's energy needs by 2050. Developing countries can virtually stabilise their CO 2 emissions, whilst at the same time increasing energy consumption through economic growth. OECD countries will be able to reduce their emissions by up to 80%.

  2. Energy Revolution, Political Revolutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonneuve, Cecile; Boncourt, Maite de

    2015-01-01

    As epicentres of the production of hydrocarbon, the Gulf States must adapt to an energy scene upset by the arrival of new resources on the market and by the historic reversal of demand in European countries. Consuming less energy and developing alternative sources in order to reserve hydrocarbon for exports: such is the huge challenge for countries whose social contract is based on unlimited consumption of subsidized energy. In the long term, their economic, social and political stability is at stake, together with their ability to remain key actors of the world energy system

  3. The third energy revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauvergeon, A.; Jamard, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    The first energy revolution was fueled by coal, the second by oil and electricity. The third energy revolution will be that of carbon-free energies, with nuclear power in the lead. For authors all available resources will be needed to satisfy the huge demand for energy shaping up for the future while preserving an increasingly fragile environment. Confronting these major challenges, they explain how reliable, carbon-free nuclear power has a real role to play in a more diversified energy mix. (A.L.B.)

  4. Energy Revolution Against Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2007-01-01

    Energy revolution is taking place in the world with objective to mitigate consequences of evident climate change, caused mostly by emissions of the greenhouse gases from combustion of fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas). The principal elements of the energy revolution are decrease in energy consumption by increase in energy efficiency and substitution of fossil fuels by renewable energies, supported by 'clean' fossil fuels and nuclear energy. (author)

  5. The digital revolution in energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therme, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The growth of renewable sources of energy on the planet (in particular, solar power) is deeply altering the economics of energy. The decentralization of decision-making, the placing of users at the center of systems, the management of energy consumption in buildings, new forms of mobility... all these are expectations that digital technology can satisfy. Do digital technology and energy naturally converge... or will there be a revolution? For sure, a revolution, but one that has to take place, first of all, in our heads

  6. Towards a new energy revolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabourbin, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    At the time of the 19. century's 'energy revolution', a man was consuming about 20.000 kcal/day. Today, in industrialized countries and if we include all forms of energies (space heating, transport, production, feeding etc.) this consumption reaches up to 230.000 kcal/day. We have reached a 'power society' which has put no limit to its growth needs. However, this growth is based on an immoderate consumption of fossil fuels which are on the way of exhaustion. A new energy revolution appears as inevitable to us, but will it be similar or in opposition to the previous ones? This revolution will have to integrate a new parameter: the need to fit with a sustainable development philosophy. To determine the conditions of this revolution, it is useful to analyse the energy systems from the needs to the resources, in a historical, philosophical and technical manner. Starting from this analysis, this book explores the possibilities to build the transition towards this new energy revolution. (J.S.)

  7. Towards a new energy revolution?; Vers une nouvelle revolution energetique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabourbin, Sabine

    2011-09-22

    At the time of the 19. century's 'energy revolution', a man was consuming about 20.000 kcal/day. Today, in industrialized countries and if we include all forms of energies (space heating, transport, production, feeding etc.) this consumption reaches up to 230.000 kcal/day. We have reached a 'power society' which has put no limit to its growth needs. However, this growth is based on an immoderate consumption of fossil fuels which are on the way of exhaustion. A new energy revolution appears as inevitable to us, but will it be similar or in opposition to the previous ones? This revolution will have to integrate a new parameter: the need to fit with a sustainable development philosophy. To determine the conditions of this revolution, it is useful to analyse the energy systems from the needs to the resources, in a historical, philosophical and technical manner. Starting from this analysis, this book explores the possibilities to build the transition towards this new energy revolution. (J.S.)

  8. Citizen's protests in times of energy revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeft, Christoph; Messinger-Zimmer, Soeren; Zilles, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Part A covers the German energy revolution as socio-scientific research field. Part B deals with local conflicts concerning energy revolution projects - inspections: protests against transmission line location, protests against wind mills, protests against fracking. Part C includes contributions on participants and non-involved people - perception and perspectives: the conflicts in the view of different groups. Part D summarizes the protests and concludes with nine hypotheses.

  9. Energy and the English Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, E A

    2013-03-13

    Societies before the Industrial Revolution were dependent on the annual cycle of plant photosynthesis for both heat and mechanical energy. The quantity of energy available each year was therefore limited, and economic growth was necessarily constrained. In the Industrial Revolution, energy usage increased massively and output rose accordingly. The energy source continued to be plant photosynthesis, but accumulated over a geological age in the form of coal. This poses a problem for the future. Fossil fuels are a depleting stock, whereas in pre-industrial time the energy source, though limited, was renewed each year.

  10. Energy [R]evolution 2010-a sustainable world energy outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, S.; Pregger, T.; Simon, S.; Naegler, T.; Graus, W.H.J.; Lins, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy [R]evolution 2010 scenario is an update of the Energy [R]evolution scenarios published in 2007 and 2008. It takes up recent trends in global energy demand and production and analyses to which extent this affects chances for achieving climate protection targets. The main target is to

  11. Energy [r]evolution - a sustainable world energy outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, S.; Muth, J.; Sawyer, S.; Pregger, T.; Simon, S.; Naegler, T.; O'Sullivan, M.; Schmid, S; Pagenkopf, J.; Frieske, B.; Graus, W.H.J.; Kermeli, K.; Zittel, W.; Rutovitz, J.; Harris, S.; Ackermann, T.; Ruwahata, R.; Martense, N.

    2012-01-01

    Energy [R]evolution 2012 provides a consistent fundamental pathway for how to protect our climate: getting the world from where we are now to where we need to be by phasing out fossil fuels and cutting CO2 emissions while ensuring energy security.The Energy [R]evolution Scenario has become a well

  12. We need an energy revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pierie, Frank

    2014-01-01

    During the K4I lunch debate Hanze UAS PhD level researchers of different nationalities presented their ideas about their EU in 2050 in terms of intrinsic qualities. They discussed how the EU should look in 2050, taking their PhD content into account and will share their views on actions that we should undertake today as a priority. They will also examine to what extend these priorities are in balance with today's practice. This Younger's Revolution is the core of this lunch debate.

  13. Germany: energy transition or revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, V.

    2013-01-01

    Germany has decided to phase out nuclear power by 2022 but it wants also to get rid of fossil energies by 2050. Those ambitious goals imply to be able to cut by half the demand for primary energy by 2050 which will be only possible if the need for building heating is cut by 80%, the constraint on transport is less important: one million of electrical vehicles will have to be on the road by 2020 and 3 millions 10 years later. In 2012 the production of electricity was made mainly from coal (44.7%), renewable energies (21.9%), nuclear energy (16%), natural gas (11.3%) and other energies (fuel...) (6.1%). Today the renewable energy sector is a major industrial sector in Germany, it represents about 382000 jobs directly or indirectly, it means more than the sector of conventional energies. (A.C.)

  14. The energy revolution is underway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    At first glance, today's new buildings are not much different from those of the past, but in labs and in companies, a real transformation is taking place: with their sophisticated communication devices, their optimized energy efficiency and their increased comfort, these dwellings and offices of tomorrow will offer a radically new living environment. Driven by a formidable stream of innovations (and strongly incentivizing regulations), this trend heralds significant changes in our way of life. (authors)

  15. ENERGY REVOLUTION UNDER THE BRICS NATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The BRICS countries are of critical importance to both supply and demand fundamentals of energy markets globally. Today BRICS plays a very important role in the system of international energy security. BRICS energy diversification is driven by concerns for energy security. The potential for a BRIC energy partnership is thus enormous. The development of the BRIC countries in the next coming decades will include demographic changes with a growing middle class population which will demand more energy and resources that our world has the potential to supply.A Green Energy Revolution is the panacea to solve major social, economic and envi­ronmental effects of their growing populations. This paper is an attempt to highlight the cooperation among the BRICS Nations for the development of Energy Sector and at the same time the concerning issue of climate change etc. It further discusses about the contribution of BRICS countries in the global economy. This paper also discusses about the role of the BRICS Nations in collaboration with the International Energy Agency.

  16. Energy transition. Between reform and revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laville, Bettina

    2014-07-01

    The author comments the content of the French bill project on energy transition. She first discusses the meaning of this concept of energy transition which can be perceived as an evolution, a transformation, a progressive change, rather than a revolution. She recalls the original debate between those who wanted to preserve nuclear energy because it does not produce CO 2 emissions, and those who wanted a more radical change of the energy system. In this respect, she outlines and comments the main statements made by the French President on these issues, and indicates the main measures defined in the bill project regarding the reduction of greenhouse gas emission, the increase of the share of renewable energies, a decrease of the share of nuclear in power production, and a reduction of energy consumption. Then, she discusses how this transition is to be financed, proposes an assessment and a discussion of the skills and shortcomings of the bill project. She notably states that the main shortcoming is the lack of strong objectives regarding the reduction of emissions by transports, and the development of inter-modality. She also regrets the disappearance of the regional public service of energy efficiency, the fact that electricity consumption is not capped. Because of that, it's not that sure that the reduction of greenhouse gas emission by a factor 4 in 2050 with respect to 1990 will be reached. In the next parts, the author discusses the issue of the ecologic tax policy, outlines the importance of being exemplary within the perspective of the 2015 Conference on Climate (COP21)

  17. Sacrificed country sides. How the energy revolution degrades the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etscheit, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The volume covers a variety of contributions on the consequences for the environment due to the energy revolution in Germany, including challenges and pitfalls. A realistic survey on the development of the energy revolution is requested in relation to the effectiveness of environmental protection and the legal protection of cultivated landscapes. Architectural aspects concerning wind energy and solar energy plants are discussed in the view of the population.

  18. Energy conundrum, digital revolution and politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersun, Oe.

    2007-01-01

    The 21st Century will be fundamentally different from the previous one in all aspects of the human life. The world is now facing unprecedented challenges that will determine the fate of the human race as a whole. Our tiny planet is too small to shoulder the weight of six and a half billion energy-needy people and it is too vulnerable to afford violent and confrontational approaches as was the case in the past 20th century. It is also a fact that science opened new horizons before us. Digital Revolution inaugurated a new era in human history. Technology offers tremendous opportunities to overcome new and inherited problems. Sadly, the family of nations is ill-equipped for handling these challenges because the organizational structure of the world society is archaic and inoperative. Or, we live in a geo strategic environment pregnant with dangerous crisis of global significance. Furthermore, the good old days when scientists were heeded respectfully as reliable guides and when scientific facts were accepted as 'veritas' are over. Solid scientific arguments are perceived as cover up stories to defend financial interests of multinational companies. Similarly, confidence in politicians is at its lowest level in several countries. At the center of this puzzle lies a frenetic quest for cleaner, cheaper and more secure energy sources. In such circumstances, the best remedies which may be created by the brightest minds of the world will be tributary to the 'goodwill' of politicians. Or, politicians are under the overwhelming pressure of their respective public opinions who may act according to emotional factors or advices from religion, gossip or ideology. Consequently, 'Societal Issues' will be 'the decisive' factor in shaping the future of 'Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems' as well as nonnuclear technologies. This paper will attempt to identify major elements of this global equation from a political standpoint. One also has to take into account a group of new and powerful

  19. Mobilizing private finance to drive an energy industrial revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, John A.; Kidney, Sean; Mallon, Karl; Hughes, Mark

    2010-01-01

    While uptake of renewable energies as a solution to climate change is widely discussed, the issue of public vs. private financing is not yet adequately explored. The debates over the Kyoto Protocol and its successor, culminating in the COP15 Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December 2009, maintained a strong preference for public over private financing. Yet it is also clear to most observers that the energy revolution will never happen without the involvement of private finance to drive private investment. In this Viewpoint, we discuss the ways in which private financing could be mobilized to drive the energy industrial revolution that is needed if climate change mitigation is to succeed.

  20. Opportunities of the energy revolution. Scientific contributions to the KIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breh, Wolfgang; Schaetzler, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    ''Opportunities for energy revolution'' was the title under which the KIT Energy Center of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in May 2012 held its first annual meeting. The meeting covered the whole Topic of the KIT Energy Center. The present proceedings give those interested the opportunity to delve into the contributions and to provide a differentiated picture of the challenges and opportunities of the energy transition.

  1. In Portugal, the energy revolution is underway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    As at the beginning of 2013, 70 per cent of the electricity consumed in Portugal had a renewable origin, this article outlines that this result is based on a strong-willed policy. In fact, Portugal entered the energy transition in 2001 with its '4E program' (energy efficiency and endogenous energies) which aimed at reaching 60 per cent of renewable energies in electricity consumption by 2020. This program was based on a strong development of wind and hydraulic energy. Moreover, the country developed its own capacities for the manufacturing of wind turbines. On another hand, other renewable energies (notably solar energy) seem a bit late although several projects are underway. As far as hydraulic energy, a dam project is a matter of controversy

  2. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  3. Energy revolution for Africa; Energierevolution fuer Afrika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, Erica

    2017-07-01

    Decreasing energy costs from renewable sources could enable many African countries to make the leap into a clean future. This would save the continent the detour via the classic dirty sources. [German] Sinkende Kosten fuer Energie aus erneuerbaren Quellen koennten vielen afrikanischen Laendern den Sprung in eine saubere Zukunft ermoeglichen. Damit wuerde sich der Kontinent den Umweg ueber die klassischen schmutzigen Quellen sparen.

  4. A Comprehensive Plan for Global Energy Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, T.

    2009-05-01

    There is no dearth of information regarding the grave crises faced by humanity in the 21st century. There is also growing consensus that the wholesale burning of fossil fuels must come to an end, either because of climate change or other still-salient reasons such as air pollution or major conflicts over dwindling reserves of cheaply recoverable oil and gas resources. At the same time, global demographics predict with disquieting certainty a world with up to 9 or 10 billion souls by mid-century. The vast expansion of energy consumption that this population represents, along with further increases in already-unacceptable levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, demands that we quickly develop almost limitless sources of clean, economical power. What is sorely lacking in the public debate are realistic solutions. Expanding wind and solar generating capacity is an important near-term goal, but neither of these technologies represents a viable solution for generating base load power at the vast scales that will be required. Energy efficiency measures are likewise well-directed, but the combination of rising population along with increasingly energy-intensive economic activity by the large fraction of Earth's current population residing in developing nations suggests that absolute energy demand will continue to rise even with radically improved energy efficiency. Fortunately we have the technologies available to provide virtually unlimited clean energy, and to utilize and recycle our resources so that everyone can improve their standard of living. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), developed at the Argonne National Laboratory in the 80's and 90's and currently championed by General Electric, is a technology that fills the bill on every count, and then some. IFRs are safe, environmentally clean, economical, and free of conflict over fuel supply. IFRs can safely consume as fuel the nuclear waste from the current installed base of light-water reactors

  5. Renewable energy: key factor of China’s energy revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wan

    2017-12-01

    To realize the sustainable development of China’s energy industry, it is necessary to speed up the transformation of energy development mode and deepen the reform of the energy system in an all-round way so as to establish a clean, low-carbon, safe and efficient modern energy system. This paper analysed the opportunities and challenges in energy sectors to promote the energy mix update in China. Fossil energy, especially coal, has brought great progress to the world as well as a great deal of negative effects. In recent years, China’s greenhouse gas emissions continued to grow rapidly, and has become the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitter. To deal with the challenge, the Chinese government has promised that renewable energy will account for 15% of total energy consumption in 2020 and 20% in 2030. This goal requires China to add 800 to 1000 GW of wind, solar and other clean energy.

  6. The geopolitical impact of the shale revolution : Exploring consequences on energy prices and rentier states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auping, W.L.; Pruyt, E.; de Jong, Sijbren; Kwakkel, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    While the shale revolution was largely a US’ affair, it affects the global energy system. In this paper, we look at the effects of this spectacular increase in natural gas, and oil, extraction capacity can have on the mix of primary energy sources, on energy prices, and through that on internal

  7. Energy (r)evolution. Towards a fully renewable energy supply in the EU 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, S. [Greenpeace International, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zervos, A.; Lins, C.; Muth, J. [European Renewable Energy Council EREC, Brussels (Belgium); Krewitt, W.; Simon, S.; Pregger, T.; Naegler, T. [DLR, Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment, Stuttgart (Germany); Schmid, S. [DLR, Institute of Vehicle Concepts, Stuttgart (DE); Graus, W.; Blomen, E. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Baer, P. [Greenhouse Development Rights, EcoEquity, Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Aubrey, C. (ed.)

    2010-06-15

    Europe's energy policy is at a crossroads. Many of its power stations are nearing the end of their working lives and its infrastructure is aging. Important issues are at stake; energy security, stability of supply, growing demand, the employment of thousands and the urgent need to cut emissions and head off climate change. But an answer is within reach: energy savings and renewable energy, with zero fuel costs, zero reliance on scarce resources, and zero climate damaging emissions, is an increasingly attractive option. This study shows that investing in green energy will nudge up the cost of electricity in the short to medium term. But it will save trillions of Euros in fuel costs alone from 2030 and represents an immediate investment in jobs and energy security. It presents a revolution that will give Europe a global competitive advantage and act as a beacon to other regions looking to steer a course away from the dangerous climate change approaching from the horizon. The revolution is feasible, as calculations done by the Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment department of the German Aerospace Center show. But it is going to rely on supportive policies at European and member state level.

  8. Importance of foreign investors for Russian power industry in prospect of energy revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Yaroslava N. Zubkova

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses current state of Russian electric power industry and the main problems of its development in the future of global energy revolution, which will lead to a significant increase in share of renewable energy in global production and consumption of energy and use of industrial energy storage, and will make it possible to change the structure of the industry and significantly reduce electricity prices. Traditional energy generation displacement by renewables associated with em...

  9. Revolutions in energy input and material cycling in Earth history and human history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Pichler, Peter-Paul; Weisz, Helga

    2016-04-01

    Major revolutions in energy capture have occurred in both Earth and human history, with each transition resulting in higher energy input, altered material cycles and major consequences for the internal organization of the respective systems. In Earth history, we identify the origin of anoxygenic photosynthesis, the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis, and land colonization by eukaryotic photosynthesizers as step changes in free energy input to the biosphere. In human history we focus on the Palaeolithic use of fire, the Neolithic revolution to farming, and the Industrial revolution as step changes in free energy input to human societies. In each case we try to quantify the resulting increase in energy input, and discuss the consequences for material cycling and for biological and social organization. For most of human history, energy use by humans was but a tiny fraction of the overall energy input to the biosphere, as would be expected for any heterotrophic species. However, the industrial revolution gave humans the capacity to push energy inputs towards planetary scales and by the end of the 20th century human energy use had reached a magnitude comparable to the biosphere. By distinguishing world regions and income brackets we show the unequal distribution in energy and material use among contemporary humans. Looking ahead, a prospective sustainability revolution will require scaling up new renewable and decarbonized energy technologies and the development of much more efficient material recycling systems - thus creating a more autotrophic social metabolism. Such a transition must also anticipate a level of social organization that can implement the changes in energy input and material cycling without losing the large achievements in standard of living and individual liberation associated with industrial societies.

  10. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Komomua, C.; O' Malley, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge. The first workshop was held May 1-2, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado. The second was held June 6-7, 2012 at the University College Dublin, in Dublin, Ireland.

  11. Sacrificed country sides. How the energy revolution degrades the environment; Geopferte Landschaften. Wie die Energiewende unsere Umwelt zerstoert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etscheit, Georg (ed.)

    2016-07-01

    The volume covers a variety of contributions on the consequences for the environment due to the energy revolution in Germany, including challenges and pitfalls. A realistic survey on the development of the energy revolution is requested in relation to the effectiveness of environmental protection and the legal protection of cultivated landscapes. Architectural aspects concerning wind energy and solar energy plants are discussed in the view of the population.

  12. Energy Revolution. A Sustainable Pathway to a Clean Energy Future for Europe. A European Energy Scenario for EU-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, S.; Baker, C.

    2005-09-01

    Greenpeace and the Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment of the German Aerospace Center (DLR),have developed a blueprint for the EU energy supply that shows how Europe can lead the way to a sustainable pathway to a clean energy future. The Greenpeace energy revolution scenario demonstrates that phasing out nuclear power and massively reducing CO2-emissions is possible. The scenario comes close to a fossil fuels phase-out by aiming for a 80% CO2 emissions reduction by 2050.The pathway in this scenario achieves this phase-out in a relatively short time-frame without using technological options (such as 'clean coal') that are ultimately dead ends, deflecting resources from the real solutions offered by renewable energy. Whilst there are many technical options that will allow us to meet short-term EU Kyoto targets (-8% GHG by 2010), these may have limited long-term potential. The Greenpeace Energy Revolution Scenario shows that in the long run, renewable energy will be cheaper than conventional energy sources and reduce EU's dependence from world market prices from imported fossil and nuclear fuels.The rapid growth of renewable energy technologies will lead to a large investment in new technologies.This dynamic market growth will result in a shift of employment opportunities from conventional energy-related industries to new occupational fields in the renewable energy industry. Renewable energy is expected to provide about 700,000 jobs in the field of electricity generation from renewable energy sources by 2010

  13. Market-oriented Energy Revolution in China and Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhen; Xue Qing

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing a new round ofambitious reform in its energy sectors after presidentXi's call for“energy revolution”in June 2014. Thistop-down strategy paves a way to market-oriented transition for Chinese energy govern system on both industrial level and corporation level. This paper analyzes the newtrends of China's energy policy and its impacts on crude oil market as well as on Chinese state-owned petroleum enterprises. Thisrevolutionwill reshapethe managementsystemof Chinese energyindustryto cope with rising energy demand, supply restraints, huge environmental costs and backward technologies.With the deepening reform of oil and gas pricing mechanism and the opening-up of petroleum industry, Chinese domestic energy market will be upgraded towards a more rationalized and competitive system. Mixed ownerships will be introduced to stimulate the vitality, creativity and brandinfluence of state-owned petroleum corporations, pushing Chinese national oil majors to collaboratejointly withvarious foreign oil and gas companies and the emerging domestic private companies with great entrepreneurship.

  14. The green bubble: waste into wealth: the new energy revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this exhaustive (and exhausting) look at the future of energy, Bell, a professor of management and chairman of the economics department at Brooklyn College, CUNY, maps a complicated future for investors and laymen with clear-eyed examination of failed U.S. environmental policy and worldwide efforts to break away from oil. Under discussion are a wide range of topics: the stampede away from oil; wind energy and turbines; photovoltaic opportunities; what car-makers are saying and what they're actually doing (including a careful look at the popular Toyota Prius); the extremely lengthy timetables for new energy-saving technologies to get off the ground; and the processes, research and expectations tied up in them all. Drawing an analogy to the dot-com debacle, Bell predicts investment in the hot properties of energy tech will lead to a bubble effect, eventually draining the financial resources of investors who linger too long. Frequently fascinating anecdotes-as in the story of Sweden's green welfare state and bicycles of Lyon-buoy what otherwise can read like a university course. Bell's latest (following 2003's The Stock Market Sting) is an educated, opinionated tour through the future of energy economics that should shore up the will and wisdom of investors, as well as open the eyes of average Americans. (authors)

  15. Energy [R]Evolution: Opportunities for Decarbonizing Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The future of conventional energy in Canada is uncertain. World oil prices have suffered steep declines recently and there are no strong arguments for recovery in the foreseeable future. The country is now engaged in serious debates and discussions over the value of GHG emissions, pipelines, oil and gas operations, and renewable energy. Oilsands deposits in northern Alberta require long-term investment and decades of consistent sales to repay those investments. The election of more progressive governments in Alberta and Canada may provide the national and global credibility and opportunity to address the environmental problems caused by Oilsands and other fossil fuel developments. The discussion will focus on the possible ways forward for Canada to diversify the regional and national economy with renewable energy networks, thereby meeting our Paris GHG emission reduction commitments. The end goal of this work is to see the Canadian economy decarbonized within two decades.

  16. Global revolution: a status report on renewable energy worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, Eric

    2005-01-01

    With at least 48 countries around the world having some type of renewable energy promotion policy, and increasingly favourable economics, renewables are seeing strong growth and increasing significance. In 2004, global investment in renewables reached US$30 billion. More than 1.7 million people are directly employed by the industry and the 180 GW of installed renewables represents 4% of global capacity. The author discusses the state of renewables in 2005, based on the Just-released 'Renewables 2005 Global Status Report' which was sponsored by the REN21 Renewable Energy Policy Network and involved over 100 collaborators, under the headings: investment trends; industry and market trends; policies to promote renewable energy. (UK)

  17. Nuclear power and the third energy revolution. Interview of Anne Lauvergeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    The first energy revolution was the changeover from wood to coal, the second one from coal to oil and now we are facing the passage from oil to CO 2 -no-emitting energy sources. The global energy equation of the world implies a permanent growth of the energy demand so the combining of energy conservation measures and the development of renewable energies go in the right direction but it will not be enough. We have to develop energy sources that do not worsen the climatic change and stay competitive. Nuclear power is one of them, it has the advantage of existing and relying on a broad feedback experience. Areva has made large investment to face a renaissance of nuclear power worldwide. Nuclear power appears to have significant strategical, economical and environmental assets and recent opinion polls show a real general trend in favor of this energy. (A.C.)

  18. The geopolitical impact of the shale revolution: Exploring consequences on energy prices and rentier states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auping, Willem L.; Pruyt, Erik; Jong, Sijbren de; Kwakkel, Jan H.

    2016-01-01

    While the shale revolution was largely a US’ affair, it affects the global energy system. In this paper, we look at the effects of this spectacular increase in natural gas, and oil, extraction capacity can have on the mix of primary energy sources, on energy prices, and through that on internal political stability of rentier states. We use two exploratory simulation models to investigate the consequences of the combination of both complexity and uncertainty in relation to the global energy system and state stability. Our simulations show that shale developments could be seen as part of a long term hog-cycle, with a short term drop in oil prices if unconventional supply substitutes demand for oil. These lower oil prices may lead to instability in rentier states neighbouring the EU, especially when dependence on oil and gas income is high, youth bulges are present, or buffers like sovereign wealth funds are too limited to bridge the negative economic effects of temporary low oil prices. - Highlights: • We quantitatively explore geopolitical consequences of the shale gas revolution. • We use a multi-model approach to generate and use energy price scenarios. • Simulations show that current low oil prices could be part of a hog cycle. • The shale gas boom was an early warning for the drop in oil prices. • Low prices due to shale gas can reduce internal stability in rentier states.

  19. Energy revolution: From a fossil energy era to a new energy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caineng Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to predict the future situation of global energy development. In view of this, we reviewed the history of energy use and understood that new energy sources will usher in a new era following oil & gas, coal and wood one after another in the past time. Although the fossil energy sources are still plenty in the world, great breakthroughs made in some key technologies and the increasing demand for ecological environmental protection both impel the third time of transformation from oil & gas to new energy sources. Sooner or later, oil, gas, coal and new energy sources will each account for a quarter of global energy consumption in the new era, specifically speaking, accounting for 32.6%, 23.7%, 30.0% and 13.7% respectively. As one of the largest coal consumer, China will inevitably face up to the situation of tripartite confrontation of the coal, oil & gas and new energy. The following forecasting results were achieved. First, the oil will be in a stable period and its annual production peak will be around 2040, reaching up to 45 × 108 t. Second, the natural gas will enter the heyday period and its annual production peak will be around 2060, reaching up to 4.5 × 1012 m3, which will play a pivotal role in the future energy sustainable development. Third, the coal has entered a high-to-low-carbon transition period, and its direct use and the discharged pollutants will be significantly reduced. In 2050, the coal will be dropped to 25% of the primary energy mix. Last, the development and utilization of new energy sources has been getting into the golden age and its proportion in the primary energy mix will be substantially enhanced. On this basis, we presented some proposals for the future energy development in China. At first, we should understand well that China's energy production and consumption has its own characteristics. Under the present situation, we should strengthen the clean and efficient use of coal resources, which

  20. Objectives and strategies for energy revolution in the context of tackling climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Kun He

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change mitigation and CO2 emission reduction have promoted the revolutionary transformation in energy system. The core content of energy system revolutionary transformation is to replace the high-carbon energy system dominated by fossil energy with low-carbon energy system dominated by new and renewable energy and finally realize the near-zero emission of CO2. The new energy system transformation has also led to a reform in global economic and social development patterns. Developing low-carbon economy becomes the fundamental strategy of sustainable development under climate risk management and the only solution to getting on the road from industrial civilization to ecological civilization. China intends to achieve the peaking of CO2 emissions around 2030 and increase the share of non-fossil fuels in primary energy consumption to around 20% by 2030. Guided by the targets, China directs its economy development to a low-carbon pattern. Therefore, new and renewable power capacity need to reach 1300 GW, and the electricity generated should be 4 times of that in 2013 with a continuous increase rate of 6%–8% around 2030. The pace of energy substitution need to be accelerated and efficient, safe, clean, and low-carbon energy supply and consumption systems should be established besides strengthened energy conservation and improved energy efficient. Therefore, reform need be deepened, favorable policy system and market mechanism for energy revolution and low-carbon development need be established, energy pricing mechanism should be reformed, and national carbon market should be formed to provide a favorable policy and market environment for low-carbon technology innovation and industry development.

  1. Energy [r]evolution. A sustainable world energy outlook. The three step approach: efficiency/renewables/structure. Energy [R]evolution 2010 at a glance - Key facts and figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Sven

    2010-01-01

    A global energy scenario paints a picture of our common future - the picture depicts how the future could unfold. Energy scenarios send important messages on alternative futures to decision makers in political, financial, industrial sectors as well as other stakeholders in the energy market. They paint a picture which can encourage and guide decision makers involved in shaping our energy future. This third edition of the Energy [R]evolution provides a more ambitious and visionary blueprint than the previous two. It demonstrates how the world can get from where we are now, to where we need to be in terms of phasing out fossil fuels, cutting CO 2 emissions while ensuring energy security. This phase-out of fossil fuels offers substantial benefits such as independence from world market fossil fuel prices as well as the creation of millions of new green jobs. It also means providing energy to the two billion people currently without reliable access to energy services

  2. The unconventional gas: a North American energy revolution not without consequences for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeker, Etienne

    2011-03-01

    While it was not talked about in France a few months ago, unconventional gas (CNG) have made a grand entrance in the energy landscape. It is the U.S. that the techniques for extracting these gases trapped in rocks such as sandstone and shale have been perfected and have open access to new and very large deposits. The consequences are serious because facing the depletion of oil resources, these gases could represent almost double the gas reserves so-called 'conventional'. In total, the world would be assured of having more than one hundred years of use if it continued at its current pace. The impact of these new resources on the price of gas is already significant. The economic crisis and the decline in imports in the U.S. have released quantities of gas are transferred to other markets, driving prices down spots on other continents, remarkable phenomenon at a time when commodity prices tends to increase. This drop is hardly noticeable, however the French consumer, for which the price of gas, indexed in long-term contracts to over 80% on the price of oil continues to increase. The energy balances are changed, many uses is now directing the gas to the detriment of coal, nuclear - which recovery is delayed - and even renewable energy. Regarded by some experts as the greatest energy revolution of recent decades, these gases there are nevertheless questions about the impact of their operations on global warming, environmental (noise, emissions, footprint, pollution risk aquifers, use of large amounts of water) and on the economic activities associated with it. In France, authorizations permits have recently sparked controversy. The Ministers in charge of industry and sustainable development launched in February 2011 a fact-finding mission whose results must be communicated in June 2011. The work schedules of manufacturers have been adapted to take account of this mission, and no exploration work will take place by the end of the mission. Contents: - Improved production

  3. Importance of foreign investors for Russian power industry in prospect of energy revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslava N. Zubkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses current state of Russian electric power industry and the main problems of its development in the future of global energy revolution, which will lead to a significant increase in share of renewable energy in global production and consumption of energy and use of industrial energy storage, and will make it possible to change the structure of the industry and significantly reduce electricity prices. Traditional energy generation displacement by renewables associated with emergence of new, more cost effective technologies. Producers of “disruptive technologies” receive advantages over importers of innovations, which are especially noticeable during the formation of the new technological wave. Considering possibilities of effective development of Russian power industry, it is important to take into account the realities, including high level of depreciation of equipment, lack of capital and technologies. Currently, in the field of technology in the power industry innovative economies of Japan, USA, UK, Canada, as well as dynamically developing economy of China are leading. The high level of patent activity in these countries is caused by presence of infrastructure which promotes the commercialization of new technologies and free access to investment capital. In Russia technological exports in power sector occurs mainly due to foreign projects of Rosatom. Operation of foreign-made equipment which accounts for a significant proportion of fixed assets and problems with the development and introduction of competitive technologies are complicated by the lack of investment in domestic market. For maintenance of imported equipment Russian companies have to buy spare parts abroad and to enter into service contracts with foreign suppliers. High depreciation of fixed assets also determines the need for new investment inflows into the sector. Thus the existing dependence on foreign investors is supposed to increase. In the short term

  4. Interdisciplinary Student/Teacher Materials in Energy, the Environment, and the Economy: 3, Energy, Engines, and the Industrial Revolution, Grades 8, 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Barbara; And Others

    This instructional unit for grades 8-9 combines science and social studies in a look at the broad social and economic upheavals that took place during the industrial revolution, giving special emphasis to the role of energy. The invention and development of the steam engine is highlighted in one lesson. Other lessons show how the industrial…

  5. The Hydrogen Economy Making the Transition to the Third Industrial Revolution and a New Energy Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremy Rifkin

    2006-01-01

    , during non-use hours, to the home, office, or the main interactive electricity network, providing premium electricity back to the grid. If just 25 percent of drivers used their vehicles as power plants to sell energy back to the grid, all of the power plants in the country could be eliminated. In order for millions of people to become producers, as well as consumers of energy, it will be necessary to redesign the power grid. That is where the software and computer revolution converge with the new hydrogen energy regime. The same design principles and smart technologies that made possible the Internet, and vast, decentralized global communication networks, will be used to reconfigure the world's power grids so that people can begin to share energy peer-to-peer, just like they now share information, creating a new, decentralized form of energy use. The coming together of decentralized communications technology and distributed hydrogen energy technology marks the next great turning point in the way people organize the energy of the planet. Hydrogen has the potential to end the world's reliance on imported oil and help diffuse the dangerous geopolitical game being played out between Muslim militants and Western nations. It will dramatically cut down on carbon dioxide emissions and mitigate the effects of global warming. And because hydrogen is so plentiful and exists everywhere on earth, every human being could be 'empowered', making it the first truly democratic energy regime in history. We are on the cusp of a third industrial revolution and a new energy era. Hydrogen is our common future. (author)

  6. The Hydrogen Economy Making the Transition to the Third Industrial Revolution and a New Energy Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Rifkin

    2006-07-01

    car is parked most of the time, it can be plugged in, during non-use hours, to the home, office, or the main interactive electricity network, providing premium electricity back to the grid. If just 25 percent of drivers used their vehicles as power plants to sell energy back to the grid, all of the power plants in the country could be eliminated. In order for millions of people to become producers, as well as consumers of energy, it will be necessary to redesign the power grid. That is where the software and computer revolution converge with the new hydrogen energy regime. The same design principles and smart technologies that made possible the Internet, and vast, decentralized global communication networks, will be used to reconfigure the world's power grids so that people can begin to share energy peer-to-peer, just like they now share information, creating a new, decentralized form of energy use. The coming together of decentralized communications technology and distributed hydrogen energy technology marks the next great turning point in the way people organize the energy of the planet. Hydrogen has the potential to end the world's reliance on imported oil and help diffuse the dangerous geopolitical game being played out between Muslim militants and Western nations. It will dramatically cut down on carbon dioxide emissions and mitigate the effects of global warming. And because hydrogen is so plentiful and exists everywhere on earth, every human being could be 'empowered', making it the first truly democratic energy regime in history. We are on the cusp of a third industrial revolution and a new energy era. Hydrogen is our common future. (author)

  7. Citizen's protests in times of energy revolution; Buergerproteste in Zeiten der Energiewende. Lokale Konflikte um Windkraft, Stromtrassen und Fracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeft, Christoph; Messinger-Zimmer, Soeren; Zilles, Julia (eds.) [Goettinger Institut fuer Demokratieforschung, Goettingen (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    Part A covers the German energy revolution as socio-scientific research field. Part B deals with local conflicts concerning energy revolution projects - inspections: protests against transmission line location, protests against wind mills, protests against fracking. Part C includes contributions on participants and non-involved people - perception and perspectives: the conflicts in the view of different groups. Part D summarizes the protests and concludes with nine hypotheses.

  8. Sexual revolutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.; Giami, A.

    2014-01-01

    The sexual revolution of 1960-1980 created a major break in attitudes and practices in Western societies. It created many new freedoms for gay men, youth and women, in terms of sexual imagery, information, and rights. Leftists denounced the revolution's consumerism whilst feminists lamented its

  9. Revolution electromobility; Revolution Elektromobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Guy [Hochschule Pforzheim (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The long-term protection of the mobility requires highly efficient vehicles which can be operated with alternative energies. Electric drives (hybrid vehicles, battery electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles) offer large potentials for the reduction of the dependence on petroleum as a source of energy as well as for the reduction of the emissions of CO{sub 2}. However, electrical mobility can be realised only in close interaction of energy industry and automobile industry - with most modern information technology and communication technology.

  10. Mexican Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuzger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    It was the complex and far-reaching transformation of the Mexican Revolution rather than the First World War that left its mark on Mexican history in the second decade of the 20th century. Nevertheless, although the country maintained its neutrality in the international conflict, it was a hidden theatre of war. Between 1914 and 1918, state actors in Germany, Great Britain and the United States defined their policies towards Mexico and its nationalist revolution with a view not only to improve...

  11. China's "energy revolution": measuring the status quo, modelling regional dynamics and assessing global impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischke, Peggy

    As the world's largest economy in transition, China plays a growing role in global energy markets, clean technology deployment and climate change negotiations. The Chinese president Xi Jinping called in June 2014 for an “energy revolution” of the country’s “energy production and consumption habits......, expanded and applied in this regard. The theories underlying this research are stemming from various scientific disciplines, such as energy and power engineering, macro- and energy-economics, and power project finance. Cross-cutting aspects are the harmonization of Chinese and international energy...... top-down and bottom-up global energy planning tools to model future regional dynamics of China's energy sector; and (v) an assessment of electricity generation costs of the first operational concentrated solar power technologies in China. The results of this thesis are relevant for a broad scientific...

  12. French revolution or industrial revolution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisdorf, Paul R. Sharp Jacob L.; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    in London and Paris in the centuries leading up to 1800. Whilst in London, building workers were facing low and stable consumer prices over the period, leaving plenty of scope for a demand-driven consumer revolution (in particular after 1650), their Parisian counterparts had to engage in a year-long grind...

  13. Time for a revolution: smart energy and microgrid use in disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, David Wayne; Noste, Erin; McCahill, Peter Woods; Rossman, A J; Lempereur, Dominique; Kaney, Kathleen; Swanson, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Modern health care and disaster response are inextricably linked to high volume, reliable, quality power. Disasters place major strain on energy infrastructure in affected communities. Advances in renewable energy and microgrid technology offer the potential to improve mobile disaster medical response capabilities. However, very little is known about the energy requirements of and alternative power sources in disaster response. A gap analysis of the energy components of modern disaster response reveals multiple deficiencies. The MED-1 Green Project has been executed as a multiphase project designed to identify energy utilization inefficiencies, decrease demands on diesel generators, and employ modern energy management strategies to expand operational independence. This approach, in turn, allows for longer deployments in potentially more austere environments and minimizes the unit's environmental footprint. The ultimate goal is to serve as a proof of concept for other mobile medical units to create strategies for energy independence.

  14. China's energy revolution - measuring the status quo, modelling regional dynamics & assessing global impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    værktøjer er udviklet i denne forbindelse. Den underliggende teori bag forskningen stammer fra en række forskellige discipliner, såsom energi og kraft ingeniørvidenskab, makro- og energi økonomi, samt kraft-projekt finansiering. Det interdisciplinære aspekt udtrykker sig ved harmoniseringen af den Kinesiske...

  15. The energy revolution as an innovation driver; Die Energiewende als Innovationstreiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Clemens; Bofinger, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik (IWES), Kassel (Germany); Fischedick, Manfred [Wuppertal Institut fuer Klima, Umwelt, Energie GmbH, Wuppertal (Germany); Martin, Niklas [ForschungsVerbund Erneuerbare Energien (FVEE), Berlin-Adlershof (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Technological innovations in the fields of renewable energy and energy efficiency are an essential basis of the global energy system transformation and act with appropriate implementation as value creation engine. The size and substantial growth of international markets for energy technologies and systems makes the positioning of German companies in these markets therefore become a topic of very far-reaching economic policy relevance. Hence the question of how Germany can benefit from a consistent implementation of the energy transition and its associated pioneering role in the international markets for energy technologies. [German] Technologische Innovationen in den Bereichen erneuerbare Energien und Energieeffizienz bilden eine wesentliche Grundlage der weltweiten Energiesystemtransformation und wirken bei geeigneter Implementierung als Wertschoepfungsmotor. Die Groesse und erhebliche Wachstumsdynamik der internationalen Maerkte fuer Energietechnologien und Systeme macht die Positionierung deutscher Unternehmen auf diesen Maerkten daher zu einem Thema von sehr weitreichender wirtschaftspolitischer Relevanz. Daraus ergibt sich die Frage, wie Deutschland von einer konsequenten Umsetzung der Energiewende und seiner damit verbundenen Vorreiterfunktion auf den internationalen Maerkten fuer Energietechnologien profitieren kann.

  16. Revolution...Now The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies – 2016 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohoo-Vallett, Paul

    2016-09-30

    Decades of investments by the federal government and industry in five key clean energy technologies are making an impact today. The cost of land-based wind power, utility and distributed photovoltaic (PV) solar power, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs) has fallen by 41% to as high as 94% since 2008. These cost reductions have enabled widespread adoption of these technologies with deployment increasing across the board.

  17. Unconventional gases: a North-American energy revolution not without consequences for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a definition of the different existing unconventional gases (coal-bed methane, tight gases, shale gases), and outlines that, although these gases as well as the techniques to extract them have been well known for a long time, it is the combination of two of these techniques (hydraulic fracturing or fracking, and horizontal drilling) which enables the current technological development and the exploitation of these gases. It also outlines that the current situation in terms of natural resources favours such a development. It evokes projects in the United States, China, India, Europe, and more particularly in France, stressing that environmental issues and population density in Europe are obstacles to perform these drillings. The author questions the production cost issue and explains how these developments, notably in the USA, may change completely the world energetic landscape, and therefore entail a review of the European energy agenda. He explores the possible consequences of a durable decrease of gas prices

  18. The 2011 MENA Revolutions: A Study in U.S. Energy (InSecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Rumsey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent upheavals in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA have brought into stark relief the conflict between democratic values and strategic interests in U.S. foreign policy. Americans are known for commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, yet the U.S. Government is frequently unwilling to step forward and openly express even rhetorical support for reform movements in foreign countries. In fact, initial American reluctance to support the recent "Arab Spring" uprisings serves as another example of what scholars argue is a general exception in the MENA to broader post-Cold War rising costs of maintaining autocracy. This article explores the American response to the recent MENA uprisings and their significance in terms of U.S. fossil fuel energy security using the theoretical lens of structural realist international relations theory.

  19. Revolutions that made the earth

    CERN Document Server

    Lenton, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Earth that sustains us today was born out of a few remarkable, near-catastrophic revolutions, started by biological innovations and marked by global environmental consequences. The revolutions have certain features in common, such as an increase in the complexity, energy utilization, and information processing capabilities of life. This book describes these revolutions, showing the fundamental interdependence of the evolution of life and its non-living environment. We would not exist unless these upheavals had led eventually to 'successful' outcomes - meaning that after each one, at length, a new stable world emerged. The current planet-reshaping activities of our species may be the start of another great Earth system revolution, but there is no guarantee that this one will be successful. This book explains what a successful transition through it might look like, if we are wise enough to steer such a course. This book places humanity in context as part of the Earth system, using a new scientific synthe...

  20. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 40, no. 2, April 2008. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2008-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2008 - February 2015 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2008 - 2009 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  1. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 40, no. 3, July 2008. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2008-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2008 - February 2015 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2008 - 2009 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  2. Trend report Energy Research Subsidy programme (2005-2008). A report on the most important trends and effects since the start of the Energy Research Subsidy (EOS) programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimman, J.; Soeriowardojo, E.; Witte, F.; Nijdam, J.

    2009-07-01

    In 2005 the Energy Research Subsidy programme (EOS) was launched in the Netherlands. In four years' time about 500 projects were realized thanks to contributions from EOS. This report provides an overview of the main trends and effects of EOS in the period 2005-2008. One of the main conclusions is that a number of technologies have developed from invention level to market-ready level thanks to the EOS programme. The main trends since the start of EOS are: Increasing confidence of investors in EOS spearheads; increasing activity in EOS spearheads; Spearheads shifting to investment and exploitation schemes; EOS contributes to a solid patent position of Dutch parties; EOS contributes to European research. [nl

  3. Quantum revolution

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The turn of the XXth century witnessed a revolution in physics comparable to Isaac Newton’s discovery of the universal laws of mechanics and of gravitation three centuries earlier. The world required to be described in novel terms, as the immutable, deterministic view of our familiar universe had given way to a new world picture, one which featured chance, flux, and an incessant upsurge of waves of matter. Such a worldview was so radically new and counterintuitive that it gave rise to strong debates, to the effect that Albert Einstein himself tried to oppose it on the grounds that “God does not play dice”. In spite of the intense debates that accompanied its emergence, quantum mechanics quickly proved an incredibly efficacious new tool to understand and to predict a wide array of new phenomena. It was so successful that in no time it broke free from the environment of research labs to become part of daily life, making it possible, for example, to understand why some materials...

  4. Marxism as permanent revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, E.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the 'permanent revolution' represented the dominant element in Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' political discourse, and that it tended to overrule considerations encapsulated in 'historical materialism'. In Marx and Engels's understanding, permanent revolution did not

  5. The Computer Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley, Edmund C.

    "The Computer Revolution", a part of the "Second Industrial Revolution", is examined with reference to the social consequences of computers. The subject is introduced in an opening section which discusses the revolution in the handling of information and the history, powers, uses, and working s of computers. A second section examines in detail the…

  6. 1980, a revolution in silicon detectors, from energy spectrometer to radiation imager: Some technical and historical details

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, Erik H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nuclear particle detectors were introduced just 50 years ago, after single crystal manufacturing was mastered. A major change took place around 1980 when the 'planar' Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology developed in microelectronics was systematically applied also in detector construction. With the simultaneous introduction of matched readout chips this eventually would lead to pixelized matrix detectors that function as radiation imaging devices. The critical contributions to this revolution by Josef Kemmer and Paul Burger are described. Performance of the segmented planar technology detectors improved significantly in comparison with the earlier spectrometric diodes. With efficient industrial support the use of silicon detectors in many new applications has become possible and detector systems with a sensitive area of several tens to >100m 2 have been constructed recently

  7. Facts, paradigms, and anomalies in the acceptance of energy psychology: A rejoinder to McCaslin's (2009) and Pignotti and Thyer's (2009) comments on Feinstein (2008a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, David

    2009-06-01

    Allegations of selection bias and other departures from critical thinking in Feinstein (see record 2008-07317-008) found in the Pignotti and Thyer (see record 2009-08897-011), and the McCaslin (see record 2009-08897-010) commentaries, are addressed. Inaccuracies and bias in the reviewers' comments are also examined. The exchange is shown to reflect a paradigmatic clash within the professional community, with energy psychology having become a lightning rod for this controversy. While postulated "subtle energies" and "energy fields" are entangled in this debate, the most salient paradigm problem for energy psychology may simply be that accumulating reports of its speed and power have not been explained using established clinical models. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Marxism as permanent revolution

    OpenAIRE

    van Ree, E.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that the 'permanent revolution' represented the dominant element in Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' political discourse, and that it tended to overrule considerations encapsulated in 'historical materialism'. In Marx and Engels's understanding, permanent revolution did not represent a historical shortcut under exceptional circumstances, but the course revolutions in the modern era would normally take. Marx and Engels traced back the pattern to the sixteenth century. It is ...

  9. Technology cycles and technology revolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetto, Luigi; Scandizzo, Pasquale Lucio

    2010-09-15

    Technological cycles have been characterized as the basis of long and continuous periods economic growth through sustained changes in total factor productivity. While this hypothesis is in part consistent with several theories of growth, the sheer magnitude and length of the economic revolutions experienced by humankind seems to indicate surmise that more attention should be given to the origin of major technological and economic changes, with reference to one crucial question: role of production and use of energy in economic development.

  10. Renewable energy sources, the internet of things and the third industrial revolution: Smart grid and contemporary information and communication technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsios, Aristidis; Bousakas, Konstantinos; Salame, Takla; Bogno, Bachirou; Papageorgas, Panagiotis; Vokas, Georgios A.; Mauffay, Fabrice; Petit, Pierre; Aillerie, Michel; Charles, Jean-Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the energy efficiency of a contemporary Smart Grid that is based on Distributed Renewable Energy Sources (DRES) is examined under the scope of the communication systems utilized between the energy loads and the energy sources. What is evident is that the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies that are based on the existing Web infrastructure can be heavily introduced in this direction especially when combined with long range low bandwidth networking technologies, power line communication technologies and optimization methodologies for renewable energy generation. The renewable energy generation optimization will be based on devices embedded in the PV panels and the wind power generators, which will rely on bidirectional communications with local gateways and remote control stations for achieving energy efficiency. Smart meters and DRES combined with IoT communications will be the enabling technologies for the ultimate fusion of Internet technology and renewable energy generation realizing the Energy Internet.

  11. The Information Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, George

    1993-01-01

    A technological revolution is erupting all about us. A millionfold rise in computation and communications cost effectiveness will transform all industries and bureaucracies. The information revolution is a decentralizing, microcosmic electronic force opposing the centralizing, controlling Industrial-Age mentality persisting in schools. Television…

  12. How to make France enter the third industrial revolution: the bet on innovation. Thematic note Nr 2: Energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maistre, Christophe de; Manceau, Delphine; Fabbri, Julie

    2014-05-01

    This report first discusses what is energy efficiency by defining and distinguishing passive, active and interactive energy efficiency, by discussing which energies we are presently using (fossil energies, nuclear energy, renewable energies), and by outlining the interest in energy efficiency. In a second part, it presents energy efficiency as a key factor for innovation in electricity management. It notably discusses the challenge of matching electricity production and consumption, and what happens when one is greater than the other (some examples are briefly commented: California and Belgium). It addresses the development of smart grids for a rational management of energy, with the implementation of cut-off strategies (examples are given: Linky, the smart EDF counter, Actility, a start-up company specialised in smart grids), in order to avoid black-outs. The main asset of smart grids is to de-synchronise energy production and consumption. Associated risks are evoked (mainly hacking). Examples are presented. The transition from smart grids to smart cities is then discussed (examples of smart phone services, an experiment in Issy les Moulineaux). The next part of the report presents energy efficiency as a multi-sector innovation lever, and presents various approaches and fields of application: the Cleantech approach (development of clean technologies and new usages with a more intelligent consumption of resources; example of the RATP), the sustainable building (low consumption building, passive buildings), the development of new usages (new mobility services), organisational innovations (car pooling, tele-working), energy efficiency as a performance factor, and emergence of new business models. Some guidelines are finally identified and proposed under two main themes: to improve regulation, to favour better consumer behaviours

  13. The Fourth Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Comments on the conclusions of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education's report, The Fourth Revolution: Instructional Technology in Higher Education,'' and advocates effort in exploiting the new technology and in assessing the possible adverse effects. (AL)

  14. en uislamisk revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    artiklen diskuterer det teologiske grundlag for de arabiske opstande. Er det tilladt ifølge islamisk lov at lave revolution på det grundlag der kendetegner den arabiske verden i 2011?......artiklen diskuterer det teologiske grundlag for de arabiske opstande. Er det tilladt ifølge islamisk lov at lave revolution på det grundlag der kendetegner den arabiske verden i 2011?...

  15. CRISES AND REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Sotelo Valencia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the materialist theory of development and fall of Marxism based on the theory of value as originally considered and presented by Karl Marx in Grundrisse and in Crítica da Economia Política, claiming that the production of value depends on labor force. As it takes place today, capital displaces labor force in every industry, service and activity, country, territory and region all over the world; workers are dismissed and are transferred to speculative activities of the fictional capital. This lesser disposition of labor force eventually harms the mean profit rate and, as time goes by, it provokes a crisis. The present capitalist crisis is resultant from the insufficiency and, to certain extent, to the incapacity of mechanisms from the system to generate enough value production in the labor process, to provide value to the invested capital (in settings of production, raw matter, and in labor force or variable capital; to create more value and to regain increased profit rate. These restraints of the financial capital (fictional capital cause a deviation to the speculative plan and contribute for the formation of tragic speculative bubbles in sectors such as those of housing, energy and food. No matter how much productivity is increased, developing a technological revolution and “sparing labor force”, the reduction of time, socially required for the production of goods and labor force, becomes harder and more marginal. This is the way the capitalist system enters a civilian, structural and organic crisis, as it is now. To go beyond the capital means to construct structures and superstructures of a new non-capitalist society based on a new way to produce, to work and to keep harmonious and friendly human social relations. It is difficult to have a successful revolution if not with the education of its agents, that is, the organized front people, parties and syndicates that will raise the social, political and cultural

  16. An Irish Revolution Without A Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan Beatty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a conventional view among Irish historians that a revolution occurred in that country between the passing of the Third Home Rule Bill of 1912 and the end of the Civil War in 1923.  The violence of those years, the collapse in support for the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP, the meteoric rise to power of Sinn Féin, a new sense of meritocracy, a greater sense of democracy and a widespread radicalism; all are seen as elements of a major change in Irish politics and life, a ‘Revolution.’  Drawing on Gramsci's notion of a “revolution without a revolution”, this paper seeks to understand the events in Ireland of 1912-23, not as a sudden rupture with the past but as the culmination of a much longer period of (often British-backed capitalist development in post-Famine Ireland. This paper argues that Irish nationalist politics in the decades before 1912 is better understood via categories such as class, gender, capitalism and the pervasive power of the British state.  As such, as well as pursuing a reassessment of the project of Irish historical development and state-building, this paper also seeks a reassessment of the project of (an equally statist Irish historiography.

  17. Crop intensification, land use, and on-farm energy-use efficiency during the worldwide spread of the green revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Pedro; Fernández, Roberto J

    2018-03-06

    We analyzed crop production, physical inputs, and land use at the country level to assess technological changes behind the threefold increase in global crop production from 1961 to 2014. We translated machinery, fuel, and fertilizer to embedded energy units that, when summed up, provided a measure of agricultural intensification (human subsidy per hectare) for crops in the 58 countries responsible for 95% of global production. Worldwide, there was a 137% increase in input use per hectare, reaching 13 EJ, or 2.6% of the world's primary energy supply, versus only a 10% increase in land use. Intensification was marked in Asia and Latin America, where input-use levels reached those that North America and Europe had in the earlier years of the period; the increase was more accentuated, irrespective of continent, for the 12 countries with mostly irrigated production. Half of the countries (28/58), mainly developed ones, had an average subsidy >5 GJ/ha/y (with fertilizers accounting for 27% in 1961 and 45% in 2014), with most of them (23/28) using about the same area or less than in 1961 (net land sparing of 31 Mha). Most of the remaining countries (24/30 with inputs <5 GJ/ha/y), mainly developing ones, increased their cropped area (net land extensification of 135 Mha). Overall, energy-use efficiency (crop output/inputs) followed a U-shaped trajectory starting at about 3 and finishing close to 4. The prospects of a more sustainable intensification are discussed, and the inadequacy of the land-sparing model expectation of protecting wilderness via intensified agriculture is highlighted.

  18. Toilet revolution in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shikun; Li, Zifu; Uddin, Sayed Mohammad Nazim; Mang, Heinz-Peter; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Lingling

    2018-06-15

    The wide-spread prevalence of unimproved sanitation technologies has been a major cause of concern for the environment and public health, and China is no exception to this. Towards the sanitation issue, toilet revolution has become a buzzword in China recently. This paper elaborates the backgrounds, connotations, and actions of the toilet revolution in China. The toilet revolution aims to create sanitation infrastructure and public services that work for everyone and that turn waste into value. Opportunities for implementing the toilet revolution include: fulfilling Millennium Development Goals and new Sustainable Development Goals; government support at all levels for popularizing sanitary toilet; environmental protection to alleviate wastewater pollution; resource recovery from human waste and disease prevention for health and wellbeing improvement. Meanwhile, the challenges faced are: insufficient funding and policy support, regional imbalance and lagging approval processes, weak sanitary awareness and low acceptance of new toilets, lack of R&D and service system. The toilet revolution requires a concerted effort from many governmental departments. It needs to address not only technology implementation, but also social acceptance, economic affordability, maintenance issues and, increasingly, gender considerations. Aligned with the ecological sanitation principles, it calls for understanding issues across the entire sanitation service chain. Public-private partnership is also recommended to absorb private capital to make up the lack of funds, as well as arouse the enthusiasm of the public. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Military Revolution, Organisational Revolutions...and Other Revolutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

      This paper is a continuation of Kantian peace and war analysis, but with other means. The paper is part of an effort to establish a systemic theory of state-formation based on the description of the emergence of a number of functional systems. In a historical perspective the military system...... was dominant in the establishment of the European State-model as well as it has a decisive role in the stabilisation of recent states. Using Niklas Luhmann's system theory that does not describes neither military systems nor the emergence of a organisational system, the present paper outlines a system...... theoretical perspective on the present and historical transformations of military systems. One the one hand the paper offers a systemic criticism of the recent so called revolution in military affairs (RMA), on the other hand the historical establishment of a self-referential form of the military system...

  20. The Iranian Revolution: The Multiple Contexts of the Iranian Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amineh, M.P.; Eisenstadt, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The Iranian Islamic Revolution, the only continual regime constituted by a modern fundamentalist movement, shares many of the characteristics of the Great revolutions. The causes of the Iranian Revolution are indeed very similar to those of the classical ones—namely the breakdown of a modernizing

  1. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  2. The Energy transition for green growth. The green growth revolution is picking up pace with the help of the energy transition law and its associated actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-04-01

    This document briefly summarizes the main objectives of the French law on energy transition: make buildings and housing energy efficient, give priority to clean means of transport, aim for zero waste make tomorrow's materials out of today's waste, increase the use of renewable energies, combat fuel poverty. The goal is: to reach 40% less greenhouse gas emissions in 2030 compared to 1990, to Reduce final energy consumption by 50% in 2050 compared to 2012, to reach 30% less fossil fuel consumption in 2030 compared to 2012, to dispose 50% less waste in landfill by 2025, to increase the share of renewable energies to 32% of final energy consumption by 2030 and to 40% of electricity production, to diversify electricity production and reduce the share of nuclear energy to 50% by 2025

  3. US oil revolution: what strategic consequences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The US energy revolution will have profound and longstanding repercussions on its national economy and on the world market. What are the strategic consequences of this evolution? Some have suggested that US policy in the Middle East could undergo a deep transformation. Don't hold your breath. (author)

  4. The Next Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Carolyn Shaw

    1975-01-01

    The future status of women is envisioned as more than labor market projections of wider employment opportunities. Responsibilities of human beings such as family formation, upbringing of children, the process of human growth and development, marriage and divorce are seen as components of the second revolution. (Author/AM)

  5. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  6. The ebook revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The eBook Revolution: A Primer for Librarians on the Front Lines is exactly what its title promises: an essential resource for librarians facing the formidable task of coordinating the library-wide transition to eBooks and fielding questions from patrons

  7. Revolution in innovation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Viardot, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Why another book on innovation, and why use the big word "revolution"? The simple answer to this question is the fact that we believe the time is right to explore what could be the next phase of innovation management not only in corporate practice, but also in the academic field....

  8. Den moderate revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje

    "normale" industrivirksomheder, men den er absolut set begrænset. Årsagerne til denne kun "moderate revolution" af organisationsformerne diskuteres: Er det fordi klassisk organisation og social nærkontakt er nødvendig i den nye økonomi, eller er det manglende fantasi og tryghedsbehov? Begge muligheder...

  9. Engineering a Biological Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Susan

    2017-01-26

    The new field of synthetic biology promises to change health care, computer technology, the production of biofuels, and more. Students participating in the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition are on the front lines of this revolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyberinfrastructure: The Second Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2007-01-01

    The engine of change for the next revolution is cyberinfrastructure, a comprehensive phenomenon that involves the creation, dissemination, preservation, and application of knowledge. It adds new dimensions that greatly increase transformational potential. Cyberinfrastructure combines complex elements to create a dynamic system. It eclipses its…

  11. Helping Students Analyze Revolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stephen; Desrosiers, Marian

    2012-01-01

    A visitor to a random sampling of Modern World History classes in the United States will find that the subject of "revolution" is a favorite for many students. Reading about and researching individuals and topics such as Tsar Nicholas II, Rasputin, Marie Antoinette and guillotines is never boring. Unfortunately, in too many classrooms,…

  12. We need an energy revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierie, Frank

    2014-01-01

    During the K4I lunch debate Hanze UAS PhD level researchers of different nationalities presented their ideas about their EU in 2050 in terms of intrinsic qualities. They discussed how the EU should look in 2050, taking their PhD content into account and will share their views on actions that we

  13. The neosexual revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigusch, V

    1998-08-01

    The affluent societies of the Western world have witnessed a tremendous cultural and social transformation of sexuality during the 1980s and 1990s, a process I refer to as the neosexual revolution. Up to now, this recoding and reassessment of sexuality has proceeded rather slowly and quietly. Yet both its real and its symbolic effects may indeed be more consequential than those brought about in the course of the rapid, noisy sexual revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. The neosexual revolution is dismantling the old patterns of sexuality and reassembling them anew. In the process, dimensions, intimate relationships, preferences, and sexual fragments emerge, many of which had been submerged, were unnamed, or simply did not exist before. In general, sexuality has lost much of its symbolic meaning as a cultural phenomenon. Sexuality is no longer the great metaphor for pleasure and happiness, nor is it so greatly overestimated as it was during the sexual revolution. It is now widely taken for granted, much like egotism or motility. Whereas sex was once mystified in a positive sense--as ecstasy and transgression, it has now taken on a negative mystification characterized by abuse, violence, and deadly infection. While the old sexuality was based primarily upon sexual instinct, orgasm, and the heterosexual couple, neosexualities revolve predominantly around gender difference, thrills, self-gratification, and prosthetic substitution. From the vast number of interrelated processes from which neosexualities emerge, three empirically observable phenomena have been selected for discussion here: the dissociation of the sexual sphere, the dispersion of sexual fragments, and the diversification of intimate relationships. These processes go hand in hand with the commercialization and banalization of sexuality. They are looked upon as being controlled individually through the mechanisms of a fundamentally egotistical consensus morality. In conformity with the general principles at

  14. Some revolutions in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In the long history of the study of the nervous system, there have been a number of major developments that involved radical and permanent changes in fundamental beliefs and assumptions about the nervous system and in tactics and strategies for studying it. These may be termed Revolutions in Neuroscience. This essay considers eight of these, ranging from the 6th century BCE to the end of the 20th century.

  15. Inside the Digital Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Brooke, H.

    2016-01-01

    Technology and transparency combined to create the digital revolution, which in turn has ushered in a new form of monitory democracy. Communicative abun-dance and global interconnection mean the democratic franchise can expand and deepen, but the author argues that it matters who is made transparent and for what purpose. Content and context matter. Technology and transparency can be used to strengthen democracy by opening up government to citizens, but the same tools can also be used by the s...

  16. Representing revolution: icons of industrialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Appreciating pictures entails a consideration not only of the people, objects and landscape that their artists have chosen to portray, but also an imagining of what has been excluded. The term 'Industrial Revolution' has been given multiple meanings, and this article (part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) explores some of these by exposing the messages concealed inside some of the most enduring images of the Revolution.

  17. Axisymmetric vibrations of thin shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Norio; Kosawada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shin

    1983-01-01

    The problem of free vibration of axisymmetric shells of revolution is important in connection with the design of pressure vessels, chemical equipment, aircrafts, structures and so on. In this study, the axisymmetrical vibration of a thin shell of revolution having a constant curvature in meridian direction was analyzed by thin shell theory. First, the Lagrangian during one period of the vibration of a shell of revolution was determined by the primary approximate theory of Love, and the vibration equations and boundary conditions were derived from its stopping condition. The vibration equations were strictly analyzed by using the series solution. The basic equations for the strain and strain energy of a shell were based on those of Novozhilov. As the examples of numerical calculation, the natural frequency and vibration mode of the symmetrical shells of revolution fixed at both ends and supported at both ends were determined, and their characteristics were clarified. The theory and the numerical calculation ore described. Especially in the frequency curves, the waving phenomena were observed frequently, which were not seen in non-axisymmetric vibration, accordingly also the vibration mode changed in complex state on the frequency curves of same order. The numerical calculation was carried out in the large computer center in Tohoku University. (Kako, I.)

  18. Studying The Great Russian Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Torkunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article revises an established view of Russian Revolution as two separate events - February Revolution and October Revolution. The author supports the concept of the «Great Russian Revolution», which unites these two events in a single process of revolutionary development. The author draws attention to the following advantages of the concept under consideration. First, it conceptualizes the revolution as a process contingent of a local and global historical context. In this sense, the revolution is presented as the transition of society to the modern stage of development, meaning the transition to modernity. Second, revolutionary events in Russia are considered from the point of view of the evolution of the spatial and socioeconomic distribution and rearrangement of key social groups: peasantry, elites, national and ethnic minorities. Third, it takes into account the personal factor in the revolutionary events, the influence of individual personalities on escalation or the reduction of socio-political tensions. Fourth, it draws attention to the fact that revolutions imply the use of various forms of political violence. Each revolution is characterized by a unique correlation of forms and intensity of political violence. Finally, it gives a normative assessment of the Revolution, encouraging a national discussion on the results and consequences of this great event.

  19. Reconsidering the Grenada revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Mandle

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Caribbean Revolutions and Revolutionary Theory: An Assessment of Cuba, Nicaragua and Grenada. BRIAN MEEKS. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1993. ix + 210 pp. (Paper n.p. The Grenada Invasion: Politics, Law, and Foreign Policy Decisionmaking. ROBERT J. BECK. Boulder: Westview, 1993. xiv + 263 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95 The Gorrión Tree: Cuba and the Grenada Revolution. JOHN WALTON COTMAN. New York: Peter Lang, 1993. xvi + 272 pp. (Cloth US$ 48.95 These three books might be thought of as a second generation of studies concerned with the rise, rule, and destruction of the People's Revolutionary Government (PRG in Grenada. The circumstances surrounding the accession to power in 1979 of the government led by Maurice Bishop, the nature of its rule, and its violent demise in 1983 resulted in the appearance during the mid-1980s of an extensive literature on the Grenada Revolution. Some of these works were scholarly, others polemical. But what they all had in common was the desire to examine, either critically or otherwise, something which was unique in the historical experience of the English-speaking Caribbean. Never, before the rule of the New JEWEL Movement (NJM in Grenada, had a Leninist party come to power; never had a violent coup initiated a new political regime; never had a Caribbean government so explicitly rejected U.S. hegemony in the area; and never, before October 1983, had a government experienced quite so dramatic a crisis as that in Grenada, one which resulted in the killing of the Prime Minister and numerous others of his supporters.

  20. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    management such as user innovation, crowd sourcing and crowd funding, as well as social media. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the first volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspectives on these topics with illustrations and analysis coming......This edited collection explores how digitalization is changing the management of innovation, and the subsequent implications for the next phases in its development. The authors identify and examine relevant phenomena which are related to the ongoing digital breakthrough in the context of innovation...

  1. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume explores how the rapid development of business model innovation changes innovation management at an international level. It discusses the next phases in its development, and the impact that this could have on the field. The authors identify and examine recent trends which have...... the potential to disrupt the traditional way of managing innovation, notably in terms of creativity, product development, and process change. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the second volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspective...

  2. Revolution of Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viardot, Eric

    This edited collection explores how digitalization is changing the management of innovation, and the subsequent implications for the next phases in its development. The authors identify and examine relevant phenomena which are related to the ongoing digital breakthrough in the context of innovation...... management such as user innovation, crowd sourcing and crowd funding, as well as social media. In line with the constant globalization of innovation, the first volume of Revolution of Innovation Management offers a variety of international perspectives on these topics with illustrations and analysis coming...

  3. The lasersoft revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    LASERSOFT and the Laser Technology, Inc. (LTI) Criterion 400 survey laser instrument constitute a virtual revolution in pre-design activities for many projects requiring field survey in the Forest Service. The instrument makes and downloads survey measurements in a couple of seconds; LASERSOFT is MS-DOS compatible software that provides a user-friendly platform for survey management and data conversion into formats required by several widely used PC-based road and site design software systems. This article provides information specific to LASERSOFT V1.0 usage, in addition to brief overviews of laser instrument capabilities and existing and planned survey routines

  4. Revolutions of Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Guides readers through the development of geometry and basic proof writing using a historical approach to the topic. In an effort to fully appreciate the logic and structure of geometric proofs, Revolutions of Geometry places proofs into the context of geometry's history, helping readers to understand that proof writing is crucial to the job of a mathematician. Written for students and educators of mathematics alike, the book guides readers through the rich history and influential works, from ancient times to the present, behind the development of geometry. As a result, readers are successfull

  5. China's Organic Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2008-01-01

    Agriculture in China is at the onset of an Organic Revolution. From 2000 to 2006, China has moved from 45th to 2nd position in the world in number of hectares under organic management. China now has more land under organic horticulture than any other country. In the year 2005/2006, China added 12% to the world’s organic area. This accounted for 63% of the world’s annual increase in organic land, and China now has 11% of the world’s organically managed land. The antecedents to China’s Organic ...

  6. The lasersoft revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, J. E.

    1994-01-15

    LASERSOFT and the Laser Technology, Inc. (LTI) Criterion 400 survey laser instrument constitute a virtual revolution in pre-design activities for many projects requiring field survey in the Forest Service. The instrument makes and downloads survey measurements in a couple of seconds; LASERSOFT is MS-DOS compatible software that provides a user-friendly platform for survey management and data conversion into formats required by several widely used PC-based road and site design software systems. This article provides information specific to LASERSOFT V1.0 usage, in addition to brief overviews of laser instrument capabilities and existing and planned survey routines.

  7. La revolution des savants

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    Premiere cassette : - 1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants" mais pour d'autres raisons, de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essai...

  8. Unconventional gases: a North-American energy revolution not without consequences for Europe; Les gaz non conventionnels: une revolution energetique nord-americaine non sans consequences pour l'Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives a definition of the different existing unconventional gases (coal-bed methane, tight gases, shale gases), and outlines that, although these gases as well as the techniques to extract them have been well known for a long time, it is the combination of two of these techniques (hydraulic fracturing or fracking, and horizontal drilling) which enables the current technological development and the exploitation of these gases. It also outlines that the current situation in terms of natural resources favours such a development. It evokes projects in the United States, China, India, Europe, and more particularly in France, stressing that environmental issues and population density in Europe are obstacles to perform these drillings. The author questions the production cost issue and explains how these developments, notably in the USA, may change completely the world energetic landscape, and therefore entail a review of the European energy agenda. He explores the possible consequences of a durable decrease of gas prices

  9. Unconventional gases: a North-American energy revolution not without consequences for Europe; Les gaz non conventionnels: une revolution energetique nord-americaine non sans consequences pour l'Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives a definition of the different existing unconventional gases (coal-bed methane, tight gases, shale gases), and outlines that, although these gases as well as the techniques to extract them have been well known for a long time, it is the combination of two of these techniques (hydraulic fracturing or fracking, and horizontal drilling) which enables the current technological development and the exploitation of these gases. It also outlines that the current situation in terms of natural resources favours such a development. It evokes projects in the United States, China, India, Europe, and more particularly in France, stressing that environmental issues and population density in Europe are obstacles to perform these drillings. The author questions the production cost issue and explains how these developments, notably in the USA, may change completely the world energetic landscape, and therefore entail a review of the European energy agenda. He explores the possible consequences of a durable decrease of gas prices

  10. The Industrial Revolution: A Misnomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Rondo

    1982-01-01

    Argues that the British industrial revolution was in no sense inevitable and scarcely deserves the term "revolution." Examined are the characteristics which the British shared with other Europeans and ways in which they were distinctive that enabled them to become the first industrial nation. (RM)

  11. Digital systems, a new ally for renewable energies: Energy supply is revolutionized; Electric power: bits in the grid; Energy transition: collectivities are in open data mode; Renewable energies: GAFAs are running around; Block-chain: a revolution to be refined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, Anne-Claire; Piro, Patrick; Bongrain, Timothee

    2017-01-01

    With 'digitalisation', data are increasingly at the heart of renewable energy production systems, for reducing costs, optimizing decentralized production, etc. This file contains 5 articles which themes are: after the apparition of several energy 'alternative' providers some ten years ago, a new generation of fully-digitalized providers (Ilek, Plum Energie, ekWateur, etc.) is revolutionizing the French energy sector; RTE and Enedis, the two subsidiaries of Electricite de France, are increasingly investing in digital systems in order to cope with the integration of renewable energies, through a more agile and flexible approach; As the French legislation has now established 'open data' for energy data, this could be an efficient tool for public communities in their sustainable energy policy approach; Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon (Gafa) have recently decided to 'green' the enormous electric power quantities they consume, leading to very positive consequences for renewable energies; Energy providers are more and more interested in Block-chain, the technology for peer-to-peer transaction platforms that uses decentralised storage to record all transaction data, as it could be essential for renewable energies; however, the technology needs to be improved

  12. The gerontology revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, R L

    1986-01-01

    America is aging. There are more people over 65 than under 25 for the first time in history, and the age of the average American is increasing daily. As the baby boomers become the soon-to-be-elderly, they bring with them enough economic and political clout to be able to force change. This "gerontology revolution" will create demands for new and altered services, new marketing strategies, new arenas for competition, and as is often the case, new opportunities for those prepared. The time has come for medical groups to face the future of gerontology in a more proactive fashion--with new and effective programs for both the advantaged and the disadvantaged elderly.

  13. The social media revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubose, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    The growing popularity and use of social media tools such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, blogging, and wikis have led to a social media revolution. Given this widespread influence, it is important for educators, administrators, and technologists to understand the risks of using social media in the classroom and workplace. To investigate popular social media sites and their effect on radiologic technology education and business practices. A comprehensive search of literature was performed to examine social media and its applications in education, health care, and business. Social media use is on the rise, affecting all aspects of mainstream society. Leaders in the radiologic sciences should be familiar with social media and cognizant of its risks. Future studies regarding social media use in the radiologic sciences are necessary to determine its effect on the radiologic science community. ©2011 by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  14. Scrutinizing the epigenetics revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Maurizio; Testa, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics is one of the most rapidly expanding fields in the life sciences. Its rise is frequently framed as a revolutionary turn that heralds a new epoch both for gene-based epistemology and for the wider discourse on life that pervades knowledge-intensive societies of the molecular age. The fundamentals of this revolution remain however to be scrutinized, and indeed the very contours of what counts as ‘epigenetic' are often blurred. This is reflected also in the mounting discourse on the societal implications of epigenetics, in which vast expectations coexist with significant uncertainty about what aspects of this science are most relevant for politics or policy alike. This is therefore a suitable time to reflect on the directions that social theory could most productively take in the scrutiny of this revolution. Here we take this opportunity in both its scholarly and normative dimension, that is, proposing a roadmap for social theorizing on epigenetics that does not shy away from, and indeed hopefully guides, the framing of its most socially relevant outputs. To this end, we start with an epistemological reappraisal of epigenetic discourse that valorizes the blurring of meanings as a critical asset for the field and privileged analytical entry point. We then propose three paths of investigation. The first looks at the structuring elements of controversies and visions around epigenetics. The second probes the mutual constitution between the epigenetic reordering of living phenomena and the normative settlements that orient individual and collective responsibilities. The third highlights the material import of epigenetics and the molecularization of culture that it mediates. We suggest that these complementary strands provide both an epistemically and socially self-reflective framework to advance the study of epigenetics as a molecular juncture between nature and nurture and thus as the new critical frontier in the social studies of the life sciences. PMID

  15. The digital revolution at the core of Engie's transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgain, Gilles; Saintes, Philippe; Weiss, Maxime; Giordano, Vincenzo; Gehain, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    More than two billion people on the planet do not have access to a reliable supply of electricity, even as greenhouse gas emissions are to approach zero in the long term. It is urgent to invent an energy system by drawing on current trends in technology and galvanizing political and industrial actors. The digital revolution is a tool for accelerating the energy revolution, a catalyst for changes in the energy sector. In 2016, Engie underwent a thoroughgoing transformation in order to become the world leader in the energy revolution. Digital technology lies at the core of this transformation. It provides powerful leverage for cementing relations between the Engie Group and its stakeholders, making the group more operationally efficient, developing new business activities and improving agility

  16. Education in Revolution: Is Iran Duplicating the Chinese Cultural Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhe, Khosrow

    1982-01-01

    Compares Chinese and Iranian Cultural Revolutions via examination of similarities and differences between the two and draws lessons from the Chinese experience for Iran or any other developing nations which decides to politicize its education systems. (Author/AH)

  17. 90 kilometers against the nuclear risk. Consequences of the anti-nuclear human chain. What the new Federal government could do to shut down the NPPs in Germany and enhance the energy revolution; 90 Kilometer gegen das Atom-Risiko. Nach der Anti-Atom-Menschenkette. Was die neue Bundesregierung tun koennte, um die AKW in Deutschland abzuschalten und die Energiewende voranzubringen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-15

    The nuclear future has not been discussed so far during the election campaign. Considering the 90 km human chain protest against the NPP Tihange the article discusses the necessary decisions to be reached the next federal government for an efficient progress of the energy revolution.

  18. Scientific Revolutions and Political Attitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mervart, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014), s. 185-190 ISSN 2336-3142 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Scientific revolution * party historiography * Czechoslovakia * communist reformism Subject RIV: AB - History

  19. The non-Euclidean revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    1986-01-01

    How unique and definitive is Euclidean geometry in describing the "real" space in which we live? Richard Trudeau confronts the fundamental question of truth and its representation through mathematical models in The Non-Euclidean Revolution. First, the author analyzes geometry in its historical and philosophical setting; second, he examines a revolution every bit as significant as the Copernican revolution in astronomy and the Darwinian revolution in biology; third, on the most speculative level, he questions the possibility of absolute knowledge of the world. Trudeau writes in a lively, entertaining, and highly accessible style. His book provides one of the most stimulating and personal presentations of a struggle with the nature of truth in mathematics and the physical world. A portion of the book won the Pólya Prize, a distinguished award from the Mathematical Association of America. "Trudeau meets the challenge of reaching a broad audience in clever ways...(The book) is a good addition to our literature o...

  20. The innovation choice of market-driven strategy in the energy technology revolution of China%中国能源革命市场驱动策略的创新选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱翌; 张培栋; 王卉卉

    2016-01-01

    China’s energy resources status quo is “rich in coal, oil-poor, less gas”, high external dependency, bad environmental friendliness and low efficiency, which exposing some problems, such as the monopoly of conventional energy market, the deficiency of market motivation and the distortion of parity between new energy and their alternations. So the market driven strategy of China’s energy revolution should make a better choice in enhancing energy efficiency and improving the construction of applied energy, mobilizing more industry to join the energy market, establishing trade market with “development rights”, which taking the energy-efficiency, environmental improvement and resource conservation as measuring standard.%中国的能源资源现状是“富煤、贫油、少气”,能源对外依存度高、环境友好性差、能源使用效率低,暴露出常规能源市场垄断、高效清洁利用市场驱动力不足、新能源与替代产品的比价关系扭曲等问题。中国能源革命的市场驱动策略应在提高能源效率、改善用能结构,动员更多的行业加入能源市场,建立以能效提高、环境改善、资源节约为衡量标准的“发展权”交易市场等方面做出创新选择。

  1. An information revolution in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A J; MacGregor, A; Spencer, S A

    2012-04-01

    With the established success of the National Joint Registry and the emergence of a range of new national initiatives for the capture of electronic data in the National Health Service, orthopaedic surgery in the United Kingdom has found itself thrust to the forefront of an information revolution. In this review we consider the benefits and threats that this revolution poses, and how orthopaedic surgeons should marshal their resources to ensure that this is a force for good.

  2. The Nanotechnology R(evolution)

    OpenAIRE

    Tahan, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology as a social concept and investment focal point has drawn much attention. Here we consider the place of nanotechnology in the second great technological revolution of mankind that began some 200 years ago. The so-called nanotechnology revolution represents both a continuation of prior science and technology trends and a re-awakening to the benefits of significant investment in fundamental research. We consider the role the military might play in the development of nanotechnology...

  3. EDITORIAL: Permanent revolution - or evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ken

    1998-03-01

    physics. The same fraction of candidates passed at O- and A-level, with much the same distribution of grades. But then at least, amongst other things, we may claim to have produced happier and more knowledgeable failures. Mr Blunkett's revolutionary idea should be extended so that any major educational change must be capable of evaluation. The customers/victims should actually be shown to have benefited - more of them should do better! It is a regrettable fact of history that most revolutions have resulted in tears before bedtime, however bright the following dawn. One problem with revolutions, as Maxim Gorky often pointed out, is that `inside every revolutionary there is a gendarme'. It is one thing to specify a target, another to direct in detail how every child and teacher in the land should achieve it. The latter is very difficult to manage, and when patience inevitably runs out there is likely to be a tendency towards gendarmerie. The control structure begins to dominate the educational one, and the means of control become more important than the ends. Rigidity replaces creativity, fossilization replaces evolution, and the energies and skills of practitioners may be devoted more to conforming passively with or ingeniously evading the constraints of a rule-bound system. There were signs that this effect exists and has been growing, but happily these signs have been detected by the `gendarmerie' and recognized as being deleterious. Government agencies are now consulting, seriously, with practitioners and such organizations as the IoP. It may well be that when the magic number 2000 arrives there will be a well-designed, self-organizing and self-monitoring National Curriculum that will engage the hearts as well as develop the minds of the young.

  4. New HEPAP report outlines revolution in particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "The most compelling questions facing contemporary particle physics research and a program to address them have been distilled into a new report “Quantum Universe: The Revolution in 21st-Century Particle Physics,” adopted today by the Department of Energy/National Science Foundation High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP)" (1 page)

  5. Telemedicine: the slow revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrief, Jack W

    2014-01-01

    The use of interactive video has been recognized as a means of delivering medical support to isolated areas since the 1950s. The Department of Defense recognized early the capacity of telemedicine to deliver medical care and support to front-line military personnel. In 1989, the Texas Telemedicine Project received grants and support from the then American Telephone and Telegraph Company (now AT&T) and the Meadows Foundation of Dallas, Texas, to establish and evaluate telemedicine delivery in central Texas. That project had 6 connected telemedicine sites: 3 in Austin, Texas, and 3 in Giddings, Texas (a small community 55 miles to the southeast of Austin). The sites in Giddings included a chronic outpatient dialysis facility, an inpatient psychiatric hospital, and the emergency department at Giddings Hospital. Patient contact began in April 1991 and continued through March 1993. During that period, data on the 1500 patient contacts made were recorded. After termination of the Texas Telemedicine Project, AT&T continued to provide the transmission lines, and between 1993 and 1996, another 12,000 patient contacts were made. Approximately 80% were dialysis evaluations and 20% were non-dialysis primary care contacts. The original cost of materials and equipment in the Texas Telemedicine Project exceeded $50,000 per site. Today, a secure Internet connection with full-motion video and wireless data transfer to almost any location in the world is achievable with an iPad. Multiple inexpensive applications with connections for electrocardiogram, otoscope, and stethoscope, among others, make this technology extremely inexpensive and user-friendly. The revolution now is rapidly moving forward, with Medicare reimbursing telemedicine contacts in medically underserved areas. Multiple bills are before Congress to expand Medicare and therefore private insurance payment for this service.

  6. Thailand's reproductive revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodel, J

    1987-01-01

    Thailand has achieved a remarkable population revolution in the past 15 years, resulting in a fertility decline of 44%, the 3rd greatest decline of the major developing countries. Thailand is quite distinct from either China or South Korea, the leaders in fertility decline. It has neither China's authoritarian power system to enforce population control nor the highly developed, Westernized outlook of South Korea. Instead it achieved its astounding fertility drop through a noncoercive family planning program operating within a context of rapid social change and a cultural setting. Thailand's drop in population growth has touched almost all segments of Thai society. The preferred number of children among couples married less than 5 years has dropped in both rural and urban families at almost exactly the same rate, from about 3.2 in 1969 to 2.3 in 1984. Religious groups represent the only substantial difference in family size preference; Moslem women married less than 5 years stated a desired average of 3.1 children versus 2.3 for Buddhist women. The direct case of the fertility drop is a national increase in contraceptive use. In 1984, 65% of Thai women reported using contraception. The Thai population, however, was ripe for using contraception when it became available due to 1) mass media creating a desire for consumer goods, 2) the increased costs of education to parents, 3) the willingness of parents to trade off "parent repayment" from many children for a few quality children, 4) couples' autonomy in fertility decision making, 5) the high status of women in Thailand, and 6) the fact that Buddhism poses no barriers to contraception. Current trends show no immediate sign of change.

  7. The second quantum revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larousserie, D.

    2008-01-01

    The development of quantum mechanics has now reached such a level that we can consider its promising applications in various fields as a looming second quantum revolution. The classical computer that relies on logical gates is out, now quantum properties open the way to new machines that will simulate nature's events exactly, this will be possible because both nature and the machine will be quantum. The machine will mimic nature and some problems like high temperature superconductivity that resist any modelling will be reproduced easily and then put within hand reach to be understood. Another application is quantum imaging based on the property of quantum entanglement. In the case of 2 entangled particle beams, the measurement of the properties of one beam fixes the values on the other beam. In other words, in case of entangled fluctuations, the measurement of the fluctuations on one beam fixes the value of the fluctuations on the other beam and by subtracting them on the second beam, we get a more accurate result: we have made the background noise disappear. Another application, that has already entered our daily life, is the generation of random numbers in a simple way: quantum mechanics states that a photon has a probability of 50 % to be reflected by a semi-reflecting plate and be detected, this experimental setting is a perfect toss play. The most known application of quantum mechanics is cryptography to assure the security of information transfer. Various systems have proved its efficiency but this technology is hampered by the damping of the signal in optical fibers and is reliable on distances shorter than a few hundreds kilometers. (A.C.)

  8. The Meanings of 'Bourgeois Revolution': Conceptualizing the French Revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Bertel

    2007-01-01

    Through an analysis of Marx’s writings on the French Revolution of 1789, the concept ‘bourgeois revolution’ can be shown to contain a much richer potential than the simplistic and widely rejected ‘orthodox’ notion of a capitalist bourgeoisie as a social agent with a fully developed class consciou......Through an analysis of Marx’s writings on the French Revolution of 1789, the concept ‘bourgeois revolution’ can be shown to contain a much richer potential than the simplistic and widely rejected ‘orthodox’ notion of a capitalist bourgeoisie as a social agent with a fully developed class...

  9. Leading the Way to the Third Industrial Revolution. Addressing the Triple Threat of the Global Financial Crisis, Energy Crisis, and Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifkin, J.; Da Graca Carvalho, M.; Consoli, A.; Bonifacio, M.

    2008-01-01

    We are at a precarious point in history. We are facing the real prospect of an economic meltdown on the scale of the Great Depression. The credit crisis is compounded by the global energy crisis and the climate change crisis, creating a potential cataclysm for civilization. There is a way out: we need to radically overhaul the way we use energy in our society

  10. Leading the Way to the Third Industrial Revolution. Addressing the Triple Threat of the Global Financial Crisis, Energy Crisis, and Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rifkin, J.; Da Graca Carvalho, M.; Consoli, A.; Bonifacio, M.

    2008-12-15

    We are at a precarious point in history. We are facing the real prospect of an economic meltdown on the scale of the Great Depression. The credit crisis is compounded by the global energy crisis and the climate change crisis, creating a potential cataclysm for civilization. There is a way out: we need to radically overhaul the way we use energy in our society.

  11. Arab revolutions and shale gas: an explosive mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncourt, Maite de

    2013-01-01

    The author comments the critical situation of Arab countries which are traditionally oil and gas producers, but have to face political and social revolutions, and also an energy revolution with the emergence of shale gas and oil, and more generally of new non-conventional energy resources. This energy revolution results in a new deal, and threatens the strategic role of the region with respect to world energy supply. While recalling levels of hydrocarbon and gas production and reserves, and the share in world production of Arab countries, the author discusses to which extent non conventional hydrocarbons are actually a threat for these producers: significant reduction of exports towards the USA, structural upheaval and uncertainty of energy markets, impact on the whole value chain of the world oil industry. The author outlines that the OPEC is progressively loosing its power and influence, and is unable to choose or decide whether to increase or decrease production. Moreover, different political instabilities stopped reforms and investments in Arab countries: revolutions, domestic political tensions, civil war. The challenge could be the ability to make a move on Asian markets, and to implement reforms in order to attract capitals and new technologies

  12. Taxation and the American Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Passant

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the interrelationship between revolution and tax in the context of the American Revolution. It examines the role of ordinary people in demanding, among other things, as part of wider demands for democracy and equality, no taxation without representation. The article aims to reintroduce the neglected notions of class and class struggle into current discussions and debates about tax and history, putting the people back into academic narratives about the history of taxation and to their place as political actors on history’s stage.

  13. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms

  14. The Fourth Revolution: Educating Engineers for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Hans; Carver, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Urges a change in engineering education for developing leaders. Describes three previous revolutions in American higher education which responded to the needs of the community. Suggests lifelong education as the fourth revolution. (YP)

  15. Free vibration of complex systems of shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, P.

    1987-01-01

    Simplified relations are presented for shells of revolution and the finite difference energy method is described as is its numerical application to the problems of the mechanics of the shells of revolution of a complex and branched meridian, used in the BOSOR4 program. Also presented are two examples of calculating the free vibration of systems of shells of revolution using the said program. Both problems stemmed from the needs of SKODA, Energeticke Strojirenstvi. The first concerns the free vibration of the system of WWER-440 reactor vessels, approximating its internals. The second concerns the eigenfrequencies and corresponding shapes of the vibrations of the DK3 diagnostic assembly which was designed and manufactured for improved knowledge of events taking place in the reactor core during different operating modes. (author). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  16. Information Technology and the Third Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the so-called third industrial revolution, or the information revolution. Topics addressed include the progression of the revolution in the U.S. economy, in Europe, and in Third World countries; the empowering technologies, including digital switches, optical fiber, semiconductors, CD-ROM, networks, and combining technologies; and future…

  17. Re-thinking the Revolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kužel, Petr

    -, č. 3 (2015), s. 199-202 ISSN 2336-3142 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Velvet Revolution * Dissent * Transformation Process * Prague Spring Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://www.usd.cas.cz/casopis/czech-journal-of-contemporary-history-3-2015/

  18. The Information Revolution in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikunov, Vladimir S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a number of topics in geography that are effected by the multimedia information revolution. These include research in political geography, finance, and the geography of tourism and medicine. Considers new technologies assisting spatial modeling and visualization of data and their effects on these fields. (MJP)

  19. Who needs a greener revolution?

    OpenAIRE

    Rull, Valentí

    2010-01-01

    To meet the challenge of producing sufficient food for 9 billion people by 2050, many have proposed a new green revolution. However, Valentí Rull questions if this is a viable solution to alleviate hunger in the long term and whether it could lead to undesired and potentially disastrous consequences.

  20. Ruin and Revolution in ``Hamlet."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, P. D.

    1999-05-01

    In the cosmic allegorical interpretation of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" (BAAS 28, 859 & 1305, 1996; Mercury 26:1, 20, 1997; RPS 18:3, 6, 1997; Giornale di Astronomia 24:3, 27, 1998), the usurper King Claudius, namesake of Ptolemy, personifies geocentricity. Textual support for this reading is found in 1.2 where Hamlet is associated with the Sun, as befits a rightful heir, while Claudius is associated with the Earth. In 3.3 Claudius fears Hamlet's antics. Rosencrantz states that the lives of many depend on the well-being of the King. He warns that if the King were to be imperiled, his subjects, those "ten thousand lesser things", would fall in a "boisterous ruin" along with "each small annexment" and "petty consequence." These 10,000 lesser lights are the naked eye stars (mv ~ 6.5) which would collapse with the demise of the pre-Diggesian firmament, along with ancient planets and their geometrical contrivances. In 5.1 Shakespeare puns on "De revolutionibus" when he refers to "fine revolution." The double meaning of "revolution" (alteration, orbital motion) was in use long before 1600. Since "revolution" is used in the context of digging, it may refer as much to the Diggesian as the Copernican Revolution. Shakespeare's prescience is revealed by his anticipation of change, as encapsulated geocentricity is transformed to stellar boundlessness, while his presence is suggested by fatherly concerns and ghost-like direction.

  1. Automation; The New Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, George E.

    Automation is a word that describes the workings of computers and the innovations of automatic transfer machines in the factory. As the hallmark of the new industrial revolution, computers displace workers and create a need for new skills and retraining programs. With improved communication between industry and the educational community to…

  2. The Quality Revolution in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonstingl, John Jay

    1992-01-01

    Whether viewed through Deming's 14 points, Juran's Trilogy, or Kaoru Ishikawa's Thought Revolution, Total Quality Management embodies 4 fundamental tenets: primary focus on customers and suppliers, universal commitment to continuous improvement, a systems approach, and top management responsibility. Educational organizations are recreating their…

  3. Women and the Information Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajcsy, Ruzena; Reynolds, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Provides a social and economic context to the information revolution and women's part in it. Speculates on how current and near-term developments in information technology can benefit women scientists from all disciplines. Discusses some of the efforts of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to increase the participation of women in computer and…

  4. Energy revolution: Fracking. In booming speed back to petroleum and natural gas; Energierevolution: Fracking. Im Boomtempo zurueck zu Oel und Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardo, Dietrich

    2013-06-06

    Fracking is the extraction of petroleum and shale gas from deep layers of earth. This technology is not new, as it was already used in the year 1940 and is comparable to geothermal drilling. In the United State of America as well as in the People's Republic of China fracking experiences an economic boom. The deposits are large. However, fracking can be a deathblow for the German energy policy turnaround. In this regard, the contribution under consideration reports on the developments.

  5. Wars, Revolutions and the First Real World Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Minkkinen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es promover la discusión conceptual para una publicación más amplia “Los Ciclos del Imperialismo, Guerra, y Revolución”. Empieza desde una presuposición que nuestro mundo común esta atravesando una transición desde un contexto histórico amplio eurocéntrico hacia un contexto histórico amplio non-eurocéntrico. Continua con la discusión histórica de los conceptos relacionados con la guerra, la reforma y la revolución y explica porque, en el contexto de la fase actual de la transición mundial y la Primera Verdadera Guerra Mundial, a pesar de la discusión anterior acerca de las revoluciones y revoluciones mundiales, es razonable sugerir que nuestro mundo común esta atravesando la Primera Verdadera Revolución Mundial._____________________ABSTRACTThe purpose of this article is to engage in a conceptual discussion for a broader publication on “The Cycles of Imperialism, War and Revolution”. It departs from a presupposition that our common world is experiencing a transition from a broad Eurocentric historical context into a non-Eurocentric broad historical context. It proceeds by a historical discussion on the concepts related to wars, reforms and revolutions and explains why, in the context of the actual phase of global transition and the First Real World War, it is, despite earlier discussions on revolutions and world revolutions, meaningful to suggest that our common world is experiencing a First Real World Revolution.

  6. EDITORIAL: The next photonic revolution The next photonic revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2009-11-01

    dependence upon active and switchable photonic metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. This revolution will lead to dramatic new science and applications on a global scale in all technologies using light, from data storage to optical processing of information, from sensing to light harvesting and energy conversion. Five plenary talks at the conference outlined its topical boundaries. They were given by Sir Michael Berry, Bristol University, UK, who spoke on the new topic of optical super-oscillations; Harry A Atwater, California Institute of Technology, USA, who gave an overview of recent developments in plasmonics; Christian Colliex, Université Paris-Sud, France, who presented the concept of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for the study of localized plasmons; Xiang Zhang, University of California at Berkeley, USA, who talked about recent achievements in the optical super-lens, and Antoinette Taylor, National Laboratory, Los Alamos, USA, who discussed recent work on tunable terahertz metamaterials. In the specially assigned `breakthrough' talks Steven Anlage, University of Maryland, USA, introduced the emerging field of superconducting meta-materials, Tobias Kippenberg, Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Germany, talked about cavity optomechanics on a chip, while Misha Lukin, Harvard University, USA, explored the field of quantum plasmonics and Victor Prinz, Russian Academy of Science, Russia, introduced a novel class of metamaterials based on three-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. The topical scope of this special section, to a great extent, echoes the paradigm shift in the NANOMETA community and includes papers on nanofabrication of plasmonic structure, transformation optics and invisibility, mapping of fields in nanostructures, nonlinear and magnetoplasmonic media, coherent effects in metamaterials, loss compensation in nanostructures, slow light and ultrafast switching of plasmon signals, and many other topics. The Guest Editor of this special section and the co

  7. The 3. industrial revolution according to Jeremy Rifkin: vision or utopia?; La 3. revolution industrielle selon Jeremy Rifkin: vision ou utopie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P. [Academie des Technologies, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-11-15

    Is the civilization of hydrogen on its way? This is what Jeremy Rifkin claims, who is announcing the 3. industrial revolution, based on electricity produced in an entirely decentralized manner from renewable energy and stored in the form of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis. This article analyses the three main 'pillars' of this industrial revolution and concludes that it is much more a matter of utopia than a 'vision'. (author)

  8. 1989 december Revolution. Urban legends

    OpenAIRE

    Oana VOICHICI

    2018-01-01

    The urban legends about terrorists that emerged during the revolution of December 1989 represent a special category. They are closely connected to the manipulation and diversion techniques and are typical of the period in which they were launched. The consequences they entailed were dramatic, even tragic: civilian and military casualties, destruction and appropriation of valuable goods that were part of the national patrimony, the ridicule of military actions in those days, meant to counterat...

  9. Revolution and progress in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, William

    2015-02-01

    This paper adapts Kuhn's conceptual framework to developmental episodes in the theory and practice of medicine. Previous attempts to understand the reception of Ignaz Semmelweis's work on puerperal fever in Kuhnian terms are used as a starting point. The author identifies some limitations of these attempts and proposes a new way of understanding the core Kuhnian notions of "paradigm," "progress," and "revolution" in the context of a socially embedded technoscience such as medicine.

  10. Radiation and the green revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    An important contribution to plant breeding is now being made by using radiation techniques to induce mutations. Benefits have been seen in a number of food crop varieties, and in some cases threats of shortages caused by disease have been averted. In addition to the fact that it is one aspect of the Green Revolution which is alleviating many food problems, the technique is proving of value to breeders of flowers and ornamental plants. (author)

  11. Wind: French revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.

    2006-01-01

    Despite having the second best wind resources in Europe after the UK, the wind industry in France lags behind its European counterparts with just 6 W of installed wind capacity per person. The electricity market in France is dominated by the state-owned Electricite de France (EdF) and its nuclear power stations. However, smaller renewable generators are now in theory allowed access to the market and France has transposed the EU renewables directive into national law. The French governement has set a target of generating 10,000 MW of renewable capacity by 2010. The announcement of an increased feed-in tariff and the introduction of 'development zones' (ZDEs) which could allow fast-tracking of planning for wind projects are also expected to boost wind projects. But grid access and adminstrative burdens remain major barriers. In addition, French politicians and local authorities remain committed to nuclear, though encouraged by the European Commission, wind is beginning to gain acceptance; some 325 wind farms (representing 1557 MW of capacity) were approved between February 2004 and January 2005. France is now regarded by the international wind energy sector as a target market. One of France's leading independent wind developers and its only listed wind company, Theolia, is expected to be one of the major beneficiaries of the acceleration of activity in France, though other companies are keen to maximise the opportunities for wind. France currently has only one indigenous manufacturer of wind turbines, but foreign suppliers are winning orders

  12. The 1917 Revolution in Tuva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Dazishen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on both archival and previously published documents, this article examines the issue of impact that Russia’s revolution of 1917 had on contemporary events in Tuva. Tuva acceded to the USSR in 1944, many years after the Bolshevik revolution and the rise of the Soviet state. However, we postulate that the “Soviet history” of Tuva, just like that of Russia, started in 1917. Soviet historiography prioritized the Great October Socialist revolution, but the events of 1917 began in February. The course of February revolution in Tannu Tuva Uriankhai did not automatically lead to the victory of the Bolsheviks and the establishment of the Soviet power. In spring and summer 1917, revolutionary change in Tuva was largely peaceful and constructive. Supported by the whole Russian population of Tuva, members of the Socialist Revolutionary Party formed the new local government and coopted representatives of Tuvan principalities as partners of the new Russian power. Bolshevik ideas, howsoever high the popularity of their supporters in Tuva might have been, did not find massive endorsement in the region. Consequently, Uriankhai saw no “dual power” (dvoevlastiie in 1917, and the victory of communists in Russia did not mean that the power should transfer to them in Tuva as well. One of the most complex issues of the revolution in the region was incorporating the political system of Tuva into that of the Russian Republic. The complications of the “Uriankhai issue” and the rise of Tuvan separatism did not lead to interethnic conflicts, and the use of force to settle the burning issues was not deemed mandatory. On the whole, both the revolutionary events of 1917 and the vocal presence of all Russian political forces in the region pointed towards the future accession of Tuva into the Russian Republic. Our study made use of sources from the Foreign Policy Archive of the Russian Empire in Moscow, as well as regional archives of Tuva, Novosibirsk

  13. Energy from waste: a 'quiet' revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    A Western Australian garden compost manufacturer's mission to cut power costs as well as its carbon footprint is expected to catalyse a number of similar projects. The Jandakot-based Richgro aims to process feedstock through an anaerobic digestion plant and produce methane to generate electricity to power 100% of its onsite operations. This is being funded with help from the Federal government's Clean Technology Investment Program plus a loan from Low Carbon Australia. LCA has funded a number of biogas projects and formed alliances with other Australian companies.

  14. 1989 december Revolution. Urban legends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana VOICHICI

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The urban legends about terrorists that emerged during the revolution of December 1989 represent a special category. They are closely connected to the manipulation and diversion techniques and are typical of the period in which they were launched. The consequences they entailed were dramatic, even tragic: civilian and military casualties, destruction and appropriation of valuable goods that were part of the national patrimony, the ridicule of military actions in those days, meant to counterattack the omnipresent invisible terrorists’ ‘imminent’ assaults. These legends clearly show how entire masses can be manipulated, instilling feelings of terror into people’s minds, playing upon their fear of repression, cruelty, death.

  15. Price increase and credit crunch: a double punishment for the financing of energy projects. Review of the Ifri Energy Breakfast Roundtable, 25 November 2008 in Brussels; Hausse des prix et baisse des credits: double peine pour le financement de l'energie - Compte-rendu du 'Ifri Energy Breakfast Roundtable' du 25 Novembre 2008 a Bruxelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulke, Ch.

    2009-07-01

    The roundtable starts by giving an overview of the consequences of the sharp decrease of the oil price and the credit crunch for the financing of energy projects. Some analysts say that under-investment will be the main result and they hence predict a major supply crunch in some year's time. Others are more optimistic and point to the compensation and mitigating effects of the current situation, e.g. demand destruction and substitution. So a major question for the future is the extent of demand destruction that has happened: will this demand come back once the economic crisis is over? Furthermore, as developing costs decrease, will lower cost pressure allow some important projects to go forward? Finally, will the low oil revenue have an influence on producer countries stance on foreign investment by International Oil Companies? A discussion with the audience follows the presentations

  16. The 3. industrial revolution according to Jeremy Rifkin: vision or utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    Is the civilization of hydrogen on its way? This is what Jeremy Rifkin claims, who is announcing the 3. industrial revolution, based on electricity produced in an entirely decentralized manner from renewable energy and stored in the form of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis. This article analyses the three main 'pillars' of this industrial revolution and concludes that it is much more a matter of utopia than a 'vision'. (author)

  17. Was there an ‘Industrious Revolution' before the Industrial Revolution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Robert C.; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    It is conventionally assumed that the pre-modern working year was fixed and that consumption varied with changes in wages and prices. This is challenged by the twin theories of the ‘industrious' revolution and the consumer revolution, positing a longer working year as people earned surplus money...... estimates of the actual working year, we find two ‘industrious' revolutions among rural workers; both, however, are attributable to economic hardship, and we detect no signs of a consumer revolution. For urban labourers, by contrast, a growing gap between their actual working year and the work  required...... to buy the basket provides great scope for a consumer revolution....

  18. No sire, it's a revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, P

    1990-09-01

    In much the way 18th century France was ripe for a revolution, so are the two social systems within which we live and work: health care and higher education. In health care, too many are suffering so that a few might live lives of luxury. Higher education is structured so as to reproduce a social order of class privilege and patriarchal values. For a complex set of reasons, (some known to us, many more beyond our consciousness) we have chosen higher education and nursing education as our arena--as the place where we might contribute to the world order, to our society, to individuals and communities who are striving to be healthy. Our project, then, is to enable others so that they might enable still others: to teach and learn with our students who are our colleagues in creating a future; to teach and learn in caring ways that will serve as prototypes for caring communities. To those who would dismiss the curriculum revolution as a fad and those involved it as aging malcontents, I refer them to the diaries of Governor Morris, an American guest of Marie Antoinette who was at Versailles during the months before the fall of the Bastille on July 14, 1789: Yesterday, it was the Fashion at Versailles not to believe that there had been any disturbances at Paris. I presume this Day's Transactions will induce a Conviction that all is not perfectly quiet (Pernoud, 1960, p. 45).

  19. The Coming Primary Care Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Andrew L; Phillips, Russell S

    2017-04-01

    The United States has the most expensive, technologically advanced, and sub-specialized healthcare system in the world, yet it has worse population health status than any other high-income country. Rising healthcare costs, high rates of waste, the continued trend towards chronic non-communicable disease, and the growth of new market entrants that compete with primary care services have set the stage for fundamental change in all of healthcare, driven by a revolution in primary care. We believe that the coming primary care revolution ought to be guided by the following design principles: 1) Payment must adequately support primary care and reward value, including non-visit-based care. 2) Relationships will serve as the bedrock of value in primary care, and will increasingly be fostered by teams, improved clinical operations, and technology, with patients and non-physicians assuming an ever-increasing role in most aspects of healthcare. 3) Generalist physicians will increasingly focus on high-acuity and high-complexity presentations, and primary care teams will increasingly manage conditions that specialists managed in the past. 4) Primary care will refocus on whole-person care, and address health behaviors as well as vision, hearing, dental, and social services. Design based on these principles should lead to higher-value healthcare, but will require new approaches to workforce training.

  20. The Cultural Revolution and Contemporary Chinese Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guey-Meei; Suchan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Using this instructional resource, teachers can explore the impact of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) on contemporary art in mainland China with their students. The three artists Luo Zhongli (b. 1948), Xu Bing (b. 1955), and Wang Guangyi (b. 1957) came of age during the Cultural Revolution and are representative of a much larger number of…

  1. Three Views of the Information Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Magda Cordell; Harris, David A.

    1983-01-01

    Cultural institutions and attitudes are being reshaped and often disrupted without warning or intention by the information revolution. Different socio-cultural visions of the information revolution among scholars in France, Japan, and the third world are described. (Author/RM)

  2. The Information "Revolution": Information, Communications and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostry, Bernard

    Today's communications systems and technology facilitate the erosion of cultural differences, threatening cultural sovereignty. In the fifteenth century, the first information revolution created the concept of the nation-state with its unique cultural identity. The technology of the second information revolution, which has advanced video…

  3. Scientific revolution, incommensurability and truth in theories ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific revolution, incommensurability and truth in theories: objection to Kuhn's perspective. ... AFRREV STECH: An International Journal of Science and Technology ... The core of our discussion is, ultimately, to provide a clearer and broader picture of the general characteristics of scientific revolution or theory change.

  4. The Computer and the Fourth Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Andrew R.

    An overview is provided of the Fourth Revolution, i.e., the revolution which is taking place in education as a result of the introduction of computers into the field. The growth of computing in education, especially in higher education, is traced, and some major National Science Foundation (NSF) programs are mentioned. Following this, a few of the…

  5. Capturing Revolute Motion and Revolute Joint Parameters with Optical Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonya, C.

    2017-12-01

    Optical tracking of users and various technical systems are becoming more and more popular. It consists of analysing sequence of recorded images using video capturing devices and image processing algorithms. The returned data contains mainly point-clouds, coordinates of markers or coordinates of point of interest. These data can be used for retrieving information related to the geometry of the objects, but also to extract parameters for the analytical model of the system useful in a variety of computer aided engineering simulations. The parameter identification of joints deals with extraction of physical parameters (mainly geometric parameters) for the purpose of constructing accurate kinematic and dynamic models. The input data are the time-series of the marker’s position. The least square method was used for fitting the data into different geometrical shapes (ellipse, circle, plane) and for obtaining the position and orientation of revolute joins.

  6. Revolution, modernity, and the potential of narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the impact of the French Revolution on Goethe’s narrative works in the mid-1790s. I argue that the reductive interpretation of Goethe’s attitude to the Revolution as distant and reluctant ignores the formal and thematic impact of the Revolution on his prose works. Similarly......, we lose important perspectives when reducing German intellectual life of the late eighteenth century to apolitical inwardness. The Revolution had an impact, also in the German context, and Goethe’s literary works were significantly affected by it. Working in various literary genres, he investigated...... and experimented with some of the fundamental challenges of the Revolution and the modern era, especially those regarding self-determination, community, and the nexus between individual and shared history. Following a brief sketch of how these issues looked from a German perspective, I will focus on Goethe’s...

  7. A revolution in diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamula, Paul W

    2003-03-01

    In November 1966, Sandy Koufax, the star left-handed pitcher of the Los Angeles Dodgers, retired after spending his final season coping with traumatic arthritis in his elbow, the compounded effects of a sliding injury to his pitching arm the previous season and 12 years of hard throwing.1 Had his career begun a few years later, he might have been able to benefit from the advances in diagnostic imaging and treatment that were introduced at that time. Modern arthroscopy and computed tomography (CT) did not become available until the mid 1970s,2 and the first elbow reconstruction was done by Frank Jobe, MD, about 10 years after Koufax retired.1 Arthroscopy was first used as a diagnostic tool, but it later became a surgical tool, affecting treatment of knees, then, later, shoulders. Since 1973, when The Physician and Sportsmedicine was launched, we have witnessed a revolution in diagnostic imaging and are continuing to see an evolution of modalities.

  8. Intelligent hearing aids: the next revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Zhang; Mustiere, Fred; Micheyl, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The first revolution in hearing aids came from nonlinear amplification, which allows better compensation for both soft and loud sounds. The second revolution stemmed from the introduction of digital signal processing, which allows better programmability and more sophisticated algorithms. The third revolution in hearing aids is wireless, which allows seamless connectivity between a pair of hearing aids and with more and more external devices. Each revolution has fundamentally transformed hearing aids and pushed the entire industry forward significantly. Machine learning has received significant attention in recent years and has been applied in many other industries, e.g., robotics, speech recognition, genetics, and crowdsourcing. We argue that the next revolution in hearing aids is machine intelligence. In fact, this revolution is already quietly happening. We will review the development in at least three major areas: applications of machine learning in speech enhancement; applications of machine learning in individualization and customization of signal processing algorithms; applications of machine learning in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical tests. With the advent of the internet of things, the above developments will accelerate. This revolution will bring patient satisfactions to a new level that has never been seen before.

  9. After the us shale gas revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    After 20 years at different positions in the gas sector, from the policy side to trading floors, the author gives an overview of the major gas issues and elaborate on the consequences of the US shale gas revolution. The first part of the book provides basic knowledge and gives needed tools to better understand this industry, that often stands, in sandwich, between upstream oil and utilities. After extensive research, publication and teaching, the author shares his insights on fundamental issues all along the gas chain and explains the price mechanisms ranging from oil-indexing to spot. The second part looks into the future of worldwide gas balance. To supply growing markets, the major resource holder, Russia, is now in direct competition with the major gas producer, the US. China has the potential not only to select the winner but also to decide the pricing principle for all Asian buyers in 2020. As China is a new and growing gas importer and has a lower price tolerance than historical Asian buyers (Japan and South Korea), it is highly possible that, against basic geography, China selects waterborne US LNG vs. close Russian pipe gas, to achieve lower import price. Europe, so risk adverse that it won't be able to take any decision regarding shale gas production on this side of 2020, should see its power fading on the energy scene and would rely more on Russia. Gas geopolitics could tighten Russia stronghold on Europe, on one side, and create a flourishing North America-Asian trade... This book is accessible to all and will particularly interest readers seeking a global gas perspective where economics and geopolitics mix. It can be read as an economic novel where billions of $ are invested to shape tomorrow energy world or as a geopolitical thriller where Russia and the US compete to impose their respective agenda, leaving China to select the winner. Contents: 1. Basics. 2. Technical aspects. 3. Markets, prices and costs. 4. Policies. 5. Where is the future supply

  10. After the US shale gas revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    After 20 years at different positions in the gas sector, from the policy side to trading floors, the author gives an overview of the major gas issues and elaborate on the consequences of the US shale gas revolution. The first part of the book provides basic knowledge and gives needed tools to better understand this industry, that often stands, in sandwich, between upstream oil and utilities. After extensive research, publication and teaching, the author shares his insights on fundamental issues all along the gas chain and explains the price mechanisms ranging from oil-indexing to spot. The second part looks into the future of worldwide gas balance. To supply growing markets, the major resource holder, Russia, is now in direct competition with the major gas producer, the US. China has the potential not only to select the winner but also to decide the pricing principle for all Asian buyers in 2020. As China is a new and growing gas importer and has a lower price tolerance than historical Asian buyers (Japan and South Korea), it is highly possible that, against basic geography, China selects waterborne US LNG vs. close Russian pipe gas, to achieve lower import price. Europe, so risk adverse that it won't be able to take any decision regarding shale gas production on this side of 2020, should see its power fading on the energy scene and would rely more on Russia. Gas geopolitics could tighten Russia stronghold on Europe, on one side, and create a flourishing North America-Asian trade... This book is accessible to all and will particularly interest readers seeking a global gas perspective where economics and geopolitics mix. It can be read as an economic novel where billions of $ are invested to shape tomorrow energy world or as a geopolitical thriller where Russia and the US compete to impose their respective agenda, leaving China to select the winner. Contents: 1. Basics. 2. Technicals. 3. Markets, prices and costs. 4. Policies. 5. Where is the future supply growth? 6

  11. The dual Green Revolutions in South Korea: reforestation and agricultural revolution under the authoritarian regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Manyong

    2012-01-01

    In South Korea, the Green Revolution has been commonly understood as the development and dissemination of new rice varieties ('Tongil' rice) and the rapid increase of rice yield in the 1970s. However, revolutionary success in agriculture was not the only green revolution South Korea experienced; another green revolution lay in the success of reforestation projects. In the 1970s, South Korea's forest greening was closely related to its agricultural revolution in several ways. Therefore, South Korea's Green Revolution was an intrinsically linked double feature of agriculture and forestry. This two-pronged revolution was initiated by scientific research - yet accomplished by the strong administrative mobilization of President Park Chung Hee's regime. The process of setting goals and meeting them through a military-like strategy in a short time was made possible under the authoritarian regime, known as 'Yushin', though the administration failed to fully acknowledge scientific expertise in the process of pushing to achieve goals.

  12. Islamic Revolution: a Civilization-building Revolution; Iranian University:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Baqer Khorramshad

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Islamic Revolution and the consequent Islamic state in Iran have revived Iranian-Islamic civilization’s discourse in a modern form which is rooted in both Iranian and Islamic ancient civilizations. Post-revolutionary Iran, as an obviously determinant country in this civilizational field, which has developed the civilization in the modern era, necessarily has to think and act civilizationally in order to resist western Humanist and Materialist affects. Academy is the place within which knowledge, as clearly one of the most important foundations of civilization-building, is produced. Civilization-building is the horizon toward which Iranian Universities should orient themselves. Academy is the canon of science, knowledge, and culture, and therefore plays an affective role in the formation, development and flourishing of a civilization; and it could be said that University is the foundation on which civilization is built. In other words, University in the modern era is not only the site of education and research, but also as an epistemological basis, participates in the process of culture and civilization-building; the matter which this study attempts to elaborate. Thus, we attempt to explain and define the necessary tools and indicators in the process.

  13. The Iranian Revolution--An Imagistic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    This three- to four-week unit for use with secondary students in courses in politics or modern world history generates a basic understanding about the origins, development, and status of the revolution in Iran. (RM)

  14. The monopolistic competition revolution in retrospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.H. Bettendorf (Leon); B.J. Heijdra (Ben)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAvinash Dixit and Joseph Stiglitz revolutionized the modelling of imperfectly competitive markets and launched "the second monopolistic competition revolution". Experts in the areas of macroeconomics, international trade theory, economic geography, and international growth theory examine

  15. Revolutions in astronomy, physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idlis, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    As consecutive turning-points in the development of natural science four global natural science revolutions (Aristotelian, Newton, Einstein and post-Einstein) are marked out and briefly outlined. Each of them simultaneously occurred in astronomy, physics and cosmology and was accompanied by radical changes of cosmological representations. These changes had quite a regular consecutive character and represented necessary steps in turn along the natural way of further elimination of ego centrism from cosmology. The first (Aristotelian) revolution turnes out a peculiar prototype of all three subsequent revolutions in astronomy, physics and cosmology. The special more detailed analysis of this revolution in this monograph allows one to tie together antique and modern phases of the science development including corresponding representations on fundamental structural elements of the matter. Besides the review of literature data the monograph comprises a series of author's scientific results

  16. APPROXIMATE DEVELOPMENTS FOR SURFACES OF REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Roxana Buneci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is provide a set of Maple procedures to construct approximate developments of a general surface of revolution generalizing the well-known gore method for sphere

  17. The Information Revolution and International Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Donald L.

    1975-01-01

    As a result of the growth of media, the onrushing Information Revolution has forced man into a new era - an era in which the study of media and their effects is prerequisite to understanding interaction among people. (Author)

  18. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-01-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science

  19. A psychohistorical analysis. Gulag and the Romanian Revolution of 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru-Cătălin Rogojanu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The direction of the current study is the analysis of the Gulag and Romanian Revolution of 1989 using a psychohistorical investigation, which attempts to provide a plausible psychological explanation of these two events.The relationship between the communist prison space and the situation in '89 can be exploited from other perspectives that emphasize different and nuanced interpretations which can radically change the old historical vision, which focused on documents (archives justifying the official history of power. The conspiratorial silence of prisoners, meaning that inability to confess the suffering in the period before 1989, „exploded“ in the revolution through aggressive manifestations in Timișoara, Bucharest and other cities in the country. In the end we can say that the Revolution was that long-expected time for Romanians to express their negative energies, anguish, disappointment in the paternal authority represented by Nicolae Ceaușescu. In 1989, the soul of the crowd (Gustave Le Bon broke loose after a long period of obedience and humiliation in communist prisons, but also in the huge camp: Romania.

  20. On the revolution of heavenly spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Copernicus, Nicolaus

    1995-01-01

    The Ptolemaic system of the universe, with the earth at the center, had held sway since antiquity as authoritative in philosophy, science, and church teaching. Following his observations of the heavenly bodies, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) abandoned the geocentric system for a heliocentric model, with the sun at the center. His remarkable work, On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres, stands as one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of all time, and profoundly influenced, among others, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton.

  1. Modern Social Media and Social Revolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    another part of the world is equally presented on the event domain and observable by the social revolution domain. Engagements work as the linkage...MODERN SOCIAL MEDIA AND SOCIAL REVOLUTIONS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in...MM-YYYY) 16-12-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) FEB 2011 – DEC 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modern Social

  2. Colour revolutions: criminal-legal aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Alekseyevich Gordeychik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective basing on the analysis of colour revolution technologies in different countries to formulate propositions for improving criminal legislation aimed at counteraction against this phenomenon. Methods general scientific induction deduction analysis synthesis and specific scientific formaljuridical and comparativelegal. Results using the results of colour revolutionsrsquo research carried out by political scientists the author evaluates the character and level of public danger of colour revolutions. The author states that the colour revolutions threaten the normal existence of the country or several countries. The conclusion is made that the colour revolutions must be counteracted by criminallegal means. The article states the absence of norms in the existing criminal legislation which would impose criminal liability on organizers incendiaries and participants of colour revolutions. It is proposed to supplement the existing criminal law with the norm stipulating the liability for such deeds and to insert this norm into Art. 34 ldquoCrimes against peace and security of humanityrdquo thus equating organization preparation and implementing colour revolutions with planning preparation launching and conducting an aggressive war Art. 353 of the Russian Criminal Code. Scientific novelty basing on the existing legal norms modern politological and juridical scientific literature a conclusion is made that the colour revolutions are based on the abuse of law. This allows the organizers of colour revolutions to legally prepare and implement the subversion of undesirable political regimes. The author formulates proposals for supplementing the criminal legislation. Practical value the materials and conclusions of the article can be used in lawmaking activity when elaborating the drafts of legal acts for changing and supplementing the Russian Criminal Code for research activity when preparing monographs and dissertations tutorials and articles when

  3. THE INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER: CAUGHT BETWEEN TWO REVOLUTIONS?

    OpenAIRE

    Niek Du Preez; Liliane Pintelon

    2012-01-01

    The .Industrial Engineer is caught between the Industrial Revolution and the Information revolution. He is confronted with choosing between pragmatic improvements in productivity and efficiency of a single operation or the opportunistic modelling and reshaping of the networked "virtual enterprise" to become more competitive in a global marketplace . The diagram below depicts the different extremes of the Industrial Engineering timeline. This implies that the two societies (Industrial and info...

  4. REVOLUTIONS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THE AFRICAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fagundes Visentini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the impact of revolutions in the International Relations and the World System as constitutive and renewed elements. Criticizes the stance of theories that consider it a domestic phenomenon that causes a systemic disturbance, focusing in the case of the African Revolutions in the 1970s. Explores the international dimension they possess, considering their impact regarding the end of the Cold War, even though it happened in the periphery of the world.

  5. Economic Motives Behind the 2011 Egyptian Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    from below,”8 attaching revolutions to a combination of several conflicts between state, bourgeoisies , and the lower class. She also states...of France , Russia, and China (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1979), 4. 9 Theda Skocpol, “ France , Russia, China: A Structural Analysis of...Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of France , Russia, and China. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1979. Soliman, Ibrahim, and Shahla

  6. Dynamic nonlinear analysis of shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesemann, W.A. von; Stricklin, J.A.; Haisler, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of finite element computer programs have been developed at Texas A and M University for the static and dynamic nonlinear analysis of shells of revolution. This paper discusses one of these, DYNAPLAS, which is a program for the transient response of ring stiffened shells of revolution subjected to either asymmetric initial velocities or to asymmetric pressure loadings. Both material and geometric nonlinearities may be considered. (Auth.)

  7. The Science of Structural Revolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Graf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A perspective on the very human process by which scientific paradigms change can help point the path forward in any science, or in an applied science, such as Structural Engineering. Understanding this process of change, we can examine earthquake engineering, seismic building codes and theories of structural engineering for earthquake loads. When we take this perspective, we recognize that Structural Engineering for earthquake resistance is in the midst of a number of revolutions, from paradigms embodied in current building codes in which earthquake demands are associated with forces, to a new paradigm in which earthquake demands are re-envisioned as resulting from structural displacements or drift. The new paradigm is embodied in the current national standard for the seismic rehabilitation of existing structures, ASCE 41 [2] and the emerging standards for performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE. Associated with this is the shift from design oriented towards life-safety to design for a range of performance objectives, such as life-safety, damage reduction, or immediate occupancy. With this perspective, we further recognize deficiencies in research and development. We have failed to systematically use the experimental and computational tools we possess to fill in the gaps of scientific knowledge. We have not developed and deployed appropriate frameworks to collect and share ideas and results. As one example, the formulation of performance-based codes now outstrips the knowledge-base needed to ensure that structures designed by the new tools will meet their performance objectives.

  8. The Demographic Revolution: Reconceptualizing Macroeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orio Giarini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is important to reconsider the measurements which refer to the “Wealth of Nations” and from which the most appropriate references for better welfare policies are derived. In the present Service Economy, not all the “value added” measures indicate an increase in the level of wealth (the costs to cope with pollution for instance, whereas many developments in service functions and performances (in the case of many communication systems for instance add to real wealth much more than the usual value added references indicate. In particular, the notion of productivity in a Service economy is much more relevant with reference to performance in time (hence in a probabilistic system than to the production factor costs (in an equilibrium-based system. But all this is linked to progress in economics as a discipline, and to its integration with environmental issues (which also pretend to solve the problems of the “Wealth of Nations” on the basis of their “sustainability”. This will be a new era in economic development which will be beyond current extrapolations and will hope for “growth” in the traditional Industrial Revolution perspective.

  9. The hydrogen economy. When there is no more oil. The creation of the worldwide energy web and the redistribution of power on earth; Die H{sub 2}-Revolution. Wenn es kein Oel mehr gibt. Mit neuer Energie fuer eine gerechte Weltwirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rifkin, J.

    2002-07-01

    The author explains that the next great economic era will be powered by hydrogen. Drawing on a variety of well-balanced research studies, his premise is that the world must switch from a fossil-fuel economy to a hydrogen based economy. This must happen soon for three reasons: the imminent peak of global oil production, the increased concentration of remaining oil reserves in the Middle East one of the most politically and socially unstable regions of the world and the steady heating up of the world atmosphere from fossil-fuel dependency. This revolution will make energy available to each country, not just the wealthiest nations, and would be the first democratic energy regime in history. [German] Das Zeitalter der fossilen Brennstoffe (Kohlenwasserstoffzeitalter) ist an einem kritischen Punkt angelangt. In dem Buch von Jeremy Rifkin beweisen nach einem kurzen Abriss der Energiegeschichte akribisch angefuehrte umfangreiche Statistiken, dass das Erdoel und Erdgas spaetestens 2010 spuerbar knapp sein wird. Die wenigen verbliebenen Erdoelreserven liegen ausserdem ueberwiegend in politisch instabilen Gebieten. Bei steigender Oelknappheit treiben die alternativ verwendeten anderen fossilen Energiequellen die globale Erwaermung voran und gefaehrden das Oekosystem der Erde. Jeremy Rifkin sieht den einzigen Ausweg in einer neuen, auf Wasserstoff basierenden Weltwirtschaft. Die ''Dekarbonisierung'' der Energie, die unvermeidlich zur Wasserstoffzukunft fuehren wird, ist abzusehen. Wasserstoff wird eine basisdemokratische, nachhaltige Energie- und Brennstoffquelle der Zukunft, unabhaengig von Oelimporten. Brennstoffzellen auf Wasserstoffbasis koennen den Energiebedarf der gesamten Menschheit ueber einen sehr langen Zeitraum decken. Die realisierung einer neuen dezentralen Form der Energienutzung und demokratischen Energiekontrolle durch Millionen von Verbrauchern (lokalen Kleinstkraftwerken mit Brennstoffzellen), angeschlossen an ein weltweites

  10. Hacking the quantum revolution: 1925-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweber, Silvan S.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the quantum revolution should be seen as an Ian Hacking type of scientific revolution: a profound, longue durée, multidisciplinary process of transforming our understanding of physical nature, with deep-rooted social components from the start. The "revolution" exhibits a characteristic style of reasoning - the hierarchization of physical nature - and developed and uses a specific language - quantum field theory (QFT). It is by virtue of that language that the quantum theory has achieved some of its deepest insights into the description of the dynamics of the physical world. However, the meaning of what a quantum field theory is and what it describes has deeply altered, and one now speaks of "effective" quantum field theories. Interpreting all present day quantum field theories as but "effective" field theories sheds additional light on Phillip Anderson's assertion that "More is different". This important element is addressed in the last part of the paper.

  11. Urbanism Faced with the New Urban Revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ascher, François

    2002-01-01

    Med den industrielle revolution fulgte den urbane revolution og urbanismen som bymæssig videns- og planlægningsdisciplin. Med de nye informations- og kommunikationsteknologier står vi i dag over for samfundsmæssige forandringer, som sætter en ny urban revolution på dagsordenen. Urbanismen er...... tilsvarende ved at blive afløst af en "meta-urbanisme", som adskiller sig fra den foregående med hensyn til målsætninger, kundskabsmæssige redskaber og handlingsinstrumenter. I artiklen redegøres for sammenhænge mellem disse teknologiske, samfundsmæssige, bymæssige og urbanistiske forandringer....

  12. A low carbon industrial revolution? Insights and challenges from past technological and economic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, Peter J.G.; Foxon, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts to promote a transition to a low carbon economy have been influenced by suggestions that a low carbon transition offers challenges and might yield economic benefits comparable to those of the previous industrial revolutions. This paper examines these arguments and the challenges facing a low carbon transition, by drawing on recent thinking on the technological, economic and institutional factors that enabled and sustained the first (British) industrial revolution, and the role of ‘general purpose technologies’ in stimulating and sustaining this and subsequent industrial transformation processes that have contributed to significant macroeconomic gains. These revolutions involved profound, long drawn-out changes in economy, technology and society; and although their energy transitions led to long-run economic benefits, they took many decades to develop. To reap significant long-run economic benefits from a low carbon transition sooner rather than later would require systemic efforts and incentives for low carbon innovation and substitution of high-carbon technologies. We conclude that while achieving a low carbon transition may require societal changes on a scale comparable with those of previous industrial revolutions, this transition does not yet resemble previous industrial revolutions. A successful low carbon transition would, however, amount to a different kind of industrial revolution. - Highlights: ► Investigates lessons for a low carbon transition from past industrial revolutions. ► Explores the implications of ‘general purpose technologies’ and their properties. ► Examines analysis of ‘long waves’ of technological progress and diffusion. ► Draws insights for low carbon transitions and policy.

  13. THE ROMANIAN REVOLUTION OF DECEMBER 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan SCURTU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available 1989 was a revolutionary year in European history. Then, the socialist-totalitarian regimes (communist in central and eastern continent collapsed, one by one. First in Poland, then in Hungary, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania. The demolition of the Berlin Wall in November 9th 1989 marked the beginning of the reunification of Europe. If the other countries in the Romanian revolution was a peaceful way, in Romania, the Ceauşescu regime removal was achieved by violence, with over 1 000 people killed. Meanwhile, the Romanian revolution proceeded radica lly, without passing through a phase of glasnosti and perestroika (reforms initiated by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

  14. Lighting: a driver of the sustainable revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaar, Harry

    2018-04-01

    Some of the most important things in life are taken for granted, and nowhere is this truer than with light. In this article, we will look at some important milestones marking light's path from human evolution to sustainable revolution, challenges facing the modern lighting industry as well as the world we live in, and what the future promises. In a sense, a new revolution is at hand. It would be hard to overestimate the fundamental importance of light as it shapes virtually everything we sense and experience.

  15. The astronomical revolution Copernicus, Kepler, Borelli

    CERN Document Server

    Koyre, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Originally published in English in 1973. This volume traces the development of the revolution which so drastically altered man's view of the universe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The ""astronomical revolution"" was accomplished in three stages, each linked with the work of one man. With Copernicus, the sun became the centre of the universe. With Kepler, celestial dynamics replaced the kinematics of circles and spheres used by Copernicus. With Borelli the unification of celestial and terrestrial physics was completed by abandonment of the circle in favour the straight line to inf

  16. Future Legacy of the Russian Revolution. Participatory Political Economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubec, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2017), s. 565-580 ISSN 2159-8282 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : revolution * participation * political economy * Russian revolution Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion OBOR OECD: Political science

  17. Wonder crop could pave the way for bio-fuel revolution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gush, Mark B

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available are some of the pressures that are influencing the quest for alternative, cleaner forms of energy. Some would suggest that the bio-fuel revolution has begun. Because of these trends a recent business initiative has proposed the introduction of the so...

  18. Linear and nonlinear symmetrically loaded shells of revolution approximated with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1978-10-01

    Nuclear Material shipping containers have shells of revolution as a basic structural component. Analytically modeling the response of these containers to severe accident impact conditions requires a nonlinear shell-of-revolution model that accounts for both geometric and material nonlinearities. Present models are limited to large displacements, small rotations, and nonlinear materials. This report discusses a first approach to developing a finite element nonlinear shell of revolution model that accounts for these nonlinear geometric effects. The approach uses incremental loads and a linear shell model with equilibrium iterations. Sixteen linear models are developed, eight using the potential energy variational principle and eight using a mixed variational principle. Four of these are suitable for extension to nonlinear shell theory. A nonlinear shell theory is derived, and a computational technique used in its solution is presented

  19. Walking through the Revolution: A Spatial Reading of Literary Echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Ana Isabel; Alves, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an embryo of a literary guide on the Carnation Revolution to be explored for educational historical excursions other than leisure and tourism. We propose a historical trail through the centre of Lisbon, city of the Carnation Revolution, called "Walk through the Revolution." The trail aims to reinforce collective…

  20. The Industrial Revolution: An ERIC/ChESS Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhey, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a list, from the ERIC database, of teaching materials and background information on the Industrial Revolution. Specific topics include life in Lowell (Massachusetts), the global impact of the Industrial Revolution, and England's Industrial Revolution. Offers directions for obtaining the full text of these materials. (CMK)

  1. The Mexican Revolution and health care or the health of the Mexican Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J J

    1985-01-01

    Despite a victorious social revolution, a self-proclaimed "revolutionary" government, and a significant post-war economic growth, Mexico has not achieved a just or equitable social system. The Mexican Revolution led to the emergence of a new bureaucratic class whose "trickle-down" development strategy sacrificed social welfare to capital accumulation. Mexican morbidity and mortality patterns resemble those of more impoverished developing nations without revolutionary experience. The patterns of health care in Mexico reflect inequities and contradictions in the society and economy at large and flow from the erosion of the egalitarian aims of the revolution concomitant with the expansion of capitalism and the concentration of the benefits of "modernization" in the hands of privileged elites. Mexico's health problems are symptomatic of a general socio-economic malaise which questions the legitimacy of the Revolution.

  2. Copernican Revolution in the Complex Plane

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 11. Copernican Revolution in the Complex Plane - An Algebraic Way to Show the "Chief Point" of Copernican Innovation. Giorgio Goldoni. General Article Volume 17 Issue 11 November 2012 pp 1065-1084 ...

  3. The Start of a Tech Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrli, Kurt O.

    2009-01-01

    We are at the start of a revolution in the use of computers, one that analysts predict will rival the development of the PC in its significance. Companies such as Google, HP, Amazon, Sun Microsystems, Sony, IBM, and Apple are orienting their entire business models toward this change, and software maker SAS has announced plans for a $70 million…

  4. Superconductivity of high Tc Scientific revolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquina, J.E.; Ridaura, R.; Gomez, R.; Marquina, V.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    A short history of superconductivity, since its discovery by Bednorz and Muller to the development of new materials with high transition temperatures, is presented. Further evolvements are analyzed in terms of T.s. Kuhn conceptions expressed in his book. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. (Author) 4 refs

  5. The monopolistic competition revolution in retrospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Heijdra, Ben J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we argue that there have been two monopolistic competition revolutions. The first was started by Joan Robinson and Edward Chamberlin in the 1930s but failed to have much impact on economic theory. The second was initiated by Avinash Dixit and Joseph Stiglitz in the early 1970s. Their

  6. Bourgeois Revolution: The Genesis of a Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Bertel

    2006-01-01

    The concept ‘bourgeois revolution' developed through a particular synthesis of three world views, each with its own period of dominance in Western thought. In the enlightenment views of civilization history developing in Scotland and France from the 1740's till about 1800, materialist notions...

  7. Beginnings of the Industrial Revolution in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrofani, E. Robert, Ed.

    These teacher-developed materials are designed to help educators integrate economic concepts into the teaching of history. The materials include readings on the Industrial Revolution in England and a series of activities that require students to analyze the impact of industrialization first on English peasant farmers, and then on workers in early…

  8. SPECIES DATABASES AND THE BIOINFORMATICS REVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological databases are having a growth spurt. Much of this results from research in genetics and biodiversity, coupled with fast-paced developments in information technology. The revolution in bioinformatics, defined by Sugden and Pennisi (2000) as the "tools and techniques for...

  9. The 'Shale Gas Revolution'. Hype and Reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, P.

    2010-09-01

    The 'shale gas revolution' - responsible for a huge increase in unconventional gas production in the US over the last couple of years - is creating huge investor uncertainties for international gas markets and renewables and could result in serious gas shortages in 10 years time. This report casts serious doubt over industry confidence in the 'revolution', questioning whether it can spread beyond the US, or indeed be maintained within it, as environmental concerns, high depletion rates and the fear that US circumstances may be impossible to replicate elsewhere, come to the fore. Investor uncertainty will reduce investment in future gas supplies to lower levels than would have happened had the 'shale gas revolution' not hit the headlines. While the markets will eventually solve this problem, rising gas demand and the long lead-in-times on most gas projects are likely to inflict high prices on consumers in the medium term. The uncertainties created by the 'shale gas revolution' are also likely to compound existing investor uncertainty in renewables for power generation in the aftermath of Copenhagen. The serious possibility of cheap, relatively clean gas may threaten investment in more expensive lower carbon technologies.

  10. Industrial Revolution and Scientific and Technological Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fremdling, Rainer

    1996-01-01

    This working paper is a draft chapter for the UNESCO-History of Humanity. Different views on the concept and spread of the industrial revolution, which took place from the late 18th century onwards, are dealt with. By way of example the revolutionary character of technological change and the search

  11. Dissent, revolution and liberty beyond Earth

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides an in-depth discussion on the central question – how can people express and survive dissent and disagreement in confined habitats in space? The discussion is an important one because it could be that the systems of inter-dependence required to survive in space are so strong that dissent becomes impossible. John Locke originally said that people have a right to use revolution to overthrow a despotic regime. But if revolution causes violence and damage that causes depressurisation with the risk of killing many people, is it even permissible to have a revolution? How then are people to express their liberty or dissatisfaction with their rulers? The emergence of structures of dissent and disagreement is an essential part of the construction of a framework of liberty in space (revolution is just the extreme example) and thus the topic deserves in-depth and immediate attention. Even today, the way in which we assemble organisations and corporations for the government and private exploration o...

  12. The Challenge of the Micro Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of choices posed by the current microtechnology revolution notes librarians' reluctance to utilize new technologies, ability of libraries to deal with success and fund new services, strategic decision facing libraries and professionals concerning essential "business" of libraries, new microcomputer portables and more powerful…

  13. A revolution in the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, J-M.

    1997-01-01

    Globalization and restructuring within the energy sector is common today. Public utilities no longer monopolize electric power generation, distribution and transmission. This results in the opening of economic borders and the integration of national markets. With the opening of electricity markets, there is little chance that Hydro-Quebec''s electric energy output will peak out any time soon, since about 18,000 megawatts of additional capacity can be brought on stream from new hydroelectric plants. This electricity produced in Quebec can be exported to close neighbors, benefiting both parties. For example New England''s electricity is mainly produced by burning of fossil fuel and nuclear energy. Hydro-Quebec could provide a cheaper and cleaner alternative to that region. 1 tab., 3 figs

  14. Mexico´s long revolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Minkkinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available México celebraba en el año 2010 el Bicentenario del empiezo de sus luchas de independencia y el Centenario de la Revolución Mexicana de 1910. Lo que no se celebra oficialmente es el proceso revolucionario contemporáneo, aunque sus ciertas fases han incluido entusiasmo por parte de diferentes actores sociales. En este artículo les ofrezco un análisis histórico de estos procesos revolucionarios como tres largas revoluciones de México. Además de eso, las explicaré dentro de un contexto histórico más amplio la transición desde un contexto histórico amplio eurocéntrico hacia un contexto histórico amplio no-eurocéntrico, que podemos entender también como la Primera Verdadera Revolución Mundial (PVRM. Empiezo con la explicación de este contexto histórico amplio. Continúo con el análisis del proceso de independencia desde 1810 así como la Revolución Mexicana desde 1910. Adelanto con la explicación de la tercera larga revolución mexicana, para la cual he seleccionado como el año del empiezo el 1988 y las elecciones presidenciales. Otros posibles años del empiezo podrían ser la represión del movimiento estudiantil en 1968 y la rebelión neozapatista desde 1994. En manera de conclusión se analiza como las largas revoluciones mexicanas están conectadas a las transiciones en la esfera del contexto histórico amplio.Palabras clave: México, revolución, largas revoluciones, Primera Verdadera Revolución Mundial (PVEM___________________________Abstract:Mexico celebrated in 2010 the Bicentenary of the beginning of its struggles of independence and the Centenary of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. What is not celebrated officially is the contemporary revolutionary process though some of its phases have included enthusiasm for the part of different social actors. In this article I offer you a historical analysis of these revolutionary processes as Mexico’s three long revolutions. Besides that I will explain them within the

  15. Spiral Galaxy Central Bulge Tangential Speed of Revolution Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to, for the first time in a century, scientifically analyze the ``rotation curves'' (sic) of the central bulges of scores of spiral galaxies. I commenced with a methodological, rational, geometrical, arithmetic, and statistical examination--none of them carried through before--of the radial velocity data. The requirement for such a thorough treatment is the paucity of data typically available for the central bulge: fewer than 10 observations and frequently only five. The most must be made of these. A consequence of this logical handling is the discovery of a unique model for the central bulge volume mass density resting on the positive slope, linear, rise of its tangential speed of revolution curve and hence--for the first time--a reliable mass estimate. The deduction comes from a known physics-based, mathematically valid, derivation (not assertion). It rests on the full (not partial) equations of motion plus Poisson's equation. Following that is a prediction for the gravitational potential energy and thence the gravitational force. From this comes a forecast for the tangential speed of revolution curve. It was analyzed in a fashion identical to that of the data thereby closing the circle and demonstrating internal self-consistency. This is a hallmark of a scientific method-informed approach to an experimental problem. Multiple plots of the relevant quantities and measures of goodness of fit will be shown. Astronomy related

  16. The continuing natural gas revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddle, R.

    1997-01-01

    This was the keynote address of the Conference, delivered by the Chairman of the National Energy Board of Canada. Consistent with the Conference theme, the speaker reviewed the major issues and trends seen in the industry today, setting the stage for more detailed discussion of these challenges by other speakers. Among major issues identified were the possibility of further-developing downstream gas deregulation, gas/electricity convergence, changing marketing techniques, the industry's ability to respond to an expanding consumer market, adopt new procedures and technology and reduce supply costs, as well as as assure ongoing profitability at modest gas prices. 11 figs

  17. Theory and practice of 'colorful' revolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The world, in terms of globalization did not become more stable and predictable. Its main characteristics today are: turbulence, insecurity, and growth potential for conflicts. The most important expression of compression of clamps of turbulence becomes events from 2011. Years, in many countries of North Africa and the Middle East, called the ''Arab revolutions''. For some, these events are coincidental and spontaneous protest ''dreamers of democracy'', while for others it is a result of the planned implementation of projects for a global reorganization of the world. Besides the difference in the value perception of ''colored revolutions'', among theorists there is no agreement even on issues of their target orientation and of their relationship to democracy, social reasonableness, and especially of compatibility of goals and the methods for their realizations.

  18. Health and the urban environment: revolutions revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGranahan, Gordan

    2009-05-15

    From cholera pandemics to smog episodes, urban development driven by narrow economic interests has shown itself to be a serious threat to human health and wellbeing. Past revolutions in sanitation and pollution control demonstrate that social movements and governance reforms can transform an urban health penalty into a health advantage. But many environmental problems have been displaced over time and space, and never truly resolved. Health concerns need once again to drive an environmental agenda – but this time it must be sustainable over the long haul, and globally equitable. With the global economic crisis raising the ante, what's needed is no less than a revolution in environmental justice that puts health, not economics, at the core of its values.

  19. Notes towards an Anthropology of Political Revolutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    apparatus and ethnographic efforts towards revolutionary events. This article advances a series of reasons why anthropology can enrich and supplement existing political science and history traditions in the study of political revolutions. Anthropology can do so via key concepts developed by Victor Turner......While resistance and rebellion have remained core themes in anthropology at least since the 1960s, anthropologists have paid much less attention to the study of political revolutions as real historical events. Yet there are compelling real-world reasons why they should orient their analytical......: “liminality,” “social drama,” “communitas,” “frame,” and “play.” Turner's ritual approach gains further relevance when linked to another series of concepts developed by Marcel Mauss, Gabriel Tarde, Georg Simmel, and Gregory Bateson, such as “imitation,” “trickster,” “schismogenesis,” and “crowd behavior...

  20. The electronics revolution inventing the future

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J B

    2017-01-01

    This book is about how electronics, computing, and telecommunications have profoundly changed our lives – the way we work, live, and play. It covers a myriad of topics from the invention of the fundamental devices, and integrated circuits, through radio and television, to computers, mobile telephones and GPS. Today our lives are ruled by electronics as they control the home and computers dominate the workspace. We walk around with mobile phones and communicate by email. Electronics didn’t exist until into the twentieth century. The industrial revolution is the term usually applied to the coming of steam, railways and the factory system. In the twentieth century, it is electronics that has changed the way we gather our information, entertain ourselves, communicate and work. This book demonstrates that this is, in fact, another revolution. .

  1. Toward a microbial Neolithic revolution in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, David S

    2016-03-29

    The Neolithic revolution--the transition of our species from hunter and gatherer to cultivator--began approximately 14,000 years ago and is essentially complete for macroscopic food. Humans remain largely pre-Neolithic in our relationship with microbes but starting with the gut we continue our hundred-year project of approaching the ability to assess and cultivate benign microbiomes in our bodies. Buildings are analogous to the body and it is time to ask what it means to cultivate benign microbiomes in our built environment. A critical distinction is that we have not found, or invented, niches in buildings where healthful microbial metabolism occurs and/or could be cultivated. Key events affecting the health and healthfulness of buildings such as a hurricane leading to a flood or a burst pipe occur only rarely and unpredictably. The cause may be transient but the effects can be long lasting and, e.g., for moisture damage, cumulative. Non-invasive "building tomography" could find moisture and "sentinel microbes" could record the integral of transient growth. "Seed" microbes are metabolically inert cells able to grow when conditions allow. All microbes and their residue present actinic molecules including immunological epitopes (molecular shapes). The fascinating hygiene and microbial biodiversity hypotheses propose that a healthy immune system requires exposure to a set of microbial epitopes that is rich in diversity. A particular conjecture is that measures of the richness of diversity derived from microbiome next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be mechanistically coupled to--rather than merely correlated with some measures of--human health. These hypotheses and conjectures inspire workers and funders but an alternative is also consequent to the first Neolithic revolution: That the genetic uniformity of contemporary foods may also decrease human exposure to molecular biodiversity in a heath-relevant manner. Understanding the consequences--including the unintended

  2. Science, Bourgeois Dignity, and the Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen

    2009-01-01

    What happened to make for the factor of 16 were new ideas, what Mokyr calls “industrial Enlightenment.” But the Scientific Revolution did not suffice. Non-Europeans like the Chinese outstripped the West in science until quite late. Britain did not lead in science---yet clearly did in technology. Indeed, applied technology depended on science only a little even in 1900.

  3. Czechoslovak Marxist humanism and the revolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mervart, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2017), s. 111-126 ISSN 0925-9392 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-23584S Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Czechoslovakia * Marxist humanism * Revolution * Karel Kosík * Robert Kalivoda Subject RIV: AB - History OBOR OECD: History (history of science and technology to be 6.3, history of specific sciences to be under the respective headings) Impact factor: 0.059, year: 2016

  4. European refining: evolution or revolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthbert, N.

    1999-01-01

    A recent detailed analysis of the refining business in Europe (by Purvin and Gurtz) was used to highlight some key issues facing the industry. The article was written under five sub-sections: (i) economic environment (assessment of the economic prospects for Europe), (ii) energy efficiency and global warming (lists the four points of the EU car makers' voluntary agreement), (iii) fuel quality and refinery investment (iv) refinery capacity and utilisation and (v) industry structure and development. Diagrams show GDP per capita for East and West, European road fuel demand to 2015 and European net trade and European refinery ownership by crude capacity. It was concluded that the future of refining in Europe is 'exciting and challenging' and there are likely to be more large joint venture refineries. (UK)

  5. THE INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER: CAUGHT BETWEEN TWO REVOLUTIONS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek Du Preez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The .Industrial Engineer is caught between the Industrial Revolution and the Information revolution. He is confronted with choosing between pragmatic improvements in productivity and efficiency of a single operation or the opportunistic modelling and reshaping of the networked "virtual enterprise" to become more competitive in a global marketplace . The diagram below depicts the different extremes of the Industrial Engineering timeline. This implies that the two societies (Industrial and information might have conflicting characteristics which requires careful repositioning of the Industrial Engineer to ensure that the benefits that can be obtained from the two societies are maximised.

    This paper documents the development of Industrial engineering , then evaluates the nature of the much publicized Information revolution and its impact on society. In order to establish the nature and composition of contemporary Industrial Engineering in the 1990' s, an analysis and categorization of the literature in four journals for the last two years are performed. This is enhanced with an INTERNET search into Industrial Engineering Research and developments that are currently under development.

  6. Axisymmetric vibrations of thick shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kosawada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shin

    1983-01-01

    Axisymmetric shells of revolution are used for chemical plants, nuclear power plants, aircrafts, structures and so on, and the elucidation of their free vibration is important for the design. In this study, the axisymmetric vibration of a barrel-shaped shell was analyzed by the modified thick shell theory. The Lagrangian during one period of the vibration of a shell of revolution was determined, and from its stopping condition, the vibration equations and the boundary conditions were derived. The vibration equations were analyzed strictly by using the series solution. Moreover, the basic equations for the strain of a shell and others were based on those of Love. As the examples of numerical calculation, the natural frequency and vibration mode of the symmetrical shells of revolution fixed at both ends and supported at both ends were determined, and their characteristics were clarified. By comparing the results of this study with the results by thin shell theory, the effects of shearing deformation and rotary inertia on the natural frequency and vibration mode were clarified. The theoretical analysis and the numerical calculation are described. The effects of shearing deformation and rotary inertia on the natural frequency became larger in the higher order vibration. The vibration mode did not much change in both theories. (Kako, I.)

  7. The Scientific & Democratic Revolution in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Flecha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main issue dealt with in this theoretical paper is the explanation of the starting scientific and democratic revolution both in the educative field and in the educative research. In addition, evidence-based arguments are included to provide validity of some affirmations. The first section argues that the social sciences are the daughters and an essential part of democracy. A few historical arguments about the way in which the dominant classes have slowed down the scientific progress and the development of people that make it possible. In the second section, it is analyzed the opposition of feudal universities to this unstoppable beginning of what could be called the scientific and democratic revolution. At the same time, we deal with its ambivalent character requiring to be supported and to be criticized so that it can be improved. In the third section, we expound the way in which this progress has provide some conditions that makes it possible to overcome the strong gender-based violence happening in our institutions of higher education and makes it also possible that women who were persecuted are now transforming our universities. Influences and criticism to our university feudalism, made by social movements such as the named 'Spanish Revolution', appear in the fourth section. In the fifth and last section, we offer a proposal to promote the scientific, democratic, and revolutionary approach of the university.

  8. E-dustrial revolution continues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverty-Wilson, K.

    2001-01-01

    The widespread use of sophisticated electronic tools to monitor data flow and to transact business is alive and well in the oilpatch despite the recent melt-down of dot com companies. By way of illustration the article cites the Alberta government's VIPIR (Volumetric and Infrastructure Petroleum Information Registry) project, which uses state-of-the-art software to gather data from all well sites. This data will assist in the accurate determination of royalties due to the province, and allow spotting of errors almost instantaneously, while reducing the reporting burden on companies. An electronic transfer system will also speed processes of land lease management, bids and transfers, by allowing transactions to be completed on-line. The province is also working on a system called the 'Alberta SuperNet' which will bring high-speed internet access to over 40 towns, villages and remote areas of the province. Concurrently, the National Energy Board is looking at a system that will allow electronic filing of applications. Electronic information transfer systems are also challenging the time -honored SCADA systems. The new systems allow readings to be transmitted daily and alarms to be sounded when problems occur, cutting back on costs by negating operator visits to sites that are running smoothly. The most immediate problem preventing the petroleum industry to truly becoming an e-industry is the lack of standardized software in use by oil, gas, supplier and service companies. Nevertheless, Alberta is said to be leading the world in oil and gas application of structured data management, and it is only a matter of time before industry-specific standards in e-communication will be developed. In the meantime, it is well to remember, that e-business is about business, not technology. Its core function is communication and the connecting of people to information and knowledge, enabling them to work smarter, faster and with greater profitability

  9. Can the US shale revolution be duplicated in Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saussay, Aurelien

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, the rapid increase in shale gas and shale oil production in the United States has profoundly changed energy markets in North America, and has led to a significant decrease in American natural gas prices. The possible existence of large shale deposits in Europe, mainly in France, Poland and the United Kingdom, has fostered speculation on whether the 'shale revolution', and its accompanying macro-economic impacts, could be duplicated in Europe. However, a number of uncertainties, notably geological, technological and regulatory, make this possibility unclear. We present a techno-economic model, SHERPA (Shale Exploitation and Recovery Projection and Analysis), to analyze the main determinants of the profitability of shale wells and plays. We calibrate our model using production data from the leading American shale plays. We use SHERPA to estimate three shale gas production scenarios exploring different sets of geological and technical hypotheses for the largest potential holder of shale gas deposits in Europe, France. Even considering that the geology of the potential French shale deposits is favorable to commercial extraction, we find that under assumptions calibrated on U.S. production data, natural gas could be produced at a high breakeven price of $8.6 per MMBtu, and over a 45 year time-frame have a net present value of $19.6 billion - less than 1% of 2012 French GDP. However, the specificities of the European context, notably high deposit depth and stricter environmental regulations, could increase drilling costs and further decrease this low profitability. We find that a 40% premium over American drilling costs would make shale gas extraction uneconomical. Absent extreme well productivity, it appears very difficult for shale gas extraction to have an impact on European energy markets comparable to the American shale revolution. (author)

  10. Russia’s Reactions to the Color Revolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    leadership brought into power by the Tulip Revolution also sought closer ties with Russia, and moved away from the democratic ideal espoused by their...words) The color revolutions, the popular democratic protests that occurred in Georgia, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan from 2003–2005 and overturned the pro...PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT The color revolutions, the popular democratic protests that occurred in Georgia, Ukraine, and

  11. Finite element model for nonlinear shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear material shipping containers have shells of revolution as basic structural components. Analytically modeling the response of these containers to severe accident impact conditions requires a nonlinear shell-of-revolution model that accounts for both geometric and material nonlinearities. Existing models are limited to large displacements, small rotations, and nonlinear materials. The paper presents a finite element model for a nonlinear shell of revolution that will account for large displacements, large strains, large rotations, and nonlinear materials

  12. Public and Private Responsibility for Mental Health: Mental Health's Fourth Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokecki, Paul R.

    Three revolutions in the history of mental health were identified by Nicholas Hobbs: the humane revolution, the scientific and therapeutic revolution, and the public health revolution. The shift of responsibilities for mental health and substance abuse services from the public to the private sector may constitute a fourth mental health revolution.…

  13. The US Shale Gas Revolution and Its Externality on Crude Oil Prices: A Counterfactual Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxun Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of shale gas production since the mid-2000s which is commonly referred to as “shale gas revolution” has had large impacts on global energy outlook. The impact is particularly substantial when it comes to the oil market because natural gas and oil are substitutes in consumption and complements and rivals in production. This paper investigates the price externality of shale gas revolution on crude oil. Applying a structural vector autoregressive model (VAR model, the effect of natural gas production on real oil price is identified in particular, and then based on the identification, counterfactuals of oil price without shale gas revolution are constructed. We find that after the expansion of shale gas production, the real West Texas Intermediate (WTI oil price is depressed by 10.22 USD/barrel on average from 2007 to 2017, and the magnitude seems to increase with time. In addition, the period before shale gas revolution is used as a “thought experiment” for placebo study. The results support the hypothesis that real WTI oil price can be reasonably reproduced by our models, and the estimated gap for oil price during 2007–2017 can be attributed to shale gas revolution. The methodology and framework can be applied to evaluate the economic impacts of other programs or policies.

  14. How did the US economy react to shale gas production revolution? An advanced time series approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgili, Faik; Koçak, Emrah; Bulut, Ümit; Sualp, M. Nedim

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at examining the impacts of shale gas revolution on industrial production in the US. To this end, this paper, first, throughout literature review, exposes the features of shale gas revolution in the US in terms of energy technology and energy markets. However, the potential influences of shale gas extraction on the US economy are not explicit in the existing literature. Thus, considering mainly the output of shale gas revolution on the US economy in this research, later, the paper conducts econometric models to reveal if there exists significant effect(s) of shale gas revolution on the US economy. Therefore, the paper employs unit root tests and cointegration tests by following relevant US monthly data from January 2008 to December 2013. Then, this paper observes long run impact of shale gas production on industrial production in the US through dynamic ordinary least squares estimation with dummy structural breaks and conducts Granger causality test based on vector error correction model. The dynamic ordinary least squares estimator explores that shale gas production has a positive effect on industrial production. Besides, the Granger causality test presents that shale gas production Granger causes industrial production in the long run. Based on the findings of the long run estimations, the paper yields that industrial production is positively related to shale gas production. Eventually, upon its findings, this paper asserts that (i) the shale gas revolution in the US has considerable positive effects on the US economy within the scope of the validity of the growth hypothesis, (ii) new technologies might be developed to mitigate the possible negative environmental effects of shale gas production, (iii) the countries having shale gas reserves, as in US, may follow energy policies to utilize their shale reserves more in the future to meet their energy demand and to increase their economic welfare. - Highlights: • Explores the US shale gas revolution

  15. "CLASS APPROACH" AND "PROLETARIAN CHARACTER" OF RUSSIAN REVOLUTION OF 1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Эдуард Эдуардович Шульц

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of the problem of “class character” of 1917’ revolution and competency of the term “proletarian revolution”. The author considers questions of participation of various social groups in the Russian revolution, draws analogies of social composition of previous revolutions, considers the principle of “proletarian revolution”, as an ideology element for positioning of Bolsheviks and power capture. It is necessary to consider that an age, gender and national factor played much bigger role un Russian revolution than class factor. Revolution in Russia in many respects leaned on young generations which made more than a third of the population of the Russian Empire by 1917. In fight against tsarism separate calculation was based on the non-russian population and national suburbs of the empire. The special role in the Russian revolution was played by the peasantry. Revolution happened in the capital (in two capitals in Russia, the peasantry remained indifferent to revolution while Bolsheviks didn't begin to take away from them the food violently. This period:(summer - fall of 1919 became the time of peak of the Civil war. However return of landowners and their claim for property of the land forced peasants to turn bayonets for revolution and the earth and, eventually, to provide to Bolsheviks a victory in the Civil war.

  16. Ukraine's Orange Revolution and U.S. Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woehrel, Steven

    2005-01-01

    In January 2005, Viktor Yushchenko became Ukraine's new President, after massive demonstrations helped to overturn the former regime's electoral fraud, in what has been dubbed the "Orange Revolution...

  17. Constructing Marxism: Karl Kautsky and the French Revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Bertel

    2009-01-01

    Karl Kautsky's writings on the French Revolution were crucial to the construction not only of the Marxist interpretation of the Revolution, which was perhaps the most important reference point for the historiography of that event during the 20th century, but even of Marxism itself as a comprehens......Karl Kautsky's writings on the French Revolution were crucial to the construction not only of the Marxist interpretation of the Revolution, which was perhaps the most important reference point for the historiography of that event during the 20th century, but even of Marxism itself...

  18. [The beginning of the Cuban demographic revolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Castellon, R

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of the Cuban demographic revolution associated with the main economic, political, and social changes in the country are analyzed. The authors begin with a brief historical outline of the political-economic situation in the country in the middle of the 19th century. There is emphasis on the dependency of the Cuban economy and its monoproducer nature (with sugar being the major export). This was due to the Spanish colonization and to the subsequent American neocolonization. The discovery of the cause for yellow fever by a Cuban physician and the sanitation campaign conducted by the Americans contributed to a diminishing of mortality. A great migratory flow occurred due to the price of sugar in the world market. This must have influenced Cuban demographic patterns which are a major factor linked to the demographic revolution. The influence on proliferation of urbanization and educational trends is emphasized. The low participation in economic activities of women during the early part of the century did affect fertility levels. The trends in mortality throughout the period 1907-43 are pointed out. It was found that 1 major aspect which had a bearing on Cuban demographic patterns was the 2 large migratory flows. An analysis of growth rates in the population--which also confirms the demographic changes in Cuba--is presented. It is concluded that the 4th decade of this century witnessed Cuba's entry in a new stage of the demographic revolution, a stage in which decreased fertility and mortality go together to create a new period. (author's)

  19. Perspective: the revolution is upon us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick S

    2010-05-01

    Profound socioeconomic pressures on medical student education have been catalogued extensively. These pressures include teaching patient shortages, teacher shortages, conflicting systems, and financial problems. Many of these problems have been caused by an unregulated free market affecting medicine overall, with market values sometimes overshadowing the academic values of education, research, and patient care. This has caused profound changes in the conduct of medical student education. Particularly important has been a reduction in the "gold standard" of teaching: direct student-teacher and supervised student-patient interaction, replaced by a potpourri of online and simulated modules. The aggregate of these changes constitutes a revolution that challenges whether medical schools, school buildings, classes, and dedicated faculty are even necessary. The author posits several recommendations in response to this revolution: (1) recognize the revolution as such, and carefully guide or abort it, lest its outcome be inadequate, inauthentic, or corrupt, (2) prioritize academic rather than business values, (3) ensure that funds allotted for education are used for education, (4) insist that medical schools, not industry, teach students, (5) value authentic education more than simulation, (6) adopt learner-centered teaching without misusing it, (7) maintain acceptable class attendance without requiring it, (8) provide, from the first school day, authentic, patient-centered medical education characterized by vertical integration, humanism, early patient exposure, biopsychosocial orientation, and physician role modeling, (9) ensure that third- and fourth-year students have rich patient-care responsibility, and 10) keep tenure. These actions would permit the preservation of an educational gold standard that justifies medical education's cost.

  20. French Revolution or Industrial Revolution? A Note on the Contrasting Experiences of England and France up to 1800

    OpenAIRE

    Paul R. Sharp; Jacob L. Weisdorf

    2011-01-01

    At the end of the eighteenth century, England and France both underwent revolutions: France the French Revolution, England the industrial revolution. This note sheds new light on these contrasting experiences in the histories of England and France by looking at the evolution of real consumer prices in London and Paris in the centuries leading up to 1800. Whilst in London, building workers were facing low and stable consumer prices over the period, leaving plenty of scope for a demand-driven c...

  1. The impact of the North American shale gas revolution on regional natural gas markets: Evidence from the regime-switching model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Jiang-Bo; Ji, Qiang; Fan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the North American shale gas revolution on price movement regimes in the North American and European gas markets, using the Markov regime-switching model. It then measures price spreads between oil and gas from 1998 to 2015 to identify the impact of the revolution on the relationship between oil and regional gas prices. The results show that the typical movement regime of Henry Hub prices changes from 'slightly upward' to 'sharply downward'. In addition, the clear seasonal effect of Henry Hub prices has disappeared after the shale gas revolution. The typical movement of national balancing point (NBP) prices has changed gradually from a 'sharply upward' regime to the alternative regimes between 'sharply downward' and 'slightly upward', tending to follow oil prices. This indicates that the shale gas revolution has had little impact on NBP price movement. Meanwhile, Henry Hub prices have decoupled from WTI prices, while NBP and Brent prices have continued to exhibit a long-term equilibrium level around which they have swung in the short time-frame since the shale gas revolution. Pertinent energy policy makers and energy market participants should pay attention to these changes and adjust their trade, production and investment strategies accordingly. - Highlights: •Impact of shale gas revolution on Henry Hub and NBP price movement regime is analysed. •Impact of revolution on relationship between oil and regional gas price is identified. •Revolution changes Henry Hub movement regime, having minor impact on NBP regime. •Clear seasonal fluctuation of Henry Hub prices has disappeared since the revolution. •Henry Hub has decoupled from WTI, while NBP and Brent exhibit long-term equilibrium.

  2. Representing space in the scientific revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David Marshall

    2014-01-01

    The novel understanding of the physical world that characterized the Scientific Revolution depended on a fundamental shift in the way its protagonists understood and described space. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, spatial phenomena were described in relation to a presupposed central point; by its end, space had become a centerless void in which phenomena could only be described by reference to arbitrary orientations. David Marshall Miller examines both the historical and philosophical aspects of this far-reaching development, including the rejection of the idea of heavenly sphere

  3. Sound and heat revolutions in phononics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldovan, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The phonon is the physical particle representing mechanical vibration and is responsible for the transmission of everyday sound and heat. Understanding and controlling the phononic properties of materials provides opportunities to thermally insulate buildings, reduce environmental noise, transform waste heat into electricity and develop earthquake protection. Here I review recent progress and the development of new ideas and devices that make use of phononic properties to control both sound and heat. Advances in sonic and thermal diodes, optomechanical crystals, acoustic and thermal cloaking, hypersonic phononic crystals, thermoelectrics, and thermocrystals herald the next technological revolution in phononics.

  4. Introducing bioinformatics, the biosciences' genomic revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zanella, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    The general audience for these lectures is mainly physicists, computer scientists, engineers or the general public wanting to know more about what’s going on in the biosciences. What’s bioinformatics and why is all this fuss being made about it ? What’s this revolution triggered by the human genome project ? Are there any results yet ? What are the problems ? What new avenues of research have been opened up ? What about the technology ? These new developments will be compared with what happened at CERN earlier in its evolution, and it is hoped that the similiraties and contrasts will stimulate new curiosity and provoke new thoughts.

  5. Imagineering the astronomical revolution - Essay review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Nicholas.

    2006-11-01

    Concerning following Books: (I) Transmitting knowledge - words, images, and instruments in early modern Europe. Kusukawa and Maclean (eds.), OUP, Oxford, 2006; (II) Widmung, Welterklärung und Wissenschaftslegitimierung: Titelbilder und ihre Funktionen in der wissenschaftlichen Revolution. Remmert, Harrassowitz, Wiesbaden, 2005; (III) The power of images in early modern science. Lefevre, Renn and Schoepflin (eds.), Birkhäuser, Basel, 2003; (IV) Immagini per conoscere - dal Rinascimento alla rivoluzione scientifica. Meroi and Pogliano (eds.), Olschki, Florenz, 2001; (V) Erkenntnis Erfindung Konstruktion - Studien zur Bildgeschichte von Naturwissenschaften und Technik vom 16. bis zum 19. Jahrhundert. Holländer (ed.), Mann, Berlin, 2000.

  6. Quantum-Mechanical Particle Confined to Surfaces of Revolution - Truncated Cone and Elliptic Torus Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Willatzen, Morten; Voon, L.C. Lew Yan

    2005-01-01

    The theory of a quantum-mechanical particle confined to a surface of revolution is described using differential geometry methods including the derivation of a general set of three ordinary differential equations in curved coordinates. The problem is shown to be completely separable with the present...... hard-wall boundary conditions. Two case studies of recent experimental interest. the nanocone and torus-shaped nanoring structures. are analyzed in terms of eigenstates, energies. and symmetry characteristics based on the theory presented....

  7. Global health governance - the next political revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickbusch, I; Reddy, K S

    2015-07-01

    The recent Ebola crisis has re-opened the debate on global health governance and the role of the World Health Organization. In order to analyze what is at stake, we apply two conceptual approaches from the social sciences - the work on gridlock and the concept of cosmopolitan moments - to assess the ability of the multilateral governance system to reform. We find that gridlock can be broken open by a health crisis which in turn generates a political drive for change. We show that a set of cosmopolitan moments have led to the introduction of the imperative of health in a range of policy arenas and moved health into 'high politics' - this has been called a political revolution. We contend that this revolution has entered a second phase with increasing interest of heads of state in global health issues. Here lies the window of opportunity to reform global health governance. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Scientific pluralism and the Chemical Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Martin

    2015-02-01

    In a number of papers and in his recent book, Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism, Pluralism (2012), Hasok Chang has argued that the correct interpretation of the Chemical Revolution provides a strong case for the view that progress in science is served by maintaining several incommensurable "systems of practice" in the same discipline, and concerning the same region of nature. This paper is a critical discussion of Chang's reading of the Chemical Revolution. It seeks to establish, first, that Chang's assessment of Lavoisier's and Priestley's work and character follows the phlogistonists' "actors' sociology"; second, that Chang simplifies late-eighteenth-century chemical debates by reducing them to an alleged conflict between two systems of practice; third, that Chang's evidence for a slow transition from phlogistonist theory to oxygen theory is not strong; and fourth, that he is wrong to assume that chemists at the time did not have overwhelming good reasons to favour Lavoisier's over the phlogistonists' views. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative effects of the shale oil revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belu Mănescu, Cristiana; Nuño, Galo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of the so-called “shale oil revolution” on oil prices and economic growth. We employ a general equilibrium model of the world oil market in which Saudi Arabia is the dominant firm, with the rest of the producers as a competitive fringe. Our results suggest that most of the expected increase in US oil supply due to the shale oil revolution has already been incorporated into prices and that it will produce an additional increase of 0.2% in the GDP of oil importers in the period 2010–2018. We also employ the model to analyze the collapse in oil prices in the second half of 2014 and conclude that it was mainly due to positive unanticipated supply shocks. - Highlights: • We analyze the impact of the “shale oil revolution” on oil prices and economic growth. • We employ a general equilibrium model of the oil market in which Saudi Arabia is the dominant firm. • We find that most of the shale oil revolution is already priced in. • We also analyze the decline in oil prices in the second half of 2014. • We find that unanticipated supply shocks played the major role in the fall.

  10. Social Media, Mediation and the Arab Revolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriyam Aouragh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article discusses the socio-political implications of user-generated applications and platforms through the prism of the Arab revolutions. Popular postmodern conceptualisations such as (post-nation state network societies, (post-class immaterial economies and (horizontal political resistance through multitudes requires rigorous reassessment in the aftermath of the events in the MENA. Although the revolutions have led to a resurgence of debates about the power of new media, such arguments (or rather assertions are echoes of earlier suggestions related to peculiar fetishisations of ICT in general and social media in particular. The point of my critique is not to deny the social and political usefulness of new media but to examine the pros and cons of the internet. I tackle the juxtaposition of the internet and political activism through the Marxist concept Mediation and investigate how the social, political and cultural realms of capitalism (superstructure are both conditioned by and react upon the political-economic base. This helps us to understand structural factors such as ICT ownership (political-economic decision making of social media; while deconstructing the effect of cultural hegemony disseminated through mass media. It also overcomes an unfortunate weakness of some “academic Marxism” (an overwhelming focus on theory by anchoring the theoretical arguments in an anthropological approach

  11. The microbiota revolution: Excitement and caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, Maria

    2017-09-01

    Scientific progress is characterized by important technological advances. Next-generation DNA sequencing has, in the past few years, led to a major scientific revolution: the microbiome revolution. It has become possible to generate a fingerprint of the whole microbiota of any given environment. As it becomes clear that the microbiota affects several aspects of our lives, each new scientific finding should ideally be analyzed in light of these communities. For instance, animal experimentation should consider animal sources and husbandry; human experimentation should include analysis of microenvironmental cues that might affect the microbiota, including diet, antibiotic, and drug use, genetics. When analyzing the activity of a drug, we should remember that, according to the microbiota of the host, different drug activities might be observed, either due to modification or degradation by the microbiota, or because the microbiota changes the immune system of the host in a way that makes that drug more or less effective. This minireview will not be a comprehensive review on the interaction between the host and microbiota, but it will aim at creating awareness on why we should not forget the contribution of the microbiota in any single aspect of biology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Valgkampen har revolutionære rødder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Mikkel; Mariegaard, Nicolai Von Eggers; Jessen, Mathias Hein

    2016-01-01

    Den generelle forståelse af forholdet mellem individ og regering, frihed og slaveri fra Den Amerikanske Revolution kan genfindes i nutidig amerikansk politik og i den aktuelle valgkamp.......Den generelle forståelse af forholdet mellem individ og regering, frihed og slaveri fra Den Amerikanske Revolution kan genfindes i nutidig amerikansk politik og i den aktuelle valgkamp....

  13. Navigating the Information Revolution: Choices for Laggard Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatune, Julius

    2007-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of information and communication technologies (ICTs) during the last two decades has had a profound impact on all spheres of human endeavors, changes that are collectively referred to as the Information Revolution (IR). But the revolution has been uneven, with some countries being far ahead and others far behind in IR,…

  14. Modern Times: The Industrial Revolution and the Concept of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppen, Frans H.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role the Industrial Revolution had in changing humankind's perception of time and recommends using the flashback approach in order to encourage students to think about how the process of industrialization still affects their lives. Provides activities that address the concept of time caused by the Industrial Revolution. (CMK)

  15. The Fourth Revolution in Teaching: Meta-Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.

    Three major educational revolutions have been the advent of writing, the use of books as teaching tools, and the shift in educational responsibility from the home to the school. The fourth revolution, which is based on the use of electronic technology in teaching, began with programmed teaching machines, individualized instruction, and the…

  16. The great scientific revolutions of the 20. century; Les grandes revolutions scientifiques du 20. siecle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrochia, D. [Universite Paul Valery, Montpellier 3, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1997-12-31

    Three great physical revolutions are studied here: the theory of relativity (general and restricted); the quantum mechanics (and its different interpretations); the theory of the determinist chaos (its pre-history as its applications). These three theories contribute to modify the answers that it is possible to bring to great metaphysical questions and to give a hint of a new philosophical landscape. (N.C.)

  17. Who lost the health care revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, W

    1990-01-01

    Just a year ago, in the March-April 1989 issue of Harvard Business Review, Professor Regina E. Herzlinger of the Harvard Business School took a long look at the U.S. health care system and declared the much touted revolution in the health care delivery system a failure. This article is a summary of the arguments that Professor Herzlinger marshaled for her treatise. In the following two articles, members of the College assess those arguments in terms of the medical management profession and in terms of the organizations, a hospital and a managed care company, for which they work. Finally, Professor Herzlinger returns to the subject with a response to these physician executives.

  18. The quiet revolution: decentralisation and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbrenner, N.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how major changes in the electricity supply industry can take place in the next few years due to market liberalisation and efforts to reduce the emission of greenhouse gasses. Decentralisation is discussed as being a 'mega-trend' and fuel cells in particular are emphasised as being a suitable means of generating heat and power locally, i.e. where they are needed. Also, the ecological advantages of using natural gas to 'fire' the fuel cell units that are to complement or replace coal-fired or gas-fired combined gas and steam-turbine power stations is discussed. Various types of fuel cell are briefly described. Market developments in the USA, where the power grid is extensive and little reserve capacity is available, are noted. New designs of fuel cell are briefly examined and it is noted that electricity utilities, originally against decentralisation, are now beginning to promote this 'quiet revolution'

  19. Silicon: Child and Progenitor of Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, R. W.

    Antoine Lavoisier, the pioneering French chemist who (together with Joseph Priestley in England) identified oxygen as an element and gave it its name, in 1789 concluded that quartz was probably a compound with an as-yet undiscovered but presumably extremely common element. That was also the year in which the French Revolution broke out. Five years later, the Jacobins accused Lavoisier of offences against the people and cut off his head, thereby nearly cutting off the new chemistry. It was not until 1824 that Jöns Berzelius in Sweden succeeded in confirming Lavoisier's speculation by isolating silicon. Argument at once broke out among the scientific elite as to whether the newly found element was a metal or an insulator. It took more than a century to settle that disagreement decisively: As so often, when all-or-nothing alternatives are fiercely argued, the truth turned out to be neither all nor nothing.

  20. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  1. Tunisia in the Aftermath of the Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Moalla

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, humor and the confused feelings of overwhelming happiness, fear, and uncertainty intertwine to reflect Tunisians’ attitudes, beliefs, feelings, and experiences in the aftermath of the revolution. The study adopts a blended netnography/ethnography approach to data collection and analysis. My original data consist of 2 hrs of recorded discussions of 60 Tunisian students and a total of 300 online humorous posts collected from the social network Facebook (FB. The data revealed that Tunisians interacting via FB used two main types of situational humor: Third party insult and Alternate reality. These two types of humor were found to be associated with a variety of psychological and social functions and to serve as effective interpersonal strategies to construct group cohesion, strengthen shared attitudes and beliefs, and develop relational identity.

  2. Revolution, Romanticism and the Long Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Craciun

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to consider the future of Victorian literary studies within the long nineteenth century, we must go back to that earlier “period” of the nineteenth century, and the French Revolution of 1789. Drawing on the aesthetic and political innovations of 1790s women's writings, this essay argues that we need to reconceive of nineteenth-century literary studies beyond the period boundaries of Romantic and Victorian. The sexualization of revolutionary Terror, and particularly of Robespierre, in Romantic-era writings by women like Helen Maria Williams, Mary Robinson and Fanny Burney, offers surprising precedents for the feminization of Terror associated with the retrospectives of Victorian writers like Carlyle and Dickens. In this respect, and given many other aesthetic continuities (for example, the crossgender and cross-period appeal of the “poetess” figure, the “Victorian period” appears increasingly unsatisfactory when compared to the merits of a long nineteenth-century model for literary studies.

  3. The two cultures and the scientific revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, C P

    2013-01-01

    2013 Reprint of 1959 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. This is the publication of the influential 1959 Rede Lecture by British scientist and novelist C. P. Snow. Its thesis was that "the intellectual life of the whole of western society" was split into the titular two cultures - namely the sciences and the humanities - and that this was a major hindrance to solving the world's problems. Published in book form, Snow's lecture was widely read and discussed on both sides of the Atlantic, leading him to write a 1963 follow-up, "The Two Cultures: And a Second Look: An Expanded Version of The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution."

  4. Book review of Revolution in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Anna Kepka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In Revolution in Higher Education, Georgia Tech Professor Richard DeMillo contrasts the rapid innovations made in online learning by a small band of interested, outside-of-academia adventurers with the slow progress made within the ivory tower. DeMillo follows innovators with now-familiar names and projects like Coursera and Udacity through their startup phases, describing motives and methods, with an insider's view at their effects on college learning. Then, after a thorough lesson in the history of the academy, DeMillo argues that adherence to academic tradition will not save higher education. In fact, he says, only flexibility and speed can help colleges and universities meet the challenges of today and the inevitable disintegration of higher education as we know it of tomorrow.

  5. Elastic buckling of ellipsoids of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solal, Roger; Hoffmann, Alain; Roche, Roland.

    1976-02-01

    The CEASEMT system of calculation by finite elements is used to determine critical internal pressures on a flattened ellipsoid of revolution. This case resembles that of an ellipsoidal head of a thin pressure vessel fitted onto a flexible colla. The calculations are performed assuming the geometry perfect, the deformations slight and the behaviour of the material perfectly elastic. The results obtained are presented favourably by plotting a reduced pressure p* against the geometry. A good definition of p* would be: p*=pπ 2 E/1-μ 2 .e 2 b 2 /a 4 (p* critical pressure, E Young's modulus, μ Poisson's coefficient, e thickness, a half large axis, b half small axis). When a/b is above 2 the p value remains close to 1. For lower a/b values the p value rises considerably with a/b [fr

  6. The Next Information Revolution in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennicutt, R. C.

    2006-08-01

    The information revolution has truly revolutionized our profession, through such innovations as the astronomical data centres, electronic journals and preprint servers, and bibliographic interfaces that link these resources through instantaneous and freely available web interfaces. For most of us the effects of these innovations have been profound, changing forever the way we access the research literature, disseminate results to our colleagues, and even in the ways we carry out our research and write papers. Astronomy's efforts in this area have attracted the attention and admiration of other scientific professions as well as the information technology community. We now stand at the threshold of a second revolution, in which enormous and rich collections of astronomical observations, models, software, and tools will be accessible through a common Virtual Observatory interface. The next logical step beyond that is an integration of these VO resources with the web of astronomical literature, to provide mechanisms for quality certification of those resources, and to provide a seamless mechanism by which authors can make the results of their research available to other scientists in their most useful form. If this is done successfully its impacts on the way we conduct and disseminate our research may be as profound as those of the past decade. However this success will require cooperative approaches to information archiving and publication involving the data centres, journals, and library communities, and which incorporate or at least emulate the features of curation, provenance, quality assurance, and intellectual property protections that underlie the traditional publishing system. This talk will highlight some of the efforts being made in the VO and journal communities to make this vision a reality, and identify some of the key challenges that remain.

  7. Dynamic nonlinear analysis of shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Riesemann, W.A.; Stricklin, J.A.; Haisler, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    DYNAPLAS is a program for the transient response of ring stiffened shells of revolution subjected to either asymmetric initial velocities or to asymmetric pressure loadings. Both material and geometric nonlinearities may be considered. The present version, DYNAPLAS II, began with the programs SAMMSOR and DYNASOR. As is the case for the earlier programs, a driver program, SAMMSOR III, generates the stiffness and mass matrices for the harmonics under consideration. A highly refined meridionally curved axisymmetric thin shell of revolution element is used in conjunction with beam type ring stiffeners in the circumferential direction. The shell element uses a cubic displacement function and through static condensation a basic eight degree of freedom element is generated. The shell material may be isotropic or orthotropic. DYNAPLAS II uses the 'displacement' method of analysis in which the nonlinearities are treated as pseudo loads on the right-hand side of the equations of motion. The equations are written for each Fourier harmonic used in representing the asymmetric loading components, and although the left-hand side of the equations is uncoupled, the right-hand side is coupled by the nonlinear pseudo loads. The strain displacement equations of Novozhilov are used and the incremental theory of plasticity is used with the von Mises yield condition and associated flow rule. Either isotropic work hardening or the mechanical sublayer model may be used. Strain rate effects may be included. Either the explicit central difference method or the implcit Houbolt method are available. The program has found use in the analysis of containment vessels for light water reactors

  8. All-Weather Solar Cells: A Rising Photovoltaic Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qunwei

    2017-06-16

    Solar cells have been considered as one of the foremost solutions to energy and environmental problems because of clean, high efficiency, cost-effective, and inexhaustible features. The historical development and state-of-the-art solar cells mainly focus on elevating photoelectric conversion efficiency upon direct sunlight illumination. It is still a challenging problem to realize persistent high-efficiency power generation in rainy, foggy, haze, and dark-light conditions (night). The physical proof-of-concept for all-weather solar cells opens a door for an upcoming photovoltaic revolution. Our group has been exploring constructive routes to build all-weather solar cells so that these advanced photovoltaic technologies can be an indication for global solar industry in bringing down the cost of energy harvesting. How the all-weather solar cells are built without reducing photo performances and why such architectures can realize electricity outputs with no visible-light are discussed. Potential pathways and opportunities to enrich all-weather solar cell families are envisaged. The aspects discussed here may enable researchers to develop undiscovered abilities and to explore wide applications of advanced photovoltaics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Green revolution: impacts, limits, and the path ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingali, Prabhu L

    2012-07-31

    A detailed retrospective of the Green Revolution, its achievement and limits in terms of agricultural productivity improvement, and its broader impact at social, environmental, and economic levels is provided. Lessons learned and the strategic insights are reviewed as the world is preparing a "redux" version of the Green Revolution with more integrative environmental and social impact combined with agricultural and economic development. Core policy directions for Green Revolution 2.0 that enhance the spread and sustainable adoption of productivity enhancing technologies are specified.

  10. Mechanical systems with closed orbits on manifolds of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtseva, E A; Fedoseev, D A

    2015-01-01

    We study natural mechanical systems describing the motion of a particle on a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold of revolution in the field of a central smooth potential. We obtain a classification of Riemannian manifolds of revolution and central potentials on them that have the strong Bertrand property: any nonsingular (that is, not contained in a meridian) orbit is closed. We also obtain a classification of manifolds of revolution and central potentials on them that have the 'stable' Bertrand property: every parallel is an 'almost stable' circular orbit, and any nonsingular bounded orbit is closed. Bibliography: 14 titles

  11. The Shale Gas Revolution: Can It Cross the Atlantic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalai, Pavol

    2013-01-01

    An American-style shale gas revolution will not take place in Europe on the short term as things stand at the moment. The economic profitability of the European resources is not as interesting, their social acceptability is not granted, and the energy security seems to worry only the countries extremely dependent on Russian imports like Poland. However, because of the influence of the American experience and that of some capitals who want to emulate or avoid it, the debate on its advantages and drawbacks continues to rage in Europe. It has become part of a wider discussion over the EU's climate-energy strategy until 2030. The European Commission, which represents the common European interest, has seized the opportunity: by the end of the year it intends to put forward new measures to improve the management of the environmental impact of any potential activities. The Union should not stop here: the positive impact in the US on the economy and energy security, and the difficulties of its own climate and energy policies should convince the Union to think beyond environmental constraints. It should notably organize a European public debate in view of the European elections in May 2014, which will take into account both economic and geopolitical aspects. On the medium term, it should dedicate resources to allow for estimates of shale gas resources in Europe and of the profitability of extraction. On the long term, the Union should observe the best practices in the US, facilitate the exchange of information between the extracting Member States, and contribute to the improvement of extraction methods towards higher environmental standards and better economic conditions. (author)

  12. the impact of digital technology revolution on surveying curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the impact of digital technology revolution on surveying curriculum review in ... Global Journal of Environmental Sciences ... Also, it focuses on the need to review the current surveying curriculum to meet the technological advancement. Finally ...

  13. Gender Revolution Prospects in Nigeria: Implications for Marriage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis suggests that the prospects for the emergence of GR ... Gender revolution (GR) and its association with demographic behaviour are well ..... The opinions expressed by the participants suggest that some fundamental social.

  14. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  15. Navigating the Information Revolution: Choices for Laggard Countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gatune, Julius

    2007-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of information and communication technologies (ICTs) during the last two decades has had a profound impact on all spheres of human endeavors, changes that are collectively referred to as the Information Revolution (IR...

  16. Illiteracy in Devon During the Industrial Revolution, 1754-1844

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    Indicates the likelihood that the initial period of the Industrial Revolution was one of deteriorating educational standards in most areas, especially in those that were seats of displaced domestic textile industries. (Author)

  17. Goblins, Morlocks, and Weasels: Classic Fantasy and the Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, Jules

    1977-01-01

    Examines three fantasy classics written at the time of the Industrial Revolution to illustrate the effects of drastic social change on fantasy writing; suggests the possible impact of these fantasies on their readers. (GT)

  18. Elasto/visco-plastic deformations of thin shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezono, S.; Akashi, T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical analysis of large elasto/visco-plastic deformations of this shells of revolution under axi-symmetrical loading with applications to pressure vessels. (orig.)

  19. Current Debates in the Study of the Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the literature on the debates surrounding the industrial revolution using four categories: (1) definition and characteristics; (2) context and causation; (3) impacts and scope; and (4) industrialization as a worldwide phenomenon. (CMK)

  20. Precocious albion: A new interpretation of the British Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Morgan; Mokyr, Joel; Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2013-01-01

    Many explanations have been offered for the British Industrial Revolution. This article points to the importance of human capital (broadly defined) and the quality of the British labor force on the eve of the Industrial Revolution. It shows that in terms of both physical quality and mechanical skills, British workers around 1750 were at a much higher level than their continental counterparts. As a result, new inventions—no matter where they originated—were adopted earlier, faster, and on a la...

  1. Two-dimensional manifolds with metrics of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2000-01-01

    This is a study of the topological and metric structure of two-dimensional manifolds with a metric that is locally a metric of revolution. In the case of compact manifolds this problem can be thoroughly investigated, and in particular it is explained why there are no closed analytic surfaces of revolution in R 3 other than a sphere and a torus (moreover, in the smoothness class C ∞ such surfaces, understood in a certain generalized sense, exist in any topological class)

  2. Russia’s Next Revolution: Reclaiming Lost Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    Western partnerships with Russia to promote stability while recognizing legitimate security, political, economic , and domestic concerns as well as its... economic trouble, which could lead to unrest and even revolution. This paper reviews Russia’s historical propensity for revolutionary change, discusses...their rights back through a revolution and regime change. If this happens, it could lead to political instability in Russia, which would create

  3. A Scientific Revolution: The Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy is going through a scientific revolution, responding to a flood of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, other space missions, and large telescopes on the ground. In this talk, I will discuss some of the important discoveries of the last decade, from dwarf planets in the outer Solar System to the mysterious dark energy that overcomes gravity to accelerate the expansion of the Universe. The next decade will be equally bright with the newly refurbished Hubble and the promise of its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. An infrared-optimized 6.5m space telescope, Webb is designed to find the first galaxies that formed in the early universe and to peer into the dusty gas clouds where stars and planets are born. With MEMS technology, a deployed primary mirror and a tennis-court sized sunshield, the mission presents many technical challenges. I will describe Webb's scientific goals, its design and recent progress in constructing the observatory. Webb is scheduled for launch in 2014.

  4. The Energy Revolution Age - Africa's Opportunity to Generate its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Today, 54 million Americans use electricity equivalent to that of 109 million Europeans or 950 million Africans. This article evaluates the possibility of supplying electricity to all Africans by 2030, generated from renewable resources. Furthermore, it evaluates the opportunity to export “green” electricity to Europe ...

  5. A strategy for obtaining social benefits from the gene revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.B. de Castro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The strategy described in the present paper offers details about the possibility for Brazil to play a more substantial role in the gene revolution. If successfully applied, the powerful science-based technology currently available in Brazil can contribute to extend the benefits of the gene revolution to the poorest countries, very much like the Green Revolution did in the past, thereby reducing the hunger syndrome which claimed the lives of millions of people in some Asian countries, particularly Pakistan and India, decades ago. In his visit to Brazil in February 2004, Norman Borlaug had the opportunity to witness the success of Brazilian agriculture. At a Conference held at ESALQ - Superior School of Agriculture Luiz de Queiroz in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil, he stated that the 21st century revolution will come from Brazil in the area of agriculture. He also said that reducing hunger is essential for the world to achieve socioeconomic stability. A central question remains unanswered: who will fund this revolution? The FAO 2003-2004 Annual Report listed the barriers preventing the gene revolution from reaching the poorest countries: inadequate regulatory procedures - Intellectual Property Rights and Biosafety, poorly functioning seed delivering systems and weak domestic plant breeding capacity; all are discussed in this paper.

  6. Kuhn's "The structure of scientific revolutions" revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arabatzis, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Thomas S. Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Up until recently, the book's philosophical reception has been shaped, for the most part, by the debates and the climate in philosophy of science in the 1960s and 1970s; this new collection of essays takes a renewed look at this work. This volume concentrates on particular issues addressed or raised in light of recent scholarship and without the pressure of the immediate concerns scholars had at the time of the Structure's publication. There has been extensive research on all of the major issues concerning the development of science which are discussed in Structure, work in which the scholars contributing to this volume have all been actively involved. In recent years they have pursued novel research on a number of topics relevant to Structure's concerns, such as the nature and function of concepts, the complexity of logical positivism and its legacy, the relation of history to philosophy o...

  7. [Pierre Bourdieu: sociology as a "symbolic revolution"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaud, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The article combines two objectives: understand the genesis and development of the sociology of Bourdieu in connection with his social and intellectual positioning. The sociology of Bourdieu is a theory of Action which reconciles the double requirement of objectification and taking account of the practical logic bound by social agents. From the character both objective and subjective of social space, he analyzes how different institutions (firstly School) are doing that mental structures match the objective structures of society. By making acceptable reality and registering it in the body, these instances contribute to reproduce social divisions and participate in the work of domination. Gradually, Bourdieu develops a general theory about Power, which leads to a sociology of State. But he refuses any sociological fatalism. Because he perceived homologies between the sociologist and the artist facing the social order, each in their own way, he devoted two researches to Flaubert and Manet, seized in the same enterprise of aesthetic subversion he described as a 'symbolic revolution'. In many aspects, the sociology of Bourdieu opens ways of looking for an objectification of caregivers and their practices.

  8. Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Graeme T; Davis, Katie E; Pisani, Davide; Tarver, James E; Ruta, Marcello; Sakamoto, Manabu; Hone, David W.E; Jennings, Rachel; Benton, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The observed diversity of dinosaurs reached its highest peak during the mid- and Late Cretaceous, the 50 Myr that preceded their extinction, and yet this explosion of dinosaur diversity may be explained largely by sampling bias. It has long been debated whether dinosaurs were part of the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (KTR), from 125–80 Myr ago, when flowering plants, herbivorous and social insects, squamates, birds and mammals all underwent a rapid expansion. Although an apparent explosion of dinosaur diversity occurred in the mid-Cretaceous, coinciding with the emergence of new groups (e.g. neoceratopsians, ankylosaurid ankylosaurs, hadrosaurids and pachycephalosaurs), results from the first quantitative study of diversification applied to a new supertree of dinosaurs show that this apparent burst in dinosaurian diversity in the last 18 Myr of the Cretaceous is a sampling artefact. Indeed, major diversification shifts occurred largely in the first one-third of the group's history. Despite the appearance of new clades of medium to large herbivores and carnivores later in dinosaur history, these new originations do not correspond to significant diversification shifts. Instead, the overall geometry of the Cretaceous part of the dinosaur tree does not depart from the null hypothesis of an equal rates model of lineage branching. Furthermore, we conclude that dinosaurs did not experience a progressive decline at the end of the Cretaceous, nor was their evolution driven directly by the KTR. PMID:18647715

  9. Online Community Interaction - Revolution or Revulsion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Thorne

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Marketing writers' assertion that online communities are the future for organisations may be misguided, although peer-to-peer networks are certainly the future for consumers. Brands have experienced 'consumer revulsion' at their poorly-planned attempts to enter online communities to interact with customers. The Internet has facilitated a revolution amongst consumers, providing a medium for online communities to thrive. Source credibility is paramount and Internet users are being selective with exactly whose message they are willing to accept, absorb and ultimately, allow to influence their buying decisions. The primary objective of this research is to undertake an exploratory investigation into the dynamics of online communities and how membership influences the buying decision for consumers of genre novels. Through the process of online focus groups and the completion of online questionnaires, data on the dynamics of online relationships between consumers and authors, the buying habits of consumers and the acceptance of online word-of-mouth (WOM were extracted and analysed. This research demonstrates that the dynamics of online communities are highly complex and in no way inferior or less fulfilling than real-life relationships and that the influence of online relationships on our buying decisions have no less impact than real-life encounters.

  10. Hot, flat and crowded. Why we need a green revolution - and how it can renew America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    The author blows the whistle about what he considers as a worldwide environmental crisis. He brings a fresh outlook to the crises of destabilizing climate change and rising competition for energy - both of which could poison our world if we do not act quickly and collectively. His argument speaks to all of us who are concerned about the state of America in the global future. The author proposes that an ambitious national strategy - which he calls 'Geo-Greenism' - is not only what we need to save the planet from overheating; it is what we need to make America healthier, richer, more innovative, more productive, and more secure. He explains a new era - the Energy-Climate era - through an illuminating account of recent events. He shows how 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the flattening of the world by the Internet (which brought 3 billion new consumers onto the world stage) have combined to bring climate and energy issues to Main Street. But they have not gone very far down Main Street; the much-touted 'green revolution' has hardly begun. With all that in mind, the author sets out the clean-technology breakthroughs we, and the world, will need; he shows that the energy technology revolution will be both transformative and disruptive; and he explains why America must lead this revolution - with the first Green President and a Green New Deal, spurred by the Greenest Generation. This book is fearless, incisive, forward-looking, and rich in surprising common sense about the world we live in today

  11. Exodus from nuclear dependent society. The 4th revolution from local initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Tetsunari

    2011-01-01

    The earthquake and resulting tsunamis occurred in March 11, 2011, caused reactor accidents of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants (NPPs). Although there appeared a serious gap between power supply and demand due to outages of NPPs and others, appropriate measures taken toward the demand side could save the region from the need for rolling blackouts. In order to realize an exodus from nuclear dependent society, a shift to energy policies for focus on regional distributive renewable energy generation was strongly recommended to revive regional economies devastated by tsunamis and also be a stable energy supply in the long term. A leading player of future electric power might be definitely renewable energy and energy conservation/power saving, that was sometimes called the 'fourth revolution from load initiative'. (T. Tanaka)

  12. The energy battle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This geo-political analysis presents the energy challenges of the international competition, the petroleum market and the future energy revolution. It deals with the energy question after the petroleum, the deregulation, the USA and european attitudes, the china and India strategies. (A.L.B.)

  13. Water Intelligence and the Cyber-Infrastructure Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    As an intrinsic factor in national security, the global economy, food and energy production, and human and ecological health, fresh water resources are increasingly being considered by an ever-widening array of stakeholders. The U.S. intelligence community has identified water as a key factor in the Nation's security risk profile. Water industries are growing rapidly, and seek to revolutionize the role of water in the global economy, making water an economic value rather than a limitation on operations. Recent increased focus on the complex interrelationships and interdependencies between water, food, and energy signal a renewed effort to move towards integrated water resource management. Throughout all of this, hydrologic extremes continue to wreak havoc on communities and regions around the world, in some cases threatening long-term economic stability. This increased attention on water coincides with the "second IT revolution" of cyber-infrastructure (CI). The CI concept is a convergence of technology, data, applications and human resources, all coalescing into a tightly integrated global grid of computing, information, networking and sensor resources, and ultimately serving as an engine of change for collaboration, education and scientific discovery and innovation. In the water arena, we have unprecedented opportunities to apply the CI concept to help address complex water challenges and shape the future world of water resources - on both science and socio-economic application fronts. Providing actionable local "water intelligence" nationally or globally is now becoming feasible through high-performance computing, data technologies, and advanced hydrologic modeling. Further development on all of these fronts appears likely and will help advance this much-needed capability. Lagging behind are water observation systems, especially in situ networks, which need significant innovation to keep pace with and help fuel rapid advancements in water intelligence.

  14. David Barker: the revolution that anticipates existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Farnetani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available David Barker is the man who “anticipated" the existence of babies by focusing attention on the importance of the fetus and what takes place during intrauterine life. Barker was one of the physicians who in the last decades brought about the greatest changes in medicine, changes so important as to represent a veritable revolution in medical thought. According to Barker's studies, the embryo obviously has a genetic complement coming from the mother and father, but from the very first stages of development it begins to undergo the influence of the outside environment, just as occurs for adults whose biological, psychological and pathological aspects are influenced by the environment to a not well-established percentage between genetic complement and epigenetics. Much of our future lives as adults is decided in our mothers' wombs. If Barker's discovery was revolutionary from the cultural standpoint, it was even more so from the strictly medical one. Barker's research method was rigid from the methodological standpoint, but innovative and speculative in its working hypotheses, with a humanistic slant. Barker's idea has another practical corollary: it is evident that the role of obstetricians, perinatologists and neonatologists is more and more relevant in medicine and future prevention. Unquestionably, besides the enormous merits of his clinical research, among the benefits that Barker has contributed there is that of having helped us to see things from new points of view. Not only is the neonate (and even more so the fetus not an adult of reduced proportions, but perhaps the neonate is the "father" of the adult person.

  15. Revolutions in twentieth-century physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Relativity theory, quantum mechanics, elementary-particle physics, and cosmology are the four pillars of modern physics. The life in the 21th century is without them no more conceivable: The special relativity theory renewed our understanding of space and time, on the laws of quantum mechanics are based countless everyday objects like transistors, computer chips, and mobile telephones; in particle accelerators we study the components oof matter, and with telescopes we take an ever deeper look in the past of the universe. Taking reference books to these themes at hand, one is overwhelmed by the plethora and complexity of the mathematical formulas. This book of the renowned professor of physics David J. Griffiths id refreshingly different. By means of many illustrative examples and entertaining stories it introducts to the themes and helps the reader also without a large mathematical apparatus to a fundamental understanding of that, about which Einstein, Schroedinger, Heisenberg, and Hubble actually thought and spoke. In each chapter numerous, pedagogically selected examples are completely worked out, in order to fill the matter with life. Moreover the text contains a manifold of problems, which allow the reader to deepen his knowledge and apply immediately. Griffith's ''Revolution in Twentieth Century Physics'' appeals not only to pupils and future studyings of natural sciences, who want to get an appetite for what lies ahead, but also to interested readers, which have already heared in the media from quarks and quanta, the curved space-time, Albert Einstein, and the big bang and now want to understandably know what is at stake in all the excitement.

  16. Tunisia’s Revolution and Youth Unemployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siala

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Youth joblessness was one of the main triggers of Tunisia’s January Revolution. Unemployment rate in Tunisia has increased from 13 percent in 2010 to 18.3 percent in 2011 (NIS, 2011. Young people and women are more affected by this increase in unemployment .Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of various individual and job-related characteristics on the probabilities of unemployment of females and males aged 15–29 and to explore policy actions to create jobs in Tunisia. These issues are addressed using data from a 2010 survey of the National Institute of Statistics that provided information on the employment status of youth aged 15–29. The main estimated results show first that individual’s age, gender, marital status, level of education, sector of economic activity, type of employment and region of residence are significantly related to the unemployment. The results indicate that, for young workers, unemployment incidence increases with the level of education. Education has a greater impact on the unemployment of females than on that of males. Second, there is a negative and significant effect of the agricultural, educational and health sectors on the probability of transition into unemployment for women and men in which case the estimated impact is greater for men. Third, coastal area and public employment are associated with lower probability of transition into unemployment. Finally, Tunisian policymakers are aware of the fact that the elected National Constituent Assembly and the transitional government have a set of challenging tasks to accomplish in order to lower the rate of youth unemployment. For instance, generating funds for business development and infrastructure in non-coastal regions, and collaborating with the private sector to promote investment– whether foreign or domestic – and employment for educated young people.

  17. Silent Revolution in Research for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Alder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Is research ‘fit-for-purpose’ for realizing sustainable development? More than two decades after the Brundtland report and UNCED Earth summit, the world has now adopted Sustainable Development Goals(SDGs. Rather than a cause for celebration, this delay should encourage reflection on the role of research in society. Why is it so difficult to realize sustainability in practice? The answer lies in the fact that universities and research centres persist with 19th century methods of data gathering, scholarly analysis, and journal articles. Today’s world needs science in real-time, whether to detect drought, confront Ebola, or assist refugees. Research needs to work faster and embrace 21st century practices including data science, open access, and infographics.A silent revolution is occurring in the ways of organizing and conducting research, enabled by new technology and encouraging work that tackles the key challenges facing society. A variety of new arrangements have come into existence that promote international collaboration, including Horizon 2020 with its emphasis on societal challenges, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation which has inspired a family of grand challenges funds on health and development, and the Future Earth joint program of research for global sustainability. These arrangements not only control billions of dollars in research funding, they also influence the strategies of national research councils and international organizations. The result is no less than a transformation in the incentives that reward how researchers invest their time and effort.Why is a revolution needed? Within research, substantial growth in knowledge production coincided with fragmentation among disciplines. One can easily find expertise and publications in soil science or agronomy, yet integrated efforts on food security and climate adaptation remain scarce. Beyond research, society remains largely uninformed, as academics avoid engaging in public

  18. NEW EDUCATION FOR NEW INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вадим Валерьевич Гриншкун

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the education system are largely determined by scientific and technical progress. In recent times it is spoken about approach of a new, fourth industrial revolution. According to researchers, this revolution coincides with a series of information revolutions and is based on the development and implementation of new means and technologies of informatization, such as the Internet of things, VR and AR, 3D-printing, and quantum computers. It is obvious that the education system needs to respond to these challenges. For the solution of relevant problems the article describes a number of urgent measures to be taken in education in the coming years. These measures are systematized depending on the factors of the fourth industrial revolution. In particular, special training of teachers, establishment of a closer partnership organizations vocational education with industry, fundamentalization of training of students, is invariant to rapidly changing technologies, and other measures. Special attention is paid to development of information technologies and approaches to the allocation information revolutions. Their change also has an impact on approaches to reforming the education system.

  19. Soft revolution. Future without any restraint. Die sanfte Revolution. Zukunft ohne Zwang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renn, O

    1980-01-01

    The book at hand does not intend to present visions of an alternative future or to condemn in the bulk soft Utopian ideas out of a feeling of conservative partiality full of prejudices. The essence and purpose of this work is to submit the soft revolution and the demands for and designs of a new way of life to impartial scrutiny. Alternative movements criticize today's industrial society. The book answers the central question as to whether this criticism is correct and whether proposals for a re-organization of society are able to eliminate existing shortcomings. In doing so, complex problem areas are touched upon. They are part of different scientific disciplines. Therefore, findings of social psychology, sociology, political science and political economy are often referred to. However, this book is not written for the scientist but for the often mentioned man-in-the-street who is fully aware of his rights and duties.

  20. Soft revolution. Future without any restraint. Die sanfte Revolution. Zukunft ohne Zwang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renn, O

    1980-01-01

    The book at hand does not intend to present visions of an alternative future or to condemn in the bulk soft utopian ideas out of a feeling of conservative partiality full of prejudices. The essence and purpose of this work is to submit the soft revolution and the demands for and designs of a new way of life to impartial scrutiny. Alternative movements criticize today's industrial society. The book answers the central question as to whether this criticism is correct and whether proposals for a re-organization of society are able to eliminate existing shortcomings. In doing so, complex problem areas are touched upon. They are part of different scientific disciplines. Therefore, findings of social psychology, sociology, political science and political economy are often referred to. However, this book is not written for the scientist but for the often mentioned man-in-the-street who is fully aware of his rights and duties.

  1. Serbian Volunteers And Russian Revolution Of 1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ia. V. Vishniakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using original documents from the Russian State Military Historical Archive, many of which are introduced for the first time, the author reveals details of creation and activities of the Serbian Volunteer Corps formed from captured soldiers and officers of the Austro-Hungarian army inOdessain the Summer 1916. The same autumn it received a baptism of fire in Dobruja fighting in the separate corps of the Russian army under the command of General Zayonchkovsky. The research interest in studying the activities of “national” and "international" military units within the Russian army is connected with the question of expediency and effectiveness of using such forces against those for whom they have not so long ago shed blood. The author, contrary to the popular opinion of Serbian historians, shows that the call to join the First Serbian division did not arouse mass enthusiasm among the prisoners of war both Serbs and representatives of other Yugoslav nations because of well-founded fears for their close relatives living in the Dual Monarchy and a fairly comfortable stay in the Russian captivity. At the same time, the author emphasizes that this military unit, commanded by officers of the Serbian regular army, was considered by the political leadership ofSerbiaas the basis of the future armed forces of the new state ofYugoslavia. The article shows that the events of the Russian Revolution of 1917 influenced the future fate of this military formation. Many of its soldiers later found themselves on different sides of the front in the Russian civil war. A special attention is payed to the interethnic conflict erupted in the corps between the Serbs on the one side and the Croats and Slovenes on the other. The author introduces a significant body of primary documents showing the nuances of relations in the corps between representatives of various Yugoslav nations. The article emphasizes that the relationship of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes within the

  2. Perception of emotional climate in a revolution: Test of a multistage theory of revolution in the Tunisian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimé, Bernard; Yzerbyt, Vincent; Mahjoub, Abdelwahab

    2017-12-01

    Participation in social movements and collective action depends upon people's capacity to perceive their societal context. We examined this question in the context of Arab Spring revolutions. In a classic theory of revolution highlighting the role of collective emotions, Brinton (1938) claimed that revolutions, far from chaos, proceed in an orderly sequence involving four stages: euphoria, degradation, terror, and restoration. The emotional climate (EC) as perceived by ordinary Tunisian citizens (2,699 women and 3,816 men) was measured during the 4 years of the Tunisian revolution. A quadratic pattern of perceived EC measures over time provided strong support to Brinton's model. In addition, three different analyses suggested the presence of four distinct stages in the evolution of perceived EC. Third, the socio-political developments in Tunisia during the four stages proved entirely consistent with both Brinton's theoretical model and the perceived EC indicators. Finally, social identification proved closely related to the temporal evolution of positive EC scores. In sum, data from this study not only lend support to the views put forth in an heretofore untested classic theory of revolution but also demonstrate that psychosocial measurements can validly monitor a major process of socio-political transformation. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  3. A Short (Personal) Future History of Revolution 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Barbara A

    2015-11-01

    Crisis of replicability is one term that psychological scientists use for the current introspective phase we are in-I argue instead that we are going through a revolution analogous to a political revolution. Revolution 2.0 is an uprising focused on how we should be doing science now (i.e., in a 2.0 world). The precipitating events of the revolution have already been well-documented: failures to replicate, questionable research practices, fraud, etc. And the fact that none of these events is new to our field has also been well-documented. I suggest four interconnected reasons as to why this time is different: changing technology, changing demographics of researchers, limited resources, and misaligned incentives. I then describe two reasons why the revolution is more likely to catch on this time: technology (as part of the solution) and the fact that these concerns cut across social and life sciences-that is, we are not alone. Neither side in the revolution has behaved well, and each has characterized the other in extreme terms (although, of course, each has had a few extreme actors). Some suggested reforms are already taking hold (e.g., journals asking for more transparency in methods and analysis decisions; journals publishing replications) but the feared tyrannical requirements have, of course, not taken root (e.g., few journals require open data; there is no ban on exploratory analyses). Still, we have not yet made needed advances in the ways in which we accumulate, connect, and extract conclusions from our aggregated research. However, we are now ready to move forward by adopting incremental changes and by acknowledging the multiplicity of goals within psychological science. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The superconductor revolutions and the (slow) applications evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foner, S.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery in the 1960's of type 2 superconductors with high critical current densities in high magnetic fields (and the development of NbTi in particular) led to the first revolution. The discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) started the second revolution. At this stage ceramists became involved with superconductors. I will assess the status of various superconductor applications, progress of HTS and their possible applications at 4.2K, and near-term needs for superconducting materials operating at 30T in specialized facilities. Reasons for the slow growth of superconductor applications will be reviewed

  5. Nonlinear viscoelastic behaviour of shells of revolution under arbitrary loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.W.; Arbabi-Kanjoori, F.

    1975-01-01

    A formulation and solution technique are presented for the creep analysis of shells of revolution subjected to arbitrary loads and temperature changes. Arbitrary creep laws are admitted in the formulation with specific attention given to the two common laws, i.e. strain hardening and time hardening. The governing equations for creep of shells of revolution are derived. The solution method requires the quasi-static linearization of the equations: linear incremental behaviour is assumed during each time step. The incremental equations are expanded in Fourier series and solved by a numerical integration technique. (Auth.)

  6. Using microbial community interactions within plant microbiomes to advance an evergreen agricultural revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative plant breeding and technology transfer fostered the Green Revolution, which transformed agriculture worldwide by increasing grain yields in developing countries. The Green Revolution temporarily alleviated world hunger, but also reduced biodiversity, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestr...

  7. Completing the Revolution? The United States and Bolivia’s Long Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Lehman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available James Malloy’s 1970 study, still one of the most systematic analytical attempts in English to understand Bolivia’s 1952 National Revolution, argued that the revolution remained “uncompleted.”  However, the election and subsequent policies of the Morales government after 2005 moved Bolivia much closer to completing two important stated objectives of the revolution, as yet unfulfilled when Malloy wrote: inclusion of all Bolivians in the political system and increased national autonomy.  While it is premature to call Bolivia’s revolution “completed,” the shift in the locus of power from Europeanized elites to more broadly popular forces and the growing independence of Bolivia from outside influence and direction under Morales are key achievements of what might be called Bolivia’s “Long Revolution.”   Giving close attention to these two fundamental achievements—inclusion and autonomy—this paper provides a preliminary examination of the complicated and often paradoxical role the United States has played in Bolivia’s long historical trajectory since April 1952.  Directly and indirectly, through imposition and suggestion, purposefully and unintentionally, by providing assistance and at the same time stimulating fierce nationalist resistance, through design and through the twists and turns of historical contingency—the United States has contributed to Bolivia’s slow revolutionary transformation.  But patterns of imposition and resistance continue and this paper argues that it is time for the United States to examine its assumptions so that the two nations can escape the cyclical patterns of the past. El trabajo que James Malloy publicó en 1970 (hasta hoy día uno de los esfuerzos analíticos más sistemáticos que se han hecho en inglés para entender la Revolución Nacional de 1952, argumentaba que la revolución permanecía "incompleta". Las elecciones y subsiguientes políticas del gobierno de Morales después de

  8. COLOUR REVOLUTIONS AND PARLIAMENTARIANISM IN THE CONTEXT OF DEMOCRATIZATION ON POST-SOVIET SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Akmatalieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Main approaches to the studies of internal and external causes of colour revolutions in Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and the Ukraine are reviewed. The article considers colour revolutions in the context of the fourth wave of democratization and concludes that colour revolutions encouraged the development of the civil society, party systems, parliamentarianism, the transparency of state bodies, and electoral process.

  9. Women and Revolution in Iran: Lessons To Be Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Nayereh

    During the Iranian Revolution of 1979, millions of Iranian women left their homes and entered the public sphere, but their public presence was soon restricted with the ascension to power of the Ayatollah Khomeini. For Westerners the Iranian women's seemingly easy acceptance of the forced wearing of the veil (chador) appeared to be their ultimate…

  10. From Dualism to Monism: The Structure of Revolution in Kenya's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa. Journal Home ... Vol 3, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... It also created a scientific revolution in Kenya's treaty practice. For the first time, ...

  11. Digitalisierung im Verteilnetz: Evolution oder Revolution anhand konkreter Beispiele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Oliver; Bachmann, Maurus

    Durch die Integration der neuen erneuerbaren Energien steht das Stromnetz vor großen Herausforderungen. Das Energiesystem als Gesamtes und die Verteilnetze im Speziellen werden smart. Anhand konkreter Beispiele wird aufgezeigt, wie die Digitalisierung im Elektrizitätsnetz voranschreitet. Diese Entwicklung ist eine Evolution, nicht aber eine Revolution.

  12. The development of coke smelting and the industrial revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Abraham Darby and the origins of the industrial revolution in Britain. Alan Macfarlane talks to John about the reasons for the area near Birmingham becoming the epi-centre of the industrial development, and the development of coke furnaces and iron smelting.

  13. Evolution and Revolution: Lessons of a Century-Long Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Aleksandrovich Minakir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The work studies economic aspects of Russian revolutions of 1917, the history and consequences of which (especially the second one, October Revolution attract notable attention today not only in Russia, but in the whole world, considering their significance for the global history, the influence on the modification of contents of human civilization’s evolution. The study analyzes the effects of forms of revolutionary transformations on the institutional and economic trends and socio-economic results both factual and hypothetical. Taking into account economic premises and consequences, this study considers revolution a transfer of power (violent or not to a new national elite or a part of pre-existing elite representing (directly or not new forms of functioning of economy and property. As a rule, these new forms are so developed that the change of political ‘casing’, through giving a priority to their institutions, guarantees economic progress by prioritizing a new type of economy that has proven its efficiency during preceding economic evolution. The study states that in Russia’s case, the base of the revolution was not a real evolution that required a political push, but a based on an abstract theory or analogies belief, an idea of creating a ‘new society’, economy, and property that have no real analogues

  14. Thematic cartography, cartography and the impact of the quantitative revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cauvin, Colette; Serradj, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    This series in three volumes considers maps as constructions resulting from a number of successive transformations and stages integrated in a logical reasoning and an order of choices. Volume 2 focuses on the impact of the quantitative revolution, partially related to the advent of the computer age, on thematic cartography.

  15. The Atomic Number Revolution in Chemistry: A Kuhnian Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wray, K. Brad

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues that the field of chemistry underwent a significant change of theory in the early twentieth century, when atomic number replaced atomic weight as the principle for ordering and identifying the chemical elements. It is a classic case of a Kuhnian revolution. In the process of add...

  16. Mathematics in Early Childhood Education: Revolution or Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipek, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Hachey (2013) aptly describes a recent surge in attention to mathematics for young children. The value of math for children as young as preschool age, however, was discovered before the 21st century. This is presently not a revolution but rather a potentially important step in an evolution of work that began at least a half century ago. Some…

  17. Unusual Suspects: "Ultras" as political actors in the Egyptian Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, R.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an examination into the mobilization of Ultras, a social group of aggressive football fans, within the Egyptian revolution as part of the larger Arab Spring uprisings of 2011. Comments are given noting how the Ultras are a good example of how non-political groups became active

  18. The Iranian Revolution, 1977–79: Interaction and Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    a radical break from the past, the development of new constructs, and unintended consequences. The execution of a revolution resulting in a clerical dictatorship was made possible by the dialectical and creative interaction between the groups involved, an interaction that took place over the two years...

  19. Politics and the life sciences: an unfinished revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary R

    2011-01-01

    Politics and the life sciences--also referred to as biopolitics--is a field of study that seeks to advance knowledge of politics and promote better policymaking through multidisciplinary analysis that draws on the life sciences. While the intellectual origins of the field may be traced at least into the 1960s, a broadly organized movement appeared only with the founding of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences (APLS) in 1980 and the establishment of its journal, Politics and the Life Sciences ( PLS ), in 1982. This essay--contributed by a past journal editor and association executive director--concludes a celebration of the association's thirtieth anniversary. It reviews the founding of the field and the association, as well as the contributions of the founders. It also discusses the nature of the empirical work that will advance the field, makes recommendations regarding the identity and future of the association, and assesses the status of the revolution of which the association is a part. It argues that there is progress to celebrate, but that this revolution--the last of three great scientific revolutions--is still in its early stages. The revolution is well-started, but remains unfinished.

  20. Decades of Chaos and Revolution: Showdowns for College Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    "Decades of Chaos and Revolution: Showdowns for College Presidents" is the story and comparison of two eras in the history of higher education. The first era covers the period of the 1960s through the mid-1970s, and the second is the first decade of the twenty-first century. Both decades were marked by events that shook the foundations of colleges…

  1. Magic and reality in the literature of the Cuban revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Martín Sastre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no innocent literature. Literature is made by love, by hate, by a woman, by an idea, by an injustice, by a hope, to praise or to criticize, but I think literature has never been isolated, pure, detached. [...] Literature cannot escape life and history (Manuel Cofiño Lopez, 1985: 9697. Cofiño Lopezs own literature is no exception. The clear contrast that he presents in The Last Woman and the upcoming battle between magic and reality, ignorance and culture, past and present has a purpose. The author raises the need to end with the old beliefs in order to progress.This inextricable link between magic and reality of the Revolution is present in several novels of the Cuban Revolution. It shows how the two interact, as well as how past and present intermingle. Moreover, we find that magic is present throughout, and is fully compatible with the Revolution. This does not make it erroneous to believe in the stories of Magic Realism. It is a mistake on the part of the revolution and those who write about it for attempting to deny people the magic of their superstitions and beliefs, since magic is not the enemy of progress. They are part of their lives and their culture, and are something that should be respected.

  2. Pedro Gutierrez Bueno's Textbooks: Audiences, Teaching Practices and Chemical Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Ramon Bertomeu; Belmar, Antonio Garcia

    2006-01-01

    Pedro Gutierrez Bueno wrote two editions of a chemistry textbook between 1788 and 1802. The paper offers a comparative view of both editions taking into account Gutierrez Bueno's biography, his intended audience and the changes related to the so-called chemical revolution. Some conclusions are at odds with common images about scientific…

  3. Living the Electronics Revolution: 60 Years of Fun with Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Bostian, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    46 slides. This presentation is an autobiographical history of the career of Professor Charles W. Bostian, whose tenure at Virginia Tech coincided with the electronics revolution of the latter half of the twentieth century, and the dawn of the twenty-first century.

  4. How Efficient is Green Revolution Technology Adoption in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study seeks to find out the effects of Green Revolution technology adoption on output/efficiency of agricultural households in Ghana. The method of analysis involves Battese and Coelli's (1993; 1995) one-step estimation of a stochastic frontier model. Technology adoption was found to have positive effects on output.

  5. Tokugawa Japan and Industrial Revolution Britain: Two Misunderstood Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a truer picture than economic historians have previously had of the economies of Tokugawa Japan, and Britain during the Industrial Revolution. Though substantially different, both societies were prosperous compared to most of the rest of the world. Japan's economic success began in the Tokugawa period…

  6. Bioresorbable scaffolds: talking of a new interventional revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassell, M. E. C. J.; Grundeken, M. J. D.; Woudstra, P.; Delewi, R.; Wykrzykowska, J. J.; Piek, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    After the introduction of coronary balloon angioplasty, bare-metal, and drug-eluting stents, fully bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) could be the fourth revolution in interventional cardiology. The BRS technology shares the advantages of metallic stents regarding acute gain and prevention of acute

  7. “Muslim Brothrhood” in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Садери Фахиме

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the roots and causes of protests in Egypt at the present stage. The author focuses on the ideological influence of Islamic parties and movements, in particular the association “Muslim Brotherhood” in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011. Methodological basis of this publication principles amounted to politological, sociological, cultural and historical methods of scientific knowledge.

  8. Rethinking the Role of Grey Literature in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savić, Dobrica

    2018-01-01

    The world is at the dawn of a new industrial revolution that will fundamentally change the way we live and work. Many consider this the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). While the First Industrial Revolution (1IR) mechanized production using water and steam power, the second one brought mass production using electric power, and the third one was characterized by automation and digitization, mainly using electronics and information technology. The 4IR is building upon the third one, but the difference, and its main contribution, is the fusion of technologies that are blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological worlds. This is further enhanced by the emerging progress of technology in fields such as quantum computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics, virtual assistants, the Internet of Things, self-driving cars, drones, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, traffic and security monitoring systems, and renewable energy. This paper examines the potential impact of the emerging 4IR on grey literature (GL) and is based on analysis of the most prevalent current trends and developments in “cyber-physical systems” that connect machines, computers and people. It will examine the need to rethink the definition of GL, its creation and publication types, processing, sustainability and usability. Given the magnitude of the potential impact of the 4IR on GL, the question is what challenges the 4IR will pose to GL managers. One could assume that the acquisition of new knowledge and skills, and the revamping of existing processes and methods will be necessary. Becoming aware of this new phenomenon is only the beginning. It needs to be followed up by professional development and adequate training. Finally, the job of GL professionals will be to promote and publicize the usefulness and importance of GL, not only in their daily work, but also in research and science. (author)

  9. Industrial revolution - industry 4.0: Are German manufacturing SMEs the first victims of this revolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Sommer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Industry 4.0 represents a special challenge for businesses in general and for SMEs in particular. The study at hand will examine companies´ awareness, readiness and capability to meet this challenge taking into account the special role of SMEs. Methodology: The results of nine studies dealing with this range of topics are examined in the framework of a systematic review and compared with regard to the objective of the study at hand. Findings: The review showed that, as a rule, there is an awareness concerning the relevance of the topic. The readiness and the capability to meet this challenge exist in parts; however, they strongly depend on the enterprise size. The smaller SMEs are, the higher the risk that they will become victims instead of beneficiaries of this revolution.Originality/value: Considering different studies concerning Industry 4.0 the article gives an insight into the dependence of the Industry 4.0 readiness in reference to the company size. This deepens the knowledge in adaption deficits German SME still have and opens different approaches for further research and action plans.

  10. Revolution ohne Kiel und ohne Revolution – Die quantitativ-theoretische Geographie in Erlangen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Paulus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at expanding the predominant narrative of a Quantitative Revolution in German-speaking geography, to develop a more complex and multifaceted perspective on this chapter of the discipline's history. For this purpose, I take a closer look at the institute of geography in Erlangen. Eugen Wirth, the long-term chair holder in Erlangen, argued that here, in contrast to the majority of other institutes, the implementation of quantitative methods started in 1932, when Walter Christaller submitted his thesis: Central Places in Southern Germany. According to Wirth a dissertation supervised by him in 1969 was a further step towards the use of quantitative methods. I argue that Wirth made a significant contribution to the debate on quantitative theoretical geography in Germany with his textbook Theoretical Geography published in 1979, although the book was subsequently criticised and strongly rejected by Bartels and others as a conservative embrace. By examining this local negotiation process, I develop one of many narratives, that stand opposed to a unified account with which the general assembly of geographers in 1969 and Bartels' Geographie des Menschen uniquely motivated the abandonment of the concept of Länderkunde.

  11. Sustainable Design: The Next Industrial Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    An insatiable appetite for energy, a burgeoning world population, and a heightened awareness of climate change are focusing global attention on sustainability, an issue that may very well determine the future course of civilization. The pursuit of a sustainable lifestyle today is of paramount importance for future generations. Achieving…

  12. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  13. A revolution in electrodes: recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    As a promising candidate for future batteries, the lithium-sulfur battery is gaining increasing interest due to its high capacity and energy density. However, over the years, lithium-sulfur batteries have been plagued by fading capacities and the low Coulombic efficiency derived from its unique electrochemical behavior, which involves solid-liquid transition reactions. Moreover, lithium-sulfur batteries employ metallic lithium as the anode, which engenders safety vulnerability of the battery. The electrodes play a pivotal role in the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. A leap forward in progress of lithium-sulfur batteries is always accompanied by a revolution in the electrode technology. In this review, recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries is summarized in accordance with the evolution of the electrodes, including the diversified cathode design and burgeoning metallic-lithium-free anodes. Although the way toward application has still many challenges associated, recent progress in lithium-sulfur battery technology still paints an encouraging picture of a revolution in rechargeable batteries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Military Technical Revolution: A Structural Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    foreign basing structure declines, overseas presence missions must become more self- sustaining . To do so, they will need to rely on innovative forms...get a force into the field and sustain it there, tasks traditionally known as mobility and sustainment . It comprises dtings that can n A-L "mosc tasks...Intemational Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the North expels all IkEA personnel and rejects further contacts with the agency. CHINO THREATENS TAIWAN

  15. Climate's evolution and the industrial revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter, a discussion is presented of the evolution of climate change and the role that man has played in causing these fluctuations. The chief cause has been the ever-increasing use of fossil fuels. A comparison is made of the amount of energy used to earn each dollar of gross national product (GNP) in industrialized nations. The use of fossil fuels in developing countries is expected to rise as their populations increase and they shift from vegetation-derived fuels to fossil fuels

  16. On the n-body problem on surfaces of revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Cristina

    2018-05-01

    We explore the n-body problem, n ≥ 3, on a surface of revolution with a general interaction depending on the pairwise geodesic distance. Using the geometric methods of classical mechanics we determine a large set of properties. In particular, we show that Saari's conjecture fails on surfaces of revolution admitting a geodesic circle. We define homographic motions and, using the discrete symmetries, prove that when the masses are equal, they form an invariant manifold. On this manifold the dynamics are reducible to a one-degree of freedom system. We also find that for attractive interactions, regular n-gon shaped relative equilibria with trajectories located on geodesic circles typically experience a pitchfork bifurcation. Some applications are included.

  17. THE OCTOBER GARBO: CLASSICAL HOLLYWOOD AND THE REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Jukić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available I propose to discuss Ernst Lubitsch’s decision to tailor Ninotchka (1939, his film with I propose to discuss Ernst Lubitsch’s decision to tailor Ninotchka (1939, his film with Greta Garbo, to Garbo in the role of a Soviet revolutionary, which — given the over whelming importance of Garbo to classical Hollywood — is how the October Revolution is situated at the heart of American cinema at the time while Garbo’s proverbial cinemat ic melancholia is shown to entail the structures of affect residual to revolutions. More over, by divorcing Garbo’s revolutionary melancholia from melodrama and attaching it to comedy, Lubitsch extricates this particular psychopolitics from the fact of genre, now as an insight into the construction of film. Finally, I show how Lubitsch engages Russian literature, especially Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, as a code-holder for Hollywood iconicity.

  18. The relativity revolution from the perspective of historical epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Jürgen

    2004-12-01

    This essay analyzes Einstein's relativity revolution as part of a long-term development of knowledge in which the knowledge system of classical physics was reorganized in a process of reflection, described here as a "Copernican process." This process led in 1905 to the introduction of fundamentally new concepts of space, time, matter, and radiation. On the basis of an extensive historical reconstruction, the heuristics of Einstein's creation of the general theory of relativity, completing the relativity revolution, is interpreted as a further transformation of the knowledge of classical physics, starting from conceiving gravitation as a borderline problem between field theory and mechanics. The essay thus provides an answer to the puzzle of how Einstein was able to create a theory capable of accounting for a wide range of phenomena that were discovered only much later.

  19. Data Revolution. Path From Big Data to Clean Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurjyan, V.; Bartle, A.; Lukashin, C.; Vakhnin, A.; Mancilla, S.; Oyarzun, R.

    2015-12-01

    We live in the era of Data Revolution, yet we produce data lot faster than we can process them. If not addressed this discrepancy in a timely manner Data Revolution will result in data pollution rather than in economic and intellectual progress.The majority of currently developed and used data processing applications are Von Neumann model based: single, sequential processes that start at a point in time, and advance one step at a time until they are finished. In the current age of cloud computing and multi-core hardware architectures this approach has noticeable limitations in processing large, distributed data. In this paper we describe the CLARA framework that is used to developing Big-data processing applications. We demonstrate the programming methodology and discuss some of the issues for data processing application elasticity, agility and maintenance.

  20. A new sexual revolution? Critical theory, pornography, and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlick, Steve

    2011-08-01

    The "sexual revolution" was a central element of North American culture in the 1960s. Today, sex is increasingly central to mainstream culture, in large part due to the Internet, and we might wonder whether we are living through a comparable period of sexual history. In this article, I revisit the work of Herbert Marcuse-the original theorist of the sexual revolution-to ask whether it can contribute to a critical theory of sexuality in the era of digital technology. After outlining Marcuse's theory of the role of Eros in social life, I discuss two pornographic Web sites that combine eroticism and social critique. I argue that Marcuse's work is valuable for its emphasis on the intersection of sex, technology, and capitalist economy, but that it needs to be supplemented by a focus on masculinity and the male body in Internet pornography.

  1. Fourth revolution in psychiatry - Addressing comorbidity with chronic physical disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shiv

    2010-07-01

    The moral treatment of mental patients, Electro Convulsive therapy (ECT), and Psychotropic medications constitute the first, second, and third revolution in psychiatry, respectively. Addressing comorbidities of mental illnesses with chronic physical illnesses will be the fourth revolution in psychiatry. Mind and body are inseparable; there is a bidirectional relationship between psyche and soma, each influencing the other. Plausible biochemical explanations are appearing at an astonishing rate. Psychiatric comorbidity with many chronic physical disorders has remained neglected. Such comorbidity with cardiac, respiratory, Gastrointestinal, endocrinal, and neurological disorders, trauma, and other conditions like HIV and so on, needs to be addressed too. Evidence base of prevalence and causal relationship of psychiatric comorbidities in these disorders has been highlighted and strategies to meet the challenge of comorbidity have been indicated.

  2. Bioresorbable scaffolds: talking about a new interventional revolution [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassell, M E C J; Grundeken, M J D; Delewi, R; Wykrzykowska, J J; Piek, J J

    2013-04-01

    After the introduction of coronary balloon angioplasty, bare-metal, and drug-eluting stents, fully bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) could be the fourth revolution in interventional cardiology. The BRS technology shares the advantages of metallic stents regarding acute gain and prevention of acute vessel occlusion by providing transient scaffolding, while potentially overcoming many of the safety concerns of drug-eluting stents. Furthermore, without a permanent metallic cage, the vessel could remodel favourably and atherosclerotic plaques could regress in the long-term. This attracted increased interest and several BRS have been developed. In this review we will describe all BRS which are thus far clinically evaluated and provide an overview of ongoing clinical studies. Although the technology seems to be very promising, more studies including patients with more complex lesions are needed to evaluate whether the BRS can be used in daily clinical practice and if it is indeed becoming a new interventional revolution.

  3. Revolutions and shifting paradigms in human factors & ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Kenneth R

    2006-07-01

    The "Revolution in Information Technology" has spawned a series of transformational revolutions in the nature and practice of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). "Generation 1" HFE evolved with a focus on adapting equipment, workplace and tasks to human capabilities and limitations. Generation 2, focused on cognitive systems integration, arose in response to the need to manage automation and dynamic function allocation. Generation 3 is focused on symbiotic technologies that can amplify human physical and cognitive capabilities. Generation 4 is emergent and is focused on biological enhancement of physical or cognitive capabilities. The shift from HFE Generations 1 and 2 to Generations 3 and 4 profoundly alters accepted boundary constraints on the adaptability of humans in complex systems design. Furthermore, it has opened an ethical divide between those that see cognitive and physical enhancement as a great benefit to society and those who perceive this as tampering with the fundamentals of human nature.

  4. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.; Ott, F.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the current energy economy in Austria. The Austrian political aims of sustainable development and climate protection imply a reorientation of the Austrian energy policy as a whole. Energy consumption trends (1993-1998), final energy consumption by energy carrier (indexed data 1993-1999), comparative analysis of useful energy demand (1993 and 1999) and final energy consumption of renewable energy sources by sector (1996-1999) in Austria are given. The necessary measures to be taken in order to reduce the energy demand and increased the use of renewable energy are briefly mentioned. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  5. Mushroom refinement endeavor auspicate non green revolution in the offing

    OpenAIRE

    SHAUKET AHMED PALA; ABDUL HAMID WANI; ROUF HAMZA BODA; BILAL AHMAD WANI

    2014-01-01

    Pala SA, Wani AH, Boda RH, Wani BA. 2014. Mushroom refinement endeavor auspicate non green revolution in the offing. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 173-185. Mushroom can serve as food, tonic, and as medicine thus make people healthier, fitter and happier. They have a cracking potential for generating great socioeconomic impact in human welfare at local, national and international level. With the help of allied mushroom farming we can easily tackle the problem of food for growing world population; re...

  6. The digital media revolution: what it means for the AJR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2011-07-01

    The digital media revolution is in full swing, fueled by rapid growth of the Internet and proliferation of handheld devices capable of accessing electronically data from virtually anywhere. With this growth of digital media, the printing industry is seeing declines in circulation and advertising revenue. Scholarly journals, including the American Journal of Roentgenology, are not immune from this changing paradigm. The scholarly journal of the future should be a platform for the active exchange of new information and ideas.

  7. The great scientific revolutions of the 20. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrochia, D.

    1997-01-01

    Three great physical revolutions are studied here: the theory of relativity (general and restricted); the quantum mechanics (and its different interpretations); the theory of the determinist chaos (its pre-history as its applications). These three theories contribute to modify the answers that it is possible to bring to great metaphysical questions and to give a hint of a new philosophical landscape. (N.C.)

  8. Elastoplastic buckling of quasi axisymmetric shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper gives the formulation of a finite element which allows the computation of quasi axisymmetric shells of revolution. This element has two nodes and the displacement field is developped in Fourier series. In this paper, an emphasis is put on the elastic and plastic buckling formulation. Two examples are developped in details showing the applicability and the interest of such a finite element. (orig.)

  9. A Swiss Manufacturer Sees the Industrial Revolution in England*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buess, Heinrich

    1962-01-01

    I have recently come across the diaries of Johann Conrad Fischer. These diaries span six decades and cover the years of social, economic, and technological upheaval which marked the industrial revolution in England. The reader is given a picture of these years through the eyes of a Swiss manufacturer with a good perception of history, and his notes are of some value to historians. PMID:13874462

  10. Smart Farming: A Transdisciplinary Data Revolution for Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Brym, Zack

    2018-01-01

    This is a presentation for the 1st University of Florida Data Symposium.Major advances in knowledge and technology have transformed farming throughout history; examples include the plow, selective breeding, chemical fertilization, mechanized cultivation, and genetically modified organisms. Systems that integrate these advances are often billed as revolutions for the benefits they deliver to farmers and the food system. Yet, advancements in agriculture are only beginning to respect the collect...

  11. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, F.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of energy production, energy conversion, atomic energy and renewable energy. The development of the energy consumption in Austria for the years 1993 to 1999 is given for the different energy types. The development of the use of renewable energy sources in Austria is given, different domestic heat-systems are compared, life cycles and environmental balance are outlined. (a.n.)

  12. Development of Cultural Construction and Constitutional Revolution in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Rabiee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article is the development of the cultural construction and the emergence of the Constitutional Revolution in Iran. This study, by examining the cultural structure of the Qajar era of the Naser-al-Din Shah period wants to investigate the cause of the Constitutional Revolution. The findings of this research, which have been collected by historical-analytical method, indicate that the pattern of development in the Qajar era is consistent with the pattern of unbalanced development. In this sense, by starting educational, political and military reforms in the Qajar era specially Nasser-al-Din Shah, gradually the cultural structure apart from the traditional political structure. This development provided the basis for the emergence of new intellectuals and elites with new political ideas in the field of governance methods. However, the attenuation of political structure and the backwardness of political development from cultural development faced with some obstacles. Political system instead of creating a development along with gradual cultural development and consolidating its position through the persuasion of the community, in fact to maintain integrity in the social system was resorted to force and preferred force and compulsion to persuasion. The kind of reaction and opposition of the political power structure against the modern intellectual movement, which contained new political demands in the area of governance and freedom, led to the weakness and, finally, the collapse of the Qajar political system and the constitutional revolution.

  13. Public outreach: (R)evolution by the lakeside

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Why do the planets revolve around the Sun? Has genetic science shaken Darwin's theories to their foundations? Are viruses the champions of evolution? Is progress a form of tradition? On 8 and 9 July, Geneva's Science History Museum is inviting you to a Science Night on the theme of 'Evolution, revolution'. The Sixth Science Night will host some 60 stands and offer workshops for children, guided tours, exhibitions and shows. Anticipating the (r)evolutions from the LHC, CERN will also be taking part in the event. The future accelerator promises to deliver scientific advances and may even turn our understanding of the infinitesimally small on its head. However, the LHC has already led to technological breakthroughs. The Laboratory's stand will put a special emphasis on the part played by CERN in the computing revolution, from the Web to the Computing Grid. Computer animations will be used to explain these technologies which have spin-offs well beyond the field of particle physics that are of benefit to the whol...

  14. Walking Through the Revolution: A Spatial Reading of Literary Echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Queiroz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an embryo of a literary guide on the Carnation Revolution to be explored for educational historical excursions other than leisure and tourism. We propose a historical trail through the centre of Lisbon, city of the Carnation Revolution, called Walk through the Revolution. The trail aims to reinforce collective memory about the major events that occurred in the early moments leading to the coup. The trail is made up by nine places of rememberance, for which literary excerpts are suggested and which are supported by a digital research procedure. A set of seven fixed and observer-independent categories are used to analyse the literary contents of 23 literary works published up to 2013. These literary works refer to events that happened between the eve of April 25 and May 1, 1974. At the same time, literary descriptions are explored using a spatial approach in order to define the literary geography of the most iconic military actions and popular demonstrations that occurred in Lisbon and the surroundings. The literary geography and the cartography of the historical events are then compared. Data analysis and visualization benefit from the use of standardised and quantitative methods, including basic statistics and geographic information systems.

  15. The Media and the Making of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Osman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available While views may differ on the factors that made the 2011 Egyptian revolution possible, the role of mass media will remain undisputable. The Internet-based social networks caught the Mubarak regime by surprise, and the popular disillusionment with the ‘national’ media led the public to turn to private newspapers and satellite channels for keeping pace with the events. This paper examines the role of specific media during the 18 days of the 2011 Egyptian revolution – from 25 January to 11 February, 2011 – which we have divided into four parts. It discusses how these media contributed to the unfolding of events, conceptualized the protests and the demands of the public, and presented the actors that participated in or opposed the revolution. These points are addressed by discussing the content of the Facebook pages of the Sixth of April Movement and We Are All Khalid Said, as well as that of a private Egyptian newspaper, al-Shuruq, and the state-run newspaper al-Ahram.

  16. [Junk food revolution or the cola colonization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinger, P; Imoberdorf, R

    2000-03-01

    In ancient times, the main problem was to get food. Nowadays the difficulty is to decide for or against some foodstuff. In industrialized countries, this abundance led to the fact that people eat differently from what they should. Traditional populations were subject to periods of feast and famine. Those with a metabolism which stored energy with high energetic efficiency had a survival advantage. This is called the 'thrifty' genotype hypothesis. With the secured supply of calories, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle, the thrifty genotype becomes disadvantageous, causing obesity. Industrialization or 'cola-colonization' also leads to a dramatic increase in obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in developing countries. The spread of fast food restaurants all over the world has changed modern nutrition fundamentally. Influence begins early in childhood. Advertising concentrates on the selling of image over substance. However, fast food contains high levels of fat, especially trans fatty acids. Higher consumption of trans fatty acids was associated with a higher incidence of and mortality from coronary heart disease.

  17. Evolution not Revolution: Nutrition and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elaine C; Yan, Mary R

    2017-05-20

    The increasing prevalence of obesity over the course of life is a global health challenge because of its strong and positive association with significant health problems such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and some cancers. The complex causes and drivers of obesity include genetic factors, social, ecological and political influences, food production and supply, and dietary patterns. Public health messages and government food and activity guidelines have little impact; the retail food environment has many low-priced, nutrient-poor, but energy-dense products and there is a gap between what an individual knows and what they do. Public health and education services need legislation to mandate supportive environments and promote food literacy. Two New Zealand case studies of proof-of-principle of positive change are described: Project Energize and Under 5 Energize as exemplars of school environment change, and the development of the Nothing Else™ healthier snack bar as an example of working with the food industry. Changes in food literacy alongside food supply will contribute in the long term to positive effects on the future prevalence of obesity and the onset of non-communicable disease. More cross-disciplinary translational research to inform how to improve the food supply and food literacy will improve the health and wellbeing of the economy and the population.

  18. Energy: a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Curtis.

    1995-01-01

    The world appears on the verge of a new era of advanced technologies and new fuels. Although such a transformation is unlikely to take place overnight, change is clearly coming. The question is how much and how fast: Will energy transition amount to a technological revolution, or merely an evolution? A detailed evaluation of the various aspects is given. (author). 23 refs

  19. From the water wheel to turbines and hydroelectricity. Technological evolution and revolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Pierre-Louis

    2017-08-01

    Since its appearance in the first century BC, the water wheel has developed with increasing pre-industrial activities, and has been at the origin of the industrial revolution for metallurgy, textile mills, and paper mills. Since the nineteenth century, the water wheel has become highly efficient. The reaction turbine appeared by 1825, and continued to undergo technological development. The impulsion turbine appeared for high chutes, by 1880. Other turbines for low-head chutes were further designed. Turbine development was associated, after 1890, with the use of hydropower to generate electricity, both for industrial activities, and for the benefits of cities. A model ;one city + one plant; was followed in the twentieth century by more complex and efficient schemes when electrical interconnection developed, together with pumped plants for energy storage.

  20. The revolution of batteries: electricity can be stored. Battery reaches all sectors. The Li-ion king

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moragues, Manuel; Cognasse, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Based on the lithium-ion technology, the revolution of energy storage is on the way. A first article describes how these new batteries are now introduced into the grid (for example in the USA, in the UK, in Germany, Italy, French islands, China, South Korea, Japan and Australia) and boost energy transition. With this revolution, new regulations and new business models are to be more precisely defined. Clients are asking for energy storage solutions. If new applications seem to boost it, the market remains however complex, unsteady and full of unknowns. In an interview, the Saft chairman comments the sector evolution, fields of application, the success of Tesla batteries, and the bad surprise of a sales drop for energy storage solutions for his company in 2015. The last article discusses how the Li-ion technology extends its domination, indicates the technological differences between fields of application (each application has its cathode), perspectives of improvement for the different involved chemical processes, and evokes safety issues. The article also indicates five technologies which pretend to compete with Li-ion technology (metal lithium polymer, sodium-ion, flow batteries with two electrolytes, lithium-sulphur, and lithium air)

  1. John Foran’s sociology of revolution: From historical sociology to the sociological imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Yu Karasyev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers J. Foran’s sociology of revolution through the stages of evolution of his theoretical and methodological views and the works representing them. The trajectory of Foran’s sociology of revolution reflects in many respects the development of the contemporary comparative and historical sociology of revolution: from the fundamental historical research of a few classical cases to the quantitative study of an extremely wide range of examples and after that to the prediction of the ‘revolution-like’ events’ in future. According to Foran, there are three ways to consider the future of revolutions: 1 the analysis of the revolutions of the past, 2 the look into the future in terms of the existing theories, 3 the sources of sociological imagination. These three methods correspond to three stages in Foran’s sociology of revolution: after conducting the historical study of the situation and revolutions in Iran, the comparative analysis of 39 revolution events in the Third World countries and then an attempt to imagine patterns of future revolutions on the example of Zapatistas’ revolution in Mexico in 1994 and the struggle for global justice at the beginning of the XXI century. Despite the evolution of the subject and methodology of the theory, the concept ‘political culture of opposition’ remained the central category of Foran’s model. This complex notion describes such social process when under the influence of material and discursive elements the revolutionaries found out some common discourse that prescribed them to participate in collective actions to change their societies. Thus, Foran states that revolutions are the product of both structural conditions and human agency and the latter is due to both political-economic and cultural reasons. The cultural-structural character of Foran’s approach makes it relevant for the study of contemporary revolutionary events.

  2. Asymmetric vibrations of shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature and thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kosawada, Tadashi; Miura, Kazuyuki.

    1988-01-01

    An exact method using power series expansions is presented for solving asymmetric free vibration problems for shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature and thickness. The gaverning equations of motion and the boundary conditions are derived from the stationary conditions of the Lagrangian of the shells of revolution. The method is demonstrated for shells of revolution having elliptical, cycloidal, parabolical, catenary and hyperbolical meridional curvature. The natural frequencies are numerically calculated for these shells having second degree thickness variation. (author)

  3. Research Panorama on the Second Green Revolution in the World and Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Alba, Ángela; Burgos, Ángela; Cárdenas, Jorge; Lara, Katherine; Sierra, Adriana; Montoya Rojas, Grace Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The second Green Revolution is understood as the development of transgenic varieties, using tools such as genetic engineering and molecular biology applied to the DNA molecule. The product of the second Green Revolution corresponds to genetically modified organisms (GMOs) developed from inter-species cross manipulation and genetic information of some species of interest. The second Green Revolution was established as a strategy to help ensure food security, an increasingly growing population,...

  4. What made Britannia great? Did the Industrial Revolution make Britain a world power?

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    How much of Britain's high living standards and military power compared to its competitors in 1850 should be attributed to Britain having first experienced the Industrial Revolution? Examining data on real wages in the north and south of England, the Netherlands and Ireland in the Industrial Revolution era, this paper contends that most of the technological advances of the Industrial Revolution benefited Britain's competitors as much as Britain itself. Britain attained higher outputs per pers...

  5. Modeling the transition to a new economy: lessons from two technological revolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Atkeson; Patrick J. Kehoe

    2006-01-01

    Many view the period after the Second Industrial Revolution as a paradigmatic example of a transition to a new economy following a technological revolution and conjecture that this historical experience is useful for understanding other transitions, including that after the Information Technology Revolution. We build a model of diffusion and growth to study transitions. We quantify the learning process in our model using data on the life cycle of U.S. manufacturing plants. This model accounts...

  6. Beyond America's War on Drugs: Developing Public Policy to Navigate the Prevailing Pharmacological Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Andrew; Bennett, Alex S; Elliott, Luther

    2015-03-30

    This paper places America's "war on drugs" in perspective in order to develop a new metaphor for control of drug misuse. A brief and focused history of America's experience with substance use and substance use policy over the past several hundred years provides background and a framework to compare the current Pharmacological Revolution with America's Nineteenth Century Industrial Revolution. The paper concludes with cautions about growing challenges and provides suggestions for navigating this revolution and reducing its negative impact on individuals and society.

  7. The Two Nursing Disciplinary Scientific Revolutions: Florence Nightingale and Martha E. Rogers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Kan; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this essay is to share Kan Koffi's ideas about scientific revolutions in the discipline of nursing. Koffi has proposed that the works of Florence Nightingale and Martha E. Rogers represent two scientific revolutions in nursing as a learned discipline. The outcome of these two scientific revolutions is a catalyst for critical disciplinary and paradigmatic debate about the universal conceptualization of nursing's distinctive professional and scientific knowledge. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Object of sciences and technologies, energy plays a major part in economics and relations between nations. Jean-Louis Bobin, physicist, analyses the relations between man and energy and wonders about fears that delivers nowadays technologies bound to nuclear energy and about the fear of a possible shortage of energy resources. (N.C.). 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennenbaum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  11. Cold fusion in the context of a scientific revolution in physics: History and economic ramifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Scientific revolutions have occurred in an approximately 80 year periodicity since 1500. Economic depressions have occurred at an approximately 40-50 year periodicity since 1790, and the economic depressions are a result of the scientific revolutions. The field of cold fusion is a part of a scientific revolution in physics. Understanding cold fusion phenomena in the broader historical context is helpful for understanding the development of the field and the significance of the phenomena technologically and economically. This paper includes a short history of science and of the recent scientific revolution, and includes predictions about the economic consequences of the development of the paradigm. (author)

  12. Growth in an English population from the Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, S; Brickley, M; Ives, R

    2008-05-01

    The rapid urbanization of the Industrial Revolution in 18th-19th century England presented new health challenges. Our aim is to investigate using English skeletal remains whether the living conditions for an urban working class group in the Industrial Revolution negatively impacted upon their skeletal growth compared with a population from a rural agrarian parish. The Industrial Revolution skeletal material is from St Martin's Churchyard, Birmingham (SMB), West Midlands. It dates primarily from the first half of the nineteenth century when Birmingham was a major manufacturing center. The rural group is from Wharram Percy (WP), North Yorkshire, and dates from 10th-19th century AD. The methodology involves plotting diaphyseal bone lengths versus dental age for subadults. No overall difference was found between the two populations in bone length-for-age among the 2- to 18-year cohort. However the younger parts of the SMB cohort were smaller than at WP; the opposite was true of the older parts of the cohort. Growth rate, as inferred from crosssectional data, appeared greater at SMB than at WP. The only result consistent with expectations is the larger bone dimensions in young children from WP, but this likely reflects prolonged breastfeeding at WP not differences in urban and rural environments. That the deleterious health effects that we know accompanied the major transition in human society from a rural agrarian to an urban industrialized living environment should be little manifest in skeletal endochondral growth data is discouraging for those who would use such methodology to monitor health in earlier populations. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution as Seen through Foreign Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Parker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available – The Enduring Legacy. Oil, Culture and Society in Venezuela, by Miguel Tinker Salas. Durham/London: Duke University Press, 2009. – Rethinking Venezuelan Politics. Class, Conflict and the Chávez Phenomenon, by Steve Ellner. Boulder/London: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2008. – Changing Venezuela by Taking Power. The History and Policies of the Chávez Government, by Gregory Wilpert. London/New York: Verso, 2007. – The Real Venezuela. Making Socialism in the 21st Century, by Iain Bruce. London: Pluto Press, 2008. – Democracy and Revolution. Latin America and Socialism Today, by D.L. Raby. London/Ann Arbor: Pluto Press, 2006.

  14. [Fast-track treatment--second revolution of colorectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellokumpu, Ilmo

    2012-01-01

    The fast-track treatment model can be regarded as the second revolution of colorectal surgery after the introduction of laparoscopic surgery. In the gastro-surgical unit of the Central Hospital of Central Finland, results equivalent to international studies in colorectal surgery have been achieved by using fast-track model. In a study setting, this treatment model has resulted in significant decrease of total treatment costs and speeded up discharge of the patients from the hospital. The fast-track treatment model requires both a motivated, trained medical team and a motivated patient.

  15. The Two Revolutions In Bio-Medical Research

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In the field of modern medical science, we can identify certain epochs. Some of these will be our concern here, for they offer important insights into the development of modern medicine and offer equally important predictors of where it is heading in the future. In fact they are so important that they qualify to be called nothing less than revolutions.Till the early twentieth century, medicine was an activity dependent on a small privileged elite. This changed by the mid-twentieth century int...

  16. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields.

  17. Unpacking Pat Parker: Intersections and Revolutions in "Movement in Black".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores Pat Parker's poem "Movement in Black." It examines the ways in which she emblematizes intersectionality and simultaneity as forms of revolution in struggles of self and society. It begins with a theoretical and historical apparatus to contextualize Parker as an artist and activist. Then it offers a literary analysis of the poem, focusing on themes of time and space, marginalization and movement, difference and power, visibility and invisibility, and history and memory. It argues that Parker uses autobiographical writing to fuse personal and political sites of resistance.

  18. Moments of inertia for solids of revolution and variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Rodolfo A; Herrera, William J; Martinez, R

    2006-01-01

    We present some formulae for the moments of inertia of homogeneous solids of revolution in terms of the functions that generate the solids. The development of these expressions exploits the cylindrical symmetry of these objects and avoids the explicit use of multiple integration, providing an easy and pedagogical approach. The explicit use of the functions that generate the solid gives the possibility of writing the moment of inertia as a functional, which in turn allows us to utilize the calculus of variations to obtain new insight into some properties of this fundamental quantity. In particular, minimization of moments of inertia under certain restrictions is possible by using variational methods

  19. The tourism revolution in the Mediterranean, 1950-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Carles Manera Erbina; Jaume Garau Taberner; Ramon Molina de Dios

    2010-01-01

    The explosion of mass tourism since the end of the Second World War has had a tangible effect on crucial flows of manpower, investment and production strategy towards the leisure economy in a large part of the world, with changes that take us back to what occurred two hundred years earlier in the heat of the Industrial Revolution. However, perhaps it is in particular areas (as was the case with the thrust of industrialisation) such as the Mediterranean basin, where this view can be identified...

  20. Hackers Heroes of the Computer Revolution - 25th Anniversary Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This 25th anniversary edition of Steven Levy's classic book traces the exploits of the computer revolution's original hackers -- those brilliant and eccentric nerds from the late 1950s through the early '80s who took risks, bent the rules, and pushed the world in a radical new direction. With updated material from noteworthy hackers such as Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Stallman, and Steve Wozniak, Hackers is a fascinating story that begins in early computer research labs and leads to the first home computers. Levy profiles the imaginative brainiacs who found clever and unorthodox sol

  1. Conrad's view of revolution/anarchism in under western eyes Conrad's view of revolution/anarchism in under western eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Eduardo de Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It is my main purpose to discuss in this paper three relevant topics concerned with Joseph Conrad's novel Under Western Eyes, namely: the author's view of revolution and anarchism and its relation with his Polish experience; how critical Conrad is of both autocracy and revolution and finally to discuss where in, the novel the writer is sympathetic to revolution. To begin with, let me mention some aspects of Conrad's Polish background. First of all, he was a Pole, born in the Russian-occupied Poland of 1857 as the son of one of the most spirited participants in the Polish National Comittee, and with a profound fear of Russian autocratic power in his blood. Politics, nationalism, the forces of imperialism and rebellion, were the first and deepest parts of his inheritance. Conrad's character was linked to the patriotic and nationalistic ardour of his father's nature, an idealist revolutionary, and to the conservatism of his uncle Tadeuz Bobrowski his guardian during youth. The duality of thought conditioned by Apollo Korzeniowski, the father, and Tadeuz Bobrowski made his character divided all his life long. The political approach in Under Western Eyes exemplifies the writer's duality of thought. In order to write this novel Conrad found uggestions in the writings of Russian novelists, mainly Dostoievsky's Crime and Punishment. Although the book fully justifies this assertion, the writer denies it and even affirmed in a letter to a friend that he had a "Russophobia", and that he did not like the works of the famous Russian writer. It is my main purpose to discuss in this paper three relevant topics concerned with Joseph Conrad's novel Under Western Eyes, namely: the author's view of revolution and anarchism and its relation with his Polish experience; how critical Conrad is of both autocracy and revolution and finally to discuss where in, the novel the writer is sympathetic to revolution. To begin with, let me mention some aspects of Conrad

  2. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  3. Transient dynamic and inelastic analysis of shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1975-01-01

    Advances in the limits of structural use in the aerospace and nuclear power industries over the past years have increased the requirements upon the applicable analytical computer programs to include accurate capabilities for inelastic and transient dynamic analyses. In many minds, however, this advanced capability is unequivocally linked with the large scale, general purpose, finite element programs. This idea is also combined with the view that, therefore, such analyses are prohibitively expensive and should be relegated to the 'last resort' classification. While this, in the general sense, may indeed be the case, if however, the user needs only to analyze structures falling into limited categories, he may find that a variety of smaller special purpose programs are available, which do not put an undue strain upon his resources. One such structural category is shells of revolution. This survey of programs will concentrate upon the analytical tools which have been developed predominantly for shells of revolution. The survey will be subdivided into three parts: a) consideration of programs for transient dynamic analysis, b) consideration of programs for inelastic analysis, and finally, c) consideration of programs capable of dynamic plasticity analysis. In each part, programs based upon finite difference, finite element, and numerical integration methods will be considered. The programs will be compared on the basis of analytical capabilities, and ease of idealization and use. In each part of the survey sample problems will be utilized to exemplify the state-of-the-art. (orig.) [de

  4. Review Essay: The Making of a Subcultural Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Paul Clark. The Chinese Cultural Revolution: A History. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008. 368 pp. $88 (cloth, $26 (paper.Paul Clark. Youth Culture in China: From Red Guards to Netizens. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 294 pp. $90 (cloth, $30 (paper, $24 (ebook.To read the two most recent books by Paul Clark, renowned for his earlier contributions to the study of Chinese cinema, is to marvel both at his vast and enviable knowledge of the subject matter and at the vast and fast-changing landscape of modern and contemporary Chinese cultural experiences and expressions. It is to be constantly amazed by the dots that the cultural historian connects, by the different terrains that he leads us through, and by the expansive vistas that he brings into focus. Students interested in almost any aspect of modern and contemporary Chinese culture (from film to fiction to music to dance to bodybuilding will appreciate the wealth of materials and references contained in these two volumes. Similarly, scholars of the Cultural Revolution and the developments since will have much to think about and to address, because what Clark presents here is a richer and more complex narrative of recent Chinese cultural history than has heretofore been packaged or popularized. It is a narrative that underscores the continuing evolution of modern Chinese culture in the twentieth century and beyond.

  5. What can cognitive science tell us about scientific revolutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bird

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions is notable for the readiness with which it drew on the results of cognitive psychology. These naturalistic elements were not well received and Kuhn did not subsequently develop them in his pub- lished work. Nonetheless, in a philosophical climate more receptive to naturalism, we are able to give a more positive evaluation of Kuhn’s proposals. Recently, philosophers such as Nersessian, Nickles, Andersen, Barker, and Chen have used the results of work on case-based reasoning, analogical thinking, dynamic frames, and the like to illuminate and develop various aspects of Kuhn’s thought in Structure. In particular this work aims to give depth to the Kuhnian concepts of a paradigm and incommensurability. I review this work and identify two broad strands of research. One emphasizes work on concepts; the other focusses on cognitive habits. After contrasting these, I argue that the conceptual strand fails to be a complete account of scientific revolutions. We need a broad approach that draws on a variety of resources in psychology and cognitive science.

  6. Central Bank of Ecuador, 1927: among Dictatorship, Revolution and Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Paúl Naranjo Navas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On July 9th, 1925, a coup d’état overthrew the Ecuadorian government of the president Gonzalo S. Córdova. The Military Junta chose the new president, Dr. Isidro Ayora, who founded the Central Bank of Ecuador in 1927. The majority of historians emphasize the patriotic spirit of the military forces in order to eliminate the influence of private banks. Nonetheless, there is a less popular view of the Julian Revolution, which understands the coup d’état, and the foundation of the Central Bank of Ecuador, as the result of struggles between bankers due to controversies around currency emissions. The arguments behind the Julian Revolution were based on some economic facts. Even though real GDP did not decrease in any year from 1913 to 1927, there was a generalized perception of a critical economy due to the constant fluctuation in prices, the increasing of fiscal deficit, and the reduction of revenues from the trade balance. The economic crisis was a common factor in the urban areas, which represented less than half percent of the total population.

  7. The quiet revolution in Asia's rice value chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Thomas; Chen, Kevin Z; Minten, Bart; Adriano, Lourdes; Dao, The Anh; Wang, Jianying; Gupta, Sunipa Das

    2014-12-01

    There is a rapid transformation afoot in the rice value chain in Asia. The upstream is changing quickly-farmers are undertaking capital-led intensification and participating in burgeoning markets for land rental, fertilizer and pesticides, irrigation water, and seed, and shifting from subsistence to small commercialized farms; in some areas landholdings are concentrating. Midstream, in wholesale and milling, there is a quiet revolution underway, with thousands of entrepreneurs investing in equipment, increasing scale, diversifying into higher quality, and the segments are undergoing consolidation and vertical coordination and integration. Mills, especially in China, are packaging and branding, and building agent networks in wholesale markets, and large mills are building direct relationships with supermarkets. The downstream retail segment is undergoing a "supermarket revolution," again with the lead in change in China. In most cases the government is not playing a direct role in the market, but enabling this transformation through infrastructural investment. The transformation appears to be improving food security for cities by reducing margins, offering lower consumer rice prices, and increasing quality and diversity of rice. This paper discusses findings derived from unique stacked surveys of all value chain segments in seven zones, more and less developed, around Bangladesh, China, India, and Vietnam. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. A Third Revolution in Linguistics: The Interplay between the Verbal and Non-Verbal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    This article regards Saussure's social, static and structural perspective and Chomsky's individual, generative and formal perspective as two revolutions in linguistics in the 20th century. A third revolution is already on the way. This is characterised by considering the individual's mental mechanisms in relation to the interplay between verbal…

  9. The Need for Comparative Education Research to Concentrate on the Cultural Revolution within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, M. Loretta

    Comparative education research and courses are needed to identify real revolutionary movements in the current cultural revolution in the United States. The presence of cultural revolution is indicated by, among other things, the development of microcultures. Intranational instead of cross-national studies are of importance in the next few years to…

  10. Report from the Netherlands: The Dutch Revolution in Secondary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The change in the Dutch secondary school mathematics curriculum known as Realistic Mathematics Education advocated by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM 2000) is discussed. There are very good chances in Netherlands to finish its mathematics revolution which would be a revolution in content, teaching style and student learning.

  11. The diffusion of Revolutions. A Comparison of regime turnovers in 5 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. Fenger (Menno)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The recent wave of revolutions or near-revolutions in Serbia, Georgia, Moldova, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine shared the following characteristics: they were triggered by stolen elections, they were the result of massive but non-violent demonstrations, and the opposition united behind

  12. 76 FR 55564 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Cedar Point, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard... Erie during the Revolution 3 Triathlon. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect participants..., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  13. 75 FR 55477 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie & Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie & Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard... portions of the Lake Erie during the Revolution 3 Cedar Point Triathlon. The temporary safety zone is... 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have...

  14. Reanalysis information for eigenvalues derived from a differential equation analysis formulation. [for shell of revolution buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, W. A.; Majumder, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation reported demonstrates that in the case considered perturbation methods can be used in a straightforward manner to obtain reanalysis information. A perturbation formula for the buckling loads of a general shell of revolution is derived. The accuracy of the obtained relations and their range of application is studied with the aid of a specific example involving a particular stiffened shell of revolution.

  15. The Effect of the Cultural Revolution on Educational Homogamy in Urban China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the Cultural Revolution led to a temporary decline in educational homogamy in urban China, which was reversed when the Cultural Revolution ended. Previous studies on educational homogamy in China have paid incomplete attention to China's shifting institutional structures. This research applies institutional theory to…

  16. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    On the occasion of the World Environment Day the Norwegian Ministry for the Environment held a conference on growth problems in energy consumption. The themes which were treated were energy conservation, hydroelectric power, the role of nuclear power, radioactive waste disposal, fossil fuel resources, ecological limits, pollution and international aspects. Nuclear energy forms the main theme of one lecture and an aspect of several others. (JIW)

  17. Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Torriti, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energy policy measures has been assessed with various appraisal and evaluation tools since the 1960s. Decision analysis, environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment are all notable examples of progenitors of Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) in the assessment of energy policies, programmes and projects. This chapter provides overview of policy tools which have been historically applied to assess the impacts of energy policies, programmes and projects....

  18. Renewable Energy. The Power to Choose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deudney, Daniel; Flavin, Christopher

    This book, consisting of 13 chapters, charts the progress made in renewable energy in recent years and outlines renewable energy's prospects. Areas addressed include: energy at the crossroads (discussing oil, gas, coal, nuclear power, and the conservation revolution); solar building design; solar collection; sunlight to electricity; wood; energy…

  19. Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  20. The Geopolitics of Shale Gas : The Implications of the US' Shale Gas Revolution on Intrastate Stability within Traditional Oil- and Natural Gas-Exporting Countries in the EU Neighborhood

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, S. de; Auping, W.; Govers, J.; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Widdershoven, C.J.C.G.; Weterings, R.A.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The US’ shale gas revolution could in the long term destabilize traditional oil- and gas exporters in the European Union (EU) neighborhood: A combination of substitution effects and greater energy efficiency, could put pressure on the price of oil, leading to fiscal difficulties in traditional hydrocarbon exporting countries.

  1. The Geopolitics of Shale Gas : The Implications of the US' Shale Gas Revolution on Intrastate Stability within Traditional Oil- and Natural Gas-Exporting Countries in the EU Neighborhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, S. de; Auping, W.; Govers, J.; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Widdershoven, C.J.C.G.; Weterings, R.A.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The US’ shale gas revolution could in the long term destabilize traditional oil- and gas exporters in the European Union (EU) neighborhood: A combination of substitution effects and greater energy efficiency, could put pressure on the price of oil, leading to fiscal difficulties in traditional

  2. Computers in Education Are Entering the Fourth Revolution--Yet Health Education Is Just Entering the Third.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, David F.

    1983-01-01

    Health educators are reacting today to what the author calls the third revolution in computers in education-- the use of microcomputers as teaching machines. He defines each revolution, as well as discussing how the fourth revolution, the portable microcomputer, is already underway. (JMK)

  3. The Darwinian revolution La revolución darwiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÓSCAR M CHAVES

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific revolution probably began at 16th century with the heliocentric theory of the eminent astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, but it was culminated with the masterful discoveries of Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton at 17th century who revealed that planet movements around the sun and other similar phenomena can be explained by simple mechanical laws of physics and astronomy. However, the origin, complexity and configuration of living beings remained in the mystery until 19th century, with the publication of "On the origin of species". In this essay I discuss the importance of the Darwinian scientific revolution, its beginnings, and the main objections of creationists to his evolutionary ideas. Darwin demonstrated that the origin and complexity of living beings can be explained by natural processes, without the intervention of a supernatural being. However, the beginnings of the Darwinian revolution were particularly difficult and 128 years after his death, the controversy between evolutionists and creationists still persists.Con base en la teoría heliocéntrica formulada por Nicolás Copérnico en el siglo XVI, Galileo Galilei e Isaac Newton iniciaron la revolución científica al demostrar que los movimientos de los planetas alrededor del sol podían ser explicados por las leyes de la física y la astronomía. No obstante, el origen y complejidad del mundo orgánico permaneció en el misterio hasta mediados del siglo XIX, cuando Charles Darwin publicó su célebre obra 'El origen de las especies'. Desde entonces, la selección natural se ha convertido en una de las teorías científicas más umversalmente aceptadas y Darwin en el fundador de la biología moderna. En este ensayo se discute la importancia de la revolución darwiniana, sus inicios y las principales objeciones de sus detractores. Darwin demostró que el origen y la complejidad de los seres vivos pueden ser explicados por procesos naturales sin necesidad de la intervenci

  4. METAPHYSICAL REVOLUTION OF DESCARTES AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to reveal and comprehend forms of influence metaphysical' revolution for a way of interpretation of the anthropological project by Descartes on the basis of investigations of modern dekartes's researchers, that is the recognition of a fundamental role of metaphysics. Methodology. As methodological base modern investigations of dekartes's researchers accenting a fundamental role of metaphysics and expediency of unbiassed judgment of heritage of the great thinker are used. The scientific novelty. The transformation of the anthropological project is outlined as manifestation of metaphysical revolution. It is about a transcendencecy of naive anthropology (as an embodiment of reductive mindset, that is interpretations of human nature as its corporality and transition to metaphysical anthropology which consists in upholding of unconditional priority of human thinking as associated with God. As result of transition concentration of attention on intense human nature, that is at tension between sensuality and intelligence, aspiration to truth and tendency to delusion, between Life and Nothing, etc. Conclusions. The appeal to the incomplete anthropological project of Descartes on the basis of innovative researches allows proving the thesis about influence of metaphysical revolution on a way of its interpretation. The main forms of oriented to science ideals of naive anthropology, trust in evidence of the senses, atheism, interpretation of science as the main form of detection rationality of human nature, which Descartes tends constructively to overcome in the text of "meditation", are highlighted. During creation of metaphysical anthropology the attention of the thinker is drawn by the fact of impossibility of comprehension of human nature by means of natural-science rationality and expediency of the appeal to metaphysics. The subject of attention of the thinker is the tension between sensuality and intelligence, need

  5. 1848 – A JUNCTURAL THEORY OF THE REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Viparelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This text is the conference, by Irene Viparelli in the Karl Marx Congress that happened in November, 2008 at Nova Lisboa University. The author examines the theoretical elaboration of Marx in the highlights of the historical events occurred between 1848 and 1851, specially the relation between crisis and revolution. The purpose of the publishing is to claim the marxism as a social and knowledge theory alive and present, because it’s historical. As development in thinking of the whole conflicts that the humanity lives in the social formations of the living way, the marxism contributes for the qualified debate of the current crisis of the capitalism and it constitutes a subsidy for the social practices that allow its improvement, the socialism.

  6. FASOR - A second generation shell of revolution code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    An integrated computer program entitled Field Analysis of Shells of Revolution (FASOR) currently under development for NASA is described. When completed, this code will treat prebuckling, buckling, initial postbuckling and vibrations under axisymmetric static loads as well as linear response and bifurcation under asymmetric static loads. Although these modes of response are treated by existing programs, FASOR extends the class of problems treated to include general anisotropy and transverse shear deformations of stiffened laminated shells. At the same time, a primary goal is to develop a program which is free of the usual problems of modeling, numerical convergence and ill-conditioning, laborious problem setup, limitations on problem size and interpretation of output. The field method is briefly described, the shell differential equations are cast in a suitable form for solution by this method and essential aspects of the input format are presented. Numerical results are given for both unstiffened and stiffened anisotropic cylindrical shells and compared with previously published analytical solutions.

  7. Pulp science: education and communication in the paperback book revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    Paperback books on scientific topics were a hot commodity in the United States from the 1940s to 1960s providing a vehicle for science communication that transformed science education. Well-known scientists authored them, including Rachel Carson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, George Gamow, Fred Hoyle, Julian Huxley, and Margaret Mead. A short history of 'the paperback revolution' that began in the 1930s is provided before concentrating on one publishing company based in New York City, the New American Library of World Literature (NAL), which produced Signet and Mentor Books. The infrastructure that led to the production and consumption of paperback books is described and an underexplored and not-previously identified genre of educational books on scientific topics, what the author refers to as pulp science, is characterized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The fourth revolution how the infosphere is reshaping human reality

    CERN Document Server

    Floridi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Who are we, and how do we relate to each other? Luciano Floridi, one of the leading figures in contemporary philosophy, argues that the explosive developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) is changing the answer to these fundamental human questions. As the boundaries between life online and offline break down, and we become seamlessly connected to each other and surrounded by smart, responsive objects, we are all becoming integrated into an ". Personas we adopt in social media, for example, feed into our 'real' lives so that we begin to live, as Floridi puts in, ". Following those led by Copernicus, Darwin, and Freud, this metaphysical shift represents nothing less than a fourth revolution. " defines more and more of our daily activity - the way we shop, work, learn, care for our health, entertain ourselves, conduct our relationships; the way we interact with the worlds of law, finance, and politics; even the way we conduct war. In every department of life, ICTs have become environmenta...

  9. Creep deformations of shells of revolution under asymmetrical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezono, S.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical analysis of creep deformations of shells of revolution under unsymmetrical loads is described with application to a cylindrical shell. The analytical formulation of the creep of axisymmetric undergoing unsymmetrical deformations is developed for two hardening laws: the time hardening law and the strain hardening law. The method is based on the creep power law, and on the assumption of plane stress condition and the Euler-Bernoulli hypothesis used in the ordinary thin shell theory. The basic differential equations derived for incremental values with respect to time are numerically solved by a finite difference method and the solutions at any time are obtained by integration of the incremental values. In conclusion the computer programs are developed which can be used to predict the creep deformations of arbitrary axisymmetrical shells. As a numerical example the creep deformation of cylindrical shell of importance in practical use is treated, and the variations of displacements and internal forces with the lapse of time are discussed

  10. The radar signature of revolution objects in scientific computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemason, P.; Le Martret, R.; Scheurer, B.; Stupfel, B.

    1990-12-01

    This work is motivated by the study of stealthy (or discrete) revolution objects vis-a-vis a radar. Efficient algorithms, specific numerical methods and two original industrial software (SHF 89 and SHF C) have been developed. These are reliable tools in intensive scientific computing. In particular, they have enabled the precise numerical modeling of complex objects, of very general forms, in the field of high frequencies and a thorough understanding of the physics of the problems involved. The purpose of this note is a general description of the work and its context, which is illustrated by examples of numerical applications (presented in Appendix 4). The technical aspects are detailed in reports and publications (a list is attached to this note) [fr

  11. Sexual revolution in China: implications for Chinese women and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiwen; Mehrotra, Purnima; Zimmerman, Rick

    2011-06-01

    China is undergoing rapid changes in sexual mores due to several reasons such as decreasing control of the state over private lives of individuals, globalization of its economy, and some policies initiated by the state. There is increased acceptance of premarital sex and extramarital sex in China, especially among youth. In historically conservative China, influenced by Confucian ideals of patriarchal dominance for centuries, the sexual freedom currently enjoyed by many is unprecedented. This has impacted women's status and sexual lives in several positive ways such as increasing freedom of sexual expression, control over their bodies, sexual choices, and increasing equality with men in all spheres of life. However several negative consequences such as a rise in STD/HIV prevalence, commercial sex, and divorce rates have also been attributed to the ongoing sexual revolution in China. Recommendations combating these and suggestions for directions in future research are discussed.

  12. A finite element model for nonlinear shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    A shell-of-revolution model was developed to analyze impact problems associated with the safety analysis of nuclear material shipping containers. The nonlinear shell theory presented by Eric Reissner in 1972 was used to develop our model. Reissner's approach includes transverse shear deformation and moments turning about the middle surface normal. With these features, this approach is valid for both thin and thick shells. His theory is formulated in terms of strain and stress resultants that refer to the undeformed geometry. This nonlinear shell model is developed using the virtual work principle associated with Reissner's equilibrium equations. First, the virtual work principle is modified for incremental loading; then it is linearized by assuming that the nonlinear portions of the strains are known. By iteration, equilibrium is then approximated for each increment. A benefit of this approach is that this iteration process makes it possible to use nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  13. Revolution at SOLEIL: review and prospect for motion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corruble, D.; Betinelli-Deck, P.; Blache, F.; Coquet, J.; Leclercq, N.; Millet, R.; Tournieux, A.

    2012-01-01

    At any synchrotron facility, motors are numerous: they are the significant actuators of accelerators and the main actuators of beamlines. Since 2003, the Electronic Control and data Acquisition group at SOLEIL has defined a modular and reliable motion architecture integrating industrial products (Galil controller, Midi-Engineering and Phytron power boards). Simultaneously, the software control group has developed a set of dedicated Tango devices. At present, more than 1000 motors and 200 motion controller crates are in operation at SOLEIL. Aware that motion control is important in improving performance, given that the positioning of optical systems and samples is a key element of any beamline, SOLEIL wants to upgrade its motion controller in order to maintain the facility at a high performance level and be able to respond to new requirements: better accuracy, complex trajectory and coupling multi-axis devices such as hexa-pods. This project is called REVOLUTION (Reconsider Various controllers for your motion). (authors)

  14. Quantum dots in bio-imaging: Revolution by the small

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Harinder; Kaul, Zeenia; Wadhwa, Renu; Taira, Kazunari; Hirano, Takashi; Kaul, Sunil C.

    2005-01-01

    Visual analysis of biomolecules is an integral avenue of basic and applied biological research. It has been widely carried out by tagging of nucleotides and proteins with traditional fluorophores that are limited in their application by features such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. Quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a superior alternative and are poised to change the world of bio-imaging and further its applications in basic and applied biology. The interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology is experiencing a revolution and QDs as an enabling technology have become a harbinger of this hybrid field. Within a decade, research on QDs has evolved from being a pure science subject to the one with high-end commercial applications

  15. Evidence-based medicine: the fourth revolution in American medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Ram, Ashwin N

    2009-01-01

    The use of evidence has become a force in American medicine to improve the quality of health care. Funding decisions from payers will demand studies with high-level evidence to support many of the costly interventions in medicine. Plastic surgery is certainly not immune to this national tidal wave to revamp the health care system by embracing evidence-based medicine in our practices. In scientific contributions of plastic surgery research, application of evidence-based principles should enhance the care of all patients by relying on science rather than opinions. In this article, the genesis of evidence-based medicine is discussed to guide plastic surgery in this new revolution in American medicine.

  16. [Consumption of alcoholic beverages: cultural revolution is necessary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Gianni

    2015-11-01

    Significant investment in advertising has been made to promote the consumption of alcoholic beverages, but only 0.5% of the GDP is allocated for preventing alcohol use. Although available evidence clearly demonstrates a causal relationship between ethanol and cancer, the perception of risk in the general population remains extremely low. This is partly due to the fact that alcohol consumption is considered as a "normal" habit in our society, mostly as a consequence of the lack of appropriate information. It should also be emphasized the lack of a common language within the healthcare community, in that too often alcohol is identified as a food or a preservative. The fourth edition of the RDA represents a true cultural revolution as it identifies alcohol consumption as a risk, regardless of the amount consumed. Recommended dosages are defined as low-risk dosages. It would be appropriate to correctly apply the Law 125/2001, which provides for inclusion of alcoholism in university education programs.

  17. 21st Century Socialism: Making a State for Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Artz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela has built mass organizations of workers and communities that have erratically challenged class and market relations—verifying that taking political power is difficult but essential to fundamental social change and that capitalist cultural practices complicate the revolutionary process. This work identifies components of state power, separating state apparatus (government as a crucial site for instituting social change. The case of democratic, participatory communication and public media access is presented as central to the successes and problems of Venezuelan 21st century socialism. Drawing on field research in community media in Caracas, the essay highlights some of the politico-cultural challenges and class contradictions in producing and distributing cultural values and social practices for a new socialist hegemony necessary for fundamental social change.

  18. Wind power takes off. A structural revolution; Vindkraften tar fart. En strukturell revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staahl, Benjamin; Lilliecreutz, Johan

    2009-03-15

    Wind power is today a large worldwide market that is growing very rapidly. It is already a significant source of energy and will dominate the electricity market within a few decades. The market today has been estimated at Euro 36.5 billion. Looking at wind power share of investment in new plants it has already about 40% in Europe and USA. The growth rate is high and rising, and the market potential for wind power is therefore great. In 2007, 20 GW of wind power was installed and in 2008 about 27 GW, and in total the global capacity in 2008 amounted to 120 GW. More than half of all existing wind power plants have been installed in the last three years. Wind power accounts for about 1.5% of global electricity consumption, but in individual countries for much higher share. Market forecast of the future is uncertain, but there is consensus that it is a rapid growth. IEA estimates in its most positive scenario that wind power capacity in 2015 will amount to 296 GW, while specialized market analysts estimate that wind power capacity globally will increase to 691 GW already in 2017, representing an annual growth rate at almost 20%. In Sweden, a total of 236 MW of new wind power capacity was built in 2008, and Swedish wind power produced around 1.5 TWh, equivalent to 1% of the country's energy consumption and 77% more than in 2006. The goal is to increase production to 10 TWh already in 2015. The Swedish Energy Agency has proposed that it should be possible to produce 30 TWh of wind power in 2020, which represents an annual growth rate of nearly 24%. There is currently no large Swedish producers of wind power plants. However there are plenty of Swedish companies that benefit from the emerging market - ABB, SKF and DIAB are major suppliers to the wind turbine manufacturers. There are also technological development related to wind, both product development and more basic innovation. The conclusions of this study is that even if wind power industry begins to ripen, there

  19. A modern Green Revolution gene for reduced height in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würschum, Tobias; Langer, Simon M; Longin, C Friedrich H; Tucker, Matthew R; Leiser, Willmar L

    2017-12-01

    Increases in the yield of wheat during the Green Revolution of the late 20 th century were achieved through the introduction of Reduced height (Rht) dwarfing genes. The Rht-B1 and Rht-D1 loci ensured short stature by limiting the response to the growth-promoting hormone gibberellin, and are now widespread through international breeding programs. Despite this advantage, interference with the plant's response to gibberellin also triggers adverse effects for a range of important agronomic traits, and consequently modern Green Revolution genes are urgently required. In this study, we revisited the genetic control of wheat height using an association mapping approach and a large panel of 1110 worldwide winter wheat cultivars. This led to the identification of a major Rht locus on chromosome 6A, Rht24, which substantially reduces plant height alone as well as in combination with Rht-1b alleles. Remarkably, behind Rht-D1, Rht24 was the second most important locus for reduced height, explaining 15.0% of the genotypic variance and exerting an allele substitution effect of -8.8 cm. Unlike the two Rht-1b alleles, plants carrying Rht24 remain sensitive to gibberellic acid treatment. Rht24 appears in breeding programs from all countries of origin investigated, with increased frequency over the last decades, indicating that wheat breeders have actively selected for this locus. Taken together, this study reveals Rht24 as an important Rht gene of commercial relevance in worldwide wheat breeding. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Try-Out of the February Revolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Nefedov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question about the causes and actors of the February revolution can be understood only in the context of previous events. In this connection, of great importance is the analysis of the causes and circumstances of a strike wave that swept through Petrograd in October 1916. Up to 100 thousand strikers (together with locked-out workers were involved in these labor unrests that were accompanied by demonstrations and clashes with the police. In many ways (bread shortage as the main motivation, bakeshops pillage, spontaneity, suddenness, involvement of adolescents and women, Cossacks’ refusal to shoot into the crowd, solders’ desertion to the side of people, these events recall those of February 23–28, 1917. The American historians L. Haimson and E. Brian called them “a try-out of the February revolution”. Short information about these strikes is available in the papers of a number of Soviet authors; however, it is presented to some extent tendentiously, based on the desire to show the directing and organizational role of the Bolshevik party. In this regard, it seems important to restore the actual course of the events and give them an objective interpretation. The study shows that the October strikes were the first reaction of Petrograd workers to the emerging food crisis, whereas the February revolution was the reaction to the second, a much more acute phase of this crisis. The mechanism of these events was similar: in the both cases, famine was the major factor pushing for protests. In the both cases, protests were spontaneous and massive, externally similar to a hunger riot. The food crisis determined the army’s position as well: both in October and in February, Cossacks and soldiers sympathized with the starving population and refused to use weapons to crackdown demonstrators

  1. Fertility and migration in the heart of the industrial revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oris, M

    1996-01-01

    This study examines demographic growth and change in Tilleur in the valley of Meuse in Belgium during 1807-80 during the process of industrialization and urbanization. The proportion of immigrants (foreigners and Flemings) increased from 15% in 1807 to 65% in 1856. After 1856, population and industrial growth stabilized. During 1856-66 the proportion of natives stabilized, and the proportion of Flemings increased. It is argued that in Tilleur there were two phases: a foundation phase of industrial and population growth and a phase of maturation with decreased non-native population and greater similarity between groups. Immigrants contributed to the birth rate in greater proportions than their proportion in the population of Tilleur. During 1847-66 native population increased annually from 2.4% to 3.8%. Migrants' annual increases were diminished by the effects of mortality but expanded by the influence of in-migration. During 1857-66 the proportion of foreigners declined and marked the transition to a new phase. During 1830-66 the sex ratio grew from 93 to 119. During the Industrial Revolution in Tilleur, women shifted from outnumbering to undernumbering men. The iron and coal in the region attracted men. The sex ratio among the Flemish was 214 in 1866. In 1830 the proportion of fertile women was higher among immigrants and declined thereafter. Age at marriage rose for natives and declined for immigrants. The native population structure by sex, age, and marriage did not favor the birth rate. During 1866-80 the birth rate of foreign immigrants and rural natives declined, the birth rate of natives doubled, and the gap between these two groups narrowed. The changes among immigrants during the foundation phase led to fertility decline in the maturation phase. Marriage and migration interactions linked the industrial revolution with the demographic transition.

  2. Portugal and the Luso-Atlantic World in the Age of Revolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Paquette

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The "Age of Revolutions" paradigm, pioneered by R.R. Palmer and Eric Hobsbawm, has been enormously influential, especially in the study of the Atlantic World c. 1750-1850. Yet it was developed without reference to the Luso-Brazilian World (and a mere passing reference to Spanish America. This essay explores the utility of the "Age of Revolutions" framework for the study of the Luso-Atlantic and suggests that Luso-Brazilian History can enrich, and modify, the prevailing understanding of the "Age of Revolutions".

  3. Asymmetric vibrations of thick shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kosawada, Tadashi; Yachita, Takumi.

    1988-01-01

    An exact method using power series expansions is presented for solving asymmetric free vibration problems for thick shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature. Based on the improved thick shell theory, the Lagrangian of the shells of revolution are obtained, and the equations of motion and the boundary conditions are derived from the stationary condition of the Lagrangian. The method is demonstrated for thick shells of revolution having elliptical, cycloidal, parabolical, catenary and hyperbolical meridional curvature. The results by the present method are compared with those by the thin shell theory and the effects of the rotatory inertia and the shear deformation upon the natural frequencies are clarified. (author)

  4. Axisymmetric vibrations of thick shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kosawada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shin; Takahashi, Fumiaki.

    1987-01-01

    An exact method using power series expansions is presented for solving axisymmetric free vibration problems for thick shells of revolution having meridionally varying curvature. Based on the improved thick shell theory, the Lagrangian of the shells of revolution are obtained, and the equations of motion and the boundary conditions are derived from the stationary condition of the Lagrangian. The method is applied to thick shells of revolution having their generating curves of ellipse, cycloid, parabola, catenary and hyperbola. The results by the present method are compared with those by the thin shell theory and the effects of rotatory inertia and shear deformation upon the natural frequencies and the mode shapes are clarified. (author)

  5. Games to get Hegemony in Iranian Politics : Participation of Islamic Jurists after the Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    After the Iranian Islamic Revolution in 1979, Islamic jurists have played an important role in the political arena of the new establishment. This paper aimed to describe changes in the Shī'ite jurisprudence academia in contemporary Iran, especially after the revolution. Thus I focused on owze-ye 'Elmīye (Shī'ite learning institution) in Qom before and after the revolution. Then I figured out the changes in the educational aspect and the administrative aspect. In addition, I tried to reveal a ...

  6. The German energy market: chronicle of a promised liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuraux, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    This book treats of: the German energy sector, its historical evolution since its creation during the second industrial revolution, the German energy market, the nuclear energy policy and its debate in the public opinion, and the present day trend towards the development of renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  7. Cell evolution and Earth history: stasis and revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2006-06-29

    This synthesis has three main parts. The first discusses the overall tree of life and nature of the last common ancestor (cenancestor). I emphasize key steps in cellular evolution important for ordering and timing the major evolutionary innovations in the history of the biosphere, explaining especially the origins of the eukaryote cell and of bacterial flagella and cell envelope novelties. Second, I map the tree onto the fossil record and discuss dates of key events and their biogeochemical impact. Finally, I present a broad synthesis, discussing evidence for a three-phase history of life. The first phase began perhaps ca 3.5 Gyr ago, when the origin of cells and anoxic photosynthesis generated the arguably most primitive prokaryote phylum, Chlorobacteria (= Chloroflexi), the first negibacteria with cells bounded by two acyl ester phospholipid membranes. After this 'chlorobacterial age' of benthic anaerobic evolution protected from UV radiation by mineral grains, two momentous quantum evolutionary episodes of cellular innovation and microbial radiation dramatically transformed the Earth's surface: the glycobacterial revolution initiated an oxygenic 'age of cyanobacteria' and, as the ozone layer grew, the rise of plankton; immensely later, probably as recently as ca 0.9 Gyr ago, the neomuran revolution ushered in the 'age of eukaryotes', Archaebacteria (arguably the youngest bacterial phylum), and morphological complexity. Diversification of glycobacteria ca 2.8 Gyr ago, predominantly inhabiting stratified benthic mats, I suggest caused serial depletion of 13C by ribulose 1,5-bis-phosphate caboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) to yield ultralight late Archaean organic carbon formerly attributed to methanogenesis plus methanotrophy. The late origin of archaebacterial methanogenesis ca 720 Myr ago perhaps triggered snowball Earth episodes by slight global warming increasing weathering and reducing CO2 levels, to yield runaway cooling; the origin of anaerobic methane

  8. Expanded R&D by Jet-engine-steering Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    Since 1987 [1,2,3,4,5] the global jet engine community is facing the historical fact that jet engine steering is gradually replacing canards and the common, often dangerous and obsolete, aerodynamic-only flight control - a fact that (i) has already affected the defense-industrial complex in the US, Russia, China, Japan, S-Korea and India, (ii) has integrated the traditional jet-engine components R&D with advanced aero-electro-physics, stealth technology, thrust vectoring aerodynamics and material science. Moreover, this military revolution is historically due to expand into the civil transport jets domain, [6,7,8,9]. The historical aim of the JES-Revolution remains the same: Replace the common, stall-spin sensitive canards [6] and Aerodynamic-Only-Obsolete-Flight Control ("AOOF Control"). Invented about 100 years ago for propeller-driven air vehicles, it has already been partially replaced for failure to function in WVR-combat post-stall domain, and for the following reasons: In comparison with complete Tail-Less, Canard-Less, Stealth-JES (Figure 5 and References [1,2,3,4,5,6]), the common AOOF Control increases drag, weight, fuel consumption, complexity, cost, and reduces flight safety, stealth, [Low Detectability] and provides zero post-stall, WVR air combat capability while its CANARDS KILL LD & REDUCE JES. Examples of stealth fighter aircraft that have already replaced canards and AOOF-Control where JES provides at least 64 to 0 KILL-RATIO advantage over AOOF-Controlled conventional fighter aircraft: The U.S. JES F-22 and, apparently, the Russian JES-Su-T-50 & 35S, China 2016-J-31, Indian HAL AMCA & FGFA, Japanese JES IHHI ATD-X, S-Korean JES KF-X. Cf. X-44 in Figure 5. Consequently, the jet engine is no longer defined as providing only brute force forward. Instead, it successfully competes with and wins over the wrong, dominating AOOF-Control, at least as a backup flight control whose sole factual domain is currently a well-established, primary flight

  9. Prokofiev: Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution / David J. Fanning

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fanning, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Prokofiev: Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October Revolution, Op. 74 a. The Tale of the Stone Flower - experts. Philharmonia Chorus and Orchestra / Neeme Järvi" Chandos ABTD 1597; CHAN9095 (75 minutes:DDD)

  10. Georgia after the Rose Revolution: Geopolitical Predicament and Implications for U.S. Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cornell, Svante E

    2007-01-01

    .... Following the 2003 Rose Revolution in Georgia, relations with Russia turned sour as the new government proved both democratic and single-mindedly focused on rebuilding the Georgian state, resolving...

  11. Style and the New Poetic Revolution in Niyi Osundare's Poetry | Alu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Research Review ... The emergence of Niyi Osundare along with a new poetic revolution is perhaps the high point of the contingencies of the transition of Modern ... generations of Nigerian poets left behind patches of conflicting ideas.

  12. The Structure of Tactical Revolution in the U.S. Army from 1968 to 1986

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donovan, George

    1998-01-01

    .... This monograph uses ideas suggested in Thomas Kuhn's book, The Structure of Scientific Revolution, to examine the forces that impelled doctrinal change, the manner in which change occurred, and the consequences...

  13. The Citizenship Experiment : Contesting the Limits of Civic Equality and Participation in the Age of Revolutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, R.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the question how Americans, Frenchmen, and Dutchmen reconsidered their ideas and ideals of citizenship during the immediate aftermath of the Haitian Revolution and the Terror in Jacobin France; and how, consequently, a shared, transatlantic, revolutionary citizenship

  14. The non-Euclidean revolution with an introduction by H.S.M. Coxeter

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    2001-01-01

    How unique and definitive is Euclidean geometry in describing the "real" space in which we live? Richard Trudeau confronts the fundamental question of truth and its representation through mathematical models in The Non-Euclidean Revolution. First, the author analyzes geometry in its historical and philosophical setting; second, he examines a revolution every bit as significant as the Copernican revolution in astronomy and the Darwinian revolution in biology; third, on the most speculative level, he questions the possibility of absolute knowledge of the world. Trudeau writes in a lively, entertaining, and highly accessible style. His book provides one of the most stimulating and personal presentations of a struggle with the nature of truth in mathematics and the physical world. A portion of the book won the Pólya Prize, a distinguished award from the Mathematical Association of America.

  15. Don't Start the Revolution Without Me: A Review of the Army Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santala, Russel

    2004-01-01

    .... The security environment has changed dramatically since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Using a model borrowed from political science for examining social revolution the transformation efforts of the Army over the past decade are explored...

  16. Cyberwar and Information Warfare: A Revolution in Military Affairs or Much Ado about Not Too Much?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Charles A

    1997-01-01

    .... Looking back on these changes, and at the changes that are being caused by the rapid advances in today's technology, many people assert that we are in the midst of a revolution in military affairs (RMA...

  17. Effective basis for modelling outlines of envelopes generated by motion of surfaces of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlapov, V.E.; Yakunin, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers effective solutions of problems on parallel processing of envelopes generated by three-dimensional movement of surfaces of revolution. In general, determining the points outlining the envelope corresponding to concrete values for motion parameters reduces to numerical solution of nonlinear equations in generatrix parameters. For surfaces of revolution whose generatrix is a circular arc, this problem reduces to solution of a fourth-degree algebraic equation. It is shown that an envelope outline can be specified in the form of an explicit function of the motion parameters for any motion if the generatrix of the surface of revolution is a strait line, and, for motion with a fixed point or a fixed axis for the surface of revolution, if the generatrix is a conic section, spline, or a number of other curves

  18. Russian Revolutions, Lenin and Trotzky in a Book by Leonid Dobronravov (Donitch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex

    Some reflections concerning the role of Communist Party in the development of sciences and arts in the Soviet Union, following from the book by Leonid Dobronravov (Donitch)(Russian Revolution) and writings by Gennady Gorelik are given.

  19. Thomas Kuhn's revolutions a historical and an evolutionary philosophy of science?

    CERN Document Server

    Marcum, James A

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Thomas Kuhn's Revolution marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Kuhn's most influential work. Drawing on the rich archival sources at MIT, and engaging fully with current scholarship, James Marcum provides the historical background to the development of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Exploring the shift Kuhn makes from a historical to an evolutionary philosophy of science and examining Kuhn's legacy in depth, Marcum answers key questions: What exactly was Kuhn's historiographic revolution and how did it come about? Why did it have the impact it did? What will its future impact be for both academia and society? Marcum's answers build a new portrait of Kuhn: his personality, his pedagogical style and the intellectual and social context in which he practiced his trade. Thomas Kuhn's Revolution shows how Kuhn transcends the boundaries of the philosophy of science, influencing sociologists, economists, theologians and even policy makers and politicians. This is a comprehensi...

  20. Human exposure to selamectin from dogs treated with revolution: methodological consideration for selamectin isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R C; Masthay, M B; Canerdy, T D; Acosta, T M; Provost, R J; Britton, D M; Atieh, B H; Keller, R J

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine selamectin residue in dog's blood and in gloves worn while petting dogs after Revolution application. Revolution contains the active ingredient selamectin (a semisynthetic avermectin), which controls endoparasites and ectoparasites, including adult fleas, flea eggs, ticks, heartworms, ear mites, and sarcoptic mange in dogs, for 30 days. Revolution was applied topically on a group of six adult house hold dogs (240 mg selamectin/dog). The gloves worn for 5 min while petting the dogs were collected in glass jars and the blood samples (5 mL/dog) were collected in EDTA tubes at 0 h, 24 h, and 72 h, and at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 weeks post-Revolution application for selamectin residue determination. At no time during the study did the dogs show any signs of toxicity, weight loss, or change in body temperature. Extracts of the blood and the gloves were analyzed for selamectin residue using RP-HPLC coupled with a UV detector (246 nm). Selamectin standard used for peak identification and quantitation was purified from Revolution. Selamectin residue was detected in the blood (10.26 +/- 1.06 ng/mL) only at 72 h post-Revolution application, probably due to its poor dermal absorption and rapid elimination from the circulation. In the glove extracts, the highest concentration of selamectin (518.90 +/- 66.80 ppm) was detected 24 h after Revolution application. Transferable residue of selamectin in gloves from dog's coat was detected at a lesser magnitude after 1 week of Revolution application, and that was followed by a further descending trend during the second, third, and fourth weeks. No selamectin residue was detected in the glove extracts after the fifth week. In spite of selamectin's binding to the sebaceous glands of the skin, gloves contained significant transferable residue. Thus, these findings suggest that repeated exposure to selamectin can pose potential health risks, especially to veterinarians, veterinary technologists, dog

  1. Apple Pay & Digital Wallets in Mexico and the United States: Illusion or Financial Revolution?

    OpenAIRE

    Heredia Salazar, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Apple Pay and digital wallets have gained popularity since the fall of 2014. Perceiving Apple Pay & digital wallets as a financial revolution at this moment might be a mistake. The following study shows that it is just the evolution of a payment system in Mexico and the United States of America, a system that opened the door to a possible future financial revolution. Current financial regulation in Mexico and the United States of America is not accurately applied; therefore, proper ...

  2. Iran's Islamic Revolution: the Ulama, the West, nationalism, and the growth of political consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Von Nordheim, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation seeks to offer an explanation for the Islamic Revolution, taking into account not only the social, political, and economic conditions of the time, but also religious and cultural elements. It seeks to determine the origins of the trends it identifies as important to an understanding of the causes of the Islamic Revolution. These include the rise of nationalism, Iran’s exploitation by foreign powers, and the assertive posture of the Shi’a ulama.

  3. Was there an ‘Industrious Revolution' before the Industrial Revolution?:An Empirical Exercise for England, c. 1300-1830

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Robert C.; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    It is conventionally assumed that the pre-modern working year was fixed and that consumption varied with changes in wages and prices. This is challenged by the twin theories of the ‘industrious' revolution and the consumer revolution, positing a longer working year as people earned surplus money to buy novel goods. In this study, we turn the conventional view on its head, fixing consumption rather than labour input. Specifically, we use a basket of basic consumption goods and compute the work...

  4. “Si Nicaragua Venció”: Lesbian and Gay Solidarity with the Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Hobson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the radical imagination of lesbian and gay activism in solidarity with the Nicaraguan Revolution. It examines the reasons US lesbian and gay radicals supported that revolution and investigates the ways that homoerotic, especially lesbian, desire shaped their solidarity. Drawing on Herbert Marcuse and Michel Foucault, the article argues that lesbian and gay radicals viewed the Nicaraguan Revolution in erotic and heterotopic terms. Posters, fliers, and interviews reveal that US activists, people of color and white, represented the Revolution and solidarity through tropes of female masculinity and women’s affection. Many Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men shared these nonnormative images of socialist change. Yet while Nicaraguans claimed Sandinismo as their own, for US activists revolution remained a distant object of desire and solidarity a “seduction,” “crush,” or embrace.  United States activists who embraced developmentalist views of Latin American sexualities remained unable to witness lesbian and gay life inside Nicaragua, while lesbian and gay Sandinistas kept silent about FSLN homophobia so as not to undermine solidarity against the Contra war. Desire served as a powerful tool for mobilizing transnational solidarity. By failing to examine desire critically, however, US activists limited their communications with Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men and weakened the relationship they sought with revolution itself.

  5. Making Breakthroughs in the Turbulent Decade: China's Space Technology During the Cultural Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengzhi; Zhang, Dehui; Hu, Danian

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses why Chinese space programs were able to develop to the extent they did during the turbulent decade of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). It first introduces briefly what China had accomplished in rocket and missile technology before the Cultural Revolution, including the establishment of a system for research and manufacturing, breakthroughs in rocket technology, and programs for future development. It then analyzes the harmful impacts of the Cultural Revolution on Chinese space programs by examining activities of contemporary mass factions in the Seventh Ministry of Machinery Industry. In the third section, this article presents the important developments of Chinese space programs during the Cultural Revolution and explores briefly the significance of these developments for the future and overall progress in space technology. Finally, it discusses the reasons for the series of developments of Chinese space technology during the Cultural Revolution. This article concludes that, although the Cultural Revolution generated certain harmful impacts on the development of Chinese space technology, the Chinese essentially accomplished their scheduled objectives in their space program, both because of the great support of top Chinese leaders, including the officially disgraced Lin Biao and the Gang of Four, and due to the implementation of many effective special measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mushroom refinement endeavor auspicate non green revolution in the offing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAUKET AHMED PALA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pala SA, Wani AH, Boda RH, Wani BA. 2014. Mushroom refinement endeavor auspicate non green revolution in the offing. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 173-185. Mushroom can serve as food, tonic, and as medicine thus make people healthier, fitter and happier. They have a cracking potential for generating great socioeconomic impact in human welfare at local, national and international level. With the help of allied mushroom farming we can easily tackle the problem of food for growing world population; reduce environmental pollution by bioconversion of huge organic wastes into mushrooms; recycle huge quantity of organic wastes to mushroom crops, biofertilizers, and biogas; restore damaged environment by mushroom mycelia through mycoforestry, mycoremediation, mycofiltration and mycopesticides in a zero emission fashion. They can be used to degrade radioactive industrial biocide wastes in an eco-friendly fashion. Since mushroom cultivation is an indoor agribusiness, it could have great economic impact by generating employment, income and functional food requirements for rural people especially in developing countries. How far mushroom cultivation can meet the functional food requirements; address the domestic food challenges, rising food prices and crisis vis a vis environmental sustainability will be thrust areas of this communication.

  7. Explaining Italian Underdevelopment. The Liberal Revolution of Piero Gobetti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Varela Petito

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents to the readers in Latin America the thought of the Italian liberal writer and politician Piero Gobetti (Torino 1900–Paris 1926 who was a close friend of Antonio Gramsci and one of the main intellectual influences on the work of the marxist peruvian thinker José Carlos Mariátegui. His most relevant book, La Rivoluzione Libérale, was translated into Spanish only recently but —as Mariátegui understood— some of Gobetti's ideas are very relevant to an analysis of Latin American socialformations. His very original "movement oriented" liberalism was influenced by the Russian revolution as well as by philosophers like Georges Sorel, Gaetano Mosca, Benedetto Croce and Henri Bergson.Gobetti's major concern in politics was to promote the emergence of a new ruling class. For a better comprehension of his thought, Gobetti's ideas are here compared with those of Gramsci and Mariátegui.

  8. Elasto/visco-plastic dynamic response of shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1977-01-01

    The authors study the large deflection elasto/visco-plastic dynamic response of shells of revolution to strong blast loads, where the viscosity of the material is considered in the plastic range. The equations of motion and the relations between the strain and the displacement are derived from the Sanders nonlinear theory for thin shells. The constitutive relation for shell response is linear elastic, visco-plastic. In the linear elastic range Hooke's law is used. In the plastic range the elasto/visco-plastic equations by Fyfe based on the model developed by Perzyna are employed. The criterion for yielding used in this analysis is the von Mises yield theory. The numerical method selected for integration of the equations of motion is a method using finite difference in both space and time. The differential equations are written in finite difference form on the basis of the parabola method. For the time integration of the equations of motion the second-order finite difference in time is used. The equations of motion are thus expressed in finite difference form if we divide the shell into segments along meridional length and around the circumference. Resultant forces and resultant moments are given from numerical integration by Simpson's 1/3 rule. The loadings which are considered in this paper may be either impulsive or of finite time duration. (Auth.)

  9. Ultramap v3 - a Revolution in Aerial Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitinger, B.; Sormann, M.; Zebedin, L.; Schachinger, B.; Hoefler, M.; Tomasi, R.; Lamperter, M.; Gruber, B.; Schiester, G.; Kobald, M.; Unger, M.; Klaus, A.; Bernoegger, S.; Karner, K.; Wiechert, A.; Ponticelli, M.; Gruber, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the last years, Microsoft has driven innovation in the aerial photogrammetry community. Besides the market leading camera technology, UltraMap has grown to an outstanding photogrammetric workflow system which enables users to effectively work with large digital aerial image blocks in a highly automated way. Best example is the project-based color balancing approach which automatically balances images to a homogeneous block. UltraMap V3 continues innovation, and offers a revolution in terms of ortho processing. A fully automated dense matching module strives for high precision digital surface models (DSMs) which are calculated either on CPUs or on GPUs using a distributed processing framework. By applying constrained filtering algorithms, a digital terrain model can be derived which in turn can be used for fully automated traditional ortho texturing. By having the knowledge about the underlying geometry, seamlines can be generated automatically by applying cost functions in order to minimize visual disturbing artifacts. By exploiting the generated DSM information, a DSMOrtho is created using the balanced input images. Again, seamlines are detected automatically resulting in an automatically balanced ortho mosaic. Interactive block-based radiometric adjustments lead to a high quality ortho product based on UltraCam imagery. UltraMap v3 is the first fully integrated and interactive solution for supporting UltraCam images at best in order to deliver DSM and ortho imagery.

  10. Philosophy and Revolution: Badiou's Infidelity to the Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Vassilacopoulos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this paper is to give reasons for thinking that Badioursquo;s philosophy is not prepared to follow through all the consequences of the historical retreat of the political event. We want to suggest that it is important to come to terms with the implications of this retreat as no less a revolutionary aspect of the revolution. Whereas fidelity to the event demands that we not be selective in following the consequences of an event, fidelity to the eventrsquo;s retreat points to a more direct relation of philosophy to the event than Badiou allows. In the first section of our paper we outline the philosophical orientation that informs our encounter with Badioursquo;s thought. In the second we examine the relationship between philosophy and the political event in order to set the context for the elaboration of our claim in the third section that fidelity to the event calls for attention not only to the demands of its emergence but also to those associated with the eventrsquo;s retreat. In the final section we indicate how the retreat of the political event might give rise to the philosophical subject and to the requirements of a philosophy of the event.

  11. Focus on performance: the 21 century revolution in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Frank

    2008-01-01

    For centuries medicine was predominantly a tradition-based "trade" until the introduction of science transformed it into an intellectually rigorous discipline. That transformation contributed heavily to the dominance in medical education of the learning of biomedical concepts ("knowing that") over learning how to translate that knowledge into clinical performance ("knowing how"). The recent emergence of performance-oriented educational initiatives suggests, however, that the balance between these two complementary approaches is changing, a change that has been referred to as "the Flexnerian revolution of the 21(st) century." Problem-based learning, learning the practice of evidence-based medicine, and learning to use clinical guidelines are among the important initiatives designed to develop high-level performance in the care of individual patients. Initiatives in which learners acquire skill in changing the performance of care systems are also being widely implemented. These trends have received important formal support through recent changes in residency training accreditation standards. Although it is too early to assess the impact of these initiatives or to know whether they will develop further, medical education is unlikely to reach its full potential unless it successfully comes to grips with the challenges of understanding, teaching, and measuring performance.

  12. Total error vs. measurement uncertainty: revolution or evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Wytze P; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2016-02-01

    The first strategic EFLM conference "Defining analytical performance goals, 15 years after the Stockholm Conference" was held in the autumn of 2014 in Milan. It maintained the Stockholm 1999 hierarchy of performance goals but rearranged them and established five task and finish groups to work on topics related to analytical performance goals including one on the "total error" theory. Jim Westgard recently wrote a comprehensive overview of performance goals and of the total error theory critical of the results and intentions of the Milan 2014 conference. The "total error" theory originated by Jim Westgard and co-workers has a dominating influence on the theory and practice of clinical chemistry but is not accepted in other fields of metrology. The generally accepted uncertainty theory, however, suffers from complex mathematics and conceived impracticability in clinical chemistry. The pros and cons of the total error theory need to be debated, making way for methods that can incorporate all relevant causes of uncertainty when making medical diagnoses and monitoring treatment effects. This development should preferably proceed not as a revolution but as an evolution.

  13. Tesco's Bob Tessari: launching a drilling revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2002-07-01

    The 'Casing Drilling' technology, patented by Tesco, which allows operators to simultaneously drill, case and evaluate oil and gas wells, is described. The system is claimed to substantially reduce the amount of lost circulation, loss of well control and bore hole instability problems that have been documented to account for about 25 per cent of total rig time on a well, and at least $4 billion (or 10 per cent of the $40 billion annual global drilling tab) spent on 'unscheduled events' associated with tripping drill pipe. With the Casing Drilling process, wells are drilled using standard oilfield casing instead of drill pipe. The host of downhole problems associated with tripping in and out of the hole are avoided, as the casing pipe is never removed. Instead, drill bits and other downhole tools are tripped through the casing with wireline at a rate of about 500 ft per minute, drastically reducing tripping time. Tesco also developed the portable top drive, the manufacture and rental of which constitutes a large part of the company's business, besides helping technologically to make Casing Drilling possible. Much of the company's success is attributed to the tenacity and zest for innovative approaches of the company's CEO, Bob Tessari, who is largely responsible for the company finding itself at the centre of a drilling technology revolution.

  14. Cooperation, norms, and revolutions: a unified game-theoretical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Helbing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cooperation is of utmost importance to society as a whole, but is often challenged by individual self-interests. While game theory has studied this problem extensively, there is little work on interactions within and across groups with different preferences or beliefs. Yet, people from different social or cultural backgrounds often meet and interact. This can yield conflict, since behavior that is considered cooperative by one population might be perceived as non-cooperative from the viewpoint of another. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the dynamics and outcome of the competitive interactions within and between groups, we study game-dynamical replicator equations for multiple populations with incompatible interests and different power (be this due to different population sizes, material resources, social capital, or other factors. These equations allow us to address various important questions: For example, can cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma be promoted, when two interacting groups have different preferences? Under what conditions can costly punishment, or other mechanisms, foster the evolution of norms? When does cooperation fail, leading to antagonistic behavior, conflict, or even revolutions? And what incentives are needed to reach peaceful agreements between groups with conflicting interests? CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our detailed quantitative analysis reveals a large variety of interesting results, which are relevant for society, law and economics, and have implications for the evolution of language and culture as well.

  15. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of shells of revolution under arbitrary loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.W.; Arbaki-Kanjoori, F.

    1975-01-01

    The requirement of some structural components such as propulsion systems and gas turbines to operate at high temperatures and pressures make the accurate evaluation of the creep phenomenon exigent (in fast breeder reactor for example). For the expected increases in operating temperatures and pressures, it becomes necessary to perform a thorough analysis of integral structural components of nuclear power plants throughout their life span. Since a large class of structures operating at elevated temperatures are composed of rotationally symmetric shells, a solution technique can be developed which involves the numerical integration of the governing shell equations. This method has been successfully applied to the static and dynamic analysis of thin elastic shells of revolution and for some cases of inelastic material behavior. It has been shown to render solutions efficiently and accurately, usually with only a fraction of computer time and storage requirements and data manipulation that is required for other numerical schemes such as the finite element method. Furthermore, the numerical integration method allows more flexibility for varying the integration step lengths than does the finite difference method and can provide uniform accuracy throughout the analysis. For nonlinear viscoelastic behavior the numerical integration technique is expected to provide similar efficiency to that obtained for the elastic problems. The computer program developed can accept time variation of material properties. Since a single form for the material constitutive law cannot encompass all materials, provisions are made so that the analysis of a very large class of material behavior can be accomplished

  16. Flourishing of Occidentalism in Iran After Cultural Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalaleh ZABARDAST

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modernity changed the community interests; it idealized individuality and liberal democracy, and based its main aim on pushing religion to the outskirts of human life. Western Christianity adjusted to modernity to justify the developments while Islam accepted it only to the extent of its capacity to authenticate the realities stated by the Qur’an. Orientalism, Occidentalism, and Islamism play impressive role in a variety of contexts today. Occidentalism in its popular variety helps to reinforce the identities. This study considers the power relationship between people and cultures. The roles and the identities are changing throughout history. Nowadays Islamic culture is one of popular subjects to study on. So, the Muslim world and revival of Islamic culture are the beginning of Occidentalism. Occidentalism is developed in the Orient in order to study the West from a non-Western World point of view. It can be referred as revival of identity (for isteghrab in Arab world by Hasan Hanafi or Talibanian or ISIS Occidentalists movements which stand for empowering Arab culture, Wahhabism or Salafism. All are revivalist movements to rapture Islamism as an ideology. This article tries to focus on the concept of Occidentalism in Iran after Iran Cultural Revolution.

  17. Immigration and the American industrial revolution from 1880 to 1920.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Charles; Mogford, Elizabeth

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we measure the contribution of immigrants and their descendents to the growth and industrial transformation of the American workforce in the age of mass immigration from 1880 to 1920. The size and selectivity of the immigrant community, as well as their disproportionate residence in large cities, meant they were the mainstay of the American industrial workforce. Immigrants and their children comprised over half of manufacturing workers in 1920, and if the third generation (the grandchildren of immigrants) are included, then more than two-thirds of workers in the manufacturing sector were of recent immigrant stock. Although higher wages and better working conditions might have encouraged more long-resident native-born workers to the industrial economy, the scale and pace of the American industrial revolution might well have slowed. The closing of the door to mass immigration in the 1920s did lead to increased recruitment of native born workers, particularly from the South, to northern industrial cities in the middle decades of the 20th century.

  18. The true revolution of nuclear will be digital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvain, B.; Le Ngoc, B.

    2016-01-01

    The French nuclear industry is undergoing tremendous change. France has lost its leader place in the competition to build reactors and today's priority is to realize important competitiveness gains. Nuclear industry must become more flexible concerning the management and integration of innovation at any stage of any nuclear activity and the digital revolution will help to do so by easing cooperation between various enterprises. A joint team composed of engineers from AREVA and EDF is working in the EPR-NM project whose purpose is to re-invent the EPR reactor in order to make it more competitive by a factor 20-30%. The deployment of digital-based technologies in nuclear industry appears late when compared to other industries like aviation industry but it could benefit from the feedback experience. The additive manufacturing already exists to fabricate some small pieces of a plane. The nuclear activities that could benefit from the application of digital-based technologies like connected objects is the monitoring of the fabrication of components, the quality control and the optimization of maintenance. (A.C.)

  19. The internet and the industrial revolution in smoking cessation counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    The internet can provide wide access to online smoking cessation programmes developed by highly qualified professionals. Compared with one-to-one counselling in smoking cessation clinics or on telephone quitlines, the mass-level dissemination of automatised, individualised counselling on the internet is comparable to the industrial revolution, when skilled craftsmen working in small shops were replaced by huge plants. Hundreds of websites provide information and advice on smoking cessation, but very few of them have been evaluated scientifically. Therefore, it is not yet known whether web-based smoking cessation interventions are effective in the long term, and which of their components are most effective for subgroups of smokers. Claims for efficacy found on some popular websites have not been evaluated. The internet is being used increasingly by tobacco companies to promote their products. The overall effect of internet smoking cessation programs on smoking prevalence is unknown. Greater efforts should be expended to improve the reach and efficacy of smoking cessation websites.

  20. The Molecular Industrial Revolution: Automated Synthesis of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobe, Melanie; Burke, Martin D

    2018-04-09

    Today we are poised for a transition from the highly customized crafting of specific molecular targets by hand to the increasingly general and automated assembly of different types of molecules with the push of a button. Creating machines that are capable of making many different types of small molecules on demand, akin to that which has been achieved on the macroscale with 3D printers, is challenging. Yet important progress is being made toward this objective with two complementary approaches: 1) Automation of customized synthesis routes to different targets by machines that enable the use of many reactions and starting materials, and 2) automation of generalized platforms that make many different targets using common coupling chemistry and building blocks. Continued progress in these directions has the potential to shift the bottleneck in molecular innovation from synthesis to imagination, and thereby help drive a new industrial revolution on the molecular scale. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. ULTRAMAP V3 – A REVOLUTION IN AERIAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Reitinger

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, Microsoft has driven innovation in the aerial photogrammetry community. Besides the market leading camera technology, UltraMap has grown to an outstanding photogrammetric workflow system which enables users to effectively work with large digital aerial image blocks in a highly automated way. Best example is the project-based color balancing approach which automatically balances images to a homogeneous block. UltraMap V3 continues innovation, and offers a revolution in terms of ortho processing. A fully automated dense matching module strives for high precision digital surface models (DSMs which are calculated either on CPUs or on GPUs using a distributed processing framework. By applying constrained filtering algorithms, a digital terrain model can be derived which in turn can be used for fully automated traditional ortho texturing. By having the knowledge about the underlying geometry, seamlines can be generated automatically by applying cost functions in order to minimize visual disturbing artifacts. By exploiting the generated DSM information, a DSMOrtho is created using the balanced input images. Again, seamlines are detected automatically resulting in an automatically balanced ortho mosaic. Interactive block-based radiometric adjustments lead to a high quality ortho product based on UltraCam imagery. UltraMap v3 is the first fully integrated and interactive solution for supporting UltraCam images at best in order to deliver DSM and ortho imagery.

  2. The Big Data Revolution: Opportunities for Chief Nurse Executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Informatics competency adoption is a recognized issue across nursing roles in digital health practice settings. Further, it has been suggested that the health system's inability to reap the promised benefits of electronic health/patient records is, in part, a manifestation of inadequate development of informatics competency by chief nurse executives (CNEs) and other clinicians (Amendola 2008; Simpson 2013). This paper will focus on CNE informatics competency and nursing knowledge development as it pertains to the Big Data revolution. With the paper's aim of showing how CNEs armed with informatics competency can harness the full potential of Big Data offering new opportunities for nursing knowledge development in their clinical transformation roles as eHealth project sponsors. It is proposed that informatics-savvy CNEs are the new transformational leaders of the digital age who will have the advantage to successfully advocate for nurses in leading 21st-century health systems. Also, transformational CNEs armed with informatics competency will position nurses and the nursing profession to achieve its future vision, where nurses are perceived by patients and professionals alike as knowledge workers, providing the leadership essential for safe, quality care and demonstrating nursing's unique contributions to fiscal health through clinically relevant, evidence-based practices (McBride 2005b). Copyright © 2016 Longwoods Publishing.

  3. Invention of science a new history of the scientific revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wootton, David

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world made by science. How and when did this happen? This book tells the story of the extraordinary intellectual and cultural revolution that gave birth to modern science, and mounts a major challenge to the prevailing orthodoxy of its history. Before 1492 it was assumed that all significant knowledge was already available; there was no concept of progress; people looked for understanding to the past not the future. This book argues that everything changed with the discovery of America, which demonstrated that new knowledge was possible: indeed it introduced the very concept of "discovery", and opened the way to the invention of science. The first crucial discovery was Tycho Brahe's nova of 1572: proof that there could be change in the heavens. The telescope (1610) rendered the old astronomy obsolete. Torricelli's experiment with the vacuum (1643) led directly to the triumph of the experimental method in the Royal Society of Boyle and Newton. By 1750 Newtonianism was being celebrated throughout E...

  4. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY AFTER THE OCTOBER REVOLUTION OF 1917: ORIGINS, PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gibadullin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study. During the period of the fall of technical and technological stability of the Russian electric power industry, the issues related to the study of the historical experience of the origin, construction and development of such large industrial complexes are actualized. The present study aims to analyze the history of the development of the Russian electric power industry after the October Revolution of 1917, to reveal the influence of the revolution on the electric power industry, to investigate the postwar period of the formation of the Unified Energy System and to assess the current state of the electric power industry in the absence of large-scale projects and programs for updating and modernizing production facilities, propose mechanisms to improve technical and technological stability of electricity of the Russian Federation.Materials and methods. In 1920, after the October Revolution of 1917, the first plan related to the development of economic activities of the national economy was adopted, which was called the State Plan for the Electrification of Russia. This document contained the main mechanisms and requirements for the formation and establishment of a new branch for the economy. Based on the use of data from the Government of the Russian Federation, Federal State Statistics Service of the Russian Federation, the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation, Joint-stock company “United Energy System of Russia”, as well as electric power companies, the post-revolutionary period of the electric power industry development, the current state and the existing potential of the Russian electric power industry are analyzed. Using the economic-statistical, comparative and logical methods, the main results of the study were presented.Results. Analyzed indices of the electric power industry in the period 1920–1935 indicate a breakthrough in the development of the Russian energy sector, this period was marked by the

  5. Europe's New Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piebalgs, A.; Conn, I.; Dobbeni, D.; Josefsson, L.G.; Mogg, L.; Rifkin, J.; Scaroni, P.; Tanaka, N.

    2009-01-01

    Europe's energy policy has been completely transformed over the last few years, tackling the dual challenges of climate change and energy security. This has lead to major new laws on issues such as energy liberalisation, renewable energy and energy efficiency. In this volume the detailed reasons for these changes are outlined and the way in which the European Union has risen to these challenges is discussed. Views are given on where Europe's energy policy will go next, the challenges of 2050 and the development of a 'third industrial revolution'. This insight is complemented by the observations and comments of some of the leading figures concerning European and global energy issues, explaining how industry, energy regulators and global thinkers see Europe's energy policy and the challenges that it now faces

  6. The path towards sustainable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi; Liu, Nian

    2017-01-01

    Civilization continues to be transformed by our ability to harness energy beyond human and animal power. A series of industrial and agricultural revolutions have allowed an increasing fraction of the world population to heat and light their homes, fertilize and irrigate their crops, connect to one another and travel around the world. All of this progress is fuelled by our ability to find, extract and use energy with ever increasing dexterity. Research in materials science is contributing to progress towards a sustainable future based on clean energy generation, transmission and distribution, the storage of electrical and chemical energy, energy efficiency, and better energy management systems.

  7. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  8. The sedentary (r)evolution: Have we lost our metabolic flexibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Jens; Klement, Rainer Johannes; Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Schwarz, Sebastian; Lötzerich, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    During the course of evolution, up until the agricultural revolution, environmental fluctuations forced the human species to develop a flexible metabolism in order to adapt its energy needs to various climate, seasonal and vegetation conditions. Metabolic flexibility safeguarded human survival independent of food availability. In modern times, humans switched their primal lifestyle towards a constant availability of energy-dense, yet often nutrient-deficient, foods, persistent psycho-emotional stressors and a lack of exercise. As a result, humans progressively gain metabolic disorders, such as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain types of cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer´s disease, wherever the sedentary lifestyle spreads in the world. For more than 2.5 million years, our capability to store fat for times of food shortage was an outstanding survival advantage. Nowadays, the same survival strategy in a completely altered surrounding is responsible for a constant accumulation of body fat. In this article, we argue that the metabolic disease epidemic is largely based on a deficit in metabolic flexibility. We hypothesize that the modern energetic inflexibility, typically displayed by symptoms of neuroglycopenia, can be reversed by re-cultivating suppressed metabolic programs, which became obsolete in an affluent environment, particularly the ability to easily switch to ketone body and fat oxidation. In a simplified model, the basic metabolic programs of humans’ primal hunter-gatherer lifestyle are opposed to the current sedentary lifestyle. Those metabolic programs, which are chronically neglected in modern surroundings, are identified and conclusions for the prevention of chronic metabolic diseases are drawn. PMID:29225776

  9. The NASA Astrophysics Data System joins the Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin; Grant, Carolyn S.; Thompson, Donna M.; Chyla, Roman; Holachek, Alexandra; Sudilovsky, Vladimir; Elliott, Jonathan; Murray, Stephen S.

    2015-08-01

    Whether or not scholarly publications are going through an evolution or revolution, one comforting certainty remains: the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is here to help the working astronomer and librarian navigate through the increasingly complex communication environment we find ourselves in. Born as a bibliographic database, today's ADS is best described as a an "aggregator" of scholarly resources relevant to the needs of researchers in astronomy and physics. In addition to indexing content from a variety of publishers, data and software archives, the ADS enriches its records by text-mining and indexing the full-text articles, enriching its metadata through the extraction of citations and acknowledgments and the ingest of bibliographies and data links maintained by astronomy institutions and data archives. In addition, ADS generates and maintains citation and co-readership networks to support discovery and bibliometric analysis.In this talk I will summarize new and ongoing curation activities and technology developments of the ADS in the face of the ever-changing world of scholarly publishing and the trends in information-sharing behavior of astronomers. Recent curation efforts include the indexing of non-standard scholarly content (such as software packages, IVOA documents and standards, and NASA award proposals); the indexing of additional content (full-text of articles, acknowledgments, affiliations, ORCID ids); and enhanced support for bibliographic groups and data links. Recent technology developments include a new Application Programming Interface which provides access to a variety of ADS microservices, a new user interface featuring a variety of visualizations and bibliometric analysis, and integration with ORCID services to support paper claiming.

  10. Ranking of delay factors in construction projects after Egyptian revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Fayek Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time is one of the major considerations throughout project management life cycle and can be regarded as one of the most important parameters of a project and the driving force of project success. Time delay is a very frequent phenomenon and is almost associated with nearly all constructing projects. However, little effort has been made to curtail the phenomenon, this research work attempts to identify, investigate, and rank factors perceived to affect delays in the Egyptian construction projects with respect to their relative importance so as to proffer possible ways of coping with this phenomenon. To achieve this objective, researcher invited practitioners and experts, comprising a statistically representative sample to participate in a structured questionnaire survey. Brain storming was taken into consideration, through which a number of delay factors were identified in construction projects. Totally, ninety-nine (99 factors were short-listed to be made part of the questionnaire survey and were identified and categorized into nine (9 major categories. The survey was conducted with experts and representatives from private, public, and local general construction firms. The data were analyzed using Relative Importance Index (RII, ranking and simple percentages. Ranking of factors and categories was demonstrated according to their importance level on delay, especially after 25/1/2011 (Egyptian revolution. According to the case study results, the most contributing factors and categories (those need attention to delays were discussed, and some recommendations were made in order to minimize and control delays in construction projects. Also, this paper can serve as a guide for all construction parties with effective management in construction projects to achieve a competitive level of quality and a time effective project.

  11. Felix Vicq d'Azyr: anatomy, medicine and revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, André

    2007-02-01

    Félix Vicq d'Azyr was born in 1748 in the small town of Valognes, Normandy. He studied medicine in Paris but he was particularly impressed by the lectures given at the Jardin du Roi by the comparative anatomist Louis Daubenton and the surgeon Antoine Petit. In 1773, Vicq d'Azyr initiated a series of successful lectures on human and animal anatomy at the Paris Medical School, from which he received his medical degree in 1774. He was elected the same year at the Academy of Sciences at age 26, thanks to his outstanding contributions to comparative anatomy. Vicq d'Azyr became widely known after his successful management of a severe cattle plague that occurred in the southern part of France in 1774, an event that led to the foundation of the Royal Society of Medicine in 1778. As Permanent Secretary of this society, Vicq d'Azyr wrote several eulogies that were models of eloquence and erudition and worth him a seat at the French Academy in 1788. Vicq d'Azyr published in 1786 a remarkable anatomy and physiology treatise: a large in-folio that contained original descriptions illustrated by means of nature-sized, colored, human brain figures of a quality and exactitude never attained before. In 1789, Vicq d'Azyr was appointed physician to the Queen Marie-Antoinette and, in 1790, he presented to the Constituent Assembly a decisive plan to reform the teaching of medicine in France. Unfortunately, Vicq d'Azyr did not survive the turmoil of the French Revolution; he died at age 46 on June 20, 1794.

  12. HD-DVD: the next consumer electronics revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topiwala, Pankaj N.

    2003-11-01

    The DVD is emerging as one of the world's favorite consumer electronics product, rapidly replacing analog videotape in the US and many other markets at prodigious rates. It is capable of offering a full feature-length, standard-definition movie in crisp rendition on TV. TV technology is itself in the midst of switching from analog to digital TV, with high-definition being the main draw. In fact, the US government has been advocating that switch over to digital TC, with both carrot and stick approaches, for nearly two decades, with only modest results--about 2% penetration. Under FCC herding, broadcasters are falling in the digital line--slowly, and sans profit. Meanwhile, delivery of HD content on portable media would be a great solution. Indeed, a new disk technology based on blue lasers is coming; but its widespread adoption may yet be four to five yeras away. But a promising new video codec--H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, the latest coding standard jointly developed by the Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) of ITU-T and Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) of ISO/IEC, just might be the missing link. It offers substantial coding gains over MPEG-2, used in today's DVDs. With H.264, it appears possible to put HD movies on today's red-laser DVDs. Since consumers love DVDs, and HD--when they can see it, can H.264 and HD-DVD ignite a new revolution, now? It may have a huge impact on (H)DTV adoption rates.

  13. The Fastskin Revolution From Human Fish to Swimming Androids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Craik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The story of fastskin swimsuits reflects some of the challenges facing the impact of technology in postmodern culture. Introduced in 1999 and ratified for the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, fastskin swimsuits were touted as revolutionising competitive swimming. Ten years later, they were banned by the world’s swimming regulatory body FINA (the Fédération Internationale de Natation, with the ban taking effect from January 2010 (Shipley 2009. The reason was the controversy caused by the large number of world records that were broken by competitors wearing polyurethane swimsuits, the next generation of the original fast skin suits. These suits were deemed to be providing an artificial advantage by increasing buoyancy and reducing drag. This had been an issue ever since they were introduced, yet FINA had approved the suits and, thereby, unleashed an unstoppable technological revolution of the sport of competitive swimming. Underlying this was the issue about its implications of the transformation of a sport based on the movement of the human body through water without the aid of artificial devices or apparatus. This article argues that the advent of the fastskin has not only transformed the art of swimming but has created a new image of the swimmer as a virtual android rather than a human fish. In turn, the image of the sport of swimming has been re-mapped as a technical artefact and sci-fi spectacle based on a radically transformed concept of the swimming body as a material object that has implications for the ideal of the fashionable body.

  14. Breast cancer research output, 1945-2008: a bibliometric and density-equalizing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Ronan W; Scutaru, Cristian; Kerin, Michael J; Sweeney, Karl J

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women, with an estimated 194,280 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2009 alone. The primary aim of this work was to provide an in-depth evaluation of research yield in breast cancer from 1945 to 2008, using large-scale data analysis, the employment of bibliometric indicators of production and quality, and density-equalizing mapping. Data were retrieved from the Web of Science (WOS) Science Citation Expanded database; this was searched using the Boolean operator, 'OR', with different terms related to breast cancer, including "breast cancer", "mammary ductal carcinoma" and "breast tumour". Data were then extracted from each file, transferred to Excel charts and visualised as diagrams. Mapping was performed as described by Groneberg-Kloft et al. in 2008. A total of 180,126 breast cancer-associated items were produced over the study period; these had been cited 4,136,224 times. The United States returned the greatest level of output (n = 77,101), followed by the UK (n = 18,357) and Germany (n = 12,529). International cooperation peaked in 2008, with 3,127 entries produced as a result; relationships between the United States and other countries formed the basis for the 10 most common forms of bilateral cooperation. Publications from nations with high levels of international cooperation were associated with greater average citation rates. A total of 4,096 journals published at least one item on breast cancer, although the top 50 most prolific titles together accounted for over 43% (77,517/180,126) of the total output. Breast cancer-associated research output continues to increase annually. In an era when bibliometric indicators are increasingly being employed in performance assessment, these findings should provide useful information for those tasked with improving that performance.

  15. Hydrogen: energy transition under way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, Pierre-Etienne; Mateo, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Written by a representative of Air Liquide with the help of a free lance journalist, this book proposes an overview of the technological developments for the use of hydrogen as a clean energy with its ability to store primary energy (notably that produced by renewable sources), and its capacity of energy restitution in combination with a fuel cell with many different applications (notably mobility-related applications). The authors outline that these developments are very important in a context of energy transition. They also outline what is left to be done, notably economically and financially, for hydrogen to play its role in the energy revolution which is now under way

  16. Following the Life Stories of Participants in the 1956 Hungarian Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Valuch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, analyses of the 1956 Revolution have devoted little attention to examining the events pertaining to this period from the aspect of social history. In this study Valuch explores the life stories of those who participated in these events from six decades ago in an attempt to introduce the most important characteristics determining various life phases from before and after the revolution. Based upon life interviews conducted during the 1990s with former 1956 participants living mainly in the city of Debrecen and its surrounding Hajdú-Bihar County, Valuch’s examination outlines those experiences determining their socialization, including family background, political attitudes predating the revolution and political activity conducted during 1956. His focus will then turn to the issue of how these individuals experienced the period of retribution following the revolution as well as attempts by the Kádár regime to marginalize participants in the 1956 Revolution. What general effect did collaboration with the revolutionary movement have on life during the Kádár regime and the political attitudes held by these individuals? In the final section, factors characterizing life stories from the 1956 period will be analyzed.

  17. The Islamic Revolution of Iran and migration of physicians to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaghy, Hossain A; Shajari, Anoshiravan

    2013-10-01

    Following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 in Iran, the trend of migration of physicians from the country continued. The total number of Iranian physicians migrated to the United States (US) increased from 1625 before revolution in 1974, to 5045 in 2010, thirty years post-revolution. The percentage of medical graduates migrating to the US, in the same period dropped from 15% to 5%. The reasons for this drop were restrictions imposed, along with creation of good postgraduate residency and fellowship programs in Iran. Following the revolution, the number of medical schools increased from 13 to 48. Despite all the restrictions and impediments for post-revolution medical graduates, over 500 medical graduates from newly established medical schools found their ways into the healthcare system of the US.     In spite of all hardships of eight years of imposed war, and 30 years of the US sanctions, Iran has been able to maintain good progress in its healthcare, education, and research in medicine and other branches of science and technology.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Foley, Ryan J.; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A.; Balam, David D.; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Galbany, Lluis; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Garnavich, Peter M.; Graham, Melissa L.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Sollerman, Jesper; Steele, Thea N.; Thomas, Rollin C.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Zheng, Chen

    2014-04-24

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with ne109 cm–3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  19. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type Iax supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Foley, Ryan J.; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A.; Balam, David D.; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Leloudas, Giorgos; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; Graham, Melissa L.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Leonard, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n e ≳ 10 9 cm –3 . Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected 'infrared catastrophe', a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a 'complete deflagration' that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  20. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type Iax supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chornock, Ryan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Balam, David D. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Branch, David [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Frieman, Joshua [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fynbo, Johan; Leloudas, Giorgos [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Leonard, Douglas C., E-mail: cmccully@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n{sub e} ≳ 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected 'infrared catastrophe', a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a 'complete deflagration' that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  1. The revolution in Russia’s Mideast strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korybko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the guiding imperatives behind Russia’s grand strategy in the Mideast, including both its domestic decision-making institutional idiosyncrasies and the wider geopolitical considerations at play. It discusses the evolution of Russian strategy after the so-called “Arab Spring” events and into the present day, taking care to individually analyze Moscow’s most important bilateral relationships. The review begins by addressing Russia’s anti-terrorist intervention in Syria, before progressing to some words about the two competing foreign policy factions present in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. After outlining the key differences between the Liberal and Military-Security camps, the work then broadly explains how their rivalry fi gures into the formulation of Russia’s overall grand strategy in the Mideast. Following that, it logically proceeds to examine the other bilateral relationships that are of signifi cance to Moscow, beginning with Turkey, Iraq, and Israel, and ending with Saudi Arabia and Iran. The goal of the research is to establish a very general understanding of how Russia’s foreign policy is presently practiced in the Mideast, how and why it got to where it is today, and forecast on the prospects for its further development. In doing this, the article relies on empirical observations and references several under-discussed news items that have evaded wider scrutiny. It also makes use of a few academic sources in proving that the geopolitical environment in which Russia conducts its present foreign policy was largely shaped by the US’ legacy of Hybrid Wars on the region, which in hindsight created fertile ground for the revolution in Russia’s Mideast strategy. In summary, Russia seeks to replace the US as the Mideast countries’ most preferred and trusted partner, capitalizing off of Washington’s decline in regional infl uence brought about by the disastrous rise of Daesh and the controversial

  2. Dynamics of alliance formation and the egalitarian revolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Gavrilets

    transition from a hierarchical society of great apes to an egalitarian society of hunter-gatherers (often referred to as "egalitarian revolution" could indeed follow an increase in human cognitive abilities. The establishment of stable group-wide egalitarian alliances creates conditions promoting the origin of cultural norms favoring the group interests over those of individuals.

  3. Global property rights. The Kyoto protocol and the knowledge revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichilnisky, G.

    2006-01-01

    measure of equity to ensure efficiency (Chichilnisky 1996, Chichilnisky and Heal 2002). This conclusion has been validated theoretically and is also in line with what was agreed by 160 nations in the Kyoto Protocol. Somewhat surprisingly, the same conclusion applies also to trading knowledge goods. Knowledge is a global public good. This paper proposes a new property rights regimes for knowledge goods and for environmental assets that seem crucial for economic progress in the era of the Knowledge Revolution TM . (author)

  4. Three revolutions in cosmical science from the telescope to the Sputnik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfeven, H.

    1989-01-01

    Three hundred years ago, what is usually called the Copernican revolution caused the transition from the geocentric to the heliocentric cosmology. The revolution was in reality caused by the introduction of the telescope. During the following 300 years, increasingly sophisticated telescopes have explored a rapidly increasing region of our cosmic environment. Newtonian theory dominated the mechanics during the 18th and 19th centuries. In the beginning of the 20th century, its limitations in three respects became obvious with such important consequences that they have motivated the authors to speak about a second revolution. This paper discusses how quantum mechanics shows the Newtonian mechanics was not valid for atom-size phenomena; the theory of relativity shows that Newtonian mechanics did not hold for velocities approaching the velocity of light; and during the 19th century, studies of electric currents in gases showed that electromagnetic phenomena often produced forces that were more important than mechanical forces

  5. The Language of Revolution and the Power of Storytelling in The Pregnant Widow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alghamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Martin Amis uses the language of revolution to describe the newly altered social circumstances at the height of the sexual revolution in his semi-autobiographical novel The Pregnant Widow. The concept of a ‘language of revolution’ as well as second- and third-wave feminist scholarship is applied to a textual analysis of the novel. Amis’s brand of satire creates a sense of displacement and challenges existing perceptions about gender, culture and sexuality, exposing them as constructed and changeable norms. Moreover, it becomes clear that the author is skeptical about the benefits of the sexual revolution for either gender, and that he views its liberating aspects as unfulfilled, particularly for women. Given that Amis names one of his characters Scheherazade, evoking the legendary heroine of The Arabian Nights, the importance of storytelling in the novel is also examined and found to be a potentially redeeming force.

  6. A departure from cognitivism: Implications of Chomsky's second revolution in linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneberger, T

    2000-01-01

    In 1957 Noam Chomsky published Syntactic Structures, expressing views characterized as constituting a "revolution" in linguistics. Chomsky proposed that the proper subject matter of linguistics is not the utterances of speakers, but what speakers and listeners know. To that end, he theorized that what they know is a system of rules that underlie actual performance. This theory became known as transformational grammar. In subsequent versions of this theory, rules continued to play a dominant role. However, in 1980 Chomsky began a second revolution by proposing the elimination of rules in a new theory: the principles-and-parameters approach. Subsequent writings finalized the abandonment of rules. Given the centrality of rules to cognitivism, this paper argues that Chomsky's second revolution constitutes a departure from cognitivism.

  7. Understanding the Dynamics of Violent Political Revolutions in an Agent-Based Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops an agent-based computational model of violent political revolutions in which a subjugated population of citizens and an armed revolutionary organisation attempt to overthrow a central authority and its loyal forces. The model replicates several patterns of rebellion consistent with major historical revolutions, and provides an explanation for the multiplicity of outcomes that can arise from an uprising. The relevance of the heterogeneity of scenarios predicted by the model can be understood by considering the recent experience of the Arab Spring involving several rebellions that arose in an apparently similar way, but resulted in completely different political outcomes: the successful revolution in Tunisia, the failed protests in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, and civil war in Syria and Libya.

  8. Elastic shells of revolution under nonstationary thermal loading using ring finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhenhan

    1986-01-01

    The report deals with the analysis of elastic shells of revolution under nonstationary thermal loading using ring finite elements. First, a ring element for moderately thick shells is derived which should also be employed for thin shells when either higher Fourier components of the displacements, or deflection patterns with very steep gradients occur. Then, a ring element for the analysis of heat conduction in shells of revolution is derived, and algorithms for the numerical solution of linear stationary, nonlinear stationary, as well as linear nonstationary problems are presented. Finally, a ring element for the coupled thermoelastic analysis of shells of revolution is developed, and an algorithm for the solution of weakly coupled problems is given. (orig.) [de

  9. Judicial Activism in the Context of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution: Emerging Conceptions of Femininity and Masculinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Lindbekk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates gender implications of judicial activism within the context of the 2011 revolution. Relying on analysis of a sample of judicial decisions in the field of divorce and child-rearing, I argue that individual judges used the family courts as a platform to articulate alternative legal discourses prior to the 2011 revolution. During the period between February 2011 and the military coup in July 2013 family legislation emerged as a controversial point. The period witnessed the mobilisation of small but vocal fathers’ rights groups that called for a revolution in Egyptian family law and formed strategic alliances with a handful of judges. The latter became members of a legislative committee formed under the presidency of Muhammad Mursi. I investigate the gender implications of their activism against a background where old and new actors and institutions competed over the right to interpret shari’a in an authoritative way.

  10. For fun and profit a history of the free and open source software revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    In the 1980s, there was a revolution with far-reaching consequences -- a revolution to restore software freedom. In the early 1980s, after decades of making source code available with programs, most programmers ceased sharing code freely. A band of revolutionaries, self-described "hackers," challenged this new norm by building operating systems with source code that could be freely shared. In For Fun and Profit, Christopher Tozzi offers an account of the free and open source software (FOSS) revolution, from its origins as an obscure, marginal effort by a small group of programmers to the widespread commercial use of open source software today. Tozzi explains FOSS's historical trajectory, shaped by eccentric personalities -- including Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds -- and driven both by ideology and pragmatism, by fun and profit. Tozzi examines hacker culture and its influence on the Unix operating system, the reaction to Unix's commercialization, and the history of early Linux development. He describes ...

  11. Fiche Pratique: Magic Circus; Une revolte? Non, une revolution!; 1789: tous en scene; Lexique de didactique, les 39 marches. (Practical Ideas: Magic Circus; A Revolt? No, a Revolution!; 1789: All on Stage; The Vocabulary of Instruction: 39 Steps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende de Rezende, Eleonora; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles present practical classroom ideas related to language instruction, including (1) a children's circus production; (2) a language-learning game using the French Revolution as its theme; (3) a play using the French Revolution as its theme; and (4) definitions of terminology used in language teaching. (MSE)

  12. CENTENARY OF 1917 RUSSIAN REVOLUTION IN THE FOCUS OF ANTI-RUSSIAN HISTORICAL PROPAGANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вардан Эрнестович Багдасарян

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the anti-Russian historical narrative focused on the 1917 events. The relevance of the theme is determined bythe wide-ranging discussion on the Russian revolution due toits anniversary. The authors solve the problem of the scientific criticism of the anti-Russian myths, focused on the assessments and interpretations of the two Russian revolutions of 1917. In the article there are shown the ideological basis and political context of the coverage of the events of 1917. The authors analyze 5 historical ideologemes, which are disseminated in the public consciousness. They also show the cognitive and political implications of adopting the respective ideology. As a typical liberal myth, the authors regard the interpretation of the October Revolution as “stolen freedom” provided by the February revolution. In the article there is shown that through the myth of “stolen freedom” the whole history of Russia is presented as a reproduction of the “totalitarian regime”. The authors prove the incorrectness of showing Bolsheviks as the initiators of the use of mass terror tactics, to which all major opposing forces resorted. There is considered the connection of the interpretation of the Revolution as the manifestation of the “Russian rebellion” with the Russophobic myth of the Russian barbarism. The authors criticize the idea of the Bolshevik imperialism, which is allegedly based on the ideology of world revolution. The article gives the deconstruction of the myth of the Bolshevik regime illegitimacy and shows the cognitive contradictions of the attempts to counter the concepts of “October Revolution” and “October Coup”. The authors reveal that the thesis of the Constituent Assembly, as an illustration of the Bolshevik illegitimacy, doesn’t correspondent to the historical facts. The authors conclude that the issues of covering the events of both the Revolutionand the Great Patriotic War are linked to the national

  13. Revolution in The Valley The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzfeld, Andy

    2011-01-01

    There was a time, not too long ago, when the typewriter and notebook ruled, and the computer as an everyday tool was simply a vision. Revolution in the Valley traces this vision back to its earliest roots: the hallways and backrooms of Apple, where the groundbreaking Macintosh computer was born. The book traces the development of the Macintosh, from its inception as an underground skunkworks project in 1979 to its triumphant introduction in 1984 and beyond. The stories in Revolution in the Valley come on extremely good authority. That's because author Andy Hertzfeld was a core member of the

  14. Drug addicts seeking treatment after the Iranian Revolution: a clinic-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvand, S; Agahi, C; Spencer, C

    1984-09-01

    A sample survey of 200 addicts attending the Rehabilitation Centre at Shiraz was conducted after the 1979 Iranian Revolution had disrupted both drug supply and addict treatment programmes. The study showed that clinics were, after the revolution, seeing a broader social range of addicts than before; and that action by the authorities was bringing many recently-addicted individuals to clinics. Heroin use predominated among those who were urban residents, whilst villagers were more likely to be opium users. The survey also sought the addicts' perceptions of the reasons for their initiation and addiction.

  15. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2014-01-01

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C 1 both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries

  16. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabitov, I Kh [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  17. Will we Succeed in Making the AI Revolution Work for Everyone?

    OpenAIRE

    Miailhe, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    Is this time different?” is the question that expert worryingly argue over when they analyze the socio-economic impact of the AI revolution as compared with the previous industrial revolutions of the 19th and 20th centuries. This Schumpeterian wave may prove to be a creative destruction raising incomes, enhancing quality of life for all and generating previously unimagined jobs to replace those that get automatized. Or it may turn out to be a destructive creation leading to mass unemployment...

  18. Coffee with the Antichrist Lima: Political Time for the French Revolution (1794-1812)

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Víctor Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with how public opinion in Lima developed a view on French Revolution.We focused on the debate that took place in 1794 and then in 1811 and 1812. Our inquiry shows that this event, itself alien from Iberoamerican revolution, could be seen as a founding event in the sense that it made possible a new experience of history in Lima, particularly among those who shortly after would fight for Peruvian independence as well as for introducing liberalism in this country. For arguing i...

  19. Reading the Revolution: Where Has the Literature Taken Us in Understanding Cuba?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Kapcia

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available – Cuba. A New History, by Richard Gott. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2004. – The Cuban Revolution. Past, Present and Future Perspectives, by Geraldine  Lievesley. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. – People’s Power. Cuba’s Experience with Representative Government, by Peter  Roman. (Updated edition Lanham, Boulder, New York, Toronto, Oxford:  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc.  – Cuba. A Revolution in Motion, by Isaac Saney. Black Point, Nova Scotia: Fernwood Books; London: Zed Books, 2003.

  20. THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION „INDUSTRY 4.0”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin STĂNCIOIU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The many observers estimate that in the world is at the beginning of a new industrial revolution, which it is considered the fourth revolution and it is called "Industry 4.0". The connecting many products to the internet, presence of sensors, wireless communications expansion, robot and intelligent machine development, real-time data analysis have the potential to turn the way the production is done. Connecting the physical world to the virtual world in cyber-physical systems it will have a disruptive impact on technologies, manufacturing processes and people.