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Sample records for energy metabolism enzymes

  1. Enzymes of energy metabolism in hatchlings of amazonian freshwater turtles (Testudines, Podocnemididae

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    WP. Duncan

    Full Text Available The metabolic profiles of selected tissues were analyzed in hatchlings of the Amazonian freshwater turtles Podocnemis expansa, P. unifilis and P. sextuberculata. Metabolic design in these species was judged based on the key enzymes of energy metabolism, with special emphasis on carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and ketone body metabolism. All species showed a high glycolytic potential in all sampled tissues. Based on low levels of hexokinase, glycogen may be an important fuel for these species. The high lactate dehydrogenase activity in the liver may play a significant role in carbohydrate catabolism, possibly during diving. Oxidative metabolism in P. sextuberculata appears to be designed for the use of lipids, amino acids and ketone bodies. The maximal activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glutamine dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and succinyl-CoA keto transferase display high aerobic potential, especially in muscle and liver tissues of this species. Although amino acids and ketone bodies may be important fuels for oxidative metabolism, carbohydrates and lipids are the major fuels used by P. expansa and P. unifilis. Our results are consistent with the food habits and lifestyle of Amazonian freshwater turtles. The metabolic design, based on enzyme activities, suggests that hatchlings of P. unifilis and P. expansa are predominately herbivorous, whereas P. sextuberculata rely on a mixed diet of animal matter and vegetation.

  2. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain

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    Gabriela K. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Methods: Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. Results: The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Conclusions: Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  4. Enzymes of inorganic polyphosphate metabolism.

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    Kulakovskaya, Tatyana; Kulaev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (PolyP) is a linear polymer containing a few to several hundred orthophosphate residues linked by energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. Investigation of PolyP-metabolizing enzymes is important for medicine, because PolyPs perform numerous functions in the cells. In human organism, PolyPs are involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) uptake in mitochondria, bone tissue development, and blood coagulation. The essentiality of polyphosphate kinases in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria is a basis for the discovery of new antibiotics. The properties of the major enzymes of PolyP metabolism, first of all polyphosphate kinases and exopolyphosphatases, are described in the review. The main differences between the enzymes of PolyP biosynthesis and utilization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, as well as the multiple functions of some enzymes of PolyP metabolism, are considered.

  5. Effect of fasting on energy metabolism and tenderizing enzymes in chicken breast muscle early postmortem.

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    Wang, Sidang; Li, Chunbao; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-04-01

    Pre-slaughter fasting is a very important practice in the meat industry. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of fasting on energy metabolism and tenderizing enzymes in chicken muscle early postmortem. A total of 30 Yellow-feathered chickens were deprived of feed for 0 h, 12 h and 24 h before slaughter (n=10 each group). Breast muscles were removed and cut into 3 parts and stored at 0°C for 0 h, 3 h and 10 h. Samples were used for analyses of zymography, cathepsins, pH, glycogen/ATP/ADP/AMP, hormones and ultrastructure. Fasting caused the accelerated depletion (p0.05). Fasting resulted in greater ultimate pH (penzymes (p<0.05). Fasting for 24 h resulted in greater ultrastructural changes and plasma corticosterone levels than fasting for 12 h and control groups. Therefore, fasting for no more than 12 h is acceptable in practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase, a glycolytic enzyme, modifies energy metabolism and reduces stress resistance of heart in mice.

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    Junji Okuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure is associated with changes in cardiac energy metabolism. Glucose metabolism in particular is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of heart failure. We examined the effects of persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (Pgam2, a glycolytic enzyme, on cardiac energy metabolism and function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transgenic mice constitutively overexpressing Pgam2 in a heart-specific manner were generated, and cardiac energy metabolism and function were analyzed. Cardiac function at rest was normal. The uptake of analogs of glucose or fatty acids and the phosphocreatine/βATP ratio at rest were normal. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis revealed an increase in the levels of a few metabolites immediately upstream and downstream of Pgam2 in the glycolytic pathway, whereas the levels of metabolites in the initial few steps of glycolysis and lactate remained unchanged. The levels of metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle were altered. The capacity for respiration by isolated mitochondria in vitro was decreased, and that for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in vitro was increased. Impaired cardiac function was observed in response to dobutamine. Mice developed systolic dysfunction upon pressure overload. CONCLUSIONS: Constitutive overexpression of Pgam2 modified energy metabolism and reduced stress resistance of heart in mice.

  7. [Effect of Low-Intensity 900 MHz Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation on Rat Brain Enzyme Activities Linked to Energy Metabolism].

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    Petrosyan, M S; Nersesova, L S; Gazaryants, M G; Meliksetyan, G O; Malakyan, M G; Bajinyan, S A; Akopian, J I

    2015-01-01

    The research deals with the effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR), power density 25 μW/cm2, on the following rat brain and blood serum enzyme activities: creatine kinase (CK), playing a central role in the process of storing and distributing the cell energy, as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) that play a key role in providing the conjunction of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The comparative analysis of the changes in the enzyme activity studied at different times following the two-hour single, as well as fractional, radiation equivalent of the total time showed that the most radiosensitive enzyme is the brain creatine kinase, which may then be recommended as a marker of the radio frequency radiation impact. According to the analysis of the changing dynamics of the CK, ALT and AST activity level, with time these changes acquire the adaptive character and are directed to compensate the damaged cell energy metabolism.

  8. Synthetic metabolism: metabolic engineering meets enzyme design.

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    Erb, Tobias J; Jones, Patrik R; Bar-Even, Arren

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic engineering aims at modifying the endogenous metabolic network of an organism to harness it for a useful biotechnological task, for example, production of a value-added compound. Several levels of metabolic engineering can be defined and are the topic of this review. Basic 'copy, paste and fine-tuning' approaches are limited to the structure of naturally existing pathways. 'Mix and match' approaches freely recombine the repertoire of existing enzymes to create synthetic metabolic networks that are able to outcompete naturally evolved pathways or redirect flux toward non-natural products. The space of possible metabolic solution can be further increased through approaches including 'new enzyme reactions', which are engineered on the basis of known enzyme mechanisms. Finally, by considering completely 'novel enzyme chemistries' with de novo enzyme design, the limits of nature can be breached to derive the most advanced form of synthetic pathways. We discuss the challenges and promises associated with these different metabolic engineering approaches and illuminate how enzyme engineering is expected to take a prime role in synthetic metabolic engineering for biotechnology, chemical industry and agriculture of the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. [Enzymes of energy metabolism in modeling of various factors of space flight].

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    Kalandarov, S; Bychkov, V P; Frenkel', I D; Volkova, L P; Proskurova, G I

    1983-01-01

    The content of lactate dehydrogenase, amino transferases and creatine kinase was measured in the test subjects of three age groups (41-50, 50-57, and 26-33 years) exposed to head-down tilt, linear acceleration, exercise, and emotional stress. The enzyme activity increased in response to head-down tilt, acceleration and exercise. The enzyme content normalized under the influence of selected nutrients.

  10. Implications of enzyme deficiencies on mitochondrial energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species formation of neurons involved in rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease: a model-based analysis.

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    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Herrmann-Georg; Bulik, Sascha

    2013-10-01

    Steadily growing experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the age-dependent impairment of nerve cells underlying several neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, the citric acid cycle enzyme complex α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and respiratory chain complex I of the respiratory chain often show reduced activities in the dopaminergic neurons involved in Parkinson's disease, both giving rise to an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism as demonstrated in a number of in vitro studies with cell lines as well as isolated mitochondria. To understand the metabolic regulation underlying these experimental findings we used a detailed kinetic model of mitochondrial energy metabolism. First, we investigated the effect of complex I inhibition on energy production and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Next, we applied the model to a situation where both KGDHC and complex I exhibit reduced activities. These calculations reveal synergistic effects with respect to the energy metabolism but antagonistic effects with respect to ROS formation: the drop in the ATP production capacity is more pronounced than at inhibition of either enzyme complex alone. Interestingly, however, the reduction state of the ROS-generating sites of the impaired complex I becomes significantly lowered if additionally the activity of the KGDHC is reduced. We discuss the pathophysiological consequences of these intriguing findings. © 2013 FEBS.

  11. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

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    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes.

  12. EFFECT OF FEEDING COMPLETE DIET SUPPLEMENTED WITH EXOGENOUS FIBROLYTIC ENZYME COCKTAIL OR ARTEMISIA ABSINTHIUM L. HERB ALONE AND IN COMBINATION ON ENERGY METABOLIC PROFILE OF LAMBS

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    Yasir Afzal Beigh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To augment sheep productivity in temperate regions by improving feed utilization efficiency, the present study was planned to assess the effect of supplementation of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme cocktail and Artemisia absinthium L. (locally known as Afsanteen herb alone and in combination as feed additives in oats straw based complete diet on energy metabolic profile in crossbred lambs. Twenty crossbred lambs were randomly divided into four groups of 5 each and were fed individually for a period of 90 days. Animals in all the groups were offered complete feeds based on oats straw 40 parts, mixed grass hay 20 parts and concentrate mixture 40 parts. The complete feeds were supplemented either alone with exogenous fibrolytic enzyme cocktail (T1 @ 6 g/kg DM or Afsanteen herb (T2 @ 4.5% of DM and combination of the two feed additives (T3 , whereas the complete feed without any supplementation served as control (T0 .Blood monitoring was carried out at the start and subsequently at monthly intervals of the experiment. Blood glucose was estimated in whole blood immediately after collection and rest were subjected to serum harvesting to analyze for non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB levels. There were no significant differences for overall blood glucose, serum NEFA and BHB levels among the treatment groups while significant (P<0.01 effect of period were recorded. It may be concluded that supplementation of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme cocktail and A. absinthium L. herb alone or in combination to complete feed is possible for intensive rearing of lambs without any adverse effect on energy metabolic profile.

  13. Dysregulated metabolic enzymes and metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells.

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    Sreedhar, Annapoorna; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2018-01-01

    Tumor cells carry various genetic and metabolic alterations, which directly contribute to their growth and malignancy. Links between metabolism and cancer are multifaceted. Metabolic reprogramming, such as enhanced aerobic glycolysis, mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolic enzymes, and dependence on lipid and glutamine metabolism are key characteristics of cancer cells. Understanding these metabolic alterations is crucial for development of novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategies. In the present review, the broad importance of metabolism in tumor biology is discussed, and the current knowledge on dysregulated metabolic enzymes involved in the vital regulatory steps of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, and lipid, amino acid, and mitochondrial metabolism pathways are reviewed.

  14. Nitrile Metabolizing Enzymes in Biocatalysis and Biotransformation.

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    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Virender; Thakur, Neerja; Savitri

    2018-01-30

    Nitrile metabolizing enzymes, i.e., aldoxime dehydratase, hydroxynitrile lyase, nitrilase, nitrile hydratase, and amidase, are the key catalysts in carbon nitrogen triple bond anabolism and catabolism. Over the past several years, these enzymes have drawn considerable attention as prominent biocatalysts in academia and industries because of their wide applications. Research on various aspects of these biocatalysts, i.e., sources, screening, function, purification, molecular cloning, structure, and mechanisms, has been conducted, and bioprocesses at various scales have been designed for the synthesis of myriads of useful compounds. This review is focused on the potential of nitrile metabolizing enzymes in the production of commercially important fine chemicals such as nitriles, carboxylic acids, and amides. A number of opportunities and challenges of nitrile metabolizing enzymes in bioprocess development for the production of bulk and fine chemicals are discussed.

  15. Metabolic enzymes in gene control

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    E. Kozhevnikova (Elena)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCellular compartments are believed to serve functional separation within the cell and allow it to perform multiple metabolic processes at the same time. Processes are divided between compartments with respect to the physiological requirements for a certain process. Thus, regulatory

  16. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

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    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  17. Apelin and energy metabolism

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    Chantal eBertrand

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of adipokines identified over the past years has allowed considering white adipose tissue as a secretory organ closely integrated into overall physiological and metabolic control. Apelin, an ubiquitous peptide was known to exert different physiological effects mainly on the cardiovascular system and the regulation of fluid homeostasis until its identification as an adipokine. This has increased its broad range of action and apelin now appears clearly as a new player in energy metabolism alongside leptin and adiponectin. Apelin has been shown to act on glucose and lipid metabolism but also to modulate insulin secretion. Moreover, different studies in both animals and humans have shown that plasma apelin concentrations are usually increased during obesity and type 2 diabetes. This mini-review will focus on the various systemic apelin effects on energy metabolism by addressing its mechanisms of action. The advances concerning the role of apelin in metabolic diseases in relation with the recent reports on apelin concentrations in obese and/or diabetic subjects will also be discussed.

  18. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

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    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook.

  19. Interplay between oxidant species and energy metabolism

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    Quijano, Celia; Trujillo, Madia; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that energy metabolism is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and critical enzymes allied to metabolic pathways can be affected by redox reactions. This interplay between energy metabolism and ROS becomes most apparent during the aging process and in the onset and progression of many age-related diseases (i.e. diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases). As such, the capacity to identify metabolic pathways involved in ROS formation, as well as specific targets and oxidative modifications is crucial to our understanding of the molecular basis of age-related diseases and for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Herein we review oxidant formation associated with the cell's energetic metabolism, key antioxidants involved in ROS detoxification, and the principal targets of oxidant species in metabolic routes and discuss their relevance in cell signaling and age-related diseases. PMID:26741399

  20. The enzymes of human diphosphoinositol polyphosphate metabolism.

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    Thomas, Mark P; Potter, Barry V L

    2014-01-01

    Diphospho-myo-inositol polyphosphates have many roles to play, including roles in apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, the response of cells to stress, the regulation of telomere length and DNA damage repair, and inhibition of the cyclin-dependent kinase Pho85 system that monitors phosphate levels. This review focuses on the three classes of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these compounds: inositol hexakisphosphate kinases, inositol hexakisphosphate and diphosphoinositol-pentakisphosphate kinases and diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolases. However, these enzymes have roles beyond being mere catalysts, and their interactions with other proteins have cellular consequences. Through their interactions, the three inositol hexakisphosphate kinases have roles in exocytosis, diabetes, the response to infection, and apoptosis. The two inositol hexakisphosphate and diphosphoinositol-pentakisphosphate kinases influence the cellular response to phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate and the migration of pleckstrin homology domain-containing proteins to the plasma membrane. The five diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolases interact with ribosomal proteins and transcription factors, as well as proteins involved in membrane trafficking, exocytosis, ubiquitination and the proteasomal degradation of target proteins. Possible directions for future research aiming to determine the roles of these enzymes are highlighted. © 2013 FEBS.

  1. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

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    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  2. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

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    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  3. Enzyme Catalysis and the Gibbs Energy

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    Ault, Addison

    2009-01-01

    Gibbs-energy profiles are often introduced during the first semester of organic chemistry, but are less often presented in connection with enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In this article I show how the Gibbs-energy profile corresponds to the characteristic kinetics of a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  4. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

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    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  5. Tradeoff between enzyme and metabolite efficiency maintains metabolic homeostasis upon perturbations in enzyme capacity

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    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Buescher, Joerg Martin; Rudroff, Florian; Picotti, Paola; Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between enzymes and metabolites, the two major constituents of metabolic networks? We propose three alternative relationships between enzyme capacity and metabolite concentration alterations based on a Michaelis–Menten kinetic; that is enzyme capacities, metabolite concentrations, or both could limit the metabolic reaction rates. These relationships imply different correlations between changes in enzyme capacity and metabolite concentration, which we tested by quantifying metabolite, transcript, and enzyme abundances upon local (single-enzyme modulation) and global (GCR2 transcription factor mutant) perturbations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results reveal an inverse relationship between fold-changes in substrate metabolites and their catalyzing enzymes. These data provide evidence for the hypothesis that reaction rates are jointly limited by enzyme capacity and metabolite concentration. Hence, alteration in one network constituent can be efficiently buffered by converse alterations in the other constituent, implying a passive mechanism to maintain metabolic homeostasis upon perturbations in enzyme capacity. PMID:20393576

  6. Effect of metabolic enzyme on organic acids in developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of metabolic enzyme on organic acids in developing 'Dangshansuli' pear leaf. S Sha, J Li, J Wu, S Zhang. Abstract. Changes in the content of citric and malic acids and the activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these two organic acids, including citrate synthase (CS), cytoplast aconitase (Cyt-ACO), ...

  7. SIRT1 and energy metabolism.

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    Li, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is the most conserved mammalian NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase that has emerged as a key metabolic sensor in various metabolic tissues. In response to different environmental stimuli, SIRT1 directly links the cellular metabolic status to the chromatin structure and the regulation of gene expression, thereby modulating a variety of cellular processes such as energy metabolism and stress response. Recent studies have shown that SIRT1 controls both glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver, promotes fat mobilization and stimulates brown remodeling of the white fat in white adipose tissue, controls insulin secretion in the pancreas, senses nutrient availability in the hypothalamus, influences obesity-induced inflammation in macrophages, and modulates the activity of circadian clock in metabolic tissues. This review focuses on the role of SIRT1 in regulating energy metabolism at different metabolic tissues.

  8. Defects in enzyme regulation versus defects in enzyme synthesis as cause of metabolic disorders.

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    Belfiore, F

    1980-01-01

    Based on the consideration that normal metabolic processes depend upon the activity of key enzymes (and membrane carriers) as modulated by regulatory factors (hormones, diet, endogenous compounds, age, physical activity, environmental agents), metabolic disorders might be classified into two groups: (I) defects in enzyme synthesis, leading to enzyme deficiency (classical inborn errors of metabolism) or to qualitative (structural) enzyme alterations (entailing unresponsiveness to regulation), in the presence of normal regulatory factors; (II) defects in enzyme regulation, which include metabolic syndromes such as diabetes mellitus, obesity and hyperlipoproteinemias (other than type I), and are due to changes in enzyme activities caused by alterations in regulatory factor(s) (secondary to various causes), in the presence of normally responsive enzymes.

  9. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

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    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  10. Transcriptional Changes Associated with Long-Term Left Ventricle Volume Overload in Rats: Impact on Enzymes Related to Myocardial Energy Metabolism

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    Elise Roussel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with left ventricle (LV volume overload (VO remain in a compensated state for many years although severe dilation is present. The myocardial capacity to fulfill its energetic demand may delay decompensation. We performed a gene expression profile, a model of chronic VO in rat LV with severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR for 9 months, and focused on the study of genes associated with myocardial energetics. Methods. LV gene expression profile was performed in rats after 9 months of AR and compared to sham-operated controls. LV glucose and fatty acid (FA uptake was also evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography in 8-week AR rats treated or not with fenofibrate, an activator of FA oxidation (FAO. Results. Many LV genes associated with mitochondrial function and metabolism were downregulated in AR rats. FA β-oxidation capacity was significantly impaired as early as two weeks after AR. Treatment with fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, normalized both FA and glucose uptake while reducing LV dilation caused by AR. Conclusion. Myocardial energy substrate preference is affected early in the evolution of LV-VO cardiomyopathy. Maintaining a relatively normal FA utilization in the myocardium could translate into less glucose uptake and possibly lesser LV remodeling.

  11. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling

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    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  12. Non-metabolic functions of glycolytic enzymes in tumorigenesis.

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    Yu, X; Li, S

    2017-05-11

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the requirement for survival and rapid growth. One hallmark of cancer metabolism is elevated aerobic glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Emerging evidence showed that most glycolytic enzymes are deregulated in cancer cells and play important roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies revealed that all essential glycolytic enzymes can be translocated into nucleus where they participate in tumor progression independent of their canonical metabolic roles. These noncanonical functions include anti-apoptosis, regulation of epigenetic modifications, modulation of transcription factors and co-factors, extracellular cytokine, protein kinase activity and mTORC1 signaling pathway, suggesting that these multifaceted glycolytic enzymes not only function in canonical metabolism but also directly link metabolism to epigenetic and transcription programs implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings underscore our understanding about how tumor cells adapt to nutrient and fuel availability in the environment and most importantly, provide insights into development of cancer therapy.

  13. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Modeling metabolic response to changes of enzyme amount in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the work of Hynne et al. (2001), in an in silico model of glycolysis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is established by introducing an enzyme amount multiple factor (.) into the kinetic equations. The model is aimed to predict the metabolic response to the change of enzyme amount. With the help of .α, the amounts of ...

  15. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Engineering the spatial organization of metabolic enzymes: mimicking nature's synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, Robert J; Varner, Jeffrey D; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2008-10-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that many cellular reactions within metabolic pathways are catalyzed not by free-floating 'soluble' enzymes, but via one or more membrane-associated multienzyme complexes. This type of macromolecular organization has important implications for the overall efficiency, specificity, and regulation of metabolic pathways. An ever-increasing number of biochemical and genetic studies on primary and secondary metabolism have laid a solid foundation for this model, providing compelling evidence in favor of the so-called channeling of intermediates between enzyme active sites and colocalization of enzymes inside a cell. In this review, we discuss several of nature's most notable multifunctional enzyme systems including the AROM complex and tryptophan synthase, each of which provides new fundamental insights into the structural organization of metabolic machinery within living cells. We then focus on the growing body of literature related to engineering strategies using protein chimeras and post-translational assembly mechanisms. Common among these techniques is the desire to mimic natural enzyme organization for optimizing the production of valuable metabolites with industrial and medical importance.

  17. Sex Differences in the Expression of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, David J.; Holloway, Minita G.

    2009-01-01

    Sex differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics characterize many drugs and contribute to individual differences in drug efficacy and toxicity. Sex-based differences in drug metabolism are the primary cause of sex-dependent pharmacokinetics and reflect underlying sex differences in the expression of hepatic enzymes active in the metabolism of drugs, steroids, fatty acids and environmental chemicals, including cytochromes P450 (P450s), sulfotransferases, glutat...

  18. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...

  19. Energy metabolism in osteoclast formation and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Silvia; Sboarina, Martina; Porporato, Paolo E; Zini, Nicoletta; Sonveaux, Pierre; Di Pompo, Gemma; Baldini, Nicola; Avnet, Sofia

    2016-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis are energy-consuming processes supported by high metabolic activities. In human osteoclasts derived from the fusion of monocytic precursors, we found a substantial increase in the number of mitochondria with differentiation. In mature osteoclasts, mitochondria were also increased in size, rich of cristae and arranged in a complex tubular network. When compared with immature cells, fully differentiated osteoclasts showed higher levels of enzymes of the electron transport chain, a higher mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate and a lower glycolytic efficiency, as evaluated by extracellular flux analysis and by the quantification of metabolites in the culture supernatant. Thus, oxidative phosphorylation appeared the main bioenergetic source for osteoclast formation. Conversely, we found that bone resorption mainly relied on glycolysis. In fact, osteoclast fuelling with galactose, forcing cells to depend on Oxidative Phosphorylation by reducing the rate of glycolysis, significantly impaired Type I collagen degradation, whereas non-cytotoxic doses of rotenone, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial complex I, enhanced osteoclast activity. Furthermore, we found that the enzymes associated to the glycolytic pathway are localised close to the actin ring of polarised osteoclasts, where energy-demanding activities associated with bone degradation take place. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the energy required for osteoclast differentiation mainly derives from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, whereas the peripheral cellular activities associated with bone matrix degradation are supported by glycolysis. A better understanding of human osteoclast energy metabolism holds the potential for future therapeutic interventions aimed to target osteoclast activity in different pathological conditions of bone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862.3360 Section 862.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology...

  1. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitors of testosterone biosynthetic and metabolic activation enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Leping; Su, Zhi-Jian; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2011-12-02

    The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3) for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) and 2 (SRD5A2) in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone) and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz) and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol). This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  3. Optimal control of metabolic networks with saturable enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzuun, D A

    2011-03-01

    This note addresses the optimal control of non-linear metabolic networks by means of time-dependent enzyme synthesis rates. The authors consider networks with general topologies described by a control-affine dynamical system coupled with a linear model for enzyme synthesis and degradation. The problem formulation accounts for transitions between two metabolic equilibria, which typically arise in metabolic adaptations to environmental changes, and the minimisation of a quadratic functional that weights the cost/benefit relation between the transcriptional effort required for enzyme synthesis and the transition to the new phenotype. Using a linear time-variant approximation of the non-linear dynamics, the problem is recast as a sequence of linear-quadratic problems, the solution of which involves a sequence of differential Lyapunov equations. The authors provide conditions for convergence to an approximate solution of the original problem, which are naturally satisfied by a wide class of models for saturable enzyme kinetics. As a case study the authors use the method to examine the robustness of an optimal just-in-time gene expression pattern with respect to heterogeneity in the biosynthetic costs of individual proteins.

  4. Inhibitors of Testosterone Biosynthetic and Metabolic Activation Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leping Ye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B, for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3 for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and 2 (SRD5A2 in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol. This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  5. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  6. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-03-16

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs.

  7. Aspartate aminotransferase – key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Otto-Ślusarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ - nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms - cytoplasmic (AST1 and mitochondrial (AST2, that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys – 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs.

  8. Flavonoids as modulators of metabolic enzymes and drug transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Anca; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Trifan, Adriana; Xiao, Jianbo

    2017-06-01

    Flavonoids, natural compounds found in plants and in plant-derived foods and beverages, have been extensively studied with regard to their capacity to modulate metabolic enzymes and drug transporters. In vitro, flavonoids predominantly inhibit the major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP450 3A4 and the enzymes responsible for the bioactivation of procarcinogens (CYP1 enzymes) and upregulate the enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification (UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs)). Flavonoids have been reported to inhibit ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (multidrug resistance (MDR)-associated proteins, breast cancer-resistance protein) that contribute to the development of MDR. P-glycoprotein, an ABC transporter that limits drug bioavailability and also induces MDR, was differently modulated by flavonoids. Flavonoids and their phase II metabolites (sulfates, glucuronides) inhibit organic anion transporters involved in the tubular uptake of nephrotoxic compounds. In vivo studies have partially confirmed in vitro findings, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of flavonoids are complex and difficult to predict in vivo. Data summarized in this review strongly support the view that flavonoids are promising candidates for the enhancement of oral drug bioavailability, chemoprevention, and reversal of MDR. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  10. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Chaturvedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  11. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  12. Metabolic enzyme polymorphisms and susceptibility to acute leukemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth J; Smith, Martyn T

    2002-01-01

    Genetic approaches to understanding the etiology of the acute leukemias are beginning to deliver meaningful insights. Polymorphic variants in xenobiotic metabolizer loci were a natural starting point to study the relevance of these changes. The finding that glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1 null variants increase leukemia risk has implicated oxidative stress in hematopoietic stem cells as an important etiological factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The importance of these enzyme systems in handling specific substrates has also been confirmed by the finding of an increased risk of therapy-related leukemia in individuals with underactive variants of GSTP1 who have been exposed to a chemotherapeutic agent metabolized by this enzyme. Benzene is a well-recognized leukemogen, and genetic variants in its metabolic pathway can modulate the risk of leukemia following exposure. In particular, underactive variants of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene (NQO1) seem to increase the risk of AML. Other enzymes within the pathway are proving more difficult to study because of the absence of variants that significantly affect the biological activity of the enzyme under study. No effect of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) gene variants in altering the risk of AML has been seen in our studies. Another pathway recently shown to be important in determining leukemia risk is folic acid metabolism, particularly important in predisposition to acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Polymorphic variants of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) which impair its activity have been shown to be associated with a protective effect. This is thought to be due to an increased availability of nucleotide precursors for incorporation into DNA. This finding implicates misincorporation of uracil into DNA as an important mechanism of leukemic change in lymphoid precursors. Future studies will extend these observations but will require biological material collected from large well

  13. Effects of Cyclamen trochopteranthum on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Sevki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The modulatory effects of the Cyclamen trochopterantum tuber extract on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, including aniline 4-hydroxylase (A4H; CYP2E1, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD; CYP1A, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD; CYP1A, caffeine N-demethylase (C3ND; CYP1A2 aminopyrene N-demethylase (APND; CYP2C6, and erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND; CYP3A1, were examined in vivo in rats. The activities of all of these enzymes were induced by the cyclamen extract. In addition, Western-blot and RT-PCR results clearly showed that CYP2E1, CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and CYP2C6 protein and mRNA levels were substantially increased by four different doses of cyclamen. Although, the CYP3A1 protein level was increased significantly, the mRNA level was not changed. These results indicate that cyclamen tuber extract might have a potential not only to inhibit and/or induce the metabolism of certain co-administered drugs but also influence the development of toxicity and carcinogenesis due to the induction of the cytochrome P450-dependent drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  14. Enzyme Recruitment and Its Role in Metabolic Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 109 years have passed since the existence of the last universal common ancestor, proteins have yet to reach the limits of divergence. As a result, metabolic complexity is ever expanding. Identifying and understanding the mechanisms that drive and limit the divergence of protein sequence space impact not only evolutionary biologists investigating molecular evolution but also synthetic biologists seeking to design useful catalysts and engineer novel metabolic pathways. Investigations over the past 50 years indicate that the recruitment of enzymes for new functions is a key event in the acquisition of new metabolic capacity. In this review, we outline the genetic mechanisms that enable recruitment and summarize the present state of knowledge regarding the functional characteristics of extant catalysts that facilitate recruitment. We also highlight recent examples of enzyme recruitment, both from the historical record provided by phylogenetics and from enzyme evolution experiments. We conclude with a look to the future, which promises fruitful consequences from the convergence of molecular evolutionary theory, laboratory-directed evolution, and synthetic biology. PMID:24483367

  15. The MetaCyc database of metabolic pathways and enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Ron; Billington, Richard; Fulcher, Carol A; Keseler, Ingrid M; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Midford, Peter E; Ong, Quang; Ong, Wai Kit; Paley, Suzanne; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Karp, Peter D

    2018-01-04

    MetaCyc (https://MetaCyc.org) is a comprehensive reference database of metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. It contains more than 2570 pathways derived from >54 000 publications, making it the largest curated collection of metabolic pathways. The data in MetaCyc is strictly evidence-based and richly curated, resulting in an encyclopedic reference tool for metabolism. MetaCyc is also used as a knowledge base for generating thousands of organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs), which are available in the BioCyc (https://BioCyc.org) and other PGDB collections. This article provides an update on the developments in MetaCyc during the past two years, including the expansion of data and addition of new features. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes: important regulators of cancer metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming Yang,1 Huizhong Su,1 Tomoyoshi Soga,2 Kamil R Kranc,3 Patrick J Pollard1 1Cancer Biology and Metabolism Group, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Mizukami, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; 3MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs regulate the stability of HIF protein by post-translational hydroxylation of two conserved prolyl residues in its α subunit in an oxygen-dependent manner. Trans-4-prolyl hydroxylation of HIFα under normal oxygen (O2 availability enables its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor pVHL E3 ligase complex, leading to the degradation of HIFα via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Due to the obligatory requirement of molecular O2 as a co-substrate, the activity of PHDs is inhibited under hypoxic conditions, resulting in stabilized HIFα, which dimerizes with HIFβ and, together with transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300, activates the transcription of its target genes. As a key molecular regulator of adaptive response to hypoxia, HIF plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and its overexpression has been detected in various cancers. The HIF1α isoform in particular has a strong impact on cellular metabolism, most notably by promoting anaerobic, whilst inhibiting O2-dependent, metabolism of glucose. The PHD enzymes also seem to have HIF-independent functions and are subject to regulation by factors other than O2, such as by metabolic status, oxidative stress, and abnormal levels of endogenous metabolites (oncometabolites that have been observed in some types of cancers. In this review, we aim to summarize current understandings of the function and regulation of PHDs in cancer with an emphasis on their roles in metabolism. Keywords: prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD

  17. Drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene variation, nicotine metabolism, prospective abstinence, and cigarette consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Bergen, Andrew W; Martha Michel; Denise Nishita; Ruth Krasnow; Javitz, Harold S.; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Hyman Hops; Zhu, Andy Z. X.; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B.; Hall, Sharon M.; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Bergen et al. The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a met...

  18. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  19. Characterisation of a major enzyme of bovine nitrogen metabolism

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathomu, LM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of cellular protein metabolism (Curthoys & Watford, 1995; Meister, 1974). Glutamine functions as a major inter-organ transport form of nitrogen, carbon and serves as a source of energy between tissues such as brain, liver, kidney and even muscles...

  20. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cellular respiration , we measured oxygen consumption in prostate cancer cells after docetaxel treatment. The results showed that upon docetaxel...and cellular energy homeostasis. Analysis of patient data indicated that higher OXCT1 levels are associated with docetaxel chemotherapy resistance...Objectives To determine the role of OXCT1-mediated ketone body utilization in regulating prostate cancer cell response to docetaxel, cellular metabolism

  1. Mutant Metabolic Enzymes Are at the Origin of Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.; Velculescu, Victor; Parsons, D.Williams

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) metabolic enzymes IDH1 and IDH2 have been found to be frequent and early genetic alterations in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. All mutations identified to date affect a single amino acid located within the isocitrate binding site (R132 of IDH1 and the analogous R172 residue of IDH2). IDH1 and IDH2 mutations define a specific subtype of gliomas and may have significant utility for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients with the...

  2. Pre-Eclampsia Placental Carbohydrate Metabolism Regulating Enzymes Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Oré, Raquel; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Suárez, Silvia; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Arnao, Inés; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Pre eclampsia is one of the most frecuent pathologies during pregnancy. The placental tissue plays an important role in the development of the pathology. In this report we performed a study of the activities of two regulatory enzymes [ Phosphofructokinase I (E.C. 2.7.1.11) and Glucose 6-P-dehidrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.49)] of the carbohydrate metabolism in both normal and pre emclampsia placental tissue. It has been found a pronounced decreased in both activities in the pathological tissue. We di...

  3. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Dissecting Leishmania infantum Energy Metabolism - A Systems Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Subramanian

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum, causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, illustrates a complex lifecycle pertaining to two extreme environments, namely, the gut of the sandfly vector and human macrophages. Leishmania is capable of dynamically adapting and tactically switching between these critically hostile situations. The possible metabolic routes ventured by the parasite to achieve this exceptional adaptation to its varying environments are still poorly understood. In this study, we present an extensively reconstructed energy metabolism network of Leishmania infantum as an attempt to identify certain strategic metabolic routes preferred by the parasite to optimize its survival in such dynamic environments. The reconstructed network consists of 142 genes encoding for enzymes performing 237 reactions distributed across five distinct model compartments. We annotated the subcellular locations of different enzymes and their reactions on the basis of strong literature evidence and sequence-based detection of cellular localization signal within a protein sequence. To explore the diverse features of parasite metabolism the metabolic network was implemented and analyzed as a constraint-based model. Using a systems-based approach, we also put forth an extensive set of lethal reaction knockouts; some of which were validated using published data on Leishmania species. Performing a robustness analysis, the model was rigorously validated and tested for the secretion of overflow metabolites specific to Leishmania under varying extracellular oxygen uptake rate. Further, the fate of important non-essential amino acids in L. infantum metabolism was investigated. Stage-specific scenarios of L. infantum energy metabolism were incorporated in the model and key metabolic differences were outlined. Analysis of the model revealed the essentiality of glucose uptake, succinate fermentation, glutamate biosynthesis and an active TCA cycle as driving forces for parasite

  5. Metabolic adaptation of Escherichia coli during temperature-induced recombinant protein production: 1. Readjustment of metabolic enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Frank; Weber, Jan; Rinas, Ursula

    2002-11-05

    The metabolic burden and the stress load resulting from temperature-induced production of human basic fibroblast growth factor is connected to an increase in the respiratory activity of recombinant Escherichia coli, thereby reducing the biomass yield. To study the underlying changes in metabolic enzyme synthesis rates, the radiolabeled proteom was subjected to two-dimen- sional gel electrophoresis. After temperature-induction, the cAMP-CRP controlled dehydrogenases of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (LpdA and SdhA) were induced four times, reaching a maximum 1 h after the temperature upshift. The more abundant tricarboxylic acid cycle dehydrogenases (Icd and Mdh) were initially produced at reduced rates but regained preshift rates within 30 min. The adenylate energy charge dropped immediately after the temperature upshift but recovered within 1 h. Similar profiles in dehydrogenase synthesis rates and adenylate energy charge were found in a control cultivation of a strain carrying the "empty" parental expression vector. Although both strains exhibited significant differences in growth pattern and respiration rates after the temperature upshift, the adaptation of the energetic state of the cells and the synthesis of enzymes from the energy-generating catabolic pathway did not seem to be affected by the strong overproduction of the recombinant growth factor. In contrast, the synthesis rates of enzymes belonging to the biosynthetic machinery, e.g., translational elongation factors, decreased more strongly in the culture synthesizing the recombinant protein. In control and producing culture, synthesis rates of elongation factors paralleled the respective growth rate profiles. Thus, cells seem to readjust their metabolic activities according to their energetic requirements and, if necessary, at the cost of their biosynthetic capabilities. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 80: 313-319, 2002.

  6. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints. A key criticism of using HTS assays for toxicity assessment is the lack of xenobiotic metabolism (XM) which precludes both metabolic detoxification as well as bioactivation of chemicals tested in vitro thereby mischaracterizing the potential risk posed by these chemicals. To address this deficiency, we have developed an extracellular platform to retrofit existing HTS assays with XM activity. This platform utilizes the S9 fraction of liver homogenate encapsulated in an alginate gel network which reduces the cytotoxicity caused by direct addition of S9 to cells in culture. Alginate microspheres containing encapsulated human liver S9 were cross-linked to solid supports extending from a 96-well plate lid and were assayed using a pro-luciferin substrate specific for CYP3A4 (IPA). We demonstrate that S9 was successfully encapsulated and remained enzymatically active post-encapsulation with 5-10X the CYP3A4 activity as compared to 1 µg solubilized human liver S9. Ketoconazole, a known inhibitor of human CYP3A4, inhibited CYP3A4 activity in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50: 0.27 µM) and inhibiti

  7. From 20th century metabolic wall charts to 21st century systems biology: database of mammalian metabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Callan C; Grady, Cameron R; Pisitkun, Trairak; Parulekar, Jaya; Knepper, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    The organization of the mammalian genome into gene subsets corresponding to specific functional classes has provided key tools for systems biology research. Here, we have created a web-accessible resource called the Mammalian Metabolic Enzyme Database ( https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/MetabolicEnzymes/MetabolicEnzymeDatabase.html) keyed to the biochemical reactions represented on iconic metabolic pathway wall charts created in the previous century. Overall, we have mapped 1,647 genes to these pathways, representing ~7 percent of the protein-coding genome. To illustrate the use of the database, we apply it to the area of kidney physiology. In so doing, we have created an additional database ( Database of Metabolic Enzymes in Kidney Tubule Segments: https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/MetabolicEnzymes/), mapping mRNA abundance measurements (mined from RNA-Seq studies) for all metabolic enzymes to each of 14 renal tubule segments. We carry out bioinformatics analysis of the enzyme expression pattern among renal tubule segments and mine various data sources to identify vasopressin-regulated metabolic enzymes in the renal collecting duct. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Maternal smoking, xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants, and gastroschisis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mary M; Reefhuis, Jennita; Gallagher, Margaret L; Mulle, Jennifer G; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Koontz, Deborah A; Sturchio, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Witte, John S; Richter, Patricia; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-06-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is one proposed risk factor for gastroschisis, but reported associations have been modest, suggesting that differences in genetic susceptibility might play a role. We included 108 non-Hispanic white and 62 Hispanic families who had infants with gastroschisis, and 1,147 non-Hispanic white and 337 Hispanic families who had liveborn infants with no major structural birth defects (controls) in these analyses. DNA was extracted from buccal cells collected from infants and mothers, and information on periconceptional smoking history was obtained from maternal interviews, as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. We analyzed five polymorphisms in three genes that code for enzymes involved in metabolism of some cigarette smoke constituents (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT2). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) independently for maternal smoking and maternal and infant gene variants, and to assess joint associations of maternal smoking and maternal or infant gene variants with gastroschisis. In analyses adjusted for maternal age at delivery and stratified by maternal race-ethnicity, we identified three suggestive associations among 30 potential associations with sufficient numbers to calculate ORs: CYP1A1*2A for non-Hispanic white mothers who smoked periconceptionally (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.98), and NAT2*6 for Hispanic non-smoking mothers (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.12-4.19) and their infants (aOR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.00-4.48). This analysis does not support the occurrence of effect modification between periconceptional maternal smoking and most of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants assessed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cortisol-Metabolizing Enzymes in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeev Blumenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to assess the activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, using a fully quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS method. Design We investigated the glucocorticoid degradation pathways that include llβ-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (llβ-HSD type 1, 5α-reductase (5α-R and 5β-reductase (5β-R, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20α- and 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD and 20β-HSD, respectively in young nonobese women with PCOS, using a fully quantitative GCMS method. Setting This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital in Israel. Patients This study group consisted of 13 young women, aged 20.1 ±2.8 years (mean ± SD, with the body mass index (BMI of 22.6 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 , diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The control group consisted of 14 healthy young women matched for weight, height, and BMI. Interventions Urine samples were analyzed using GCMS. We measured urinary steroid metabolites that represent the products and substrates of the study enzymes and calculated the product/substrate ratios to represent enzyme activity. Main Outcome Measures The calculation of enzymatic activity, based on glucocorticoid degradation metabolites, was done by GCMS in PCOS vs. controls. Results All glucocorticoid degradation metabolites were higher in the PCOS group than in controls. Of the adrenal enzymes, the activities of 21-hydroxylase and 17α-hydroxylase were reduced, whereas the activity of 17,20-lyase was enhanced in PCOS. Of the degradation enzymes, the activity of 11β-HSD type 1 was reduced in women with PCOS only when calculated from cortoles and cortolones ratios. The activities of 5α-R/5β-R were increased only when calculating the 11-hydroxy metabolites of androgens. The activity of 20α-HSD was elevated in the patients with PCOS and its relation with the substrate levels was lost. Conclusions We

  10. Evolution of ligands, receptors and metabolizing enzymes of thyroid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Guillaume; Roux, Natacha; Laudet, Vincent

    2017-12-25

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in vertebrates such as the control of the metabolism, development and seasonality. Given the pleiotropic effects of thyroid disorders (developmental delay, mood disorder, tachycardia, etc), THs signaling is highly investigated, specially using mammalian models. In addition, the critical role of TH in controlling frog metamorphosis has led to the use of Xenopus as another prominent model to study THs action. Nevertheless, animals regarded as non-model species can also improve our understanding of THs signaling. For instance, studies in amphioxus highlighted the role of Triac as a bona fide thyroid hormone receptor (TR) ligand. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the THs signaling in the different taxa forming the metazoans (multicellular animals) group. We mainly focus on three actors of the THs signaling: the ligand, the receptor and the deiodinases, enzymes playing a critical role in THs metabolism. By doing so, we also pinpoint many key questions that remain unanswered. How can THs accelerate metamorphosis in tunicates and echinoderms while their TRs have not been yet demonstrated as functional THs receptors in these species? Do THs have a biological effect in insects and cnidarians even though they do not have any TR? What is the basic function of THs in invertebrate protostomia? These questions can appear disconnected from pharmacological issues and human applications, but the investigation of THs signaling at the metazoans scale can greatly improve our understanding of this major endocrinological pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Gaurav D.; Last, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks. PMID:26276843

  12. Altered drug metabolism during pregnancy: hormonal regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2010-06-01

    Medication use during pregnancy is prevalent, but pharmacokinetic information of most drugs used during pregnancy is lacking in spite of known effects of pregnancy on drug disposition. Accurate pharmacokinetic information is essential for optimal drug therapy in mother and fetus. Thus, understanding how pregnancy influences drug disposition is important for better prediction of pharmacokinetic changes of drugs in pregnant women. Pregnancy is known to affect hepatic drug metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Physiological changes accompanying pregnancy are probably responsible for the reported alteration in drug metabolism during pregnancy. These include elevated concentrations of various hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, placental growth hormones and prolactin. This review covers how these hormones influence expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), thus potentially responsible for altered drug metabolism during pregnancy. The reader will gain a greater understanding of the altered drug metabolism in pregnant women and the regulatory effects of pregnancy hormones on expression of DMEs. In-depth studies in hormonal regulatory mechanisms as well as confirmatory studies in pregnant women are warranted for systematic understanding and prediction of the changes in hepatic drug metabolism during pregnancy.

  13. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S133-S140 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : enzyme * metabolism * radiometric assay * thyroid hormone Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  14. Involvement of methyltransferases enzymes during the energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methyl group transfer from dimethylsulfide (DMS), trimethylamine and methanol to 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M) were investigated from cell extracts of Methanosarcina semesiae sp. nov. to evaluate whether the enzyme systems involved were constitutive or inductive. The extracts from cells grown on ...

  15. Effects of hyperammonemia on brain energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Leke, Renata

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to the effects of elevated plasma ammonia levels on brain energy metabolism is abundant, but heterogeneous in terms of the conclusions. Thus, some studies claim that ammonia has a direct, inhibitory effect on energy metabolism whereas others find no such correlation...... but related to the fact that hepatic encephalopathy is always associated with reduced brain activity, a condition clearly characterized by a decreased CMRO2. Whether this may be related to changes in GABAergic function remains to be elucidated....

  16. Energy Balance and Metabolism after Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tonorezos, Emily S.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Unfavorable physiological, biological, and behavioral alterations during and following treatment for cancer may lead to chronic energy imbalance predisposing to a myriad of deleterious health conditions including obesity, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. In addition to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal effects of these conditions, energy imbalance and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can also affect cancer-related morbidity and mortality. To this end, lifestyle intervent...

  17. Metabolism of C-labeled photosynthate and distribution of enzymes of glucose metabolism in soybean nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibach, P H; Streeter, J G

    1983-07-01

    The metabolism of translocated photosynthate by soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules was investigated by (14)CO(2)-labeling studies and analysis of nodule enzymes. Plants were exposed to (14)CO(2) for 30 minutes, followed by (12)CO(2) for up to 5 hours. The largest amount of radioactivity in nodules was recovered in neutral sugars at all sampling times. The organic acid fraction of the cytosol was labeled rapidly. Although cyclitols and malonate were found in high concentrations in the nodules, they accumulated less than 10% of the radioactivity in the neutral and acidic fractions, respectively. Phosphate esters were found to contain very low levels of total label, which prohibited analysis of the radioactivity in individual compounds. The whole nodule-labeling patterns suggested the utilization of photosynthate for the generation of organic acids (principally malate) and amino acids (principally glutamate).The radioactivity in bacteroids as a percentage of total nodule label increased slightly with time, while the percentage in the cytosol fraction declined. The labeling patterns for the cytosol were essentially the same as whole nodule-labeling patterns, and they suggest a degradation of carbohydrates for the production of organic acids and amino acids. When it was found that most of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in sugars, the enzymes of glucose metabolism were surveyed. Bacteroids from nodules formed by Rhizobium japonicum strain 110 or strain 138 lacked activity for phosphofructokinase and NADP-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, key enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathways. Enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were found in the cytosol fraction.In three experiments, bacteroids contained about 10 to 30% of the total radioactivity in nodules 2 to 5 hours after pulse-labeling of plants, and 60 to 65% of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in the neutral sugar fraction at all sampling times. This

  18. Mechanistic and structural insight into promiscuity based metabolism of cardiac drug digoxin by gut microbial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kundan; Jaiswal, Shubham K; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Srivastava, Gopal N; Sharma, Ashok K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-12-23

    The recent advances in microbiome studies have revealed the role of gut microbiota in altering the pharmacological properties of oral drugs, which contributes to patient-response variation and undesired effect of the drug molecule. These studies are essential to guide us for achieving the desired efficacy and pharmacological activity of the existing drug molecule or for discovering novel and more effective therapeutics. However, one of the main limitations is the lack of atomistic details on the binding and metabolism of these drug molecules by gut-microbial enzymes. Therefore, in this study, for a well-known and important FDA-approved cardiac glycoside drug, digoxin, we report the atomistic details and energy economics for its binding and metabolism by the Cgr2 protein of Eggerthela lenta DSM 2243. It was observed that the binding pocket of digoxin to Cgr2 primarily involved the negatively charged polar amino acids and a few non-polar hydrophobic residues. The drug digoxin was found to bind Cgr2 at the same binding site as that of fumarate, which is the proposed natural substrate. However, digoxin showed a much lower binding energy (17.75 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) than the binding energy (42.17 ±2 Kcal mol -1 ) of fumarate. This study provides mechanistic insights into the structural and promiscuity-based metabolism of widely used cardiac drug digoxin and presents a methodology, which could be useful to confirm the promiscuity-based metabolism of other orally administrated drugs by gut microbial enzymes and also help in designing strategies for improving the efficacy of the drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in Nitrogen Metabolism and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Maize Tassel in Black Soils Region of Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eXu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Two varieties of maize (Zea mays L. grown in fields in Black soils of Northeast China were tested to study the dynamic changes of nitrogen metabolism and antioxidant enzyme activity in tassels of maize. Results showed that antioxidant enzyme activity in tassels of maize increased first and then decreased with the growing of maize, and reached peak value at shedding period. Pattern of proline was consistent with antioxidant enzyme activity, showing that osmotic adjustment could protect many enzymes, which are important for cell metabolism. Continuous reduction of soluble protein content along with the growing of maize was observed in the study, which indicated that quantitative material and energy were provided for pollen formation. Besides, another major cause was that a large proportion of nitrogen was used for the composition of structural protein. Nitrate nitrogen concentrations of tassels were more variable than ammonium nitrogen, which showed that nitrate nitrogen was the favored nitrogen source for maize.

  20. Key Metabolic Enzymes Underlying Astrocytic Upregulation of GABAergic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław T. Kaczor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic plasticity is recognized as a key mechanism of shaping the activity of the neuronal networks. However, its description is challenging because of numerous neuron-specific mechanisms. In particular, while essential role of glial cells in the excitatory plasticity is well established, their involvement in GABAergic plasticity only starts to emerge. To address this problem, we used two models: neuronal cell culture (NC and astrocyte-neuronal co-culture (ANCC, where we chemically induced long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses (iLTP. iLTP could be induced both in NC and ANCC but in ANCC its extent was larger. Importantly, this functional iLTP manifestation was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin puncta size. Furthermore, blocking astrocyte Krebs cycle with fluoroacetate (FA in ANCC prevented enhancement of both mIPSC amplitude and gephyrin puncta size but this effect was not observed in NC, indicating a key role in neuron-astrocyte cross-talk. Blockade of monocarboxylate transport with α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CIN abolished iLTP both in NC and ANCC and in the latter model prevented also enlargement of gephyrin puncta. Similarly, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase with BAYU6751 prevented enlargement of gephyrin puncta upon iLTP induction. Finally, block of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoxide (MSO nearly abolished mIPSC increase in both NMDA stimulated cell groups but did not prevent enlargement of gephyrin puncta. In conclusion, we provide further evidence that GABAergic plasticity is strongly regulated by astrocytes and the underlying mechanisms involve key metabolic enzymes. Considering the strategic role of GABAergic interneurons, the plasticity described here indicates possible mechanism whereby metabolism regulates the network activity.

  1. Energy balance and metabolism after cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Jones, Lee W

    2013-12-01

    Unfavorable physiological, biological, and behavioral alterations during and following treatment for cancer may lead to chronic energy imbalance predisposing to a myriad of deleterious health conditions including obesity, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. In addition to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal effects of these conditions, energy imbalance and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can also affect cancer-related morbidity and mortality. To this end, lifestyle interventions such as diet and physical activity are especially relevant to mitigate the deleterious impact of chronic energy imbalance in cancer survivors. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-Wide Prediction of Metabolic Enzymes, Pathways, and Gene Clusters in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläpfer, Pascal; Zhang, Peifen; Wang, Chuan; Kim, Taehyong; Banf, Michael; Chae, Lee; Dreher, Kate; Chavali, Arvind K; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Bernard, Thomas; Kahn, Daniel; Rhee, Seung Y

    2017-04-01

    Plant metabolism underpins many traits of ecological and agronomic importance. Plants produce numerous compounds to cope with their environments but the biosynthetic pathways for most of these compounds have not yet been elucidated. To engineer and improve metabolic traits, we need comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the organization and regulation of plant metabolism at the genome scale. Here, we present a computational pipeline to identify metabolic enzymes, pathways, and gene clusters from a sequenced genome. Using this pipeline, we generated metabolic pathway databases for 22 species and identified metabolic gene clusters from 18 species. This unified resource can be used to conduct a wide array of comparative studies of plant metabolism. Using the resource, we discovered a widespread occurrence of metabolic gene clusters in plants: 11,969 clusters from 18 species. The prevalence of metabolic gene clusters offers an intriguing possibility of an untapped source for uncovering new metabolite biosynthesis pathways. For example, more than 1,700 clusters contain enzymes that could generate a specialized metabolite scaffold (signature enzymes) and enzymes that modify the scaffold (tailoring enzymes). In four species with sufficient gene expression data, we identified 43 highly coexpressed clusters that contain signature and tailoring enzymes, of which eight were characterized previously to be functional pathways. Finally, we identified patterns of genome organization that implicate local gene duplication and, to a lesser extent, single gene transposition as having played roles in the evolution of plant metabolic gene clusters. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Genome-Wide Prediction of Metabolic Enzymes, Pathways, and Gene Clusters in Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peifen; Kim, Taehyong; Banf, Michael; Chavali, Arvind K.; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Bernard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plant metabolism underpins many traits of ecological and agronomic importance. Plants produce numerous compounds to cope with their environments but the biosynthetic pathways for most of these compounds have not yet been elucidated. To engineer and improve metabolic traits, we need comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the organization and regulation of plant metabolism at the genome scale. Here, we present a computational pipeline to identify metabolic enzymes, pathways, and gene clusters from a sequenced genome. Using this pipeline, we generated metabolic pathway databases for 22 species and identified metabolic gene clusters from 18 species. This unified resource can be used to conduct a wide array of comparative studies of plant metabolism. Using the resource, we discovered a widespread occurrence of metabolic gene clusters in plants: 11,969 clusters from 18 species. The prevalence of metabolic gene clusters offers an intriguing possibility of an untapped source for uncovering new metabolite biosynthesis pathways. For example, more than 1,700 clusters contain enzymes that could generate a specialized metabolite scaffold (signature enzymes) and enzymes that modify the scaffold (tailoring enzymes). In four species with sufficient gene expression data, we identified 43 highly coexpressed clusters that contain signature and tailoring enzymes, of which eight were characterized previously to be functional pathways. Finally, we identified patterns of genome organization that implicate local gene duplication and, to a lesser extent, single gene transposition as having played roles in the evolution of plant metabolic gene clusters. PMID:28228535

  4. "Slave" metabolites and enzymes. A rapid way of delineating metabolic control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teusink, B.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2000-01-01

    Although control of fluxes and concentrations tends to be distributed rather than confined to a single rate-limiting enzyme, the extent of control can differ widely between enzymes in a metabolic network. In some cases, there are enzymes that lack control completely. This paper identifies one

  5. Enzyme activation through the utilization of intrinsic dianion binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyes, T L; Malabanan, M M; Zhai, X; Reyes, A C; Richard, J P

    2017-03-01

    We consider 'the proposition that the intrinsic binding energy that results from the noncovalent interaction of a specific substrate with the active site of the enzyme is considerably larger than is generally believed. An important part of this binding energy may be utilized to provide the driving force for catalysis, so that the observed binding energy represents only what is left over after this utilization' [Jencks,W.P. (1975) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas. Mol. Biol. , , 219-410]. The large ~12 kcal/mol intrinsic substrate phosphodianion binding energy for reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is divided into 4-6 kcal/mol binding energy that is expressed on the formation of the Michaelis complex in anchoring substrates to the respective enzyme, and 6-8 kcal/mol binding energy that is specifically expressed at the transition state in activating the respective enzymes for catalysis. A structure-based mechanism is described where the dianion binding energy drives a conformational change that activates these enzymes for catalysis. Phosphite dianion plays the active role of holding TIM in a high-energy closed active form, but acts as passive spectator in showing no effect on transition-state structure. The result of studies on mutant enzymes is presented, which support the proposal that the dianion-driven enzyme conformational change plays a role in enhancing the basicity of side chain of E167, the catalytic base, by clamping the base between a pair of hydrophobic side chains. The insight these results provide into the architecture of enzyme active sites and the development of strategies for the de novo design of protein catalysts is discussed.

  6. Circulating follistatin in relation to energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Plomgaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    a relation to energy metabolism. In this narrative review, we attempt to reconcile the existing findings on circulating follistatin with the novel concept that circulating follistatin is a liver-derived molecule regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. The picture emerging is that conditions associated...... with elevated levels of circulating follistatin have a metabolic denominator with decreased insulin sensitivity and/or hyperglucagoneimia....

  7. Modeling metabolic response to changes of enzyme amount in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... (2001), in an in silico model of glycolysis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is established by introducing an enzyme amount multiple factor (ɑ) into the ... not only biochemical characteristic but also location of enzymes in the network should be considered. Key words: Glycolysis, yeast, metabolites level, enzyme ...

  8. Tracing the Repertoire of Promiscuous Enzymes along the Metabolic Pathways in Archaeal Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic pathways that carry out the biochemical transformations sustaining life depend on the efficiency of their associated enzymes. In recent years, it has become clear that promiscuous enzymes have played an important role in the function and evolution of metabolism. In this work we analyze the repertoire of promiscuous enzymes in 89 non-redundant genomes of the Archaea cellular domain. Promiscuous enzymes are defined as those proteins with two or more different Enzyme Commission (E.C.) numbers, according the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. From this analysis, it was found that the fraction of promiscuous enzymes is lower in Archaea than in Bacteria. A greater diversity of superfamily domains is associated with promiscuous enzymes compared to specialized enzymes, both in Archaea and Bacteria, and there is an enrichment of substrate promiscuity rather than catalytic promiscuity in the archaeal enzymes. Finally, the presence of promiscuous enzymes in the metabolic pathways was found to be heterogeneously distributed at the domain level and in the phyla that make up the Archaea. These analyses increase our understanding of promiscuous enzymes and provide additional clues to the evolution of metabolism in Archaea. PMID:28703743

  9. Intrinsic effects of solvent polarity on enzymic activation energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Clark, D.S.; Dordick, J.S.

    2000-01-05

    The effect of organic solvents on subtilisin Carlsberg catalysis has been investigated with the aid of a thermodynamic analysis. Saturation solubility experiments were performed to provide a quantitative measure of substrate desolvation from the reaction medium. This enabled calculation of the intrinsic enzymic activation energy and resulted in a linear free energy relationship with respect to solvent polarity. The results indicate that the intrinsic activation energy of subtilisin catalysis is lowest in polar organic solvents, which may be due to transition state stabilization of the enzyme's polar transition state for transesterification.

  10. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  11. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  12. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Charron

    Full Text Available Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities and physiological (energy reserves responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  13. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  14. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-31

    The Na+ gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na+-dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na+ load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na+ extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na+ following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na+ as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na+ and the metabolic machinery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Relationships between Bone Turnover and Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia A. P. Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that diabetes can be detrimental to bone health, and its chronic complications have been associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. However, there is growing evidence that the skeleton plays a key role in a whole-organism approach to physiology. The hypothesis that bone may be involved in the regulation of physiological functions, such as insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism, has been suggested. Given the roles of insulin, adipokines, and osteocalcin in these pathways, the need for a more integrative conceptual approach to physiology is emphasized. Recent findings suggest that bone plays an important role in regulating intermediary metabolism, being possibly both a target of diabetic complications and a potential pathophysiologic factor in the disease itself. Understanding the relationships between bone turnover and glucose metabolism is important in order to develop treatments that might reestablish energy metabolism and bone health. This review describes new insights relating bone turnover and energy metabolism that have been reported in the literature.

  16. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Bergen

    Full Text Available The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine, has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3. Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  17. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes in...

  18. Timing of potential and metabolic brain energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, Jakob; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2007-01-01

    The temporal relationship between cerebral electro-physiological activities, higher brain functions and brain energy metabolism is reviewed. The duration of action potentials and transmission through glutamate and GABA are most often less than 5 ms. Subjects may perform complex psycho-physiologic...

  19. Timing of potential and metabolic brain energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, Jakob; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2007-01-01

    The temporal relationship between cerebral electro-physiological activities, higher brain functions and brain energy metabolism is reviewed. The duration of action potentials and transmission through glutamate and GABA are most often less than 5 ms. Subjects may perform complex psycho-physiological

  20. Brain Ceramide Metabolism in the Control of Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Cruciani-Guglielmacci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of energy balance by the central nervous system (CNS is a key actor of energy homeostasis in mammals, and deregulations of the fine mechanisms of nutrient sensing in the brain could lead to several metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, while neuronal activity primarily relies on glucose (lactate, pyruvate, the brain expresses at high level enzymes responsible for the transport, utilization and storage of lipids. It has been demonstrated that discrete neuronal networks in the hypothalamus have the ability to detect variation of circulating long chain fatty acids (FA to regulate food intake and peripheral glucose metabolism. During a chronic lipid excess situation, this physiological lipid sensing is impaired contributing to type 2 diabetes in predisposed subjects. Recently, different studies suggested that ceramides levels could be involved in the regulation of energy balance in both hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic areas. Moreover, under lipotoxic conditions, these ceramides could play a role in the dysregulation of glucose homeostasis. In this review we aimed at describing the potential role of ceramides metabolism in the brain in the physiological and pathophysiological control of energy balance.

  1. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Vic; Amar, Patrick; Legent, Guillaume; Ripoll, Camille; Thellier, Michel; Ovádi, Judit

    2013-02-11

    There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined.

  2. Pareto optimality in organelle energy metabolism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Claudio; Carapezza, Giovanni; Costanza, Jole; Lió, Pietro; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In low and high eukaryotes, energy is collected or transformed in compartments, the organelles. The rich variety of size, characteristics, and density of the organelles makes it difficult to build a general picture. In this paper, we make use of the Pareto-front analysis to investigate the optimization of energy metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Using the Pareto optimality principle, we compare models of organelle metabolism on the basis of single- and multiobjective optimization, approximation techniques (the Bayesian Automatic Relevance Determination), robustness, and pathway sensitivity analysis. Finally, we report the first analysis of the metabolic model for the hydrogenosome of Trichomonas vaginalis, which is found in several protozoan parasites. Our analysis has shown the importance of the Pareto optimality for such comparison and for insights into the evolution of the metabolism from cytoplasmic to organelle bound, involving a model order reduction. We report that Pareto fronts represent an asymptotic analysis useful to describe the metabolism of an organism aimed at maximizing concurrently two or more metabolite concentrations.

  3. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  5. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet eSangar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell.

  6. Gamma radiation induced alterations in the ultrastructure of pancreatic islet, metabolism and enzymes in wistar rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoo, J.V.; Suryawanshi, S.A. [Inst. of Science, Bombay (India)

    1992-07-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation (600 rads) on the ultrastructure of pancreatic islet, metabolism and some enzymes in wistar rat, are reported. Electron microscopic observations of endocrine pancreas revealed prominent changes in beta cells while alpha and delta cells were not much affected. Irradiation also inflicted hyperglycemia, increase in liver and muscle glycogen and decrease in insulin level. It has also increased the activity of enzymes but failed to produce significant changes in protein, lipid and mineral metabolism. (auth0008.

  7. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Archaea: Current Insights into Unusual Enzymes and Pathways and Their Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many “classical” pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of “new,” unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented. PMID:24600042

  8. Role of the microbiome in energy regulation and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwdorp, Max; Gilijamse, Pim W.; Pai, Nikhil; Kaplan, Lee M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal microbes regulate metabolic function and energy balance; an altered microbial ecology is believed to contribute to the development of several metabolic diseases. Relative species abundance and metabolic characteristics of the intestinal microbiota change substantially in those who are

  9. Effect of fat source, energy level and enzyme supplementation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martina

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... A.M. Abudabos#. Department of Animal Production, College of Food and Agriculture Sciences ... used to study the interactions of the two fat sources, SBO and KOF, at two levels of metabolizable energy ... It was suggested that the enzymes reduce the negative effects of NSPs and improve the digestion of.

  10. Methanol Metabolism in Yeasts : Regulation of the Synthesis of Catabolic Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egli, Th.; Dijken, J.P. van; Veenhuis, M.; Harder, W.; Fiechter, A.

    1980-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of four dissimilatory enzymes involved in methanol metabolism, namely alcohol oxidase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase and catalase was investigated in the yeasts Hansenula polymorpha and Kloeckera sp. 2201. Enzyme profiles in cell-free extracts of

  11. METABOLIC MAPPING BY ENZYME HISTOCHEMISTRY IN LIVING ANIMALS, TISSUES AND CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins in intact animals, tissue and cells has become an indispensable tool in cell biology Imaging activity of enzymes, which is called metabolic mapping, provides information on subcellular localisation in combination with function of the enzymes

  12. De novo biosynthesis of secondary metabolism enzymes in homogeneous cultures of Penicillium urticae.

    OpenAIRE

    Grootwassink, J W; Gaucher, G M

    1980-01-01

    The initiation of patulin biosynthesis in submerged batch cultures of Penicillium urticae NRRL 2159A was investigated at the enzyme level. In contrast to earlier studies, this study achieved a clear temporal separation of growing cells devoid of secondary metabolism-specific enzymes from nongrowing cells, which rapidly produce these enzymes. A spore inoculum, silicone-treated flasks, and two new media which supported a rapid, pellet-free, filamentous type of growth were used. In yeast extract...

  13. Energy metabolism of hyperthyroid gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Arjona, Francisco J; Laiz-Carrión, Raúl; Flik, Gert; Klaren, Peter H M; Mancera, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, in particular 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine or T3, are involved in multiple physiological processes in mammals such as protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. However, the metabolic actions of T3 in fish are still not fully elucidated. We therefore tested the effects of T3 on Sparus aurata energy metabolism and osmoregulatory system, a hyperthyroid-induced model that was chosen. Fish were implanted with coconut oil depots (containing 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0μg T3/g body weight) and sampled at day 3 and 6 post-implantation. Plasma levels of free T3 as well as glucose, lactate and triglyceride values increased with increasing doses of T3 at days 3 and 6 post-implantation. Changes in plasma and organ metabolite levels (glucose, glycogen, triglycerides, lactate and total α amino acid) and enzyme activities related to carbohydrate, lactate, amino acid and lipid pathways were detected in organs involved in metabolism (liver) and osmoregulation (gills and kidney). Our data implicate that the liver uses amino acids as an energy source in response to the T3 treatment, increasing protein catabolism and gluconeogenic pathways. The gills, the most important extruder of ammonia, are fuelled not only by amino acids, but also by lactate. The kidney differs significantly in its substrate preference from the gills, as it obtained metabolic energy from lactate but also from lipid oxidation processes. We conclude that in S. aurata lipid catabolism and protein turnover are increased as a consequence of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism, with secondary osmoregulatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of oxytocin in energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia; Tilelli, Cristiane Queixa; Brito, Nilton Almeida; Brito, Márcia Nascimento

    2013-07-01

    The basic mechanisms that lead obesity are not fully understood; however, several peptides undoubtedly play a role in regulating body weight. Obesity, a highly complex metabolic disorder, involves central mechanisms that control food intake and energy expenditure. Previous studies have shown that central or peripheral oxytocin administration induces anorexia. Recently, in an apparent discrepancy, rodents that were deficient in oxytocin or the oxytocin receptor were shown to develop late-onset obesity without changing their total food intake, which indicates the physiological importance of oxytocin to body metabolism. Oxytocin is synthesized not only within magnocellular and parvocellular neurons but also in several organs, including the ovary, uterus, placenta, testis, thymus, kidney, heart, blood vessels, and skin. The presence of oxytocin receptors in neurons, the myometrium and myoepithelial cells is well recognized; however, this receptor has also been identified in other tissues, including the pancreas and adipose tissue. The oxytocin receptor is a typical class I G protein-coupled receptor that is primarily linked to phospholipase C-β via Gq proteins but can also be coupled to other G proteins, leading to different functional effects. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge of the effects of oxytocin on controlling energy metabolism, focusing primarily on the role of oxytocin on appetite regulation, thermoregulation, and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of the enzymes catalyzing metabolism of methoxyflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskell, L; Canova-Davis, E; Philpot, R; Parandoush, Z; Chiang, J Y

    1986-01-01

    The hepatic microsomal metabolism of methoxyflurane in rabbits is markedly stimulated by treatment with phenobarbital. However, the increased rate of metabolism cannot be completely accounted for by the activity of the purified phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P-450 isozyme 2, even in the presence of cytochrome b5. The discovery of a second hepatic phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P-450, isozyme 5, led us to undertake experiments to determine in hepatic and pulmonary preparations the portion of microsomal metabolism of methoxyflurane catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 isozymes 2 and 5. We report herein that isozyme 2 accounts for 25% and 29%, respectively, of the O-demethylation of methoxyflurane in hepatic microsomes from untreated and phenobarbital-treated rabbits, and for 25% of the methoxyflurane metabolism in pulmonary microsomes. Results for isozyme 5 indicate that it catalyzes 19% and 27% of methoxyflurane metabolism in control and phenobarbital-induced liver, and 47% of O-demethylation in the lung. In summary, we demonstrate that methoxyflurane O-demethylation in lung, phenobarbital-induced liver, and control liver microsomes is catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 isozymes 2 and 5. Results with purified cytochrome P-450 isozyme 5 are consistent with those obtained using microsomal preparations. Furthermore, metabolism of methoxyflurane by purified isozyme 5 is markedly stimulated by cytochrome b5. A role for cytochrome b5 in cytochrome P-450 isozyme 5-catalyzed metabolism of methoxyflurane was also demonstrated in microsomes. Antibody to isozyme 5 was unable to inhibit methoxyflurane metabolism in the presence of maximally inhibiting concentrations of cytochrome b5 antibody.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Intraspecific variation in aerobic metabolic rate of fish: relations with organ size and enzyme activity in brown trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Tommy; Malte, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highly active animals require a high aerobic capacity (i.e., a high maximum metabolic rate [MMR]) to sustain such activity, and it has been speculated that a greater capacity for aerobic performance is reflected in larger organs, which serve as energy processors but are also expensive to maintain and which increase the minimal cost of living (i.e., the basal or standard metabolic rate [SMR]). In this study, we assessed the extent of intraspecific variation in metabolic rate within a group of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) and tested whether the observed variation in residual (body-mass-corrected) SMR, MMR, and absolute aerobic scope could be explained by variations in the residual size (mass) of metabolically active internal organs. Residual SMR was found to correlate positively with residual MMR, indicating a link between these two metabolic parameters, but no relationship between organ mass and metabolic rate was found for liver, heart, spleen, intestine, or stomach. Instead, activity in the liver of two aerobic mitochondrial enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and, to a lesser extent, citrate synthase, was found to correlate with whole-animal metabolic rate, indicating that causes for intraspecific variation in the metabolic rate of fish can be found at a lower organizational level than organ size.

  17. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-14

    Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic pathways. A graph-theoretic analysis of E.coli's metabolic network shows that localized enzymes, in contrast to non-localized ones, form a tree-like hierarchical structure, have a higher within-group connectivity, and are traversed by a higher number of feed-forward and feedback loops than their non-localized counterparts. A Gene Ontology analysis of these enzymes reveals an enrichment of terms related to essential metabolic functions in growing cells. Given that these findings suggest a distinct metabolic role for localization, we studied the dynamics of cellular localization of the cell wall synthesizing enzymes in B. subtilis and found that enzymes localize during exponential growth but not during stationary growth. We conclude that active biochemical pathways inside the cytoplasm are organized spatially following a rule where their first or their last enzymes localize to effectively connect the different active pathways and thus could reflect the activity state of the cell's metabolic network.

  18. Polyphosphate--an ancient energy source and active metabolic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achbergerová, Lucia; Nahálka, Jozef

    2011-08-04

    There are a several molecules on Earth that effectively store energy within their covalent bonds, and one of these energy-rich molecules is polyphosphate. In microbial cells, polyphosphate granules are synthesised for both energy and phosphate storage and are degraded to produce nucleotide triphosphate or phosphate. Energy released from these energetic carriers is used by the cell for production of all vital molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, sugars and lipids. Polyphosphate chains directly regulate some processes in the cell and are used as phosphate donors in gene regulation. These two processes, energetic metabolism and regulation, are orchestrated by polyphosphate kinases. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) can currently be categorized into three groups (PPK1, PPK2 and PPK3) according their functionality; they can also be divided into three groups according their homology (EcPPK1, PaPPK2 and ScVTC). This review discusses historical information, similarities and differences, biochemical characteristics, roles in stress response regulation and possible applications in the biotechnology industry of these enzymes. At the end of the review, a hypothesis is discussed in view of synthetic biology applications that states polyphosphate and calcium-rich organelles have endosymbiotic origins from ancient protocells that metabolized polyphosphate.

  19. Polyphosphate - an ancient energy source and active metabolic regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    There are a several molecules on Earth that effectively store energy within their covalent bonds, and one of these energy-rich molecules is polyphosphate. In microbial cells, polyphosphate granules are synthesised for both energy and phosphate storage and are degraded to produce nucleotide triphosphate or phosphate. Energy released from these energetic carriers is used by the cell for production of all vital molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, sugars and lipids. Polyphosphate chains directly regulate some processes in the cell and are used as phosphate donors in gene regulation. These two processes, energetic metabolism and regulation, are orchestrated by polyphosphate kinases. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) can currently be categorized into three groups (PPK1, PPK2 and PPK3) according their functionality; they can also be divided into three groups according their homology (EcPPK1, PaPPK2 and ScVTC). This review discusses historical information, similarities and differences, biochemical characteristics, roles in stress response regulation and possible applications in the biotechnology industry of these enzymes. At the end of the review, a hypothesis is discussed in view of synthetic biology applications that states polyphosphate and calcium-rich organelles have endosymbiotic origins from ancient protocells that metabolized polyphosphate. PMID:21816086

  20. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  1. [Energy metabolism in fasting and subsequent refeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H L; Kirchgessner, M

    1984-03-01

    A metabolism trial with six adult sows was conducted to study the effect of fasting and realimentation on heat production, energy retention, and utilization of energy. Complete balance measurements by indirect calorimetry (CN-method, RQ-method) were carried out from the 8th to the 10th day of fasting, and thereafter from the 1st to the 7th day and from the 33rd to the 36th day of the realimentation phase. Previous to fasting and during the time of refeeding the energy supply was adapted to maintenance requirement. Heat production rose by 20% after refeeding the animals. This heat increment corresponded to 2.2 MJ/kg feed dry matter, or 12% of the energy intake, respectively. The stimulation of heat production induced by refeeding occurred spontaneously within one day. After the first day of refeeding a plateau was reached, which in the course of the steady energy supply was still present even after the 5th week of realimentation. Residual effects of fasting in the mode of a compensatory heat production were not observed. Therefore, a constant utilization of efficiency of metabolizable energy for maintenance was estimated at 82%. The change of body energy during the entire experimental period resulted in a loss of 198 MJ corresponding to about 5% of the body weight.

  2. ROS and energy metabolism in cancer cells: alliance for fast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Won; Lee, Sunmi; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2015-03-01

    In normal cells, the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level is proportional to the activity of mitochondrial electron transport and tightly controlled by endogenous antioxidant system. However, energy metabolism and ROS homeostasis in cancer cells are much different from those in normal cells. For example, a majority of cellular glucose is metabolized through aerobic glycolysis ("Warburg effect") and the pentose phosphate pathway. Cancer cells harbor functional mitochondria, but many mutations in nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes and mitochondrial genome result in the mitochondrial metabolic reprogramming. The other characteristic of cancer cells is to maintain much higher ROS level than normal cells. Ironically, cancer cells overexpress the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase and the ROS-eliminating antioxidant enzymes, both of which enzyme systems share NADPH as a reducing power source. In this article, we review the complex connection between ROS and energy metabolisms in cancer cells.

  3. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünse, Christina E; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  4. Corn and soybean meal metabolizable energy with the addition of exogenous enzymes for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LRB Dourado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two metabolism assays were carried out to determine corn and soybean meal metabolizable energy when enzymes were added. In the first trial, 35 cockerels per studied feedstuff (corn and soybean meal were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design with four treatments of seven replicates of one bird each. The evaluated treatments were: ingredient (corn and soybean meal with no enzyme addition, with the addition of an enzyme complex (xylanase, amylase, protease - XAP, xylanase, or phytase. Precise feeding method was used to determine true metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (TMEn. The use of enzymes did not result in any differences (p>0.05 in soybean meal TMEn, but phytase improved corn TMEn in 2.3% (p=0.004. In the second trial, 280 seven-day-old broiler chicks were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design with seven treatments of five replicates of eight birds each. Treatments consisted of corn with no enzyme addition or with the addition of amylase, xylanase, phytase, XAP complex, XAP+phytase combination, or xylanase/ pectinase/β-glucanase complex (XPBG. Corn was supplemented with macro and trace minerals. Total excreta collection was used to determine apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn. Differences were observed (p=0.08 in AMEn and dry matter metabolizability coefficient (p=0.03. The combination of the XAP complex with phytase promoted a 2.11% increase in corn AMEn values, and the remaining enzymes allowed increased between 0.86% and 1.66%.

  5. Multifaceted roles of metabolic enzymes of the Paracoccidioides species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Maria Marcos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi, and are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a serious disease of multiple organs. The large number of tissues colonized by this fungus suggests the presence of a variety of surface molecules involved in adhesion. A surprising finding is that the majority of enzymes in the glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and glyoxylate cycle in Paracoccidioides spp. has adhesive properties that aid in the interaction with the host extracellular matrix, and so act as ‘moonlighting’ proteins. Moonlighting proteins have multiple functions and add another dimension to cellular complexity, while benefiting cells in several ways. This phenomenon occurs in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. For example, moonlighting proteins from the glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle can play roles in bacterial pathogens, either by acting as proteins secreted in a conventional pathway or not and/or as cell surface component that facilitate adhesion or adherence . This review outlines the multifuncionality exposed by a variety of Paracoccidioides spp. enzymes including aconitase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, triose phosphate isomerase, fumarase and enolase. The roles that moonlighting activities play in the virulence characteristics of this fungus and several other human pathogens during their interactions with the host are discussed.

  6. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP .

  7. Doxorubicin toxicity changes myocardial energy metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong; Wang, Hui-Lin; Yu, Hai-Lun; Cui, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Meng-Ting; Xu, Xu; Gao, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-25

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an antitumor antibiotics used against malignancies. But its toxicity limits the therapy of DOX. The purpose of this study was to evaluate DOX toxicity and the alteration of energy metabolism after short term and long term treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Short term control group, short term DOX treatment group, long term control group and long term DOX treatment group. In short term treated group, rats were injected with DOX i.p. at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg every 48 h for six equal injections. In long term, treated group, rats were tail-intravenously injected with DOX at a dose of 3 mg/kg once a week for four weeks. At the end of the experiment, histopathological changes, general blood biomarkers, endogenous antioxidant enzymes, cardiac energy metabolism and related mRNA expression of AMPK signal pathway were determined. DOX induced prominent oxidative stress, a higher mortality rate, histological and ECG changes, obvious cardiac hypertrophy, acute cardiac damage and cardiac energy impairment in short term treatment rats. In long term treatment rats, DOX caused serious nephropathy and systolic dysfunction, terrible cardiac energy impairment, clear alteration of substrate utilization and AMPK signal pathway. DOX treatment can induce different damages after short term and long term treatment. In short term treatment group, rats experienced a terrible mortality rate about 40%, the acute cardiac damage, cardiac energy impairment and an early heart failure which are potential connected with reduction of glucose utilization. In the long term treatment group, serious nephropathy and obvious changes of mRNA expressions of AMPK signal pathway were observed. Meanwhile, the serious cardiac energy impairment and substrate utilization alteration denote an obviously heart failure. This study could be helpful to develop therapy strategies of DOX complications for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  8. Liver enzymes and markers of inflammation in Nigerian adults with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udenze Ifeoma Christiana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the plasma levels of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in people with metabolic syndrome and to determine the association between the liver enzymes and obesity, insulin resistance, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: This was a case control study of 50 adult men and women with metabolic syndrome, and 50 age- and sex-matched males and females without metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII criteria. Written informed consent was obtained from the participants. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Venous blood was collected after an overnight fast. The ethics committee of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, approved the study protocol. Comparison of continuous variables was done using the student′s t-test. Regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the liver enzymes ALP (P = 0.031, ALT (P = 0.019, and GGT (P = 0.037, as well as in the inflammatory markers CRP (P = 0.019 and the cytokine IL-6 (P = 0.040 between the two study groups. ALP and ALT showed significant correlation with waist circumference, BMI, fasting insulin, and waist/hip ratio (P < 0.05. Multivariate regression also identified ALT, AST, and ALP to be associated with IL-6 and CRP (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Liver enzyme levels were increased in metabolic syndrome and associated with obesity, fasting insulin, and CRP. Elevated liver enzymes may indicate dysmetabolism and increased

  9. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action.

  10. Bifidobacterial Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal colonization of bifidobacteria is important for the health of infants. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been identified as growth factors for bifidobacteria. Recently, a bifidobacterial enzymatic system to metabolize HMO was identified. 1,3-β-Galactosyl-N-acetylhexosamine phosphorylase (GLNBP, EC 2.4.1.211), which catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of galacto-N-biose (GNB) (Galβ1→3GalNAc)] and lacto-N-biose I (LNB) (Galβ1→3GlcNAc), is a key enzyme to explain the metabolism of HMO. Infant-type bifidobacteria possess the intracellular pathway to specifically metabolize GNB and LNB (GNB/LNB pathway). Bifidobacterium bifidum possesses extracellular enzymes to liberate LNB from HMO. However, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis imports intact HMO to be hydrolyzed by intracellular enzymes. Bifidobacterial enzymes related to the metabolism of HMO are useful tools for preparing compounds related to HMO. For instance, LNB and GNB were produced from sucrose and GlcNAc/GalNAc in 1 pot using 4 bifidobacterial enzymes, including GLNBP. LNB is expected to be a selective bifidus factor for infant-type strains. PMID:22585921

  11. Correlation of Homocysteine Metabolic Enzymes Gene Polymorphism and Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Xinjiang Uygur Population

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Mei; Ji, Huihui; Zhou, Xiaohui; Liang, Jie; Zou, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic polymorphisms in the homocysteine (HCY) metabolic enzymes in the Xinjiang Uygur population who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Material/Methods Based on the epidemiological investigation, 129 cases of diagnosed Uygur MCI patients and a matched control group with 131 cases were enrolled for analyzing the association between the polymorphisms in the HCY metabolism related genes (C677T, A1298C, and G1968A polymorphisms in MTHF...

  12. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity.

  13. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets – “Sand out and Gold Stays”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y.; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T.; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: 1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune and other tissues; 2) Our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and 3) Histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and Treg polarization/differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of “sand out and gold stays,” where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity. PMID:26746407

  14. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  15. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T-C Francis; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-04-14

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors.

  16. A systems biology framework for modeling metabolic enzyme inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifman Jaques

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because metabolism is fundamental in sustaining microbial life, drugs that target pathogen-specific metabolic enzymes and pathways can be very effective. In particular, the metabolic challenges faced by intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, residing in the infected host provide novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Results We developed a mathematical framework to simulate the effects on the growth of a pathogen when enzymes in its metabolic pathways are inhibited. Combining detailed models of enzyme kinetics, a complete metabolic network description as modeled by flux balance analysis, and a dynamic cell population growth model, we quantitatively modeled and predicted the dose-response of the 3-nitropropionate inhibitor on the growth of M. tuberculosis in a medium whose carbon source was restricted to fatty acids, and that of the 5'-O-(N-salicylsulfamoyl adenosine inhibitor in a medium with low-iron concentration. Conclusion The predicted results quantitatively reproduced the experimentally measured dose-response curves, ranging over three orders of magnitude in inhibitor concentration. Thus, by allowing for detailed specifications of the underlying enzymatic kinetics, metabolic reactions/constraints, and growth media, our model captured the essential chemical and biological factors that determine the effects of drug inhibition on in vitro growth of M. tuberculosis cells.

  17. Canonical and new generation anticancer drugs also target energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Pacheco-Velázquez, Silvia C; López-Ramírez, Sayra Y; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made for the development of new anticancer drugs (protein kinase or proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal humanized antibodies) with presumably low or negligible side effects and high specificity. However, an in-depth analysis of the side effects of several currently used canonical (platin-based drugs, taxanes, anthracyclines, etoposides, antimetabolites) and new generation anticancer drugs as the first line of clinical treatment reveals significant perturbation of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. Canonical and new generation drug side effects include decreased (1) intracellular ATP levels, (2) glycolytic/mitochondrial enzyme/transporter activities and/or (3) mitochondrial electrical membrane potentials. Furthermore, the anti-proliferative effects of these drugs are markedly attenuated in tumor rho (0) cells, in which functional mitochondria are absent; in addition, several anticancer drugs directly interact with isolated mitochondria affecting their functions. Therefore, several anticancer drugs also target the energy metabolism, and hence, the documented inhibitory effect of anticancer drugs on cancer growth should also be linked to the blocking of ATP supply pathways. These often overlooked effects of canonical and new generation anticancer drugs emphasize the role of energy metabolism in maintaining cancer cells viable and its targeting as a complementary and successful strategy for cancer treatment.

  18. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  19. Altered Activities of Antioxidant Enzymes in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vávrová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, an increase of oxidative stress could play an important role which is closely linked with insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess several parameters of the antioxidant status in MetS. Methods: 40 subjects with MetS and 40 age- and sex-matched volunteers without MetS were examined for activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1, glutathione reductase (GR, paraoxonase1 (PON1, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, and conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (CD-LDL. Results: Subjects with MetS had higher activities of CuZnSOD (p Conclusions: Our results implicated an increased oxidative stress in MetS and a decreased antioxidative defense that correlated with some laboratory (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and clinical (waist circumference, blood pressure components of MetS.

  20. Effect of copper on liver key enzymes of anaerobic glucose metabolism from freshwater tropical fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cleoni dos Santos; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the effect of copper on liver key enzymes of the anaerobic glucose metabolism (hexokinase, HK; phosphofructokinase, PFK; pyruvate kinase, PK; lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) as well as of the pentose pathway (glycose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, G6PDH) from the fish Prochilodus lineatus. The fish were acclimated at either 20 degrees C or 30 degrees C at pH 7.0, transferred to water at pH 4.5 or 8.0, and exposed to 96 h-CL(50) copper concentrations. Copper accumulation in liver was higher in fish acclimated at 20 degrees C and maintained in water pH 8.0. Three-way analysis of variance revealed a significant effect of temperature on all enzymes, a significant effect of pH on all enzymes except for PK, and a significant effect of copper on only PFK, and LDH in pH 4.5 at 20 degrees C and, at 30 degrees C, on PFK and PK at pH 4.5 and 8.0, HK at pH 4.5 and G6PDH at pH 8.0. There were significant interactions between treatments for many enzymes. These changes suggest that the activity of enzymes in question is modified by a change in ambient water. At least at 30 degrees C, the overall reduction in the glycolytic enzyme activities of copper-exposed fish seems to reduce energy availability via glucose metabolism, thereby contributing to enhance copper toxic effects.

  1. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed. © 2013 FEBS.

  2. Thermoregulation and energy metabolism in the lesser bush baby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-01-29

    Jan 29, 1988 ... S. Afr. J. Zool. 1989,24(2). Thermoregulation and energy metabolism in the lesser bush baby , ... Thermoregulation and energy metabolism were studied in adult and juvenile G. s. moho/i at ambient temperatures ranging from ... periods on cold nights to reduce energy expenditure. (Martin & Bearder 1979).

  3. Genetic polymorphism of metabolic enzymes modifies the risk of chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kezic, Sanja; Calkoen, Florentine; Wenker, Mira A. M.; Jacobs, John J. L.; Verberk, Maarten M.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether genetic polymorphism in enzymes involved in the metabolism of organic solvents influences susceptibility to chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), which is one of the major effects of long-term exposure to organic solvents. Polymorphisms in the genes

  4. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  5. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-03-09

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development.

  6. Energy metabolism and hindbrain AMPK: regulation by estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briski, Karen P; Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha

    2014-03-01

    Nerve cell energy status is screened within multiple classically defined hypothalamic and hindbrain components of the energy balance control network, including the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex (DVC). Signals of caudal DVC origin have a physiological role in glucostasis, e.g., maintenance of optimal supply of the critical substrate fuel, glucose, through control of motor functions such as fuel consumption and gluco-counterregulatory hormone secretion. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a likely source of these signals as combinatory laser microdissection/high-sensitivity Western blotting reveals expression of multiple biomarkers for metabolic sensing, including adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hypoglycemia elicits estradiol-dependent sex differences in A2 AMPK activation as phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) expression is augmented in male and ovariectomized (OVX) female, but not estrogen-replaced, OVX rats. This dichotomy may reflect, in part, estradiol-mediated up-regulation of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme expression during hypoglycemia. Our new model for short-term feeding abstinence has physiological relevance to planned (dieting) or unplanned (meal delay) interruption of consumption in modern life, which is negatively correlated with appetite control and obesity, and is useful for investigating how estrogen may mitigate the effects of disrupted fuel acquisition on energy balance via actions within the DVC. Estradiol reduces DVC AMPK activity after local delivery of the AMP mimic, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside, or cessation of feeding for 12 h but elevates pAMPK expression when these treatments are combined. These data suggest that estrogen maintains cellular energy stability over periods of suspended fuel acquisition and yet optimizes, by DVC AMPK-dependent mechanisms, counter-regulatory responses to metabolic challenges that occur during short-span feeding abstinence.

  7. Ets-1 regulates energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Verschoor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells predominantly utilize glycolysis for ATP production even in the presence of abundant oxygen, an environment that would normally result in energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Although the molecular mechanism for this metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis has not been fully elucidated, it is likely that mitochondrial damage to the electron transport chain and the resulting increased production of reactive oxygen species are significant driving forces. In this study, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor Ets-1 in the regulation of mitochondrial function and metabolism. Ets-1 was over-expressed using a stably-incorporated tetracycline-inducible expression vector in the ovarian cancer cell line 2008, which does not express detectable basal levels of Ets-1 protein. Microarray analysis of the effects of Ets-1 over-expression in these ovarian cancer cells shows that Ets-1 up-regulates key enzymes involved in glycolysis and associated feeder pathways, fatty acid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In contrast, Ets-1 down-regulates genes involved in the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and mitochondrial proteins. At the functional level, we have found that Ets-1 expression is directly correlated with cellular oxygen consumption whereby increased expression causes decreased oxygen consumption. Ets-1 over-expression also caused increased sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors, as well as growth inhibition in a glucose-depleted culture environment. Collectively our findings demonstrate that Ets-1 is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells.

  8. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  9. Microbial Antimony Biogeochemistry: Enzymes, Regulation, and Related Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Wang, Qian; Oremland, Ronald S; Kulp, Thomas R; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-09-15

    Antimony (Sb) is a toxic metalloid that occurs widely at trace concentrations in soil, aquatic systems, and the atmosphere. Nowadays, with the development of its new industrial applications and the corresponding expansion of antimony mining activities, the phenomenon of antimony pollution has become an increasingly serious concern. In recent years, research interest in Sb has been growing and reflects a fundamental scientific concern regarding Sb in the environment. In this review, we summarize the recent research on bacterial antimony transformations, especially those regarding antimony uptake, efflux, antimonite oxidation, and antimonate reduction. We conclude that our current understanding of antimony biochemistry and biogeochemistry is roughly equivalent to where that of arsenic was some 20 years ago. This portends the possibility of future discoveries with regard to the ability of microorganisms to conserve energy for their growth from antimony redox reactions and the isolation of new species of "antimonotrophs." Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Microbial antimony biogeochemistry: Enzymes, regulation, and related metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Qian Wang,; Oremland, Ronald S.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a toxic metalloid that occurs widely at trace concentrations in soil, aquatic systems, and the atmosphere. Nowadays, with the development of its new industrial applications and the corresponding expansion of antimony mining activities, the phenomenon of antimony pollution has become an increasingly serious concern. In recent years, research interest in Sb has been growing and reflects a fundamental scientific concern regarding Sb in the environment. In this review, we summarize the recent research on bacterial antimony transformations, especially those regarding antimony uptake, efflux, antimonite oxidation, and antimonate reduction. We conclude that our current understanding of antimony biochemistry and biogeochemistry is roughly equivalent to where that of arsenic was some 20 years ago. This portends the possibility of future discoveries with regard to the ability of microorganisms to conserve energy for their growth from antimony redox reactions and the isolation of new species of “antimonotrophs.”

  11. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex......, since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed...... a comprehensive analysis of the expression of VDR, VD activating (CYP2R1, CYP27A1, CYP27B1) and inactivating (CYP24A1) enzymes in the testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle (SV), prostate and spermatozoa....

  12. Nasal cavity enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism: effects on the toxicity of inhalants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, A R; Hadley, W M

    1991-01-01

    A decade ago, the ability of nasal tissues to metabolize inhalants was only dimly suspected. Since then, the metabolic capacities of nasal cavity tissues has been extensively investigated in mammals, including man. Aldehyde dehydrogenases, cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases, rhodanese, glutathione transferases, epoxide hydrolases, flavin-containing monooxygenases, and carboxyl esterases have all been reported to occur in substantial amounts in the nasal cavity. The contributions of these enzyme activities to the induction of toxic effects from inhalants such as benzo-a-pyrene, acetaminophen, formaldehyde, cocaine, dimethylnitrosamine, ferrocene, and 3-trifluoromethylpyridine have been the subject of dozens of reports. In addition, the influence of these enzyme activities on olfaction and their contribution to vapor uptake is beginning to receive attention from the research community. Research in the next decade promises to provide answers to the many still unanswered questions posed by the presence of the substantial xenobiotic metabolizing capacity of the nasal cavity.

  13. Energy metabolism and the skeleton: Reciprocal interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Patrizia; Panico, Anna; Spertino, Elena; Isaia, Giovanni Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The relation between bone remodelling and energy expenditure is an intriguing, and yet unexplained, challenge of the past ten years. In fact, it was only in the last few years that the skeleton was found to function, not only in its obvious roles of body support and protection, but also as an important part of the endocrine system. In particular, bone produces different hormones, like osteocalcin (OC), which influences energy expenditure in humans. The undercarboxylated form of OC has a reduced affinity for hydroxyapatite; hence it enters the systemic circulation more easily and exerts its metabolic functions for the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells, insulin secretion, sensitivity, and glucose tolerance. Leptin, a hormone synthesized by adipocytes, also has an effect on both bone remodelling and energy expenditure; in fact it inhibits appetite through hypothalamic influence and, in bone, stimulates osteoblastic differentiation and inhibits apoptosis. Leptin and serotonin exert opposite influences on bone mass accrual, but several features suggest that they might operate in the same pathway through a sympathetic tone. Serotonin, in fact, acts via two opposite pathways in controlling bone remodelling: central and peripheral. Serotonin product by the gastrointestinal tract (95%) augments bone formation by osteoblast, whereas brain-derived serotonin influences low bone mineral density and its decrease leads to an increase in bone resorption parameters. Finally, amylin (AMY) acts as a hormone that alters physiological responses related to feeding, and plays a role as a growth factor in bone. In vitro AMY stimulates the proliferation of osteoblasts, and osteoclast differentiation. Here we summarize the evidence that links energy expenditure and bone remodelling, with particular regard to humans. PMID:23330074

  14. Activities of key metabolic enzymes in the heater organs of scombroid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, A; Block, B A; Sidell, B D

    1991-11-01

    Maximal in vitro activities of key metabolic enzymes were measured in brain and eye heaters of five species of scombroid fishes. Istiophorid billfishes (blue marlin, striped marlin and Mediterranean spearfish), xiphiid billfishes (Pacific and Mediterranean stocks) and a scombrid fish (butterfly mackerel) were included in the analysis. Our main objectives were (1) to assess the maximum possible substrate flux in heater tissue, and (2) to determine what metabolic substrates could fuel heat production. Heater tissue of all scombroids examined showed extremely high oxidative capacity. Activities of citrate synthase, a commonly measured index of oxidative metabolism, included the highest value ever reported for vertebrate tissue. In most billfishes, citrate synthase activities were similar to or higher than those found for mammalian cardiac and avian flight muscle. Marker enzymes for aerobic carbohydrate metabolism (hexokinase) and fatty acid metabolism (carnitine palmitoyltransferase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) also displayed extraordinarily high activities. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase measured in heater organs were among the highest reported for vertebrates. These results indicate that heat production could be fueled aerobically by either lipid or carbohydrate metabolism. Inter- and intraspecifically, heater organs of fishes from the colder Mediterranean waters had a higher aerobic capacity and, hence, a greater heat-generating potential, than fishes from the warmer waters of the Pacific. This difference may be attributed to different thermal environments or it may result from allometry, since fishes caught in the Mediterranean were considerably smaller than those caught in the Pacific.

  15. Incorporation of enzyme concentrations into FBA and identification of optimal metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Subhasis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present article, we propose a method for determining optimal metabolic pathways in terms of the level of concentration of the enzymes catalyzing various reactions in the entire metabolic network. The method, first of all, generates data on reaction fluxes in a pathway based on steady state condition. A set of constraints is formulated incorporating weighting coefficients corresponding to concentration of enzymes catalyzing reactions in the pathway. Finally, the rate of yield of the target metabolite, starting with a given substrate, is maximized in order to identify an optimal pathway through these weighting coefficients. Results The effectiveness of the present method is demonstrated on two synthetic systems existing in the literature, two pentose phosphate, two glycolytic pathways, core carbon metabolism and a large network of carotenoid biosynthesis pathway of various organisms belonging to different phylogeny. A comparative study with the existing extreme pathway analysis also forms a part of this investigation. Biological relevance and validation of the results are provided. Finally, the impact of the method on metabolic engineering is explained with a few examples. Conclusions The method may be viewed as determining an optimal set of enzymes that is required to get an optimal metabolic pathway. Although it is a simple one, it has been able to identify a carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and the optimal pathway of core carbon metabolic network that is closer to some earlier investigations than that obtained by the extreme pathway analysis. Moreover, the present method has identified correctly optimal pathways for pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways. It has been mentioned using some examples how the method can suitably be used in the context of metabolic engineering.

  16. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Energy metabolism in students depending on motivation during exams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umriukhin, E A; Badikov, V I; Novikova, L P; Dzhebrailova, T D; Klimina, N V; Korobeĭnikova, I I

    1998-01-01

    The energy metabolism (EM) was shown to significantly depend upon the motivation level in students during examination. Energy expenditure increased before the examination in low- and medium motivation groups but not in highly motivated students.

  18. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  19. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  20. The enzymes of biotin dependent CO2 metabolism: What structures reveal about their reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L; Holden, Hazel M; Maurice, Martin St

    2012-01-01

    Biotin is the major cofactor involved in carbon dioxide metabolism. Indeed, biotin-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and are involved in a myriad of metabolic processes including fatty acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The cofactor, itself, is composed of a ureido ring, a tetrahydrothiophene ring, and a valeric acid side chain. It is the ureido ring that functions as the CO2 carrier. A complete understanding of biotin-dependent enzymes is critically important for translational research in light of the fact that some of these enzymes serve as targets for anti-obesity agents, antibiotics, and herbicides. Prior to 1990, however, there was a dearth of information regarding the molecular architectures of biotin-dependent enzymes. In recent years there has been an explosion in the number of three-dimensional structures reported for these proteins. Here we review our current understanding of the structures and functions of biotin-dependent enzymes. In addition, we provide a critical analysis of what these structures have and have not revealed about biotin-dependent catalysis. PMID:22969052

  1. Role of ketone bodies in perinatal myocardial energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, B; van der Leij, FR; Kuipers, JRG

    Metabolic changes at around the time of birth are crucial for life. Here we review the energy utilization in the myocardium, emphasizing ketone body metabolism. Before birth, glucose and lactate are the major energy substrates for the myocardium. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) are normally not

  2. Genetic Control of Phosphate-Metabolizing Enzymes in NEUROSPORA CRASSA: Relationships among Regulatory Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Barbara S.; Chia, William; Metzenberg, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the phosphate-metabolizing enzymes are made during phosphate starvation, but not under phosphate sufficiency. The synthesis of these enzymes is controlled by three regulatory genes: pcon-nuc-2, preg and nuc-1. pcon-nuc-2 and preg are closely linked. A model of the hierarchical relationships among these regulatory genes is presented. Studies of double mutants and revertants confirm several predictions of the model. It has been found that nuc-2 (null) and pconc (constitutive) mutations reside in the same cistron. pregc (constitutive) mutations are epistatic to nuc-2 mutations. nuc-1 (null) mutations are epistatic to all others. PMID:123873

  3. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  4. Expression of two drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450-enzymes in human salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Hansen, C; Torpet, L A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The oral cavity is constantly lubricated by saliva and even small amounts of xenobiotics and / or their metabolites in the saliva may affect the oral mucosa. Our aim was therefore to clarify if xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 are expressed in salivary glands. METHODS...... and seromucous / serous acinar cells in all gland types although to a varying degree and intensity. Mucous acinar cells were positive to a lesser extent. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a xenobiotic metabolizing capability of salivary glands. This may have implications for development of oral mucosal disease...

  5. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  6. Role of the microbiome in energy regulation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwdorp, Max; Gilijamse, Pim W; Pai, Nikhil; Kaplan, Lee M

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal microbes regulate metabolic function and energy balance; an altered microbial ecology is believed to contribute to the development of several metabolic diseases. Relative species abundance and metabolic characteristics of the intestinal microbiota change substantially in those who are obese or have other metabolic disorders and in response to ingested nutrients or therapeutic agents. The mechanisms through which the intestinal microbiota and its metabolites affect host homeostasis are just beginning to be understood. We review the relationships between the intestinal microbiota and host metabolism, including energy intake, use, and expenditure, in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism. These associations, along with interactions among the intestinal microbiota, mucus layer, bile acids, and mucosal immune responses, reveal potential mechanisms by which the microbiota affect metabolism. We discuss how controlled studies involving direct perturbations of microbial communities in human and animal models are required to identify effective therapeutic targets in the microbiota. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy......, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include...

  8. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia - host cell interactions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Hanevik, Kurt; Andersson, Mattias K; Bruserud, Oystein; Svärd, Staffan G

    2013-11-14

    Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Giardia affects the host's arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy.

  9. A Plant Bacterial Pathogen Manipulates Its Insect Vector's Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj; Ebert, Timothy A; Rogers, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    Insect-transmitted plant-pathogenic bacteria may alter their vectors' fitness, survival, behavior, and metabolism. Because these pathogens interact with their vectors on the cellular and organismal levels, potential changes at the biochemical level might occur. "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. The genome of CLas revealed the presence of an ATP translocase that mediates the uptake of ATP and other nucleotides from medium to achieve its biological processes, such as growth and multiplication. Here, we showed that the levels of ATP and many other nucleotides were significantly higher in CLas-infected than healthy psyllids. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation for ATP synthase subunits, while ATPase enzyme activity showed a decrease in ATPase activity. These results indicated that CLas stimulated Diaphorina citri to produce more ATP and many other energetic nucleotides, while it may inhibit their consumption by the insect. As a result of ATP accumulation, the adenylated energy charge (AEC) increased and the AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP ratios decreased in CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. Survival analysis confirmed a shorter life span for CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. In addition, electropenetrography showed a significant reduction in total nonprobing time, salivation time, and time from the last E2 (phloem ingestion) to the end of recording, indicating that CLas-infected psyllids were at a higher hunger level and they tended to forage more often. This increased feeding activity reflects the CLas-induced energetic stress. In conclusion, CLas alters the energy metabolism of its psyllid vector, D. citri, in order to secure its need for energetic nucleotides.IMPORTANCE Insect transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria involves propagation and circulation of the bacteria within their vectors. The transmission process is complex and requires specific interactions at the molecular and biochemical

  10. Adaptations in the energy metabolism of parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, K.W.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833436

    2009-01-01

    For this thesis fundamental research was performed on the metabolic adaptations found in parasites. Studying the adaptations in parasite metabolisms leads to a better understanding of parasite bioenergetics and can also result in the identification of new anti-parasitic drug targets. We focussed on

  11. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Modulation of Ethanol-Metabolizing Enzymes by Developmental Lead Exposure: Effects in Voluntary Ethanol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam B. Virgolini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review article provides evidence of the impact of the environmental contaminant lead (Pb on the pattern of the motivational effects of ethanol (EtOH. To find a mechanism that explains this interaction, the focus of this review article is on central EtOH metabolism and the participating enzymes, as key factors in the modulation of brain acetaldehyde (ACD accumulation and resulting effect on EtOH intake. Catalase (CAT seems a good candidate for the shared mechanism between Pb and EtOH due to both its antioxidant and its brain EtOH-metabolizing properties. CAT overactivation was reported to increase EtOH consumption, while CAT blockade reduced it, and both scenarios were modified by Pb exposure, probably as the result of elevated brain and blood CAT activity. Likewise, the motivational effects of EtOH were enhanced when brain ACD metabolism was prevented by ALDH2 inhibition, even in the Pb animals that evidenced reduced brain ALDH2 activity after chronic EtOH intake. Overall, these results suggest that brain EtOH metabolizing enzymes are modulated by Pb exposure with resultant central ACD accumulation and a prevalence of the reinforcing effects of the metabolite in brain against the aversive peripheral ACD accumulation. They also support the idea that early exposure to an environmental contaminant, even at low doses, predisposes at a later age to differential reactivity to challenging events, increasing, in this case, vulnerability to acquiring addictive behaviors, including excessive EtOH intake.

  13. Metabolic regulation rather than de novo enzyme synthesis dominates the osmo-adaptation of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Jildau; Kiewiet, José; Lindenbergh, Alexander; van Eunen, Karen; Siderius, Marco; Bakker, Barbara M

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycerol is essential for yeast cells to survive hyperosmotic stress. Upon hyperosmotic stress the gene expression of enzymes in the glycerol pathway is strongly induced. Recently, however, it was shown that this gene-expression response is not essential for survival of an osmotic shock [Mettetal JT et al. (2008) Science 319: 482–484 and Westfall PJ et al. (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci 105: 12212–12217]. Instead, pure metabolic adaptation can rescue the yeast. The existence of two alternative mechanisms urged the question which of these mechanisms dominates time-dependent adaptation of wild-type yeast to osmotic stress under physiological conditions. The regulation of the glycerol pathway was analysed in aerobic, glucose-limited cultures upon addition of 1 M of sorbitol, leading to a hyperosmotic shock. In agreement with earlier studies, the mRNA levels of the glycerol-producing enzymes as well as their catalytic capacities increased. Qualitatively this induction followed a similar time course to the increase of the glycerol flux. However, a quantitative regulation analysis of the data revealed an initial regulation by metabolism alone. After only a few minutes gene expression came into play, but even after an hour, 80% of the increase in the glycerol flux was explained by metabolic changes in the cell, and 20% by induction of gene expression. This demonstrates that the novel metabolic mechanism is not just a secondary rescue mechanism, but the most important mechanism to regulate the glycerol flux under physiological conditions.

  14. Mouse genetics suggests cell-context dependency for Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes during tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisa M; Forshell, Tacha Zi Plym; Rimpi, Sara; Kreutzer, Christiane; Pretsch, Walter; Bornkamm, Georg W; Nilsson, Jonas A

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc (hereafter called Myc) belongs to a family of transcription factors that regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Myc initiates the transcription of a large cast of genes involved in cell growth by stimulating metabolism and protein synthesis. Some of these, like those involved in glycolysis, may be part of the Warburg effect, which is defined as increased glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of adequate oxygen supply. In this study, we have taken a mouse-genetics approach to challenge the role of select Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis in vivo. By breeding λ-Myc transgenic mice, Apc(Min) mice, and p53 knockout mice with mouse models carrying inactivating alleles of Lactate dehydrogenase A (Ldha), 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (Shmt1), we obtained offspring that were monitored for tumor development. Very surprisingly, we found that these genes are dispensable for tumorigenesis in these genetic settings. However, experiments in fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells expressing oncogenic Ras show that these cells are sensitive to Ldha knockdown. Our genetic models reveal cell context dependency and a remarkable ability of tumor cells to adapt to alterations in critical metabolic pathways. Thus, to achieve clinical success, it will be of importance to correctly stratify patients and to find synthetic lethal combinations of inhibitors targeting metabolic enzymes.

  15. Is within-normal range liver enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikniaz, Leila; Nikniaz, Zeinab; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa

    2017-08-30

    Considering the clear association between metabolic syndrome and future cardiovascular disease, early detection of metabolic syndrome is important. This study was conducted to assess the correlation between metabolic syndrome components and within-normal-range of liver enzymes in Iranian adults. This cross-sectional study was comprised of 700 Iranian adults in the districts of East Azerbaijan-Iran in 2015. The levels of lipid profile and glucose were measured by enzymatic colorimetric methods. Weight, height, waist circumferences were measured with standard protocols. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were assessed using the ultraviolet method. The Pearson correlation and Logistic regression were used to for statistical analysis. With increasing the number of metabolic abnormalities, the mean ALT level was increased significantly (Ptrend=0.04). In women, the increase in AST and ALT with increasing the number of metabolic abnormalities was statistically significant (PAST=0.01; PALTmetabolic syndrome outcome when compared to those in the first quartile [OR (95% CI): 4.43 (1.69, 11.63)]. In women, with increasing the quartiles of ALT within normal limits, the percent of participants with metabolic syndrome also increased significantly (Ptrend=0.04). Based on the results, the use of ALT and AST:ALT ratio as continuous biomarkers for early signaling of dysmetabolism especially in women could be encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic effect of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract on carbohydrate metabolizing and mitochondrial TCA cycle and respiratory chain enzymes in mammary carcinoma rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arathi, G; Sachdanandam, P

    2003-09-01

    Semecarpus anacardium Linn. of the family Anacardiaceae has many applications in the Ayurvedic and Siddha systems of medicine. We have evaluated the effect of S. anacardium nut milk extract on carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory enzymes in liver and kidney mitochondria of dimethyl benzanthracene-induced mammary carcinoma in Sprague-Dawley rats. Mammary carcinoma-bearing rats showed a significant rise in glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase and aldolase) and a simultaneous fall in gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase). The activities of mitochondrial enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, NADH-dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were significantly lowered in mammary carcinoma-bearing rats when compared with control rats. S. anacardium nut extract administration to tumour-induced animals significantly lowered the glycolytic enzyme activities (hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase and aldolase) and there was a rise in gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase), which indicated an antitumour and anticancer effect. Comparison of normal control rats and rats administered S. anacardium only as drug control animals showed no significant variations in enzyme activities. S. anacardium nut extract administration to dimethyl benzanthracene-tumour-induced animals significantly increased the activities of mitochondrial enzymes, thereby suggesting its role in mitochondrial energy production.

  17. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells....... By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells....... Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift...

  18. Evolution of a flipped pathway creates metabolic innovation in tomato trichomes through BAHD enzyme promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Pengxiang; Miller, Abigail M; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Jones, A Daniel; Last, Robert L

    2017-12-12

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of structurally diverse specialized metabolites via multistep biosynthetic networks, including compounds of ecological and therapeutic importance. These pathways are restricted to specific plant groups, and are excellent systems for understanding metabolic evolution. Tomato and other plants in the nightshade family synthesize protective acylated sugars in the tip cells of glandular trichomes on stems and leaves. We describe a metabolic innovation in wild tomato species that contributes to acylsucrose structural diversity. A small number of amino acid changes in two acylsucrose acyltransferases alter their acyl acceptor preferences, resulting in reversal of their order of reaction and increased product diversity. This study demonstrates how small numbers of amino acid changes in multiple pathway enzymes can lead to diversification of specialized metabolites in plants. It also highlights the power of a combined genetic, genomic and in vitro biochemical approach to identify the evolutionary mechanisms leading to metabolic novelty.

  19. Illustrating the Effect of pH on Enzyme Activity Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles provide students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis, making such profiles useful as teaching and learning tools. Traditional kinetic topics, such as the effect of pH on enzyme activity, are often not discussed in terms of Gibbs energy profiles. Herein, the symbolism of Gibbs…

  20. Enzyme oscillation can enhance the thermodynamic efficiency of cellular metabolism: Consequence of anti-phase coupling between reaction flux and affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Himeoka, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Cells generally convert nutrient resources to useful products via energy transduction. Accordingly, the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion process is one of the most essential characteristics of living organisms. However, although these processes occur under conditions of dynamic metabolism, most studies of cellular thermodynamic efficiency have been restricted to examining steady states; thus, the relevance of dynamics to this efficiency has not yet been elucidated. Here, we develop a simple model of metabolic reactions with anabolism-catabolism coupling catalysed by enzymes. Through application of external oscillation in the enzyme abundances, the thermodynamic efficiency of metabolism was found to be improved. This result is in strong contrast with that observed in the oscillatory input, in which the efficiency always decreased with oscillation. This improvement was effectively achieved by separating the anabolic and catabolic reactions, which tend to disequilibrate each other, and taking advantag...

  1. Milestones in the history of research on cardiac energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloukas, Apostolos I; Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Tsoumakas, Theofanis L; Kosma, Alexandra G; Diamantis, Aristidis

    2013-11-01

    The present study summarizes the history of research on cardiac metabolism from antiquity till the 21st century. It describes important landmarks regarding the discovery of oxygen and of the 3 steps of cellular respiration, as well as major research on cardiac energy metabolism. For this purpose, we conducted a thorough search of original manuscripts, books, and contemporary reviews published in PubMed. The first views and concepts about the heart's function appear in Greek philosophic manuscripts of 2500 years ago. According to Aristotle, the heart is responsible for heat production, which is essential for life. The understanding of cardiac metabolism awaited new discoveries. The discovery of oxygen during the 18th century, along with the idea of energy conservation, or what is now known as one of the first versions of the first law of thermodynamics, played an important role in initiating the study of energy metabolism in general and heart metabolism later. The discovery of glycolysis, of the Krebs cycle, and of adenosine triphosphate offered a better understanding of cellular respiration, necessary for later research. Indeed, many researchers dedicated their studies to energy metabolism, but Richard John Bing, the renowned German research cardiologist, is the one who guided the exploration of cardiac metabolism, and he is therefore considered to be the father of cardiac energy metabolism. Since then, encouraging new research has been taking place, offering important clinical applications for heart patients. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adipose tissue remodeling: its role in energy metabolism and metabolic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Sik eChoe; Jin Young eHuh; In Jae eHwang; Jong In eKim; Jae Bum eKim

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue (WAT) functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue (BAT) accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secret various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic a...

  3. Modeling of the metabolic energy dissipation for restricted tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana; Milivojevic, Milan

    2017-10-01

    Energy dissipation mostly represents unwanted outcome but in the biochemical processes it may alter the biochemical pathways. However, it is rarely considered in the literature although energy dissipation and its alteration due to the changes in cell microenvironment may improve methods for guiding chemical and biochemical processes in the desired directions. Deeper insight into the changes of metabolic activity of tumor cells exposed to osmotic stress or irradiation may offer the possibility of tumor growth reduction. In this work effects of the osmotic stress and irradiation on the thermodynamical affinity of tumor cells and their damping effects on metabolic energy dissipation were investigated and modeled. Although many various models were applied to consider the tumor restrictive growth they have not considered the metabolic energy dissipation. In this work a pseudo rheological model in the form of "the metabolic spring-pot element" is formulated to describe theoretically the metabolic susceptibility of tumor spheroid. This analog model relates the thermodynamical affinity of cell growth with the volume expansion of tumor spheroid under isotropic loading conditions. Spheroid relaxation induces anomalous nature of the metabolic energy dissipation which causes the damping effects on cell growth. The proposed model can be used for determining the metabolic energy "structure" in the context of restrictive cell growth as well as for predicting optimal doses for cancer curing in order to tailor the clinical treatment for each person and each type of cancer.

  4. Human microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics: well-known and promising members of the SDR superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarydová, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2012-05-01

    The best known, most widely studied enzyme system in phase I biotransformation is cytochrome P450 (CYP), which participates in the metabolism of roughly 9 of 10 drugs in use today. The main biotransformation isoforms of CYP are associated with the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Other enzymes that are also active in phase I biotransformation are carbonyl reducing enzymes. Much is known about the role of cytosolic forms of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics, but their microsomal forms have been mostly poorly studied. The only well-known microsomal carbonyl reducing enzyme taking part in the biotransformation of xenobiotics is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Physiological roles of microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes are better known than their participation in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This review is a summary of the fragmentary information known about the roles of the microsomal forms. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, it has been reported, so far, that retinol dehydrogenase 12 participates only in the detoxification of unsaturated aldehydes formed upon oxidative stress. Another promising group of microsomal biotransformation carbonyl reducing enzymes are some members of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Generally, it is clear that this area is, overall, quite unexplored, but carbonyl reducing enzymes located in the ER have proven very interesting. The study of these enzymes could shed new light on the metabolism of several clinically used drugs or they could become an important target in connection with some diseases.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin modulates xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Nath, Niharika; Street, Cherease R; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Boring, Daniel; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-15

    The balance between phase-I carcinogen-activating and phase-II detoxifying xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes is critical to determining an individual's risk for cancer. We evaluated the effect of Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin (HS-ASA) on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in HT-29 human colon and Hepa 1c1c7 mouse liver adenocarcinoma cells and in Wistar rats. HS-ASA inhibited the growth of HT-29 and Hepa 1c1c7 cells, with an IC(50) of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM and 4.2 ± 0.4 μM, respectively. The IC(50) for ASA in both cell lines was greater than 5000 μM at 24h. In these cell lines, HS-ASA caused a dose-dependent increase in activity and expression of the phase-II enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinoneoxireductase (NQO1). It also caused an increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression. The levels of CYP 1A1 a phase-I enzyme was increased by HS-ASA in both cell lines. Pretreatment of cells with NaF, an esterase inhibitor, abrogated the HS-ASA-mediated increases in NQO1 enzyme activity. HS-ASA increased the protein levels of the transcription factor Nrf2, which is a regulator of the phase-II enzymes. In vivo, HS-ASA at 100mg/kg/day had no effect on rat's weights; it induced a 3.4-fold and 1.4-fold increase in hepatic GST and NQO1 enzyme activities, respectively. GST and NQO1 protein levels were also increased. In contrast to that in cultured cells, CYP 1A1 protein levels were not altered in vivo. Therefore, HS-ASA induces phase-II enzymes, at least in part, through the action of H(2)S and by modulating Nrf2; these effects may be part of its mechanism of action against carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary betaine supplementation affects energy metabolism of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, J.W.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Simmins, P.H.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dietary betaine supplementation on energy partitioning in growing pigs under energy-restricted dietary conditions was assessed. The effect of betaine on the adaptation in energy. metabolism of pigs over time after a change in diet and housing also was studied. Six groups of 14

  7. Basal Metabolic Rate and Energy Expenditure of Rural Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of basal metabolic rate (BMR) provides an important baseline for the determination of an individual's total energy requirement. The study sought to establish human energy expenditure of rural farmers in Magubike village in Tanzania, through determination of BMR, physical activity level (PAL) and total energy ...

  8. Genetic variants of methyl metabolizing enzymes and epigenetic regulators: Associations with promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Wouters, K.A.D.; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.; Engeland, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation affects carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. Folate metabolizing enzymes may influence the bioavailability of methyl groups, whereas DNA and histone methyltransferases are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We studied associations of genetic variants of

  9. Effects of birth on energy metabolism in the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, J; Delaval, E; Freund, N; Razanoelina, M; Djouadi, F; Bismuth, J; Geloso, J P

    1988-06-01

    The oxygen-consumption rates and the activities of fumarase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase were compared in mitochondria isolated from fetal- and neonatal-rat kidney. Whole-organ ATP, phosphocreatine and creatine contents were determined in parallel. Kidney mitochondrial respiratory rates in the presence of succinate, glutamate/malate and palmitoyl-L-carnitine increased between 21 days post coitum and 1 day post partum, together with activities of oxidative enzymes. However, this postnatal maturation of oxidative metabolism was not yet initiated in mitochondria isolated from kidney 1 h post partum. An increase in ATP and phosphocreatine was observed immediately after delivery; newborn-rat kidney ATP content then remained high, whereas phosphocreatine reserves decreased considerably between 6 h and 1 day post partum. It is concluded that the increase in high-energy phosphate compounds observed at birth is not initially related to an activation of oxidative phosphorylation, and probably involves a transient stimulation of anaerobic glycolysis, while a progressive mitochondrial maturation takes place in the rat kidney during the first day of newborn life.

  10. Disturbances to neurotransmitter levels and their metabolic enzyme activity in a freshwater planarian exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Li, Mei-Hui; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Chung, Szu-Yao; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Using specific neurobehaviors as endpoints, previous studies suggested that planarian neurotransmission systems could be targets of Cd neurotoxicity. However, direct evidence for disturbed neurotransmission systems by Cd in treated planarians is still lacking. In planarians, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play critical roles in neuromuscular function, but little is known about their metabolic degradation. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to determine the appearances of DA, 5-HT, and their metabolic products in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica, characterize the activity of enzymes involved in their metabolism, and investigate the effects of Cd on planarian 5-HTergic and DAergic neurotransmission systems. Only DA, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were found in planarian tissues. Further enzymatic study revealed the activity of planarian monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). These findings suggest that planarian MAO catalyzes the metabolism of 5-HT into 5-HIAA. However, DA metabolites from the MAO-involved metabolic pathway were not found, which might be due to a lack of COMT activity. Finally, in Cd-treated planarians, tissue levels of 5-HT and DA were decreased and MAO activity altered, suggesting that planarian neurotransmission systems are disturbed following Cd treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish-Damavandi, Mahnaz; Ho, Han Kiat; Kang, Tse Siang

    2016-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA), derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS) to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  12. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Darvish-Damavandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acidemia (PA is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC. This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA, derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  13. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight conditions on the activities of certain enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rat liver are investigated in an attempt to account for the losses in body weight observed during space flight despite preflight caloric consumption. Liver samples were analyzed for the activities of 32 cytosolic and microsomal enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen and individual fatty acid levels for ground control rats and rats flown on board the Cosmos 936 biosatellite under normal space flight conditions and in centrifuges which were sacrificed upon recovery or 25 days after recovery. Significant decreases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in palmitoyl CoA desaturase are found in the flight stationary relative to the flight contrifuged rats upon recovery, with all enzymes showing alterations returning to normal values 25 days postflight. The flight stationary group is also observed to be characterized by more than twice the amount of liver glycogen of the flight centrifuged group as well as a significant increase in the ratio of palmitic to palmitoleic acid. Results thus indicate metabolic changes which may be involved in the mechanism of weight loss during weightlessness, and demonstrate the equivalence of centrifugation during space flight to terrestrial gravity.

  14. Different effects of vanadium ions on some DNA-metabolizing enzymes. [Calves, Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbioni, E.; Clerici, L.; Brazzelli, A.

    The effects of vanadium on some enzymes involved in DNA metabolism were investigated in vitro. Vanadate (V) ions competitively inhibit calf thymus terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase with K/sub i/ = 2.5 ..mu..M. A binding of vanadium to the enzyme with no change of the amount of the Zn constituent of the protein was found at concentrations of vanadate causing inhibition. The catalytic activity of mammalian DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. was also inhibited by vanadate ions at an I/sub 50/ of 60 ..mu..M, while the bacterial (E. coli) DNA polymerase 1 was affected to the same extent only when the concentration of vanadate was raised to about 0.5 mM. In contrast to the inhibitory effects caused by vanadium on the nucleotidyl transferases, concentrations of pentavalent vanadium ions of the order of 10 ..mu..M increase 2.4-fold the hydrolytic activity of deoxyribonuclease I from bovine pancreas. These findings suggest that vanadium can interact with enzymes involved in nucleic acid metabolism.

  15. Visceral metabolism and efficiency of energy use by ruminants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilberto Vilmar Kozloski; João Batista Teixeira da Rocha; Maria de Lourdes Santorio Ciocca

    2001-01-01

    ... absorbed at the intestinal lumen. Probably, the major source of variation in the efficiency of utilization of metabolizable energy among feeds is associated mainly with visceral metabolism and it is unlikely that the ratio ketogenic...

  16. Brain energy metabolism: development and application of novel live methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates methods of studying brain energy metabolism with a specific focus on the substrates oxygen and glucose. It details the in vitro development and in vivo characterisation of microelectrochemical sensors for the detection of brain tissue oxygen, and the in vivo characterisation of oxygen and glucose electrodes in the hippocampus utilising the technique of long-term in vivo electrochemistry (LIVE). Chapter 1 introduces the brain, energy metabolism and neurochemical ana...

  17. Selective photoregulation of the activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, two key enzymes in glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Velasco, Dolores; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C

    2015-07-14

    Glycogen is a polymer of α-1,4- and α-1,6-linked glucose units that provides a readily available source of energy in living organisms. Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are the two enzymes that control, respectively, the synthesis and degradation of this polysaccharide and constitute adequate pharmacological targets to modulate cellular glycogen levels, by means of inhibition of their catalytic activity. Here we report on the synthesis and biological evaluation of a selective inhibitor that consists of an azobenzene moiety glycosidically linked to the anomeric carbon of a glucose molecule. In the ground state, the more stable (E)-isomer of the azobenzene glucoside had a slight inhibitory effect on rat muscle GP (RMGP, IC50 = 4.9 mM) and Escherichia coli GS (EcGS, IC50 = 1.6 mM). After irradiation and subsequent conversion to the (Z)-form, the inhibitory potency of the azobenzene glucoside did not significantly change for RMGP (IC50 = 2.4 mM), while its effect on EcGS increased 50-fold (IC50 = 32 μM). Sucrose synthase 4 from potatoes, a glycosyltransferase that does not operate on glycogen, was only slightly inhibited by the (E)-isomer (IC50 = 0.73 mM). These findings could be rationalized on the basis of kinetic and computer-aided docking analysis, which indicated that both isomers of the azobenzene glucoside mimic the EcGS acceptor substrate and exert their inhibitory effect by binding to the glycogen subsite in the active center of the enzyme. The ability to selectively photoregulate the catalytic activity of key enzymes of glycogen metabolism may represent a new approach for the treatment of glycogen metabolism disorders.

  18. Recuperative effect of Semecarpus anacardium linn. nut milk extract on carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes in experimental mammary carcinoma-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, Venugopal; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2002-03-01

    Semecarpus anacardium Linn. of the family Anacardiaceae has many applications in the Ayurvedic and Siddha systems of medicine. We have tested the antitumour activity of Semecarpus anacardium nut extract against experimental mammary carcinoma in animals. As there is a direct relationship between the proliferation of tumour cells and the activities of the glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes, we studied changes in the activities of enzymes involved in this metabolic pathway in the liver and kidney. The enzymes investigated were glycolytic enzymes, namely hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, aldolase and the gluconeogenic enzymes, namely glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase in experimental rats. A significant rise in glycolytic enzyme activities and a simultaneous fall in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were found in mammary carcinoma bearing rats. Drug administration returned these enzyme activities to their respective control activities. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The role of intestinal microbiota in energy metabolism and metabolic discorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Cani, Patrice D.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are a worldwide epidemic. In humans, obesity causes changes in gut microbial composition. Analysis of the consequences of these changes for host energy metabolism, particularly in the context of obesity, requires good experimental models. The use of gnotobiotic animal models has indicated new mediators and molecular targets that suggest a metabolic dialogue between the gut bacteria and the host. The discovery of the impact of a hig...

  20. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng (Pitt)

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  1. Testing biochemistry revisited: how in vivo metabolism can be understood from in vitro enzyme kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen van Eunen

    Full Text Available A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was later applied to different experimental steady-state conditions, it often exhibited unrestrained metabolite accumulation.Here we resolve this issue by showing that the results of such ab initio modeling are improved substantially by (i including appropriate allosteric regulation and (ii measuring the enzyme kinetic parameters under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. The following modifications proved crucial: (i implementation of allosteric regulation of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, (ii implementation of V(max values measured under conditions that resembled the yeast cytosol, and (iii redetermination of the kinetic parameters of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under physiological conditions.Model predictions and experiments were compared under five different conditions of yeast growth and starvation. When either the original model was used (which lacked important allosteric regulation, or the enzyme parameters were measured under conditions that were, as usual, optimal for high enzyme activity, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and some other glycolytic intermediates tended to accumulate to unrealistically high concentrations. Combining all adjustments yielded an accurate correspondence between model and experiments for all five steady-state and dynamic conditions. This enhances our understanding of in vivo metabolism in terms of in vitro biochemistry.

  2. Testing Biochemistry Revisited: How In Vivo Metabolism Can Be Understood from In Vitro Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eunen, Karen; Kiewiet, José A. L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was later applied to different experimental steady-state conditions, it often exhibited unrestrained metabolite accumulation. Here we resolve this issue by showing that the results of such ab initio modeling are improved substantially by (i) including appropriate allosteric regulation and (ii) measuring the enzyme kinetic parameters under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. The following modifications proved crucial: (i) implementation of allosteric regulation of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, (ii) implementation of Vmax values measured under conditions that resembled the yeast cytosol, and (iii) redetermination of the kinetic parameters of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under physiological conditions. Model predictions and experiments were compared under five different conditions of yeast growth and starvation. When either the original model was used (which lacked important allosteric regulation), or the enzyme parameters were measured under conditions that were, as usual, optimal for high enzyme activity, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and some other glycolytic intermediates tended to accumulate to unrealistically high concentrations. Combining all adjustments yielded an accurate correspondence between model and experiments for all five steady-state and dynamic conditions. This enhances our understanding of in vivo metabolism in terms of in vitro biochemistry. PMID:22570597

  3. Effect of masheri, a pyrolysed tobacco product on carcinogen metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammigan, N; Nair, U J; Bhide, S V

    1989-08-01

    Studies on the modulation of the carcinogen metabolizing enzymes on treatment with masheri extract (ME) and benzo (a) pyrene (B (a)P), were carried out in male Sprague Dawley rats (12 weeks old) fed a nutritionally adequate standard diet. Injection (ip) of ME and B (a) P at 3/4 LD50 dose given in 3 doses at 24 hr interval increased the phase I activating enzymes, viz. cytochrome P-450, benzo (a) pyrene hydroxylase and benzphetamine demethylase while both ME and B (a) P significantly depleted glutathione content and decreased glutathione-S transferase activity. Furthermore, the same treatment of ME and B (a) P significantly depleted the hepatic vitamin A pool while a concommittant increase in vitamin C content was observed.

  4. In vitro activity of Lycium barbarum (Goji) against major human phase I metabolism enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Tam, Teresa W; Mao, Jingqin; Salem, Ammar; Arnason, John T; Krantis, Anthony; Foster, Brian C

    2016-09-01

    Goji berry (Lycium barbarum) has been used as traditional Chinese medicine and a functional food in China. Goji tea may interact with drugs such as warfarin by inhibiting the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9, and this study was undertaken to characterize the effect of Goji products on CYP2C9/19-, CYP2D6 *1/*10-, CYP3A4/5/7-, CYP19-, and flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3-mediated metabolism. Goji juice, water, and ethanol extracts were examined for their effect on CYP2C9/19-, 2D6-, 3A4/5/7-, 4A11-, CYP19-, and FMO3-mediated metabolism by using in vitro bioassay. The mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of Goji juice on CYP3A4 was also examined. Data indicates that both fresh juice and commercially available juice caused strong inhibition (over 75 %) of most of the major CYP450 enzymes and moderate inhibition of FMO3 (30-60 %). Compared to juice, the Goji cold/hot water extracts effected low inhibition (below 30 %) of these enzymes. Ethanol (80 %) extracts exhibit the strongest inhibition on CYP2C9 and 2C19 (over 90 %). The inhibition pattern of dried and fresh berry extract and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV fingerprints were similar. These findings suggest that Goji products (berries, tea, tincture, and juice) can inhibit phase I drug metabolism enzymes and have the potential to affect the safety and efficacy of therapeutic products.

  5. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław eKaczor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocytes depends on key enzymes involved in cellular metabolism remains largely unknown. To address this issue, we have considered two simple models of neuronal cultures: nominally astrocyte-free neuronal culture (NC and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures (ANCC and miniature Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents (mIPSCs were recorded in control conditions and in the presence of respective enzyme blockers. We report that enrichment of neuronal culture with astrocytes results in a marked increase in mIPSC frequency. This enhancement of GABAergic activity was accompanied by increased number of GAD65 and vGAT puncta, indicating that at least a part of the frequency enhancement was due to increased number of synaptic contacts. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (with MSO strongly reduced mIPSC frequency in ANCC but had no effect in NC. Moreover, treatment of ANCC with inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (BAYU6751 or with selective inhibitor of astrocytic Krebs cycle,fluoroacetate, resulted in a marked reduction of mIPSC frequency in ANCC having no effect in NC. We conclude that GABAergic synaptic transmission strongly depends on neuron-astrocyte interaction in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes as well as on the Krebs cycle.

  6. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy...

  7. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Renaud

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age. The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched, Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched, and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched. Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty

  8. Gene expression of regulatory enzymes involved in the intermediate metabolism of sheep subjected to feed restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, S; Brito, R; Almeida, A M; Scanlon, T; Kilminster, T; Milton, J; Greeff, J; Oldham, C; Cardoso, L A

    2013-03-01

    The effect of feed restriction on gene expression of regulatory enzymes of intermediary metabolism was studied in two sheep breeds (Australian Merino and Dorper) subjected to two nutritional treatments: feed restriction (85% of daily maintenance requirements) and control (ad libitum feeding), during 42 days. The experimental animals (ram lambs) were divided into four groups, n = 5 (Australian Merino control (MC), Australian Merino Restriction (MR), Dorper control (DC) and Dorper Restriction (DR)). After the trial, animals were sacrificed and samples were taken from liver tissue to quantify glucose levels and gene expression of relevant intermediary metabolism enzymes (phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glycogen synthase (GS), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS)) through real-time PCR. During the experimental period, the MR animals lost 12.6% in BW compared with 5.3% lost by the Dorper lambs. MC and DC rams gained, respectively, 8.8% and 14% during the same period. Within the Dorper breed, restricted feed animals revealed a significant decrease over controls in the transcription of PFK (1.95-fold) and PK (2.26-fold), both glycolytic enzymes. The gluconeogenesis showed no change in the feed restricted animals of both breeds. DR feed group presented a significant decrease over the homologous Merino sheep group on GS. In both experimental breeds, FAS mRNA expression was decreased in restricted feed groups. GDH expression was decreased only in the DR animals (1.84-fold) indicating a reduced catabolism of amino acids in these animals. Finally, CPS was significantly (P enzymes and hepatic glucose production of Dorper sheep to feed restriction concurring with the BW results in the experimental groups.

  9. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    We have examined, in the livers of rats carried aboard the Cosmos 936 biosatellite, the activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition to the enzyme studies, the levels of glycogen and of the individual fatty acids in hepatic lipids were determined. Livers from flight and ground control rats at recovery (R0) and 25 days after recovery (R25) were used for these analyses. For all parameters measured, the most meaningful comparisons are those made between flight stationary (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) animals at R0. When these two groups of flight rats were compared at R0, statistically significant decreases in the activity levels of glycogen phosphorylase, α-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in the palmitoyl CoA desaturase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened by the fact that all enzyme activities showing alterations at R0 returned to normal 25 days postflight. When liver glycogen and total fatty acids of the two sets of flight animals were determined, significant differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed. The weightless group (FS) at R0 contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did the centrifuged controls (FC) and a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate was noted. These metabolic alterations, both in enzyme levels and in hepatic constituents, appear to be characteristic of the weightless condition. Our data seem to justify the conclusion that centrifugation during flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  10. The evolution of enzyme specificity in the metabolic replicator model of prebiotic evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Könnyu

    Full Text Available The chemical machinery of life must have been catalytic from the outset. Models of the chemical origins have attempted to explain the ecological mechanisms maintaining a minimum necessary diversity of prebiotic replicator enzymes, but little attention has been paid so far to the evolutionary initiation of that diversity. We propose a possible first step in this direction: based on our previous model of a surface-bound metabolic replicator system we try to explain how the adaptive specialization of enzymatic replicator populations might have led to more diverse and more efficient communities of cooperating replicators with two different enzyme activities. The key assumptions of the model are that mutations in the replicator population can lead towards a both of the two different enzyme specificities in separate replicators: efficient "specialists" or b a "generalist" replicator type with both enzyme specificities working at less efficiency, or c a fast-replicating, non-enzymatic "parasite". We show that under realistic trade-off constraints on the phenotypic effects of these mutations the evolved replicator community will be usually composed of both types of specialists and of a limited abundance of parasites, provided that the replicators can slowly migrate on the mineral surface. It is only at very weak trade-offs that generalists take over in a phase-transition-like manner. The parasites do not seriously harm the system but can freely mutate, therefore they can be considered as pre-adaptations to later, useful functions that the metabolic system can adopt to increase its own fitness.

  11. Promotion of mitochondrial energy metabolism during hepatocyte apoptosis in a rat model of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Yan; Yang, Baoshan; Zhou, Li; Ren, Feng; Duan, Zhong-Ping; Ma, Ying-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocyte apoptosis and energy metabolism in mitochondria have an important role in the mechanism of acute liver failure (ALF). However, data on the association between apoptosis and the energy metabolism of hepatocytes are lacking. The current study assessed the activity of several key enzymes in mitochondria during ALF, including citrate synthase (CS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase‑1 (CPT‑1) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX), which are involved in hepatocyte energy metabolism. A total of 40 male Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided into five groups and administered D‑galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide to induce ALF. Hepatic pathology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling examinations indicated that hepatocyte apoptosis was observed at 4 h and increased 8 h after ALF. Hepatocyte necrosis appeared at 12 h and was significantly higher at 24 h with inflammatory cell invasion. The results measured by electron microscopy indicated that ultrastructural changes in mitochondria began at 4 h and the mitochondrial outer membrane was completely disrupted at 24 h resulting in mitochondrial collapse. The expression of CS, CPT‑1 and COX was measured and analyzed using assay kits. The activity and protein expression of CS, CPT‑1 and COX began to increase at 4 h, reached a peak at 8 h and decreased at 12 h during ALF. The activities of CS, CPT‑1 and COX were enhanced during hepatocyte apoptosis suggesting that these enzymes are involved in the initiation and development of ALF. Therefore, these results demonstrated that energy metabolism is important in hepatocyte apoptosis during ALF and hepatocyte apoptosis is an active and energy‑consuming procedure. The current study on how hepatocyte energy metabolism affects the transmission of death signals may provide a basis for the early diagnosis and development of an improved therapeutic strategy for ALF.

  12. The transferome of metabolic genes explored: analysis of the horizontal transfer of enzyme encoding genes in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, John W; McConkey, Glenn A; Westhead, David R

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic networks are responsible for many essential cellular processes, and exhibit a high level of evolutionary conservation from bacteria to eukaryotes. If genes encoding metabolic enzymes are horizontally transferred and are advantageous, they are likely to become fixed. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a key role in prokaryotic evolution and its importance in eukaryotes is increasingly evident. High levels of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) accompanied the establishment of plastids and mitochondria, and more recent events have allowed further acquisition of bacterial genes. Here, we present the first comprehensive multi-species analysis of E/HGT of genes encoding metabolic enzymes from bacteria to unicellular eukaryotes. The phylogenetic trees of 2,257 metabolic enzymes were used to make E/HGT assertions in ten groups of unicellular eukaryotes, revealing the sources and metabolic processes of the transferred genes. Analyses revealed a preference for enzymes encoded by genes gained through horizontal and endosymbiotic transfers to be connected in the metabolic network. Enrichment in particular functional classes was particularly revealing: alongside plastid related processes and carbohydrate metabolism, this highlighted a number of pathways in eukaryotic parasites that are rich in enzymes encoded by transferred genes, and potentially key to pathogenicity. The plant parasites Phytophthora were discovered to have a potential pathway for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis of E/HGT origin not seen before in eukaryotes outside the Plantae. The number of enzymes encoded by genes gained through E/HGT has been established, providing insight into functional gain during the evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. In eukaryotic parasites, genes encoding enzymes that have been gained through horizontal transfer may be attractive drug targets if they are part of processes not present in the host, or are significantly diverged from equivalent host enzymes.

  13. Difference in the distribution pattern of substrate enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli, according to chaperonin requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Niwa, Tatsuya; Taguchi, Hideki

    2011-06-24

    Chaperonins are important in living systems because they play a role in the folding of proteins. Earlier comprehensive analyses identified substrate proteins for which folding requires the chaperonin GroEL/GroES (GroE) in Escherichia coli, and they revealed that many chaperonin substrates are metabolic enzymes. This result implies the importance of chaperonins in metabolism. However, the relationship between chaperonins and metabolism is still unclear. We investigated the distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network using network analysis techniques as a first step towards revealing this relationship, and found that as chaperonin requirement increases, substrate enzymes are more laterally distributed in the metabolic. In addition, comparative genome analysis showed that the chaperonin-dependent substrates were less conserved, suggesting that these substrates were acquired later on in evolutionary history. This result implies the expansion of metabolic networks due to this chaperonin, and it supports the existing hypothesis of acceleration of evolution by chaperonins. The distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network is inexplicable because it does not seem to be associated with individual protein features such as protein abundance, which has been observed characteristically in chaperonin substrates in previous works. However, it becomes clear by considering this expansion process due to chaperonin. This finding provides new insights into metabolic evolution and the roles of chaperonins in living systems.

  14. Difference in the distribution pattern of substrate enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli, according to chaperonin requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niwa Tatsuya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperonins are important in living systems because they play a role in the folding of proteins. Earlier comprehensive analyses identified substrate proteins for which folding requires the chaperonin GroEL/GroES (GroE in Escherichia coli, and they revealed that many chaperonin substrates are metabolic enzymes. This result implies the importance of chaperonins in metabolism. However, the relationship between chaperonins and metabolism is still unclear. Results We investigated the distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network using network analysis techniques as a first step towards revealing this relationship, and found that as chaperonin requirement increases, substrate enzymes are more laterally distributed in the metabolic. In addition, comparative genome analysis showed that the chaperonin-dependent substrates were less conserved, suggesting that these substrates were acquired later on in evolutionary history. Conclusions This result implies the expansion of metabolic networks due to this chaperonin, and it supports the existing hypothesis of acceleration of evolution by chaperonins. The distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network is inexplicable because it does not seem to be associated with individual protein features such as protein abundance, which has been observed characteristically in chaperonin substrates in previous works. However, it becomes clear by considering this expansion process due to chaperonin. This finding provides new insights into metabolic evolution and the roles of chaperonins in living systems.

  15. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress.

  16. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P.; Lubyaga, Yulia A.; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V.; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S.; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress. PMID:27896024

  17. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya P. Vereshchagina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate. Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress.

  18. Enzyme activities and gene expression of starch metabolism provide insights into grape berry development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Chaobo; Wu, Weimin; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chuan; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-01-01

    Grapes are categorized as a non-climacteric type of fruit which its ripening is not associated to important rises in respiration and ethylene synthesis. The starch metabolism shares a certain role in the carbohydrate metabolic pathways during grape berry development, and is regarded as an important transient pool in the pathway of sugar accumulation. However, the comprehensive role of starch and its contribution to the quality and flavor of grape berry have not been explored thoroughly. In this study, the expression levels of genes enzyme activities and carbohydrate concentrations related to starch metabolism, were analyzed to understand the molecular mechanism of starch accumulation during grape berry development. The results indicated that starch granules in grape berry were located at the chloroplast in the sub-epidermal tissues, acting as the temporary reserves of photosynthetic products to meet the needs for berry development, and relatively high starch contents could be detected at véraison stage. Moreover, both ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) and sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.3.1.14) involved in starch synthesis displayed elevated gene expression and enzymes activities in the sub-epidermal tissue, while α- and β-amylases involved in its degradation were highly transcribed and active in the central flesh, explaining the absence of starch in this last tissue. Change in the gene expression and activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, β-amylase and sucrose phosphate synthase revealed that they were regulated by the circadian rhythms in the fruitlets compared with those in the leaves. Both the morphological, enzymological and transcriptional data in this study provide advanced understandings on the function of starch during berry development and ripening that are so important for berry quality. This study will further facilitate our understanding of the sugar metabolism in grape berry as well as in other plant species.

  19. [Important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of active ingredients of Chinese materia medica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaolin; Du, Qiu; Di, Liuqing

    2010-02-01

    Oral drug bioavailability depends on gastrointestinal absorption, intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes are the important factors in drug gastrointestinal absorption and they can also be induced or inhibited by the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica. This article presents important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica, and points out the importance of research on transport and metabolism of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica in Chinese extract and Chinese medicinal formulae.

  20. Performance and Energy Metabolism by Broiler Chickens Fed Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing maize grain with different dietary levels of maize and millet offals on performance and energy metabolism in broiler chickens. Proximate composition and metabolizable energy (ME) values were determined. Feeding trial was also conducted to comparemaize and ...

  1. Effect of quantitative feed restriction on energy metabolism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    huis

    During the restriction period, restricted animals lost weight and showed negative energy (EB) and nitrogen ... Keywords: Energy metabolism, feed quality, metabolizability, nitrogen retention, sheep, restriction .... continuous measurements (every 3 min) of CO2, CH4 and O2 exchange (Brouwer, 1965) in 24 h cycles. By.

  2. Basal Metabolic Rate and Energy Expenditure of Rural Farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BRIAN

    2013-09-04

    Sep 4, 2013 ... Measurement of basal metabolic rate (BMR) provides an important baseline for the determination of an individual's total energy requirement. The study sought to establish human energy expenditure of rural farmers in Magubike village in Tanzania, through determination of BMR, physical activity level (PAL) ...

  3. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates...

  4. Metabolic regulation is sufficient for global and robust coordination of glucose uptake, catabolism, energy production and growth in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Millard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of microorganisms is regulated through two main mechanisms: changes of enzyme capacities as a consequence of gene expression modulation ("hierarchical control" and changes of enzyme activities through metabolite-enzyme interactions. An increasing body of evidence indicates that hierarchical control is insufficient to explain metabolic behaviors, but the system-wide impact of metabolic regulation remains largely uncharacterized. To clarify its role, we developed and validated a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central metabolism that links growth to environment. Metabolic control analyses confirm that the control is widely distributed across the network and highlight strong interconnections between all the pathways. Exploration of the model solution space reveals that several robust properties emerge from metabolic regulation, from the molecular level (e.g. homeostasis of total metabolite pool to the overall cellular physiology (e.g. coordination of carbon uptake, catabolism, energy and redox production, and growth, while allowing a large degree of flexibility at most individual metabolic steps. These properties have important physiological implications for E. coli and significantly expand the self-regulating capacities of its metabolism.

  5. Fermentation and the properties of some enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in the trematode Calicophoron ijimai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhrestyuk, N P; Burenina, E A; Yarygina, G V

    1984-09-01

    Glycogen content, glucose consumption and the production of metabolic end products by Calicophoron ijimai were determined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The major end products of fermentation were identified as lactic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric and alpha-methylbutyric acids, propionic acid predominating. The activities and properties of some of the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism were determined. The worms showed high phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, malate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) but relatively low pyruvate kinase and very low lactate dehydrogenase activities. The pH optima, coenzyme, cofactor and ionic requirements of the enzymes were similar to those of other helminths. Malate dehydrogenase had an 8-fold greater affinity for oxaloacetate than malate, and was about 14 times more active for oxaloacetate reduction than malate oxidation. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was 2.4 times more active and had a 2-fold greater affinity for phosphoenolpyruvate and dinucleotide than pyruvate kinase. The low activities of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase but high activities of malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase suggest that anaerobic carbohydrate catabolism follows the fumarate reductase pathway.

  6. Effects of Maillard browned egg albumin on drug-metabolizing enzyme systems in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintauro, S J; Lucchina, L A

    1987-05-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a purified diet containing 5% Maillard browned egg albumin (EA-B) or browned hydrolysed egg albumin (HEA-B) for 10 wk. Control animals were pair-fed a corresponding isocaloric, isonitrogenous non-browned egg albumin (EA-C) or hydrolysed egg albumin (HEA-C) diet. At the end of 10 wk, the rats were killed and hepatic, small intestinal and colonic microsomes and cytosol fractions were prepared by ultracentrifugation. Animals fed EA-B exhibited significantly (P less than 0.05) increased hepatic benzo[alpha]pyrene hydroxylase activity and significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased colonic aminopyrine N-demethylase activity compared to control (EA-C) animals. HEA-B-fed animals also exhibited a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in colonic aminopyrine N-demethylase activity compared with HEA-C controls, but no significant differences were detected in hepatic or small intestinal enzyme activities in this group. These data suggest that Maillard browned protein products may modify hepatic and/or colonic drug-metabolizing enzyme system activities, and may thus contribute to alterations in the metabolism of endogenous substrates and of exogenous drugs, precarcinogens and other xenobiotics.

  7. Role of aldo-keto reductase family 1 (AKR1) enzymes in human steroid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik; Penning, Trevor M

    2014-01-01

    Human aldo-keto reductases AKR1C1-AKR1C4 and AKR1D1 play essential roles in the metabolism of all steroid hormones, the biosynthesis of neurosteroids and bile acids, the metabolism of conjugated steroids, and synthetic therapeutic steroids. These enzymes catalyze NADPH dependent reductions at the C3, C5, C17 and C20 positions on the steroid nucleus and side-chain. AKR1C1-AKR1C4 act as 3-keto, 17-keto and 20-ketosteroid reductases to varying extents, while AKR1D1 acts as the sole Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid-5β-reductase (steroid 5β-reductase) in humans. AKR1 enzymes control the concentrations of active ligands for nuclear receptors and control their ligand occupancy and trans-activation, they also regulate the amount of neurosteroids that can modulate the activity of GABAA and NMDA receptors. As such they are involved in the pre-receptor regulation of nuclear and membrane bound receptors. Altered expression of individual AKR1C genes is related to development of prostate, breast, and endometrial cancer. Mutations in AKR1C1 and AKR1C4 are responsible for sexual development dysgenesis and mutations in AKR1D1 are causative in bile-acid deficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Energy conservation and maximal entropy production in enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Vitas, Marko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2017-08-01

    A procedure for maximization of the density of entropy production in a single stationary two-step enzyme reaction is developed. Under the constraints of mass conservation, fixed equilibrium constant of a reaction and fixed products of forward and backward enzyme rate constants the existence of maximum in the density of entropy production is demonstrated. In the state with maximal density of entropy production the optimal enzyme rate constants, the stationary concentrations of the substrate and the product, the stationary product yield as well as the stationary reaction flux are calculated. The test, whether these calculated values of the reaction parameters are consistent with their corresponding measured values, is performed for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase. It is found that calculated and measured rate constants agree within an order of magnitude, whereas the calculated reaction flux and the product yield differ from their corresponding measured values for less than 20 % and 5 %, respectively. This indicates that the enzyme Glucose Isomerase, considered in a non-equilibrium stationary state, as found in experiments using the continuous stirred tank reactors, possibly operates close to the state with the maximum in the density of entropy production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on energy metabolism of Lactobacillus plantarum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-long; Ju, Xing-rong; Jiang, Han-hu

    2006-02-01

    Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on energy metabolism were investigated with Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC8014 as the test microorganism in this work. An INT colorimetric method of oxidation-reduction was established to measure INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of L. plantarum ATCC8014 cells. The utilization of glucose and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of the cells after HPP treatment were determined using colorimetric methods. The experimental results showed that survival counts of ATCC8014 cells on MRS agar medium and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization decreased significantly, and little changes of utilization of glucose took place with increasing pressure ranging from 150 to 250 MPa for 15 min. Utilization of glucose also reduced evidently at high pressure ( > 300 MPa) for 15 min. Whereas survival cell counts on MRS agar medium were below the detection limit and INT metabolic activity of deoxidization of ATCC8014 was 0% after a 15-min pressure holding time at 400MPa, utilization of glucose of the cells retained 56.1% compared with that of untreated cells. In summary, it can be concluded that enzymes absorbing and transporting glucose in cellular membrane appear to have a high resistance to pressure, enzymes and biological regulating systems involved in glycolysis are more resistant to pressure than those in TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) system, TCA of ATCC8014 is more sensitive to pressure than glycolysis, and the decrease of INT metabolic activity of deoxidization is highly related to cell reduction during HHP, which provide some theoretical evidences for mechanisms of HHP sterilization. Inhibition of TCA metabolism is a very important cause of ATCC8014 inactivation by HHP. High hydrostatic pressure can be used as an effective tool to explore pathways of biological metabolism.

  10. De novo biosynthesis of secondary metabolism enzymes in homogeneous cultures of Penicillium urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootwassink, J W; Gaucher, G M

    1980-01-01

    The initiation of patulin biosynthesis in submerged batch cultures of Penicillium urticae NRRL 2159A was investigated at the enzyme level. In contrast to earlier studies, this study achieved a clear temporal separation of growing cells devoid of secondary metabolism-specific enzymes from nongrowing cells, which rapidly produce these enzymes. A spore inoculum, silicone-treated flasks, and two new media which supported a rapid, pellet-free, filamentous type of growth were used. In yeast extract-glucose-buffer medium, a marked drop in the specific growth rate (approximately equal to 0.26 h-1) coincided with the appearance of the first pathway-specific enzyme, 6-methylsalicylic acid synthetase, at about 19 h after inoculation. About 3 h later, when replicatory growth had ceased entirely, the sparsely branched mycelia (length, approximately equal to 550 microns) began the rapid synthesis of a later pathway enzyme, m-hydroxybenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase. A similar sequence of events occurred in a defined nitrate-glucose-buffer medium; 12 other strains or isolates of P. urticae, as well as some patulin-producing aspergilli, behaved in a similar manner. The age at which a culture produced m-hydroxybenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase was increased by increasing the nutrient nitrogen content of the medium or by decreasing the size of the spore inoculum. In each instance the appearance of enzyme was determined by the nutritional status of the culture and not by its age. A similar appearance of patulin pathway enzymes occurred when a growing culture was resuspended in a nitrogen-free 4% glucose solution with or without 0.1 M phosphate (pH 6.5). The appearance of both the synthetase and the dehydrogenase was arrested by the addition of cycloheximide (0.4 to 5 micrograms/ml) or actinomycin D (20 to 80 micrograms/ml). This requirement for de novo protein and ribonucleic acid syntheses was confirmed by the incorporation of labeled leucine into the dehydrogenase, and the possibility that

  11. Activity of metabolic enzymes and muscle-specific gene expression in parr and smolts Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. of different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churova, Maria V; Meshcheryakova, Olga V; Veselov, Aleksey E; Efremov, Denis A; Nemova, Nina N

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the energy metabolism level and the features of muscle growth regulation during the development of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) inhabiting the Indera River (Kola Peninsula, Russia). The activities of aerobic and anaerobic enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and lactate dehydrogenase) and carbohydrate metabolism enzymes (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and aldolase) were measured in muscle and liver tissue. Gene expression levels of myosin heavy chain (MyHC), myostatin (MSTN-1a), and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs-MyoD1a, MyoD1b, MyoD1c, Myf5, myogenin) were measured in the white muscles of salmon parr of ages 0+, 1+, 2+, and 3+ and smolts of ages 2+ and 3+. Multidirectional changes in the activity of enzymes involved in aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism with age were shown in the white muscles of the parr. The cytochrome c oxidase activity was higher in muscles of underyearlings (0+) and yearlings (1+) and decreased in 2+ and 3+ age groups. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, in contrast, increased with age. The patterns of changes in expression levels of MyoD1a, MyoD1b, myogenin, MyHC, and MSTN-1a at different ages of the parr were similar. Particularly, the expression of these genes peaked in the yearling parr (1+) and then decreased in elder groups. The differences were revealed in parameters studied between the parr and smolts. The level of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism enzyme activities was higher in the white muscles of smolts than in parr. The activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes was decreased in the smolts' livers. The expression levels of MyHC, MyoD1a, MyoD1b, and myogenin were lower in smolts at age 2+ compared to parr. These findings expand our knowledge of age-related and stage-related features of energy metabolism and muscle development regulation in young Atlantic salmon in their natural habitat. The results might be used for monitoring of the salmon

  12. Identification of enzymes responsible for nitrazepam metabolism and toxicity in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Keigo; Fukami, Tatsuki; Gotoh, Saki; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-09-15

    Nitrazepam (NZP) is a hypnotic agent that rarely causes liver injuries in humans and teratogenicity in rodents. In humans, NZP is primarily metabolized to 7-aminonitrazepam (ANZP) by reduction and subsequently to 7-acetylamino nitrazepam (AANZP) by acetylation. ANZP can be regenerated from AANZP by hydrolysis in rodents, but it is still unclear whether this reaction occurs in humans. In rodents, AANZP may be associated with teratogenicity, while in humans, it is known that drug-induced liver injuries may be caused by NZP reactive metabolite(s). In this study, we attempted to identify the enzymes responsible for NZP metabolism to obtain a basic understanding of this process and the associated metabolite toxicities. We found that the NZP reductase activity in human liver cytosol (HLC) was higher than that in human liver microsomes (HLM). We purified the responsible enzyme(s) from HLC and found that the NZP reductase was aldehyde oxidase 1 (AOX1). The role of AOX1 was confirmed by an observed increase in the NZP reductase activity upon addition of N1-methylnicotinamide, an electron donor of AOX1, as well as inhibition of this activity in HLC in the presence of AOX1 inhibitors. ANZP was acetylated to form AANZP by N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 2. An experiment using recombinant esterases in an inhibition study using HLM revealed that AANZP is hydrolyzed by arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC) in the human liver. N-Hydroxylamino NZP, which is suspected to be a reactive metabolite, was detected as a conjugate with N-acetyl-l-cysteine through NZP reduction and ANZP hydroxylation reactions. In the latter reaction, the conjugate was readily formed by recombinant CYP3A4 among the various P450 isoforms tested. In sum, we found that AOX1, NAT2, AADAC, and CYP3A4 are the determinants for the pharmacokinetics of NZP and that they confer interindividual variability in sensitivity to NZP side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reactive intermediates produced from the metabolism of the vanilloid ring of capsaicinoids by p450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Christopher A; Henion, Fred; Bugni, Tim S; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Stockmann, Chris; Pramanik, Kartick C; Srivastava, Sanjay K; Yost, Garold S

    2013-01-18

    This study characterized electrophilic and radical products derived from the metabolism of capsaicin by cytochrome P450 and peroxidase enzymes. Multiple glutathione and β-mercaptoethanol conjugates (a.k.a., adducts), derived from the trapping of quinone methide and quinone intermediates of capsaicin, its analogue nonivamide, and O-demethylated and aromatic hydroxylated metabolites thereof, were produced by human liver microsomes and individual recombinant human P450 enzymes. Conjugates derived from concomitant dehydrogenation of the alkyl terminus of capsaicin were also characterized. Modifications to the 4-OH substituent of the vanilloid ring of capsaicinoids largely prevented the formation of electrophilic intermediates, consistent with the proposed structures and mechanisms of formation for the various conjugates. 5,5'-Dicapsaicin, presumably arising from the bimolecular coupling of free radical intermediates was also characterized. Finally, the analysis of hepatic glutathione conjugates and urinary N-acetylcysteine conjugates from mice dosed with capsaicin confirmed the formation of glutathione conjugates of O-demethylated quinone methide and 5-OH-capsaicin in vivo. These data demonstrated that capsaicin and structurally similar analogues are converted to reactive intermediates by certain P450 enzymes, which may partially explain conflicting reports related to the cytotoxic, pro-carcinogenic, and chemoprotective effects of capsaicinoids in different cells and/or organ systems.

  14. Reactive Intermediates Produced from Metabolism of the Vanilloid Ring of Capsaicinoids by P450 Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Christopher A.; Henion, Fred; Bugni, Tim S.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Stockmann, Chris; Pramanik, Kartick C.; Srivastava, Sanjay K.; Yost, Garold S.

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized electrophilic and radical products derived from metabolism of capsaicin by cytochrome P450 and peroxidase enzymes. Multiple glutathione and β-mercaptoethanol conjugates (a.k.a., adducts), derived from trapping of quinone methide and quinone intermediates of capsaicin, its analogue nonivamide, and O-demethylated and aromatic hydroxylated metabolites thereof, were produced by human liver microsomes and individual recombinant human P450 enzymes. Conjugates derived from concomitant dehydrogenation of the alkyl terminus of capsaicin, were also characterized. Modifications to the 4-OH substituent of the vanilloid ring of capsaicinoids largely prevented the formation of electrophilic intermediates, consistent with the proposed structures and mechanisms of formation for the various conjugates. 5,5’-Dicapsaicin, presumably arising from bi-molecular coupling of free radical intermediates, was also characterized. Finally, the analysis of hepatic glutathione conjugates and urinary N-acetylcysteine conjugates from mice dosed with capsaicin confirmed the formation of glutathione conjugates of O-demethylated, quinone methide, and 5-OH-capsaicin in vivo. These data demonstrated that capsaicin and structurally similar analogues are converted to reactive intermediates by certain P450 enzymes, which may partially explain conflicting reports related to the cytotoxic, pro-carcinogenic, and chemoprotective effects of capsaicinoids in different cells and/or organ systems. PMID:23088752

  15. Correlation of homocysteine metabolic enzymes gene polymorphism and mild cognitive impairment in the Xinjiang Uygur population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mei; Ji, Huihui; Zhou, Xiaohui; Liang, Jie; Zou, Ting

    2015-01-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic polymorphisms in the homocysteine (HCY) metabolic enzymes in the Xinjiang Uygur population who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Based on the epidemiological investigation, 129 cases of diagnosed Uygur MCI patients and a matched control group with 131 cases were enrolled for analyzing the association between the polymorphisms in the HCY metabolism related genes (C677T, A1298C, and G1968A polymorphisms in MTHFR, as well as the A2756G polymorphism in MS) and MCI by using the SNaPshot method. We then determined the homocysteine level in patients. In Xinjiang Uygur subjects, the A1298C polymorphisms in MTHFR and the A2756G polymorphisms in the MS gene in the MCI group were different from those in the control group. However, the C677T and G1968A polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene in MCI patients were not different from those in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression showed that, in addition to the well-known risk factors, such as low education level, high cholesterol level, high level of low-density lipoprotein, and high homocysteine levels, the A>G mutation in the MS gene at the rs1805087 locus was another independent risk factor for MCI in the Uyghur MCI population. The risk of MCI in G allele carriers was 2.265 times higher than that in matched control individuals (95% CI: 1.205~4.256, P<0.05). The genetic polymorphism of HCY metabolizing enzymes is correlated to the occurrence of MCI in the Xinjiang Uygur population. The A2756G polymorphism in the MS gene could be an independent risk factor for MCI in the Xinjiang Uygur population.

  16. Discovery of a sesamin-metabolizing microorganism and a new enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Takuto; Fujiki, Etsuko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-08-09

    Sesamin is one of the major lignans found in sesame oil. Although some microbial metabolites of sesamin have been identified, sesamin-metabolic pathways remain uncharacterized at both the enzyme and gene levels. Here, we isolated microorganisms growing on sesamin as a sole-carbon source. One microorganism showing significant sesamin-degrading activity was identified as Sinomonas sp. no. 22. A sesamin-metabolizing enzyme named SesA was purified from this strain and characterized. SesA catalyzed methylene group transfer from sesamin or sesamin monocatechol to tetrahydrofolate (THF) with ring cleavage, yielding sesamin mono- or di-catechol and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. The kinetic parameters of SesA were determined to be as follows: Km for sesamin = 0.032 ± 0.005 mM, Vmax = 9.3 ± 0.4 (μmol⋅min(-1)⋅mg(-1)), and kcat = 7.9 ± 0.3 s(-1) Next, we investigated the substrate specificity. SesA also showed enzymatic activity toward (+)-episesamin, (-)-asarinin, sesaminol, (+)-sesamolin, and piperine. Growth studies with strain no. 22, and Western blot analysis revealed that SesA formation is inducible by sesamin. The deduced amino acid sequence of sesA exhibited weak overall sequence similarity to that of the protein family of glycine cleavage T-proteins (GcvTs), which catalyze glycine degradation in most bacteria, archaea, and all eukaryotes. Only SesA catalyzes C1 transfer to THF with ring cleavage reaction among GcvT family proteins. Moreover, SesA homolog genes are found in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings provide new insights into microbial sesamin metabolism and the function of GcvT family proteins.

  17. Effect of methyl jasmonate on energy metabolism in peach fruit during chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Yonghua

    2013-06-01

    Energy status is associated with ripening, senescence and physiological disorder of various types of fruit after harvest, including peaches. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) was effective in enhancing chilling tolerance in cold-stored peach fruit. The effect of MeJA on energy metabolism in peach fruit was investigated. MeJA treatment increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate, but decreased the content of adenosine monophosphate, which resulted in a higher level of energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities including H+-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca2+-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were also higher in MeJA-treated fruit than those in control fruit. Meanwhile, MeJA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde, super-oxidant radical and hydrogen peroxide. These results indicated that MeJA could enhance chilling tolerance of peach fruit by inducing enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and maintaining high levels of ATP and energy charge. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Maternal drug abuse and human term placental xenobiotic and steroid metabolizing enzymes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakki, P; Stockmann, H; Kantola, M; Wagner, P; Lauper, U; Huch, R; Elovaara, E; Kirkinen, P; Pasanen, M

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of maternal drug abuse at term on human placental cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated (Phase I) xenobiotic and steroid-metabolizing activities [aromatase, 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD), pyrene 1-hydroxylase (P1OH), and testosterone hydroxylase], and androstenedione-forming isomerase, NADPH quinone oxidoreductase (Phase II), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities in vitro. Overall, the formation of androstenedione, P1OH, and testosterone hydroxylase was statistically significant between control and drug-abusing subjects; we observed no significant differences in any other of the phase I and II activities. In placentas from drug-abusing mothers, we found significant correlations between ECOD and P1OH activities (p abuse drugs but did smoke cigarettes), the P1OH activity correlated with ECOD, EROD (p abusing mothers and the significant correlation between P1OH and ECOD activities, but not with aromatase or EROD activities) indicate that maternal drug abuse results in an additive effect in enhancing placental xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes when the mother also smokes cigarettes; this may be due to enhancing a "silent" CYP form, or a new placental CYP form may be activated. The change in the steroid metabolism profile in vitro suggests that maternal drug abuse may alter normal hormonal homeostasis during pregnancy. PMID:10656854

  19. [Energy metabolism and myocardial function in myocardiodystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirova, K V; Kurlygina, L A; Zavodskaia, I S; Novikova, N A

    1976-09-01

    A total of 92 patients with chronic tonsilitis and cardiovascular changes were subjected to clinical observations, ECG analysis, potassium and nitroglycerine tests, and studies of the lactic acid level and creatinekinase activity as indces of myocardial metabolism. The examinations were conducted prior to and following tonsillectomy. In a majority of patients a correlation was revealed between the degree of ECG changes and the serum lactic acid level, as well as between the ECG improvement and a reduction of the lactic acid level following tonsillectomy. Three stages of tonsillogenic myocardiodystrophy were distinguished. The obtained data indicate the rationale of the used tests for the evaluation of the myocardial meabolism alterations and of the efficacy of treatment of chronic tonsillitis patients.

  20. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  1. Micromanaging metabolism-a role for miRNAs in teleost energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennigen, Jan A

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein coding RNA sequences, which are found in most eukaryotes. Since their initial discovery, miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of many biological processes. One of the most important processes profoundly regulated by miRNAs is energy metabolism. Traditionally, metabolic functions of miRNAs have been studied in genome-sequenced mammalian organisms, especially the mouse model. However, partially driven by commercial interest in aquaculture, increasingly feasible large-scale molecular techniques have resulted in the characterization of miRNA repertoires, and importantly, several genome sequences of several (commercially important) teleost species, which also hold important roles as research models in the comparative physiology of energy metabolism. This review aims to introduce the recent advances in miRNA research in teleost fish and to describe the current knowledge of miRNA function in teleost energy metabolism. The most pressing research needs and questions to determine metabolic roles of miRNAs in teleost models are presented, as well as applicable technical approaches and current bottlenecks. Rainbow trout, which possess the advantages of newly available molecular tools and a long history as comparative research model in teleost energy metabolism, are discussed as a promising research model to address these questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesaconyl-Coenzyme A Hydratase, a New Enzyme of Two Central Carbon Metabolic Pathways in Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Jan; Schlichting, Ansgar; Strychalsky, Nina; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2008-01-01

    The coenzyme A (CoA)-activated C5-dicarboxylic acids mesaconyl-CoA and β-methylmalyl-CoA play roles in two as yet not completely resolved central carbon metabolic pathways in bacteria. First, these compounds are intermediates in the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation in Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a phototrophic green nonsulfur bacterium. Second, mesaconyl-CoA and β-methylmalyl-CoA are intermediates in the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway for acetate assimilation in various bacteria, e.g., in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Methylobacterium extorquens, and Streptomyces species. In both cases, mesaconyl-CoA hydratase was postulated to catalyze the interconversion of mesaconyl-CoA and β-methylmalyl-CoA. The putative genes coding for this enzyme in C. aurantiacus and R. sphaeroides were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were purified and studied. The recombinant homodimeric 80-kDa proteins catalyzed the reversible dehydration of erythro-β-methylmalyl-CoA to mesaconyl-CoA with rates of 1,300 μmol min−1 mg protein−1. Genes coding for similar enzymes with two (R)-enoyl-CoA hydratase domains are present in the genomes of Roseiflexus, Methylobacterium, Hyphomonas, Rhodospirillum, Xanthobacter, Caulobacter, Magnetospirillum, Jannaschia, Sagittula, Parvibaculum, Stappia, Oceanicola, Loktanella, Silicibacter, Roseobacter, Roseovarius, Dinoroseobacter, Sulfitobacter, Paracoccus, and Ralstonia species. A similar yet distinct class of enzymes containing only one hydratase domain was found in various other bacteria, such as Streptomyces species. The role of this widely distributed new enzyme is discussed. PMID:18065535

  3. Mesaconyl-coenzyme A hydratase, a new enzyme of two central carbon metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Jan; Schlichting, Ansgar; Strychalsky, Nina; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2008-02-01

    The coenzyme A (CoA)-activated C5-dicarboxylic acids mesaconyl-CoA and beta-methylmalyl-CoA play roles in two as yet not completely resolved central carbon metabolic pathways in bacteria. First, these compounds are intermediates in the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation in Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a phototrophic green nonsulfur bacterium. Second, mesaconyl-CoA and beta-methylmalyl-CoA are intermediates in the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway for acetate assimilation in various bacteria, e.g., in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Methylobacterium extorquens, and Streptomyces species. In both cases, mesaconyl-CoA hydratase was postulated to catalyze the interconversion of mesaconyl-CoA and beta-methylmalyl-CoA. The putative genes coding for this enzyme in C. aurantiacus and R. sphaeroides were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were purified and studied. The recombinant homodimeric 80-kDa proteins catalyzed the reversible dehydration of erythro-beta-methylmalyl-CoA to mesaconyl-CoA with rates of 1,300 micromol min(-1) mg protein(-1). Genes coding for similar enzymes with two (R)-enoyl-CoA hydratase domains are present in the genomes of Roseiflexus, Methylobacterium, Hyphomonas, Rhodospirillum, Xanthobacter, Caulobacter, Magnetospirillum, Jannaschia, Sagittula, Parvibaculum, Stappia, Oceanicola, Loktanella, Silicibacter, Roseobacter, Roseovarius, Dinoroseobacter, Sulfitobacter, Paracoccus, and Ralstonia species. A similar yet distinct class of enzymes containing only one hydratase domain was found in various other bacteria, such as Streptomyces species. The role of this widely distributed new enzyme is discussed.

  4. Genetic evaluation of AMPD1, CPT2, and PGYM metabolic enzymes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, P E; Venturini, L; Poplavskaya, E; Bertelli, M; Cecchin, S; Granato, M; Nikulina, S Y; Salmina, A; Aksyutina, N; Capelli, E; Ricevuti, G; Lorusso, L

    2016-07-29

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease that can seriously impair one's quality of life; patients complain of excessive fatigue and myalgia following physical exertion. This disease may be associated with abnormalities in genes affecting exercise tolerance and physical performance. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2), and the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) genes provide instructions for producing enzymes that play major roles in energy production during work. The aim of this study was to look for evidence of genotype-associated excessive muscle fatigue. Three metabolic genes (AMPD1, CPT2, and PYGM) were therefore fully sequenced in 17 Italian patients with CFS. We examined polymorphisms known to alter the function of these metabolic genes, and compared their genotypic distributions in CFS patients and 50 healthy controls using chi-square tests and odds ratios. One-way analysis of variance with F-ratio was carried out to determine the associations between genotypes and disease severity using CF scores. No major genetic variations between patients and controls were found in the three genes studied, and we did not find any association between these genes and CFS. In conclusion, variations in AMPD1, CPT2, and PGYM genes are not associated with the onset, susceptibility, or severity of CFS.

  5. Metabolic adaptation via regulated enzyme degradation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S Y; Ishola, O A; Ahmed, M A; Tabana, Y M; Dahham, S; Agha, M T; Musa, S F; Muhammed, R; Than, L T L; Sandai, D

    2017-03-01

    The virulence of Candida albicans is dependent upon fitness attributes as well as virulence factors. These attributes include robust stress responses and metabolic flexibility. The assimilation of carbon sources is important for growth and essential for the establishment of infections by C. albicans. Previous studies showed that the C. albicans ICL1 genes, which encode the glyoxylate cycle enzymes isocitratelyase are required for growth on non-fermentable carbon sources such as lactate and oleic acid and were repressed by 2% glucose. In contrast to S. cerevsiae, the enzyme CaIcl1 was not destabilised by glucose, resulting with its metabolite remaining at high levels. Further glucose addition has caused CaIcl1 to lose its signal and mechanisms that trigger destabilization in response to glucose. Another purpose of this study was to test the stability of the Icl1 enzyme in response to the dietary sugars, fructose, and galactose. In the present study, the ICL1 mRNAs expression was quantified using Quantitative Real Time PCR, whereby the stability of protein was measured and quantified using Western blot and phosphoimager, and the replacing and cloning of ICL1 ORF by gene recombination and ubiquitin binding was conducted via co-immuno-precipitation. Following an analogous experimental approach, the analysis was repeated using S. cerevisiaeas a control. Both galactose and fructose were found to trigger the degradation of the ICL1 transcript in C. albicans. The Icl1 enzyme was stable following galactose addition but was degraded in response to fructose. C. albicans Icl1 (CaIcl1) was also subjected to fructose-accelerated degradation when expressed in S. cerevisiae, indicating that, although it lacks a ubiquitination site, CaIcl1 is sensitive to fructose-accelerated protein degradation. The addition of an ubiquitination site to CaIcl1 resulted in this enzyme becoming sensitive to galactose-accelerated degradation and increases its rate of degradation in the

  6. Loss of malic enzymes leads to metabolic imbalance and altered levels of trehalose and putrescine in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Smallbone, Laura Anne; diCenzo, George C; Morton, Richard; Finan, Turlough M

    2016-07-26

    Malic enzymes decarboxylate the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate malate to the glycolytic end-product pyruvate and are well positioned to regulate metabolic flux in central carbon metabolism. Despite the wide distribution of these enzymes, their biological roles are unclear in part because the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes can be by-passed by other pathways. The N2-fixing alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti contains both a NAD(P)-malic enzyme (DME) and a separate NADP-malic enzyme (TME) and to help understand the role of these enzymes, we investigated growth, metabolomic, and transcriptional consequences resulting from loss of these enzymes in free-living cells. Loss of DME, TME, or both enzymes had no effect on growth with the glycolytic substrate, glucose. In contrast, the dme mutants, but not tme, grew slowly on the gluconeogenic substrate succinate and this slow growth was further reduced upon the addition of glucose. The dme mutant strains incubated with succinate accumulated trehalose and hexose sugar phosphates, secreted malate, and relative to wild-type, these cells had moderately increased transcription of genes involved in gluconeogenesis and pathways that divert metabolites away from the TCA cycle. While tme mutant cells grew at the same rate as wild-type on succinate, they accumulated the compatible solute putrescine. NAD(P)-malic enzyme (DME) of S. meliloti is required for efficient metabolism of succinate via the TCA cycle. In dme mutants utilizing succinate, malate accumulates and is excreted and these cells appear to increase metabolite flow via gluconeogenesis with a resulting increase in the levels of hexose-6-phosphates and trehalose. For cells utilizing succinate, TME activity alone appeared to be insufficient to produce the levels of pyruvate required for efficient TCA cycle metabolism. Putrescine was found to accumulate in tme cells growing with succinate, and whether this is related to altered levels of NADPH requires

  7. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  8. Quercetin-metabolizing CYP6AS enzymes of the pollinator Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenfu; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G; Johnson, Reed M; Zangerl, Arthur R; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2009-12-01

    Although the honey bee (Apis mellifera) genome contains far fewer cytochrome P450 genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism than other insect genomes sequenced to date, the CYP6AS subfamily, apparently unique to hymenopterans, has undergone an expansion relative to the genome of the jewel wasp (Nasonia vitripennis). The relative dominance of this family in the honey bee genome is suggestive of a role in processing phytochemicals encountered by honey bees in their relatively unusual diet of honey (comprising concentrated processed nectar of many plant species) and bee bread (a mixture of honey and pollen from many plant species). In this study, quercetin was initially suggested as a shared substrate for CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, and CYP6AS4, by its presence in honey, extracts of which induce transcription of these three genes, and by in silico substrate predictions based on a molecular model of CYP6AS3. Biochemical assays with heterologously expressed CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 enzymes subsequently confirmed their activity toward this substrate. CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 metabolize quercetin at rates of 0.5+/-0.1, 0.5+/-0.1, 0.2+/-0.1, and 0.2+/-0.1 pmol quercetin/ pmol P450/min, respectively. Substrate dockings and sequence alignments revealed that the positively charged amino acids His107 and Lys217 and the carbonyl group of the backbone between Leu302 and Ala303 are essential for quercetin orientation in the CYP6AS3 catalytic site and its efficient metabolism. Multiple replacements in the catalytic site of CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 and repositioning of the quercetin molecule likely account for the lower metabolic activities of CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 compared to CYP6AS1 and CYP6AS3.

  9. Δ9 desaturase from Trypanosoma cruzi: Key enzyme in the parasite metabolism. Cloning and overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, Mariela R; Paulucci, Natalia S; Selva, Armentano; Garban, Hermes; de Lema, Mirta García

    2017-01-01

    Desaturases, key enzymes in the metabolism of fatty acids, regulate the physical and biochemical properties of membranes. They adjust the composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in response to changes in the environmental. We demonstrated the existence of Δ9 desaturase activity in epimastigotes of the Trypanosoma cruzi Tulahuen strain. In the present study, showed that this enzyme has an approximate molecular mass of 50kDa and a pI value of approximately 9. In order to characterize the Δ9 desaturase of Trypanosoma cruzi, (TcΔ9DES) we have cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene consists of 1300bp and encodes a peptide of 433 amino acids with a molecular weight of 50kDa. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed three clusters of histidine and two hydrophobic regions, characteristic of membrane-bound desaturases. Gene expression studies showed that TcΔ9DES was overexpressed as an active protein. Fatty acid analysis showed that the expressed protein was confirmed to be functional with Δ9 desaturase activity. This enzyme changed the fatty acid profile of TcΔ9DES-expressing E. coli, decreasing the levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic (18:0) acids and enhancing palmitoleic (16:1Δ9) and monounsaturated 18 carbons fatty acids. When [1-14C]palmitic or [1-14C]stearic acid was used as substrate, TcΔ9DES-expressing E. coli exhibited high desaturase activity associated with increased levels of monounsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that the TcΔ9DES enzyme was actively expressed in E. coli. To check the commitment of TcΔ9DES against sterol biosynthesis inhibitors we tested the activity under ketoconazole effect. Native TcΔ9DES, showed a significant activity inhibition. Since TcΔ9DES has shown active participation under different environmental factors, among them, ketoconazole, we consider that it plays a critical role in the metabolism of the parasite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  11. Changes in energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries stored at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shunchang; Wei, Baodong; Liu, Xiuying; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature storage and transport of blueberries is widely practiced in commercial blueberry production. In this research, the storage life of blueberries was extended at low temperature, but fruit stored for 30 d at 0°C pitted after 2d at room-temperature. Fruit cellular structure and physiological parameters accompanying pitting in blueberries were changed. The objective of this research was to characterise properties of energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries during storage, including adenosine phosphates and mitochondrial enzymes involved in stress responses. Physiological and metabolic disorders, changes in cell ultrastructure, energy content and ATPase enzyme activity were observed in pitting blueberries. Energy shortages and increased activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were observed in fruit kept at shelf life. The results suggested that sufficient available energy status and a stable enzymatic system in blueberries collectively contribute to improve chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating pitting and maintaining quality of blueberry fruit in long-term cold storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial energy metabolism of rat hippocampus after treatment with the antidepressants desipramine and fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Bagini, Laura; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2017-07-15

    Alterations in mitochondrial functions have been hypothesized to participate in the pathogenesis of depression, because brain bioenergetic abnormalities have been detected in depressed patients by neuroimaging in vivo studies. However, this hypothesis is not clearly demonstrated in experimental studies: some suggest that antidepressants are inhibitors of mitochondrial metabolism, while others observe the opposite. In this study, the effects of 21-day treatment with desipramine (15 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) were examined on the energy metabolism of rat hippocampus, evaluating the catalytic activity of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways. Because of the micro-heterogeneity of brain mitochondria, we have distinguished between (a) non-synaptic mitochondria (FM) of neuronal perikaryon (post-synaptic compartment) and (b) intra-synaptic light (LM) and heavy (HM) mitochondria (pre-synaptic compartment). Desipramine and fluoxetine changed the catalytic activity of specific enzymes in the different types of mitochondria: (a) in FM, both drugs enhanced cytochrome oxidase and glutamate dehydrogenase, (b) in LM, the overall bioenergetics was unaffected and (c) in HM only desipramine increased malate dehydrogenase and decreased the activities of Electron Transport Chain Complexes. These results integrate the pharmacodynamic features of desipramine and fluoxetine at subcellular level, overcoming the previous conflicting data about the effects of antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, mainly referred to whole brain homogenates or to bulk of cerebral mitochondria. With the differentiation in non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria, this study demonstrates that desipramine and fluoxetine lead to adjustments in the mitochondrial bioenergetics respect to the energy requirements of pre- and post-synaptic compartments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic activity and enzyme induction in rat fecal microflora maintained in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, A K; Bearne, C A; Rowland, I R

    1983-01-01

    The enzyme activity of the rat hindgut microflora maintained in an anaerobic two-stage continuous culture was compared with that of rat cecal contents. A qualitative comparison (API ZYM) showed a high degree of similarity between the two populations. Quantitative determinations showed that azoreductase, beta-glucosidase, nitrate reductase, and nitroreductase activities were comparable, and that beta-glucuronidase activity was very low in the culture. beta-Glucuronidase, beta-glucosidase, and nitrate reductase activities were induced within the culture by their respective substrates. Bile acids influenced microbial activity in vitro, with cholic acid inducing beta-glucosidase, azoreductase, and beta-glucuronidase activities and decreasing nitrate reductase activity. Chenodeoxycholic acid increased beta-glucosidase and beta-glucuronidase activities and decreased azoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitroreductase activities in vitro. These studies demonstrate that the rat hindgut microflora may be successfully cultured in vitro and suggest control mechanisms that regulate the metabolic activity of these organisms in vivo. PMID:6416166

  14. Enzyme and metabolic engineering for the production of novel biopolymers: crossover of biological and chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2013-12-01

    The development of synthetic biology has transformed microbes into useful factories for producing valuable polymers and/or their precursors from renewable biomass. Recent progress at the interface of chemistry and biology has enabled the production of a variety of new biopolymers with properties that substantially differ from their petroleum-derived counterparts. This review touches on recent trials and achievements in the field of biopolymer synthesis, including chemo-enzymatically synthesized aliphatic polyesters, wholly biosynthesized lactate-based polyesters, polyhydroxyalkanoates and other unusual bacterially synthesized polyesters. The expanding diversities in structure and the material properties of biopolymers are key for exploring practical applications. The enzyme and metabolic engineering approaches toward this goal are discussed by shedding light on the successful case studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  16. Tempol Supplementation Restores Diaphragm Force and Metabolic Enzyme Activities in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Burns

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by striated muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure. Since oxidative stress is recognized as a secondary pathology in DMD, the efficacy of antioxidant intervention, using the superoxide scavenger tempol, was examined on functional and biochemical status of dystrophin-deficient diaphragm muscle. Diaphragm muscle function was assessed, ex vivo, in adult male wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, with and without a 14-day antioxidant intervention. The enzymatic activities of muscle citrate synthase, phosphofructokinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were assessed using spectrophotometric assays. Dystrophic diaphragm displayed mechanical dysfunction and altered biochemical status. Chronic tempol supplementation in the drinking water increased diaphragm functional capacity and citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities, restoring all values to wild-type levels. Chronic supplementation with tempol recovers force-generating capacity and metabolic enzyme activity in mdx diaphragm. These findings may have relevance in the search for therapeutic strategies in neuromuscular disease.

  17. Fluorogenic Metabolic Probes for Direct Activity Readout of Redox Enzymes: Selective Measurement of Human AKR1C2 in Living Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dominic J. Yee; Vojtech Balsanek; David R. Bauman; Trevor M. Penning; Dalibor Sames

    2006-01-01

    .... Fluorogenic substrates allow for direct measurement of enzyme activity in situ; however, in contrast to proteases and exo-glycosidases, there are no simple guidelines for the design of selective probes for redox metabolic enzymes...

  18. GENETIC POLIMORPHISMS OF ENZYMES INVOLVED IN FOLATE METABOLISM IN HEALTHY SLOVENIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Bohanec

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Enzymes that play a major role in folate metabolism are 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, thymidilate synthase (TS, methionine synthase (MS and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR. Polymorphisms in their corresponding genes alter their enzymatic activity. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies of polymorphic MTHFR and TS genotypes in healthy adults from Slovenian population in order to estimate the proportion of individuals that may be at risk for certain diseases or increased toxicity if treated with antifolate drugs.Methods. MTHFR and TS polymorphisms were studied by a genotyping technique, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis. DNA samples from 122 unrelated adult healthy subjects were obtained from the Tissue Typing Center and University Children’s Hospital in Ljubljana.Results. In the analyzed group 62.3% of individuals carried at least one polymorphic MTHFR 677T allele and 52.5% carried at least one polymorphic 1298C allele. Only 12% of individuals had no polymorphic MTHFR allele. The frequencies of MTHFR genotypes were influenced by the age of the subjects under investigation. The frequency of the TS 3R/3R genotype in Slovenian population was significantly lower than in some other populations.Conclusions. Genetic polymorphisms in folate metabolic pathway occur with high frequency in Slovenian population and modify cancer risk. Regarding the influence of these polymorphisms on the efficacy of treatment with antifolate drugs the introduced genotyping method could contribute to the individualization of treatment with methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil.

  19. PAF and its metabolic enzymes in healthy volunteers: interrelations and correlations with basic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Stamatakis, George; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2012-01-01

    PAF (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a potent inflammatory mediator, is synthesized via the remodeling and the de novo route, key enzymes of which are acetyl-CoA:lyso-PAF acetyltransferase (lyso-PAF-AT) and DTT-insensitive CDP-choline:1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT), respectively. PAF-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and its extracellular isoform lipoprotein-associated phospholipase-A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) catabolize PAF. This study evaluated PAF levels together with leukocyte PAF-CPT, lyso-PAF-AT, PAF-AH and Lp-PLA(2) activities in 106 healthy volunteers. Men had lower PAF levels and higher activity of both catabolic enzymes and lyso-PAF-AT than women (P-values PAF levels in men (r=-0.279, P=0.06) and lyso-PAF-AT in women (r=-0.280, P=0.05). In contrast, Lp-PLA(2) was positively correlated with age (r=0.201, P=0.04). Moreover, PAF-CPT was positively correlated with glucose (r=0.430, P=0.002) in women. In addition, Principal Component Analysis revealed three PAF metabolic patterns: (i) increased activities of PAF-CPT and PAF-AH, (ii) increased activities of PAF-CPT and lyso-PAF-AT and (iii) increased activity of Lp-PLA(2). The present study underlines the complexity of PAF's metabolism determinants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Involvement of microRNA in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs of about 20 nucleotides in length and participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA binds to 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs and thereby destabilizes the transcripts or suppresses the translation. It is expected that miRNAs could have diverse functions and therefore play a role in the gene expression caused by the drug treatment, which have yet to be determined. Demonstration of the participation of specific miRNA in the drug-mediated gene expression would make it a biomarker for the toxicological assessment and help an understanding of molecular machinery of the drug-drug interaction. Under these backgrounds, we investigated the change of miRNAs in the liver of mice treated with phenobarbital, a typical inducer for drug-metabolizing enzymes, and demonstrate the participation of miRNAs in the phenobarbital-regulated gene expression. We investigated the relationship between phenobarbital-mediated changes in miRNA and mRNA by using Agilent miRNA microarray and DNA microarray, followed by real time RT-PCR. From these experiments, it was suggested that the phenobarbital-induced changes in cyp2c29 and mrp3 are regulated by miR-30a and miR-29b, respectively. In addition, we obtained evidence that indicates a phenobarbital-mediated decrease in miR-122, a highly abundant liver-specific miRNA, leads to the activation of the transcription factor CAR and thereby induces drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  1. Reciprocal regulation of bone and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The primary relationship affecting skeletal tissue involves the association between fat mass and bone mass. However, there is some complexity in this relationship that may be explained by endocrine and neural pathways representing direct, reciprocal signalling between fat and bone tissue. For example, leptin signalling can directly stimulate osteoblastic differentiation and osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, but it also has central signalling actions in that it decreases cancellous bone volume. A novel regulatory loop between bone and adipose tissue suggests that uncarboxylated osteocalcin may affect energy homeostasis and afford a pathway by which fat mass can be regulated by bone mass. The multilayered and complex signals between fat and bone tissue involve both direct and indirect pathways. The endocrinologic nature of these signals highlights an emerging trend in medicine: identification of organ-based endocrine signals. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Aluminum chloride caused liver dysfunction and mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feibo; Liu, Yanfen; Zhao, Hansong; Yu, Kaiyuan; Song, Miao; Zhu, Yanzhu; Li, Yanfei

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is known to exert hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms mostly are unclear. Liver is a metabolism organ that maintains the energy level and structural stability of body, mitochondria are the main sites of energy metabolism, thus, we hypothesized that mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder contributes to liver dysfunction in aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) treatment rat. To verify the hypothesis, forty male Wistar rats were randomly allocated and orally exposed to 0, 64mg/kg, 128mg/kg and 256mg/kg body weight AlCl 3 in drinking water for 120days, respectively. We found that AlCl 3 exposure reduced the electron transport chain complexes I-V activities and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, as well as disturbed mitochondrial DNA transcript, presenting as the inhibited mRNA expressions of NADH dehydrogenase 1, NADH dehydrogenase 2, cytochrome b, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 and ATP synthase 6, indicating that AlCl 3 exposure disturbs the mitochondrial energy metabolism, and it caused an increase in liver enzymes (Aspartate aminotransferase and Alanine aminotransferase) and histopathological lesions. Additionally, we found that reactive oxygen species accumulation and decreased superoxide dismutase activity in mitochondria, and increased 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA, demonstrating AlCl 3 exposure promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, which may be a contributing factor to mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder and liver dysfunction. The study displayed that mitochondria are the potential target of liver damage induced by AlCl 3 , providing considerable direction for the prevention and clinical intervention of liver diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Islet transplantation in diabetic rats normalizes basal and exercise-induced energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Harmina; Benthem, L.; Suylichem, P.T.R. van; Leest, J. van der; Strubbe, J.H.; Steffens, A.B.

    Transplantation of islets of Langerhans in diabetic rats normalizes resting glucose and insulin levels, but it remains unclear whether islet transplantation restores resting and exercise-induced energy metabolism. Therefore, we compared energy metabolism in islet transplanted rats with energy

  4. Metabolic enzyme expression highlights a key role for MTHFD2 and the mitochondrial folate pathway in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit; Madhusudhan, Nikhil; Sheppard, Nina Gustafsson; Strittmatter, Laura; Kampf, Caroline; Huang, Jenny; Asplund, Anna; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is now widely regarded as a hallmark of cancer, but it is not clear whether individual metabolic strategies are frequently exploited by many tumours. Here we compare messenger RNA profiles of 1,454 metabolic enzymes across 1,981 tumours spanning 19 cancer types to identify enzymes that are consistently differentially expressed. Our meta-analysis recovers established targets of some of the most widely used chemotherapeutics, including dihydrofolate reductase, thymidylate synthase and ribonucleotide reductase, while also spotlighting new enzymes, such as the mitochondrial proline biosynthetic enzyme PYCR1. The highest scoring pathway is mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism and is centred on MTHFD2. MTHFD2 RNA and protein are markedly elevated in many cancers and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. MTHFD2 is expressed in the developing embryo, but is absent in most healthy adult tissues, even those that are proliferating. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial compartmentalization of one-carbon metabolism in cancer and raises important therapeutic hypotheses.

  5. Metabolic enzyme expression highlights a key role for MTHFD2 and the mitochondrial folate pathway in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit; Madhusudhan, Nikhil; Sheppard, Nina Gustafsson; Strittmatter, Laura; Kampf, Caroline; Huang, Jenny; Asplund, Anna; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is now widely regarded as a hallmark of cancer, but it is not clear whether individual metabolic strategies are frequently exploited by many tumours. Here we compare messenger RNA profiles of 1,454 metabolic enzymes across 1,981 tumours spanning 19 cancer types to identify enzymes that are consistently differentially expressed. Our meta-analysis recovers established targets of some of the most widely used chemotherapeutics, including dihydrofolate reductase, thymidylate synthase and ribonucleotide reductase, while also spotlighting new enzymes, such as the mitochondrial proline biosynthetic enzyme PYCR1. The highest scoring pathway is mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism and is centred on MTHFD2. MTHFD2 RNA and protein are markedly elevated in many cancers and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. MTHFD2 is expressed in the developing embryo, but is absent in most healthy adult tissues, even those that are proliferating. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial compartmentalization of one-carbon metabolism in cancer and raises important therapeutic hypotheses. PMID:24451681

  6. Enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; López-Maside, Laura; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Sixto-Leal, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) are structurally related to branched-chain fatty acids. Leucine is 2-amino-4-methyl-pentanoic acid, isoleucine is 2-amino-3-methyl-pentanoic acid, and valine is 2-amino-3-methyl-butanoic acid. Similar to fatty acid oxidation, leucine and isoleucine produce acetyl-coA. Additionally, leucine generates acetoacetate and isoleucine yields propionyl-coA. Valine oxidation produces propionyl-coA, which is converted into methylmalonyl-coA and succinyl-coA. Branched-chain aminotransferase catalyzes the first reaction in the catabolic pathway of branched-chain amino acids, a reversible transamination that converts branched-chain amino acids into branched-chain ketoacids. Simultaneously, glutamate is converted in 2-ketoglutarate. The branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain ketoacids to produce branched-chain acyl-coA intermediates, which then follow separate catabolic pathways. Human tissue distribution and function of most of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid catabolism is unknown. Congenital deficiencies of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism are generally rare disorders. Some of them are associated with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity and respiratory chain dysfunction that may contribute to their clinical phenotype. The biochemical phenotype is characterized by accumulation of the substrate to the deficient enzyme and its carnitine and/or glycine derivatives. It was established at the beginning of the twentieth century that the plasma level of the branched-chain amino acids is increased in conditions associated with insulin resistance such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. However, the potential clinical relevance of this elevation is uncertain.

  7. The relation of diet with PAF and its metabolic enzymes in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detopoulou, P; Fragopoulou, E; Nomikos, T; Yannakoulia, M; Stamatakis, G; Panagiotakos, D B; Antonopoulou, S

    2015-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, is implicated in atherosclerosis. Its key biosynthetic enzymes are lyso-PAF acetyltransferases (lyso-PAF-AT), responsible for PAF synthesis through the remodeling route and a specific CDP-choline:1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT), responsible for its de novo biosynthesis. PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and its extracellular isoform lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A₂ catabolize PAF. The impact of diet on PAF metabolism is ill-defined. The aim was to investigate associations between PAF, its enzymes and dietary factors. One-hundred and six (n = 106) healthy volunteers were recruited. Food-frequency questionnaires, dietary recalls, lifestyle and biochemical variables were collected. Food groups, macronutrient intake, a priori (MedDietScore) and a posteriori defined food patterns with PCA analysis, dietary antioxidant capacity (DAC), glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load were assessed. PAF was inversely correlated with antioxidant-rich foods (herbal drinks and coffee), the DAC as well as a dietary pattern characterized by legumes, vegetables, poultry and fish (all Ps PAF was positively correlated to % fat intake. Lyso-PAF-AT was also negatively associated with healthy patterns (fruits, nuts and herbal drinks, and a pattern rich in olive oil and whole-wheat products), as well as the DAC and % monounsaturated fatty acids. PAF-CPT was negatively associated with GI and coffee intake and positively with dietary cholesterol. PAF-AH was negatively associated with coffee and positively associated with alcohol consumption (all Ps PAF or its biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting potential new mechanisms of the diet-disease associations.

  8. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  9. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  10. Levels of Key Enzymes of Methionine-Homocysteine Metabolism in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Pérez-Sepúlveda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the role of key enzymes in the methionine-homocysteine metabolism (MHM in the physiopathology of preeclampsia (PE. Methods. Plasma and placenta from pregnant women (32 controls and 16 PE patients were analyzed after informed consent. Protein was quantified by western blot. RNA was obtained with RNA purification kit and was quantified by reverse transcritase followed by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR. Identification of the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and A2756G methionine synthase (MTR SNP was performed using PCR followed by a high-resolution melting (HRM analysis. S-adenosyl methionine (SAM and S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH were measured in plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS. The SNP association analysis was carried out using Fisher’s exact test. Statistical analysis was performed using a Mann-Whitney test. Results. RNA expression of MTHFR and MTR was significantly higher in patients with PE as compared with controls. Protein, SAM, and SAH levels showed no significant difference between preeclamptic patients and controls. No statistical differences between controls and PE patients were observed with the different SNPs studied. Conclusion. The RNA expression of MTHFR and MTR is elevated in placentas of PE patients, highlighting a potential compensation mechanism of the methionine-homocysteine metabolism in the physiopathology of this disease.

  11. Folate cycle enzyme MTHFD1L confers metabolic advantages in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Derek; Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Lan Li, Lynna; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Tsang, Felice Ho-Ching; Wei, Larry Lai; Chan, Cerise Yuen-Ki; Wong, Chun-Ming; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui

    2017-05-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glucose and glutamine, which provide macromolecules and antioxidants that sustain rapid cell division. Metabolic reprogramming in cancer drives an increased glycolytic rate that supports maximal production of these nutrients. The folate cycle, through transfer of a carbon unit between tetrahydrofolate and its derivatives in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments, produces other metabolites that are essential for cell growth, including nucleotides, methionine, and the antioxidant NADPH. Here, using hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a cancer model, we have observed a reduction in growth rate upon withdrawal of folate. We found that an enzyme in the folate cycle, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1-like (MTHFD1L), plays an essential role in support of cancer growth. We determined that MTHFD1L is transcriptionally activated by NRF2, a master regulator of redox homeostasis. Our observations further suggest that MTHFD1L contributes to the production and accumulation of NADPH to levels that are sufficient to combat oxidative stress in cancer cells. The elevation of oxidative stress through MTHFD1L knockdown or the use of methotrexate, an antifolate drug, sensitizes cancer cells to sorafenib, a targeted therapy for HCC. Taken together, our study identifies MTHFD1L in the folate cycle as an important metabolic pathway in cancer cells with the potential for therapeutic targeting.

  12. Dietary flaxseed oil supplementation mitigates the effect of lead on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane, and oxidative stress in rat kidney tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Sana; Naqshbandi, Ashreeb; Khan, Farah

    2013-06-01

    Lead is a heavy metal widely distributed in the environment. Lead is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is capable of causing numerous acute and chronic illnesses. Human and animal exposure demonstrates that lead is nephrotoxic. However, attempts to reduce lead-induced nephrotoxicity were not found suitable for clinical use. Recently, flaxseed oil (FXO), a rich source of ω-3 fatty acids and lignans, has been shown to prevent/reduce the progression of certain types of cardiovascular and renal disorders. In view of this, the present study investigates the protective effect of FXO on lead acetate (PbAc)-induced renal damage. Rats were pre-fed normal diet and the diet rich in FXO for 14 days, and then, four doses of lead acetate (25 mg/kg body weight) were administered intraperitoneally while still on diet. Various serum parameters, enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane (BBM), and oxidative stress were analyzed in rat kidney. PbAc nephrotoxicity was characterized by increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. PbAc increased the activities of lactate dehydrogenase and NADP-malic enzyme, whereas it decreased malate and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase, and BBM enzyme activities. PbAc caused oxidant/antioxidant imbalances as reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. In contrast, FXO alone enhanced the enzyme activities of carbohydrate metabolism, BBM, and antioxidant defense system. FXO feeding to PbAc-treated rats markedly enhanced resistance to PbAc-elicited deleterious effects. In conclusion, dietary FXO supplementation ameliorated PbAc-induced specific metabolic alterations and oxidative damage by empowering antioxidant defense mechanism and improving BBM integrity and energy metabolism.

  13. Possible associations between antioxidant enzyme polymorphisms and metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saruwatari J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Junji Saruwatari,1,* Norio Yasui-Furukori,2,* Ryoko Kamihashi,1 Yuki Yoshimori,1 Kentaro Oniki,1 Shoko Tsuchimine,2 Madoka Noai,1 Yasushi Sato,3 Taku Nakagami,4 Norio Sugawara,2 Manabu Saito,2 Akira Fujii,2 Ayami Kajiwara,1 Shuichi Mihara,5 Yasuhiro Ogata,6 Sunao Kaneko,2 Kazuko Nakagawa1,71Division of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hirosaki Aiseikai Hospital, Hirosaki, 4Department of Psychiatry, Odate Municipal General Hospital, Odate, 5Mihara Life Care Clinic, Kumamoto, 6Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care Center, Kumamoto, 7Center for Clinical Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan*These authors contributed equally to this paperBackground: This study investigated the possible association between common and potentially functional polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes and metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia.Methods: The possible associations of the glutathione S-transferase (GST M1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes, and the superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 Val16Ala polymorphism with the risks of being overweight and having metabolic syndrome were examined using a logistic regression analysis in 154 schizophrenic Japanese patients and 203 controls.Results: Among smokers with schizophrenia, the risks of being overweight and having decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher in those with the GSTM1 null genotype than in those with the present genotype (odds ratio 3.20 and 3.15, P=0.03 and P=0.04, respectively, while among nonsmokers with schizophrenia, the risk of an abnormal waist circumference was lower in those with the GSTM1 null genotype (odds ratio 0.34, P=0.04. The risk of a decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was significantly higher in patients with the combined GSTM1 null and

  14. THE GENERATION OF METABOLIC ENERGY BY SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N; Lolkema, J.S.; Poolman, B.

    1995-01-01

    Secondary metabolic-energy-generating systems generate a proton motive force (pmf) or a sodium ion motive force (smf) by a process that involves the action of secondary transporters. The (electro)chemical gradient of the solute(s) is converted into the electrochemical gradient of protons or sodium

  15. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain’s energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups.

  16. In Vitro Studies on the Metabolic Energy Requirements of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krebs buffer, pH 7.3 free from zinc and whose metabolic energy requirement of absorption was to be investigated until slightly distended. Sacs were incubated for 30 minutes at 37oC with continuous aeration in media containing the buffer and ...

  17. [Phase changes of energy metabolism during adaptation to immobilization stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnichenko, V I; Nosar, V I; Honchar, O O; Opanasenko, H V; Hlazyrin, I D; Man'kovs'ka, I M

    2014-01-01

    In stress, it was showed the organ and tissue changes associated with damage by lipid peroxides, and the disrupted barrier function. As a consequence, it was to lead to a syndrome of "stress-induced lung" and violation of oxygen delivery to the tissues and hypoxia. Purpose of the study was to investigate the dynamics of changes in gas exchange, blood glucose, body temperature, oxidant and antioxidant system activity, as well as mitochondrial respiration by Chance under the influence of chronic stress (6-hour immobilization daily for 3 weeks). It was identified 4 phase changes of energy metabolism in the dynamics of chronic stress. In the first phase, hypomethabolic, instability oxidative metabolism, decreased oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates, significant elevation of FAD-dependent substrates oxidation and low MRU were found. The activity of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was increased; it was occurred on a background low activity of glutathione peroxidase, and of misbalanced antioxidant system. After seven immobilizations, second phase-shift in energy metabolism, was observed, and then the third phase (hypermetabolic) started. It was characterized by gradual increase in oxidative metabolism, the restoration of oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates, MRU, as well as optimizing balance of oxidant and antioxidant systems. The fourth phase was started after 15 immobilizations, and characterized by the development of adaptive reactions expressed in increased tolerance of energy metabolism to the impact of immobilization. The results are correlated with changes in the dynamics of blood corticosterone. Thus, it was found the phase character of the energy metabolism rebuilding during the chronic stress.

  18. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  19. A Bayesian method for identifying missing enzymes in predicted metabolic pathway databases

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    Karp Peter D

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PathoLogic program constructs Pathway/Genome databases by using a genome's annotation to predict the set of metabolic pathways present in an organism. PathoLogic determines the set of reactions composing those pathways from the enzymes annotated in the organism's genome. Most annotation efforts fail to assign function to 40–60% of sequences. In addition, large numbers of sequences may have non-specific annotations (e.g., thiolase family protein. Pathway holes occur when a genome appears to lack the enzymes needed to catalyze reactions in a pathway. If a protein has not been assigned a specific function during the annotation process, any reaction catalyzed by that protein will appear as a missing enzyme or pathway hole in a Pathway/Genome database. Results We have developed a method that efficiently combines homology and pathway-based evidence to identify candidates for filling pathway holes in Pathway/Genome databases. Our program not only identifies potential candidate sequences for pathway holes, but combines data from multiple, heterogeneous sources to assess the likelihood that a candidate has the required function. Our algorithm emulates the manual sequence annotation process, considering not only evidence from homology searches, but also considering evidence from genomic context (i.e., is the gene part of an operon? and functional context (e.g., are there functionally-related genes nearby in the genome? to determine the posterior belief that a candidate has the required function. The method can be applied across an entire metabolic pathway network and is generally applicable to any pathway database. The program uses a set of sequences encoding the required activity in other genomes to identify candidate proteins in the genome of interest, and then evaluates each candidate by using a simple Bayes classifier to determine the probability that the candidate has the desired function. We achieved 71% precision at a

  20. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Z

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zejun Lu,1,* Yuqin Yao,2,* Qi Song,3 Jinliang Yang,4 Xiangfei Zhao,1 Ping Yang,1 Jingbo Kang1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Naval General Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, 2Research Center for Public Health and Preventive Medicine, West China School of Public Health/No 4 West China Teaching Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 3Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, The General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Beijing, 4State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy/Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectra (MS technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. Keywords: renal cell cancer, metabolism, two-dimensional electrophoresis, proteome 

  1. Pharmacogenomics in drug-metabolizing enzymes catalyzing anticancer drugs for personalized cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2007-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is characterized by a broad range of efficacy and toxicity among patients. Most anticancer drugs show wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and have narrow therapeutic windows. Since drug metabolism is often an essential determinant of interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomic studies of drug-metabolizing enzymes are expected to rationalize cancer chemotherapy in terms of patient, treatment, and dosage selection. Candidate gene approaches to pharmacogenomics are based on existing knowledge in clinical pharmacology, used to select the target(s) to be analyzed. So far, the candidate gene approach has provided important clues for pharmacogenomic-based personalized chemotherapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), solely metabolized by thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), and irinotecan, mainly detoxified by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). Reduced activity of TPMT caused by polymorphisms in the TPMT gene and decreased activity of UGT1A1 caused by UGT1A1*28 are related to severe toxic effects of 6-MP and irinotecan, respectively. In response to these findings, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has supported clinical pharmacogenetic testing by revising the package inserts for these anticancer drugs. The genome wide approach to pharmacogenomics has gradually evolved with continued progress in genome sciences and technologies. This approach can disclose previously unknown relations of factors, as well as identify potential multigenetic associations. The genome wide approach can also identify genes underlying the phenotypic effects of anticancer drugs. This approach may play a complemental role to the candidate gene approach in the future of cancer pharmacogenomics. This review describes recent progress in pharmacogenomics in the field of cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Enzymic synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-d-glucose. II. Metabolic characteristics of the enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leznicki, A. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-D-glucose from indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) has been shown to be a reversible reaction with the equilibrium away from ester formation and toward formation of IAA. The enzyme occurs primarily in the liquid endosperm of the corn kernel but some activity occurs in the embryo. It is relatively specific showing no glucose ester formation with oxindole-3-acetic acid or 7-hydroxy-oxindole-3-acetic acid, and low activity with phenylpropene acids, such as rho-coumaric acid. The enzyme is also specific for the nucleotide sugar showing no activity with UDPGalactose or UDPXylose. The enzyme is inhibited by inorganic pyrophosphate, by phosphate esters and by phospholipids, particularly phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The enzyme is inhibited by zeatin, by 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, by IAA-myo-inositol and IAA-glucan, but not by zeatin riboside, and only weakly by gibberellic acid, abscisic acid and kinetin. The reaction is slightly stimulated by both calcium and calmodulin and, in some cases, by thiol compounds. The role of this enzyme in the homeostatic control of indole-3-acetic acid levels in Zea mays is discussed.

  3. Structural basis for catalytically restrictive dynamics of a high-energy enzyme state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovermann, Michael; Ådén, Jörgen; Grundström, Christin; Elisabeth Sauer-Eriksson, A.; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    An emerging paradigm in enzymology is that transient high-energy structural states play crucial roles in enzymatic reaction cycles. Generally, these high-energy or `invisible' states cannot be studied directly at atomic resolution using existing structural and spectroscopic techniques owing to their low populations or short residence times. Here we report the direct NMR-based detection of the molecular topology and conformational dynamics of a catalytically indispensable high-energy state of an adenylate kinase variant. On the basis of matching energy barriers for conformational dynamics and catalytic turnover, it was found that the enzyme's catalytic activity is governed by its dynamic interconversion between the high-energy state and a ground state structure that was determined by X-ray crystallography. Our results show that it is possible to rationally tune enzymes' conformational dynamics and hence their catalytic power--a key aspect in rational design of enzymes catalysing novel reactions.

  4. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Arriarán

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism.Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities.Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT.Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole.

  5. Iminosugar inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes that underpin cereal grain germination and endosperm metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Rejzek, Martin; Rugen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Starch is a major energy store in plants. It provides most of the calories in the human diet and, as a bulk commodity, it is used across broad industry sectors. Starch synthesis and degradation are not fully understood, owing to challenging biochemistry at the liquid/solid interface and relatively...... limited knowledge about the nature and control of starch degradation in plants. Increased societal and commercial demand for enhanced yield and quality in starch crops requires a better understanding of starch metabolism as a whole. Here we review recent advances in understanding the roles of carbohydrate...

  6. Temporal repeatability of metabolic rate and the effect of organ mass and enzyme activity on metabolism in European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldsen, Martin Maagaard; Norin, Tommy; Malte, Hans

    2013-05-01

    Intraspecific variation in metabolic rate of fish can be pronounced and have been linked to various fitness-related behavioural and physiological traits, but the underlying causes for this variation have received far less attention than the consequences of it. In the present study we investigated whether European eels (Anguilla anguilla) displayed temporal repeatability of body-mass-corrected (residual) metabolic rate over a two-month period and if variations in organ mass and enzyme activity between individual fish could be the cause for the observed variation in metabolic rate. Both standard metabolic rate (SMR; Pearson's r=0.743) and routine metabolic rate (RMR; r=0.496) were repeatable over the two-month period. Repeatability of RMR is an interesting finding as it indicates that the level of spontaneous activity in respirometer-confined fish is not random. Cumulative organ mass (liver, heart, spleen and intestine; mean 1.6% total body mass) was found to explain 38% of the variation in SMR (r=0.613) with the liver (one of the metabolically most active organs) being the driver for the correlation between organ mass and metabolic rate. No relationships were found for either liver citrate synthase or cytochrome oxidase activity and metabolic rate in the European eels. Reasons for, and contributions to, the observed variation in metabolic rate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes in phenolic-rich grapevine tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covington, Elizabeth Dunn; Roitsch, Thomas Georg; Dermastia, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Physiological studies in plants often require enzyme extraction from tissues containing high concentrations of phenols and polyphenols. Unless removed or neutralized, such compounds may hinder extraction, inactivate enzymes, and interfere with enzyme detection. The following protocol for activity...

  8. Energy metabolism of Heliobacterium modesticaldum during phototrophic and chemotrophic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Robert E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliobacterium modesticaldum is a gram-positive nitrogen-fixing phototrophic bacterium that can grow either photoheterotrophically or chemotrophically but not photoautotrophically. Surprisingly, this organism is lacking only one gene for the complete reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA cycle required for autotrophic carbon fixation. Along with the genomic information reported recently, we use multiple experimental approaches in this report to address questions regarding energy metabolic pathways in darkness, CO2 fixation, sugar assimilation and acetate metabolism. Results We present the first experimental evidence that D-ribose, D-fructose and D-glucose can be photoassimilated by H. modesticaldum as sole carbon sources in newly developed defined growth medium. Also, we confirm two non-autotrophic CO2-fixation pathways utilized by H. modesticaldum: reactions catalyzed by pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and report acetate excretion during phototrophic and chemotrophic growth. Further, genes responsible for pyruvate fermentation, which provides reducing power for nitrogen assimilation, carbon metabolism and hydrogen production, are either active or up-regulated during chemotrophic growth. The discovery of ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR activity in cell extracts provides the reducing power required for carbon and nitrogen metabolisms. Moreover, we show that photosynthetic pigments are produced by H. modesticaldum during the chemotrophic growth, and demonstrate that H. modesticaldum performs nitrogen fixation during both phototrophic and chemotrophic growth. Conclusion Collectively, this report represents the first comprehensive studies for energy metabolism in heliobacteria, which have the simplest known photosynthetic machinery among the entire photosynthetic organisms. Additionally, our studies provide new and essential insights, as well as broaden current knowledge, on the energy

  9. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer: review and hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Purna

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are often unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration, malignant brain cancer is potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. A radically different approach to brain cancer management is proposed that combines metabolic control analysis with the evolutionarily conserved capacity of normal cells to survive extreme shifts in physiological environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The bioenergetic transition from glucose to ketone bodies metabolically targets brain tumors through integrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. The approach focuses more on the genomic flexibility of normal cells than on the genomic defects of tumor cells and is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with dietary energy restriction and the ketogenic diet.

  10. Effect of fat source, energy level and enzyme supplementation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of replacing soybean oil (SBO), typical in broiler diets, with a less expensive commercial fat blend, Kofat (KOF). A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experimental design was used to study the interactions of the two fat sources, SBO and KOF, at two levels of metabolizable energy (ME) (low ...

  11. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vaughan

    Full Text Available A silencer region (I-allele within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle.Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER, serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS, were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc.Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09. The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and -3%, respectively. Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon.The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of glucose import and oxidation in

  12. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David; Brogioli, Michael; Maier, Thomas; White, Andy; Waldron, Sarah; Rittweger, Jörn; Toigo, Marco; Wettstein, Jessica; Laczko, Endre; Flück, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A silencer region (I-allele) within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle. Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER), serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc. Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09). The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and -3%, respectively). Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione) were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon. The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of glucose import and oxidation in working

  13. The genes and enzymes of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    carotenoid metabolic pathway is well characterised, and the genes and enzymes have been studied in a number of plants. The study of the 42 carotenoid pathway genes of grapevine showed that they share a high degree of similarity with other eudicots. Expression and pigment profiling of developing berries provided insights into the most complete grapevine carotenoid pathway representation. This study represents an important reference study for further characterisation of carotenoid biosynthesis and catabolism in grapevine. PMID:22702718

  14. [Effect of hydroxylated pyrimidine derivatives on activities of thiamine-dependent enzymes and some parameters of lipid metabolism in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, D A; Gorenshteĭn, B I; Karaedova, L M; Naruta, E E; Zabrodskaia, S V; Rudiak, T V; Akat'ev, V E; Larin, F S

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that hydroxylated pyrimidine derivatives actively participate in metabolic proceeds related to functioning of vitamin B1-dependent enzymes (transketolase, 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase). Hydroxypyrimidines also induce a significant increase in the levels of total lipids and cholesterol in the mice liver, not changing the phospholipid content.

  15. Integrative analyses of genetic variation in enzyme activities of primary carbohydrate metabolism reveal distinct modes of regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Sulpice, R.; Gibon, Y.; Steinhauser, M.C.; Fu, J.; Koornneef, M.; Stitt, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant primary carbohydrate metabolism is complex and flexible, and is regulated at many levels. Changes of transcript levels do not always lead to changes in enzyme activities, and these do not always affect metabolite levels and fluxes. To analyze interactions between these three levels

  16. Deciphering neuron-glia compartmentalization in cortical energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Jolivet

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Energy demand is an important constraint on neural signaling. Several methods have been proposed to assess the energy budget of the brain based on a bottom-up approach in which the energy demand of individual biophysical processes are first estimated independently and then summed up to compute the brain's total energy budget. Here, we address this question using a novel approach that makes use of published datasets that reported average cerebral glucose and oxygen utilization in humans and rodents during different activation states. Our approach allows us (1 to decipher neuron-glia compartmentalization in energy metabolism and (2 to compute a precise state-dependent energy budget for the brain. Under the assumption that the fraction of energy used for signaling is proportional to the cycling of neurotransmitters, we find that in the activated state, most of the energy (~80% is oxidatively produced and consumed by neurons to support neuron-to-neuron signaling. Glial cells, while only contributing for a small fraction to energy production (~6%, actually take up a significant fraction of glucose (50% or more from the blood and provide neurons with glucose-derived energy substrates. Our results suggest that glycolysis occurs for a significant part in astrocytes whereas most of the oxygen is utilized in neurons. As a consequence, a transfer of glucose-derived metabolites from glial cells to neurons has to take place. Furthermore, we find that the amplitude of this transfer is correlated to (1 the activity level of the brain; the larger the activity, the more metabolites are shuttled from glia to neurons and (2 the oxidative activity in astrocytes; with higher glial pyruvate metabolism, less metabolites are shuttled from glia to neurons. While some of the details of a bottom-up biophysical approach have to be simplified, our method allows for a straightforward assessment of the brain's energy budget from macroscopic measurements with minimal

  17. Roles for fructose-2,6-bisphosphate in the control of fuel metabolism: beyond its allosteric effects on glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaodong; Khan, Salmaan A; Peng, Li-Jen; Lange, Alex J

    2006-01-01

    Fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F26P2) was identified as a regulator of glucose metabolism over 25 years ago. A truly bifunctional enzyme, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (6PFK2/FBP2), with two active sites synthesizes F26P2 from fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and ATP or degrades F26P2 to F6P and Pi. In the classic view, F26P2 regulates glucose metabolism by allosteric effects on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (6PFK1, activation) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, inhibition). When levels of F26P2 are high, glycolysis is enhanced and gluconeogenesis is inhibited. In this regard, altering levels of F26P2 via 6PFK2/FBP2 overexpression has been used for metabolic modulation, and has been shown capable of restoring euglycemia in rodent models of diabetes. Recently, a number of novel observations have suggested that F26P2 has much broader effects on the enzymes of glucose metabolism. This is evidenced by the effects of F26P2 on the gene expression of two key glucose metabolic enzymes, glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). When levels of F26P2 are elevated in the liver, the gene expression and protein amount of GK is increased whereas G6Pase is decreased. These coordinated changes in GK and G6Pase protein illustrate how F26P2 regulates glucose metabolism. F26P2 also affects the gene expression of enzymes related to lipid metabolism. When F26P2 levels are elevated in liver, the expression of two key lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) is reduced, contributing to a unique coordinated decrease in lipogenesis. When combined, F26P2 effects on glucose and lipid metabolism provide cooperative regulation of fuel metabolism. The regulatory roles for F26P2 have also expanded to transcription factors, as well as certain key proteins (enzymes) of signaling and/or energy sensoring. Although some effects may be secondary to changes in metabolite levels, high levels of F26P2 have been shown to regulate protein

  18. Metabolism by rat liver cytosol of illudin S, a toxic substance of Lampteromyces japonicus. II. Characterization of illudin S-metabolizing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Inoue, T; Kadota, S; Kikuchi, T

    1992-01-01

    1. Enzyme systems responsible for formation of cyclopropane ring-cleavage metabolites (M1 and M2) of illudin S in rat liver were characterized. 2. The enzymes were localized in the cytosol fraction and utilized NADPH alone as electron donor; they were not affected by oxygen and had low pH optima. 3. Formation of metabolites M1 and M2 was inhibited completely by dicumarol (10(-4) M), an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase. 4. Menadione (10(-4) M) and quercetin (10(-4) M) both inhibited formation of M1 and M2 by 35% and 15%, respectively, but quinacrine, barbital, pyrazole and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid had no significant effect. 5. Results show that the enzyme systems may differ from DT-diaphorase, aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, ketone reductase, aldose reductase, aldehyde reductase and alcohol dehydrogenase, known cytosolic enzymes responsible for xenobiotic metabolism.

  19. An MRM-based workflow for absolute quantitation of lysine-acetylated metabolic enzymes in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leilei; Wang, Fang; Xu, Ying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Cuiping; Qin, Xue; Yu, Hongxiu; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-12-07

    As a key post-translational modification mechanism, protein acetylation plays critical roles in regulating and/or coordinating cell metabolism. Acetylation is a prevalent modification process in enzymes. Protein acetylation modification occurs in sub-stoichiometric amounts; therefore extracting biologically meaningful information from these acetylation sites requires an adaptable, sensitive, specific, and robust method for their quantification. In this work, we combine immunoassays and multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) technology to develop an absolute quantification for acetylation modification. With this hybrid method, we quantified the acetylation level of metabolic enzymes, which could demonstrate the regulatory mechanisms of the studied enzymes. The development of this quantitative workflow is a pivotal step for advancing our knowledge and understanding of the regulatory effects of protein acetylation in physiology and pathophysiology.

  20. Advances in the Understanding of Protein-Protein Interactions in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes through the Use of Biophysical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed N. Lampe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a growing appreciation has developed for the importance of protein-protein interactions to modulate the function of drug metabolizing enzymes. Accompanied with this appreciation, new methods and technologies have been designed for analyzing protein-protein interactions both in vitro and in vivo. These technologies have been applied to several classes of drug metabolizing enzymes, including: cytochrome P450's (CYPs, monoamine oxidases (MAOs, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, and sulfotransferases (SULTs. In this review, we offer a brief description and assessment of the impact of many of these technologies to the study of protein-protein interactions in drug disposition. The still expanding list of these techniques and assays has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of how these enzymes carry out their important functions in vivo.

  1. Efavirenz dosing: influence of drug metabolizing enzyme polymorphisms and concurrent tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gengiah, Tanuja N; Botha, Julia H; Yende-Zuma, Nonhlanhla; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment alters efavirenz (EFV) clearance. Polymorphisms in important drug metabolizing enzymes and the implications for EFV dosing were investigated. Trough EFV concentrations (Cmin) were measured in 54 South African black patients. During TB treatment, EFV dose was 600 mg in patients EFV Cmin. During TB treatment, median EFV Cmin was 3.2 (IQR 2.6-6.3) µg/ml and 3.3 (2.4-9.5) µg/ml in the 800 mg and 600 mg groups, respectively. After TB treatment EFV Cmin was 2.0 (1.4-3.5) µg/ml. Minor allele frequencies for CYP2B6 516G→T, 785A→G, 983T→C, UGT2B7-372G→A, CYP2A6*9B and CYP2A6*17 were 0.31, 0.33, 0.23, 0.29, 0.10 and 0.02, respectively. Haplotypes CYP2B6*6 and CYP2B6*18 were found in 38.9% and 25.9% of patients, respectively. Polymorphisms in all three CYP2B6 genes studied (516T-785G-983C) were present in 11.1% of patients and in this group median EFV Cmin was 19.2 (IQR 9.5-20) µg/ml during and 4.7 (IQR 3.5-5.6) µg/ml after TB treatment. The presence of TB treatment and composite genotypes CYP2B6 516 GT/TT, CYP2B6 983 TC/CC and CYP2A6*9B carrier status predicted median EFV Cmin>4 µg/ml. Adverse events due to high EFV concentrations were rare. Because polymorphisms of EFV metabolizing enzymes are frequent and are associated with elevated EFV concentrations in this population, EFV dose increases are unnecessary when concomitant rifampicin-containing TB treatment is prescribed.

  2. [13C] phenylalanine breath test and hepatic phenylalanine metabolism enzymes in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W; Sun, D; Lin, X; Jiang, Y; Sun, X

    2005-10-01

    Stable isotope 13C-labelled phenylalanine breath test has been applied to enable the quantitative evaluation of hepatic functional reserve, but the mechanism underlying the changes in function has not been resolved. This study evaluated the correlation between expression of the mRNA of key enzymes mediating phenylalanine metabolism and the metabolism of L-[1-13C] phenylalanine (13C-phe) assessed by the excretion of 13C-CO2 in the breath of rats with, and without, chronic hepatic injury induced by administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 29) were given subcutaneous injections of CCl4 to induce chronic hepatic injury. L-[1-13C] phenylalanine breath tests (PheBT) were then applied to the rats to assess hepatic function. Expression of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PHH) and tyrosine transaminase (TYT) mRNA in liver was detected by real-time fluorescence quantification RT-PCR, using TaqMan as the probe. It was then determined whether the PheBT results correlated with PHH and/or TYT mRNA expression. In addition, immunohistochemical labelling was used to visualize PHH protein expression in the control and injured liver tissue. There were significant decreases in PheBT and PHH mRNA expression in the cirrhotic rats relative to the uninjured controls and these two measures of liver function were correlated. However, TYT mRNA expression was not changed by CCl4-induced liver injury. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PHH protein was expressed predominantly in the cytoplasm of liver cells. The results of the PheBT were consistent with the changes in PHH gene expression following liver injury. The present findings indicate that decreased expression of the rate-limiting enzyme PHH, but not of TYT, might underlie the functional deficits detected as decreased PheBT. The 13C excretion rate constant per mass liver (PheBT-k/LW) was the most sensitive index that could be used to evaluate the PHH mRNA expression in the liver.

  3. Studies on growth, nitrogen and energy metabolism in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorbek, G; Chwalibog, André; Eggum, B O

    1982-01-01

    Feed intake, growth, nitrogen retention and energy metabolism were measured in 12 male Wistar rats fed ad lib. for 14 weeks with non-purified diets. The feed intake increased rapidly in 4 weeks time from 16 g/d to 25 g/d, and then it was constant in the following 10 weeks. In relation to metabolic...... = 0.968. The nitrogen retention increased from 200 to 300 mg N/d in period III when the rats 60 days old, and then it decreased in the following 10 weeks to about 100 mg N/d. In relation to metabolic live weight nitrogen retention is assumed to be near maximum level, decreasing from 1100 to 200 mg N...

  4. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  5. NAD(H) and NADP(H) Redox Couples and Cellular Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wusheng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2017-07-28

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))/reduced NAD(+) (NADH) and NADP(+)/reduced NADP(+) (NADPH) redox couples are essential for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and for modulating numerous biological events, including cellular metabolism. Deficiency or imbalance of these two redox couples has been associated with many pathological disorders. Recent Advances: Newly identified biosynthetic enzymes and newly developed genetically encoded biosensors enable us to understand better how cells maintain compartmentalized NAD(H) and NADP(H) pools. The concept of redox stress (oxidative and reductive stress) reflected by changes in NAD(H)/NADP(H) has increasingly gained attention. The emerging roles of NAD(+)-consuming proteins in regulating cellular redox and metabolic homeostasis are active research topics. The biosynthesis and distribution of cellular NAD(H) and NADP(H) are highly compartmentalized. It is critical to understand how cells maintain the steady levels of these redox couple pools to ensure their normal functions and simultaneously avoid inducing redox stress. In addition, it is essential to understand how NAD(H)- and NADP(H)-utilizing enzymes interact with other signaling pathways, such as those regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism. Additional studies are needed to investigate the inter-relationships among compartmentalized NAD(H)/NADP(H) pools and how these two dinucleotide redox couples collaboratively regulate cellular redox states and cellular metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the utility of using pharmacological interventions or nutrient-based bioactive NAD(+) precursors as therapeutic interventions for metabolic diseases. Thus, a better understanding of the cellular functions of NAD(H) and NADP(H) may facilitate efforts to address a host of pathological disorders effectively. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Serum Liver Enzymes Level at Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Miralem; Dervisevic, Amela; Pepic, Esad; Lepara, Orhan; Fajkic, Almir; Ascic-Buturovic, Belma; Tuna, Enes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate liver function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with and without metabolic syndrome (MS) by determining serum levels of gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We also investigated correlation between levels of liver enzymes and some components of MS in both groups of patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 96 patients (age 47–83 years) with T2DM. All patients were divided according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) in two groups: 50 patients with T2 DM and MS (T2DM-MS) and 46 patients with T2DM without MS (T2DM-Non MS). The analysis included blood pressure monitoring and laboratory tests: fasting blood glucose (FBG), total lipoprotein cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), fibrinogen and liver enzymes: GGT, ALT and AST. T2DM-MS group included patients which had FBG ≥ 6,1 mmol/L, TG ≥ 1,7 mmol/L and blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm Hg. Results: T2DM-MS patients had significant higher values of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and medium arterial pressure compared to T2DM-Non MS patients. Serum levels of TC, TG, LDL-C, VLDL-C and FBG were significantly higher in the T2DM-MS group compared to the T2DM-Non MS group. Serum fibrinogen level and GGT level were significantly higher in patients with T2DM-MS compared to the serum fibrinogen level and GGT level in T2DM-Non MS patients. Mean serum AST and ALT level were higher, but not significantly, in patients with T2DM and MS compared to the patients with T2DM without MS. Significant negative correlations were observed between TC and AST (r= -0,28, p<0,05), as well as between TC and ALT level (r= -0,29, p<0,05) in T2DM-MS group of patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that patients with T2DM and MS have markedly elevated liver enzymes. T2DM and MS probably play a role in

  7. Short communication: expression of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the female lower genital tract: implications for microbicide research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Cost, Marilyn; Poloyac, Samuel; Rohan, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Topical vaginal microbicides have been considered a promising option for preventing the male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV; however, clinical trials to date have not clearly demonstrated robust and reproducible effectiveness results. While multiple approaches may help enhance product effectiveness observed in clinical trials, increasing the drug exposure in lower genital tract tissues is a compelling option, given the difficulty in achieving sufficient drug exposure and positive correlation between tissue exposure and microbicide efficacy. Since many microbicide drug candidates are substrates of transporters and/or metabolizing enzymes, there is emerging interest in improving microbicide exposure and efficacy through local modulation of transporters and enzymes in the female lower genital tract. However, no systematic information on transporter/enzyme expression is available for ectocervical and vaginal tissues of premenopausal women, the genital sites most relevant to microbicide drug delivery. The current study utilized reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to examine the mRNA expression profile of 22 transporters and 19 metabolizing enzymes in premenopausal normal human ectocervix and vagina. Efflux and uptake transporters important for antiretroviral drugs, such as P-gp, BCRP, OCT2, and ENT1, were found to be moderately or highly expressed in the lower genital tract as compared to liver. Among the metabolizing enzymes examined, most CYP isoforms were not detected while a number of UGTs such as UGT1A1 were highly expressed. Moderate to high expression of select transporters and enzymes was also observed in mouse cervix and vagina. The implications of this information on microbicide research is also discussed, including microbicide pharmacokinetics, the utilization of the mouse model in microbicide screening, as well as the in vivo functional studies of cervicovaginal transporters and enzymes.

  8. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camporeale, Annalisa, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Demaria, Marco [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, 8001 Redwood Blvd, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Monteleone, Emanuele [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Giorgi, Carlotta [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Wieckowski, Mariusz R. [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Str. 3, Warsaw 02-093 (Poland); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Poli, Valeria, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3{sup C/C}) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms.

  9. [Formation mechanism of high-energy metabolism along meridians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Zhou, Li-hua

    2014-11-01

    According to the analysis and integration on prior research results regarding meridian essence, it is believed that high-energy metabolism is one of the main characteristics of along-meridian specificity. With discussion on the formation mechanism of along-meridians high-energy metabolism as entry point, it is found out that proteins of voltage-gated calcium channel along the meridians are likely to play an essential role of starting and coupling during the along-meridians functional activity. Thus, the hypothesis "proteins coupling in the meridians" is modified to the hypothesis "calcium channels proteins coupling in the meridians", which opens new path to reveal material basis and action mechanism of meridians.

  10. Evaluation of the energy efficiency of enzyme fermentation by mechanistic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albaek, Mads O.; Gernaey, Krist V.; Hansen, Morten S.

    2012-01-01

    of cellulosic enzymes by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei and found excellent agreement with experimental data. The most influential factor was demonstrated to be viscosity and its influence on mass transfer. Not surprisingly, the biological model is also shown to have high influence on the model...... was found. This modeling approach can be used by manufacturers to evaluate the enzyme fermentation process for a range of different process conditions with regard to energy efficiency....

  11. Bone and energy metabolism parameters in professional cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-weeks stage race.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lombardi

    Full Text Available Cycling is a not weight-bearing activity and is known to induce bone resorption. Stage races are really strenuous endurance performances affecting the energy homeostasis. The recently highlighted link, in the co-regulation of bone and energy metabolism, demonstrates a central role for the equilibrium between carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of osteocalcin. Aim of this study was to understand the acute physiological responses to a cycling stage race in terms of bone turnover and energy metabolism and the possible co-regulative mechanisms underlying their relationship. We studied nine professional cyclists engaged in 2011 Giro d'Italia stage race. Pre-analytical and analytical phases tightly followed academic and anti-doping authority's recommendations. Bone and energy metabolism markers (bone alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, leptin and adiponectin and related hormones (cortisol and testosterone were measured, by Sandwich Enzyme Immunoassays, at days -1 (pre-race, 12 and 22 during the race. The power output and the energy expenditure (mean and accumulated were derived and correlated with the biochemical indexes. During the race, bone metabolism showed that an unbalance in behalf of resorption, which is enhanced, occurred along with a relative increase in the concentration of the undercarboxylated form of osteocalcin that was indirectly related to the enhanced energy expenditure, through adipokines modifications, with leptin decrease (high energy consumption and adiponectin increase (optimization of energy expenditure. The exertion due to heavy effort induced a decrease of cortisol, while testosterone levels resulted unchanged. In conclusion, during a 3-weeks stage race, bone metabolism is pushed towards resorption. A possible relationship between the bone and the energy metabolisms is suggested by the relative correlations among absolute and relative concentrations

  12. Bone and energy metabolism parameters in professional cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-weeks stage race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Graziani, Rosa; Colombini, Alessandra; Banfi, Giuseppe; Corsetti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Cycling is a not weight-bearing activity and is known to induce bone resorption. Stage races are really strenuous endurance performances affecting the energy homeostasis. The recently highlighted link, in the co-regulation of bone and energy metabolism, demonstrates a central role for the equilibrium between carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of osteocalcin. Aim of this study was to understand the acute physiological responses to a cycling stage race in terms of bone turnover and energy metabolism and the possible co-regulative mechanisms underlying their relationship. We studied nine professional cyclists engaged in 2011 Giro d'Italia stage race. Pre-analytical and analytical phases tightly followed academic and anti-doping authority's recommendations. Bone and energy metabolism markers (bone alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, leptin and adiponectin) and related hormones (cortisol and testosterone) were measured, by Sandwich Enzyme Immunoassays, at days -1 (pre-race), 12 and 22 during the race. The power output and the energy expenditure (mean and accumulated) were derived and correlated with the biochemical indexes. During the race, bone metabolism showed that an unbalance in behalf of resorption, which is enhanced, occurred along with a relative increase in the concentration of the undercarboxylated form of osteocalcin that was indirectly related to the enhanced energy expenditure, through adipokines modifications, with leptin decrease (high energy consumption) and adiponectin increase (optimization of energy expenditure). The exertion due to heavy effort induced a decrease of cortisol, while testosterone levels resulted unchanged. In conclusion, during a 3-weeks stage race, bone metabolism is pushed towards resorption. A possible relationship between the bone and the energy metabolisms is suggested by the relative correlations among absolute and relative concentrations trends of

  13. Metabolic enzyme activities of abyssal and hadal fishes: pressure effects and a re-evaluation of depth-related changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerringer, M. E.; Drazen, J. C.; Yancey, P. H.

    2017-07-01

    Metabolic enzyme activities of muscle tissue have been useful and widely-applied indicators of whole animal metabolic capacity, particularly in inaccessible systems such as the deep sea. Previous studies have been conducted at atmospheric pressure, regardless of organism habitat depth. However, maximum reaction rates of some of these enzymes are pressure dependent, complicating the use of metabolic enzyme activities as proxies of metabolic rates. Here, we show pressure-related rate changes in lactate and malate dehydrogenase (LDH, MDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) in six fish species (2 hadal, 2 abyssal, 2 shallow). LDH maximal reaction rates decreased with pressure for the two shallow species, but, in contrast to previous findings, it increased for the four deep species, suggesting evolutionary changes in LDH reaction volumes. MDH maximal reaction rates increased with pressure in all species (up to 51±10% at 60 MPa), including the tide pool snailfish, Liparis florae (activity increase at 60 MPa 44±9%), suggesting an inherent negative volume change of the reaction. PK was inhibited by pressure in all species tested, including the hadal liparids (up to 34±3% at 60 MPa), suggesting a positive volume change during the reaction. The addition of 400 mM TMAO counteracted this inhibition at both 0.5 and 2.0 mM ADP concentrations for the hadal liparid, Notoliparis kermadecensis. We revisit depth-related trends in metabolic enzyme activities according to these pressure-related rate changes and new data from seven abyssal and hadal species from the Kermadec and Mariana trenches. Results show that, with abyssal and hadal species, pressure-related rate changes are another variable to be considered in the use of enzyme activities as proxies for metabolic rate, in addition to factors such as temperature and body mass. Intraspecific increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes with depth of capture, independent of body mass, in two hadal snailfishes suggest improved nutritional

  14. [Effect of diet overloaded by fats on the enzyme systems of metabolism in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herych, O Kh; Pentiuk, O O

    2008-01-01

    The feeding of rats with high-fat diet (a part of fats was 50% of energy value of ration against 20% in control) during 4 weeks increased the level of cytochrome P-450 in the liver and enhanced aniline- and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity of CYP2E1 as well as erythromycin N-demethylase activity of CYP3A; the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase class 3, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, glutathione-S-transferase and N-acetyl transferase. At the same time, the moderate decrease of indomethacin-O-demethylase of CYP2C both phenolsulfotransferase activity were fixed. The changes of enzymatic activity correlated with activating of processes of gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis and, especially, ketogenesis. A high-fat diet enhanced reactions of biotransformation of amidopyrine, acetanilide, toluene, sulfadimezine, were catalyzed with CYP2E1, CYP3A and enzymes of conjugation, simultaneously it increased the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol.

  15. Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2007-11-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

  16. Heparin and related polysaccharides: Synthesis using recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suflita, Matthew; Fu, Li; He, Wenqin; Koffas, Mattheos; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are linear anionic polysaccharides that exhibit a number of important biological and pharmacological activities. The two most prominent members of this class of polysaccharides are heparin/heparan sulfate and the chondroitin sulfates (including dermatan sulfate). These polysaccharides, having complex structures and polydispersity, are biosynthesized in the Golgi of most animal cells. The chemical synthesis of these glycosaminoglycans is precluded by their structural complexity. Today, we depend on food animal tissues for their isolation and commercial production. Ton quantities of these glycosaminoglycans are used annually as pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. The variability of animal-sourced glycosaminoglycans, their inherent impurities, the limited availability of source tissues, the poor control of these source materials, and their manufacturing processes, suggest a need for new approaches for their production. Over the past decade there have been major efforts in the biotechnological production of these glycosaminoglycans. This mini-review focuses on the use of recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering for the production of heparin and chondroitin sulfates. PMID:26219501

  17. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  18. Inhibitory effects of kale ingestion on metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Izumi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Teramoto, Sachiyuki; Takayanagi, Risa; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Kale (Brassica oleracea L. var acephala DC) is a leafy green vegetable belonging to the cabbage family (Brassicaceae) that contains a large amount of health-promoting phytochemicals. There are any reports about the effects of kale ingestion on the chemoprevention function and mechanism, but the interactions between kale and drugs have not been researched. We investigated the effects of kale intake on cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism by using cocktail probe drugs, including midazolam (for CYP3A4), caffeine (for CYP1A2), dextromethorphan (for CYP2D6), tolbutamide (for CYP2C9), omeprazole (for CYP2C19), and chlorzoxazone (for CYP2E1). Cocktail drugs were administered into rats treated with kale and cabbage (2000 mg/kg) for a week. The results showed that kale intake induced a significant increase in plasma levels and the AUC of midazolam, caffeine, and dextromethorphan. In addition, the plasma concentration and AUC of omeprazole tended to increase. Additionally, no almost differences in the mRNA expression levels of CYP enzymes in the liver were observed. In conclusion, kale ingestion was considered to have an inhibitory effect on the activities of CYP3A4, 1A2, 2D6, and 2C19 for a reason competitive inhibition than inhibitory changes in the mRNA expressions.

  19. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene polymorphisms predict response to lung volume reduction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeMeo Dawn L

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT, marked variability in response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS was observed. We sought to identify genetic differences which may explain some of this variability. Methods In 203 subjects from the NETT Genetics Ancillary Study, four outcome measures were used to define response to LVRS at six months: modified BODE index, post-bronchodilator FEV1, maximum work achieved on a cardiopulmonary exercise test, and University of California, San Diego shortness of breath questionnaire. Sixty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in five genes previously shown to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility, exercise capacity, or emphysema distribution. Results A SNP upstream from glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1; p = 0.003 and a coding SNP in microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1; p = 0.02 were each associated with change in BODE score. These effects appeared to be strongest in patients in the non-upper lobe predominant, low exercise subgroup. A promoter SNP in EPHX1 was associated with change in BODE score (p = 0.008, with the strongest effects in patients with upper lobe predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity. One additional SNP in GSTP1 and three additional SNPs in EPHX1 were associated (p Conclusion Genetic variants in GSTP1 and EPHX1, two genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, were predictive of response to LVRS. These polymorphisms may identify patients most likely to benefit from LVRS.

  20. Tumour‐selective targeting of drug metabolizing enzymes to treat metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierdl, Monika; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Hatfield, M Jason

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for the detoxification of ester‐containing xenobiotics. This hydrolysis reaction results in the formation of the corresponding carboxylic acid and alcohol. Due to their highly plastic active site, CEs can hydrolyze structurally very distinct and complex molecules. Because ester groups significantly increase the water solubility of compounds, they are frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry to make relatively insoluble compounds more bioavailable. By default, this results in CEs playing a major role in the distribution and metabolism of these esterified drugs. However, this can be exploited to selectively improve compound hydrolysis, and using specific in vivo targeting techniques can be employed to generate enhanced drug activity. Here, we seek to detail the human CEs involved in esterified molecule hydrolysis, compare and contrast these with CEs present in small mammals and describe novel methods to improve drug therapy by specific delivery of CEs to cells in vivo. Finally, we will discuss the development of such approaches for their potential application towards malignant disease. PMID:27423046

  1. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate that ...

  2. Adipose tissue remodeling: its role in energy metabolism and metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sik eChoe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue (WAT functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue (BAT accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secret various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic over-nutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  3. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  4. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  5. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59-22.76 μg/mL and 110.71-526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin, CAM: Complementary and alternative medicine, cDNA: Complementary

  6. Adaptive evolution of mitochondrial energy metabolism genes associated with increased energy demand in flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunxia; Xu, Shixia; Xu, Junxiao; Guo, Yan; Yang, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Insects are unique among invertebrates for their ability to fly, which raises intriguing questions about how energy metabolism in insects evolved and changed along with flight. Although physiological studies indicated that energy consumption differs between flying and non-flying insects, the evolution of molecular energy metabolism mechanisms in insects remains largely unexplored. Considering that about 95% of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is supplied by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation, we examined 13 mitochondrial protein-encoding genes to test whether adaptive evolution of energy metabolism-related genes occurred in insects. The analyses demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA protein-encoding genes are subject to positive selection from the last common ancestor of Pterygota, which evolved primitive flight ability. Positive selection was also found in insects with flight ability, whereas no significant sign of selection was found in flightless insects where the wings had degenerated. In addition, significant positive selection was also identified in the last common ancestor of Neoptera, which changed its flight mode from direct to indirect. Interestingly, detection of more positively selected genes in indirect flight rather than direct flight insects suggested a stronger selective pressure in insects having higher energy consumption. In conclusion, mitochondrial protein-encoding genes involved in energy metabolism were targets of adaptive evolution in response to increased energy demands that arose during the evolution of flight ability in insects.

  7. Fat metabolism is regulated by altered gene expression oflipogenic enzymes and regulatory factors in liver and adiposetissue but not in semimembranosus muscle of pigs during thefattening period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duran-Montge, P; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown previously that lipid metabolism is regulated by fatty acids (FA) and that thyroid hormones are important regulators of energy metabolism. The effects of weight, dietary fat level and dietary FA profile on thyroid hormone levels and expression of lipogenic genes and tissue FA...... hormones and genes encoding enzymes of fat synthesis in adipose tissue (acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACACA), fatty acid synthase and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD)) and the large differences in expression of lipogenic genes at different weights (60 and 100 kg BW), suggest a role for thyroid hormones and for T3...... composition were studied. Sixty-one crossbred gilts weighing 6265.2 kg BW average were either slaughtered at the beginning of the trial (n55) or fed one of seven diets (n58 pigs per diet): a semisynthetic diet formulated to contain a very low level of fat (NF) and six diets based on barley-soybean meal...

  8. Effect of BCAA intake during endurance exercises on fatigue substances, muscle damage substances, and energy metabolism substances

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Jeong, Woo-Seok; Lee, Ha-Yan

    2013-01-01

    The increase rate of utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) by muscle is reduced to its plasma concentration during prolonged exercise leading to glycogen. BCAA supplementation would reduce the serum activities of intramuscular enzymes associated with muscle damage. To examine the effects of BCAA administration on fatigue substances (serotonin, ammonia and lactate), muscle damage substances (CK and LDH) and energy metabolism substances (FFA and glucose) after endurance exercise. Sub...

  9. The mouse liver displays daily rhythms in the metabolism of phospholipids and in the activity of lipid synthesizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorné, Lucas D; Acosta-Rodríguez, Victoria A; Pasquaré, Susana J; Salvador, Gabriela A; Giusto, Norma M; Guido, Mario Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system involves central and peripheral oscillators regulating temporally biochemical processes including lipid metabolism; their disruption leads to severe metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes, etc). Here, we investigated the temporal regulation of glycerophospholipid (GPL) synthesis in mouse liver, a well-known peripheral oscillator. Mice were synchronized to a 12:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle and then released to constant darkness with food ad libitum. Livers collected at different times exhibited a daily rhythmicity in some individual GPL content with highest levels during the subjective day. The activity of GPL-synthesizing/remodeling enzymes: phosphatidate phosphohydrolase 1 (PAP-1/lipin) and lysophospholipid acyltransferases (LPLATs) also displayed significant variations, with higher levels during the subjective day and at dusk. We evaluated the temporal regulation of expression and activity of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesizing enzymes. PC is mainly synthesized through the Kennedy pathway with Choline Kinase (ChoK) as a key regulatory enzyme or through the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway. The PC/PE content ratio exhibited a daily variation with lowest levels at night, while ChoKα and PEMT mRNA expression displayed maximal levels at nocturnal phases. Our results demonstrate that mouse liver GPL metabolism oscillates rhythmically with a precise temporal control in the expression and/or activity of specific enzymes.

  10. Ameliorating effect of eugenol on hyperglycemia by attenuating the key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Sathish, Gajendren; Jayanthi, Mahadevan; Muthukumaran, Jayachandran; Muruganathan, Udaiyar; Ramachandran, Vinayagam

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a serious health burden for both governments and healthcare providers. This study was hypothesized to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of eugenol by determine the activities of key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced into male albino Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)). Eugenol was administered to diabetic rats intragastrically at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg b.w. for 30 days. The dose 10 mg/kg b.w. significantly reduced the levels of blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and increased plasma insulin level. The altered activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and liver marker enzymes (AST, ALT, and ALP), creatine kinase and blood urea nitrogen in serum and blood of diabetic rats were significantly reverted to near normal levels by the administration of eugenol. Further, eugenol administration to diabetic rats improved body weight and hepatic glycogen content demonstrated the antihyperglycemic potential of eugenol in diabetic rats. The present findings suggest that eugenol can potentially ameliorate key enzymes of glucose metabolism in experimental diabetes, and it is sensible to broaden the scale of use of eugenol in a trial to alleviate the adverse effects of diabetes.

  11. Intracellular Localization of Enzymes of Carbon Metabolism in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Exhibiting C3 Photosynthetic Characteristics or Performing Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Foster, Joyce G.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, a halophilic, inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, was grown at NaCl concentrations of 20 and 400 millimolar in the rooting medium. Plants from the low salinity treatment showed exclusively C3-photosynthetic net CO2 fixation, whereas plants exposed to the high salinity level exhibited net CO2 dark fixation involving CAM. Mesophyll protoplasts, isolated from both tissues, were gently ruptured, and the intracellular localization of enzymes was studied following differential centrifugation and Percoll density gradient centrifugation of protoplast extracts. Both centrifugation techniques resulted in the separation of intact chloroplasts, with up to 90% yield, from other organelles and the nonparticulate fraction of cells. Enzymes were identified by determination of activity and by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of enzyme protein. Experiments established the extraorganellar (cytoplasmic) location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, enolase, phosphoglyceromutase, and NADP-malic enzyme; the mitochondrial location of NAD-malic enzyme; and the chloroplastic location of pyruvate, Pi dikinase. NAD-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphohexose isomerase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were associated with both cytoplasm and chloroplasts. NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase activity was found in both the chloroplastic and extrachloroplastic fractions; the activity in the chloroplast showed an optimum at pH 8.0 and was dependent upon preincubation of enzyme with dithiothreitol. The extrachloroplastic activity showed an optimum at pH 6.5 and was independent of pretreatment with dithiothreitol. Protoplast extracts of M. crystallinum performing CAM exhibited higher activities (expressed per mg chlorophyll per min) of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, NADP-malic enzyme, NAD-malic enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, enolase, phosphoglyceromutase, NAD-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  12. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism.

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    Liubov A Dadinova

    Full Text Available The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB; (ii inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase; (iii 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI; and (iv glutamate decarboxylase (GadA. The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques.

  13. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of amide imidazole derivatives as novel metabolic enzyme CYP26A1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Liu, Kai; Han, Jing; Zhao, Li-yu; Su, Xiao; Lin, Bin; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Cheng, Mao-Sheng

    2015-10-15

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) as a physiological metabolite of vitamin A is widely applied in the treatment of cancer, skin, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. CYP26A1 enzyme, induced by ATRA in liver and target tissues, metabolizes ATRA into 4-hydroxyl-RA. Inhibition of CYP26A1 metabolic enzyme represents a promising strategy for discovery of new specific anticancer agents. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of new amide imidazole derivatives as retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) toward CYP26A1 enzyme. First, based on the recent theoretical models (Sun et al., J. Mol. Graph. Model., 2015, 56, 10-19) a series of RAMBAs with novel scaffolds were designed using fragment-based drug discovery approach. Subsequently, the new RAMBAs were synthesized and evaluated for their biological activities. All the compounds demonstrated appropriate enzyme activities and cell activities. The promising inhibitors 20 and 23 with IC50 value of 0.22 μM and 0.46 μM toward CYP26A1, respectively, were further evaluated for CYP selectivity and the metabolic profile of ATRA. Both compounds 20 and 23 showed higher selectivity for CYP26A1 over other CYPs (CYP2D6, CYP3A4) when compared to liarozole. They also showed better inhibitory activities for the metabolism of ATRA when also compared to liarozole. These studies further validated the pharmacophore and structure-activity relationship models obtained about CYP26A1 inhibitors and highlighted the promising activities of the new series of CYP26A1 inhibitors designed from such models. They also paved the way for future development of those candidates as potential drugs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Disturbance of Antioxidant Enzymes and Purine Metabolism in the Ejaculate of Men Living in Disadvantaged Areas of Kyzylorda Region

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    Valentihna N. Kislitskaya

    2015-07-01

    CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of study, it was put the influence  of negative factors of the Aral Sea region in men’s sperm of reproductive  age gives to disability free-radical processes, that proves changing of ferments of ant oxidative protection Catalase and adenosine deaminase (ADA.  This disturbance in men’s sperm of reproductive age leading to increased level of oxidative stress and impaired activity of  antioxidant enzymes and purine metabolism, responsible for the abnormal transmembrane and intracellular processes, reflecting the degree of imbalance of enzymes.

  15. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism

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    Meera Shah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer.

  16. Enhancing energy and glucose metabolism by disrupting triglyceride synthesis: Lessons from mice lacking DGAT1

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    Chen Hubert C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the ability to make triglycerides is essential for normal physiology, excess accumulation of triglycerides results in obesity and is associated with insulin resistance. Inhibition of triglyceride synthesis, therefore, may represent a feasible strategy for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 is one of two DGAT enzymes that catalyze the final reaction in the known pathways of mammalian triglyceride synthesis. Mice lacking DGAT1 have increased energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and are protected against diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance. These metabolic effects of DGAT1 deficiency result in part from the altered secretion of adipocyte-derived factors. Studies of DGAT1-deficient mice have helped to provide insights into the mechanisms by which cellular lipid metabolism modulates systemic carbohydrate and insulin metabolism, and a better understanding of how DGAT1 deficiency enhances energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity may identify additional targets or strategies for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  17. [Effect of high performance sports on energy metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W; Maassen, N

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge about metabolism and muscular fatigue has been considerably improved during the recent years. Intramuscular pH should not generally be discussed as a factor of cellular fatigue as it has been shown to increase transiently at the beginning and to be very differently affected in ST-(6,9) and FT-fibers (6,2) at the end of exercise. During maximum exercise, we assume changes of muscle membrane potential due to increasing interstitial potassium concentrations as an important performance-limiting factor. The role, lactate is playing during exercise, has to be thought over. Its production by the binding of two protons to the pyruvate molecule is necessary for an intensive anaerobic and aerobic metabolism. The lactate molecules itself represent a source of energy, which is preferentially used by the heart muscle and by ST-fibers working at lower intensity. During long term endurance events, the glycogen stores are assumed to be a limiting factor. However, no direct casual relationship between glycogen and fatigue mechanisms has been found hithertoo. The anaerobic glycolytic metabolism decreases during long lasting exercise as a result of lowered glycogen stores. Therefore, metabolic acidosis cannot be observed after ultra-long endurance events. In contrast, a respiratory alcalosis is the common finding.

  18. Validated Predictions of Metabolic Energy Consumption for Submaximal Effort Movement.

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    George A Tsianos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical performance emerges from complex interactions among many physiological systems that are largely driven by the metabolic energy demanded. Quantifying metabolic demand is an essential step for revealing the many mechanisms of physical performance decrement, but accurate predictive models do not exist. The goal of this study was to investigate if a recently developed model of muscle energetics and force could be extended to reproduce the kinematics, kinetics, and metabolic demand of submaximal effort movement. Upright dynamic knee extension against various levels of ergometer load was simulated. Task energetics were estimated by combining the model of muscle contraction with validated models of lower limb musculotendon paths and segment dynamics. A genetic algorithm was used to compute the muscle excitations that reproduced the movement with the lowest energetic cost, which was determined to be an appropriate criterion for this task. Model predictions of oxygen uptake rate (VO2 were well within experimental variability for the range over which the model parameters were confidently known. The model's accurate estimates of metabolic demand make it useful for assessing the likelihood and severity of physical performance decrement for a given task as well as investigating underlying physiologic mechanisms.

  19. [Modifications in myocardial energy metabolism in diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The capacity of cardiac myocyte to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. Because FA is the main heart fuel (although the most expensive one in oxygen, and prompt to induce deleterious effects), this process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Several pathological situations are associated with an accumulation of FA or derivatives, or with an excessive b-oxidation. The diabetic cardiomyocyte is characterised by an over consumption of FA. The control of the FA/glucose balance clearly appears as a new strategy for cytoprotection, particularly in diabetes and requires a reduced FA contribution to ATP production. Cardiac myocytes can control FA mitochondrial entry, but display weak ability to control FA uptake, thus the fate of non beta-oxidized FA appear as a new impairment for the cell. Both the trigger and the regulation of cardiac contraction result from membrane activity, and the other major FA function in the myocardium is their role in membrane homeostasis, through the phospholipid synthesis and remodeling pathways. Sudden death, hypercatecholaminemia, diabetes and heart failure have been associated with an altered PUFA content in cardiac membranes. Experimental data suggest that the 2 metabolic pathways involved in membrane homeostasis may represent therapeutic targets for cytoprotection. The drugs that increase cardiac phospholipid turnover (trimetazidine, ranolazine,...) display anti-ischemic non hemodynamic effect. This effect is based on a redirection of FA utilization towards phospholipid synthesis, which decrease their availability for energy production. A nutritional approach gave also promising results. Besides its anti-arrhythmic effect, the dietary docosahexaenoic acid is able to reduce FA energy consumption and hence oxygen demand. The cardiac metabolic pathways involving FA should be considered as a whole, precariously balanced. The diabetic heart being characterised by

  20. Acetate formation in the energy metabolism of parasitic helminths and protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Henze, Katrin; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Martin, William

    2010-03-15

    Formation and excretion of acetate as a metabolic end product of energy metabolism occurs in many protist and helminth parasites, such as the parasitic helminths Fasciola hepatica, Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum, and the protist parasites, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis as well as Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. In all of these parasites acetate is a main end product of their energy metabolism, whereas acetate formation does not occur in their mammalian hosts. Acetate production might therefore harbour novel targets for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. In parasites, acetate is produced from acetyl-CoA by two different reactions, both involving substrate level phosphorylation, that are catalysed by either a cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) or an organellar acetate:succinate CoA-transferase (ASCT). The ACS reaction is directly coupled to ATP synthesis, whereas the ASCT reaction yields succinyl-CoA for ATP formation via succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS). Based on recent work on the ASCTs of F. hepatica, T. vaginalis and Trypanosoma brucei we suggest the existence of three subfamilies of enzymes within the CoA-transferase family I. Enzymes of these three subfamilies catalyse the ASCT reaction in eukaryotes via the same mechanism, but the subfamilies share little sequence homology. The CoA-transferases of the three subfamilies are all present inside ATP-producing organelles of parasites, those of subfamily IA in the mitochondria of trypanosomatids, subfamily IB in the mitochondria of parasitic worms and subfamily IC in hydrogenosome-bearing parasites. Together with the recent characterisation among non-parasitic protists of yet a third route of acetate formation involving acetate kinase (ACK) and phosphotransacetylase (PTA) that was previously unknown among eukaryotes, these recent developments provide a good opportunity to have a closer look at eukaryotic acetate formation. (c) 2010 Australian Society for Parasitology

  1. Genetic variation in alcohol metabolizing enzymes among Inuit and its relation to drinking patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Mikkelsen, Stine Schou; Becker, Ulrik; Hansen, Torben; Tolstrup, Janne S

    2014-11-01

    Variation in genes involved in alcohol metabolism is associated with drinking patterns worldwide. We compared variation in these genes among the Inuit with published results from the general population of Denmark and, due to the Asian ancestry of the Inuit, with Han Chinese. We analyzed the association between gene variations and drinking patterns among the Inuit. We genotyped 4162 Inuit participants from two population health surveys. Information on drinking patterns was available for 3560. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were examined: ADH1B arg48his, ADH1C ile350val, ADH1C arg272gln, ALDH2 glu504lys, ALDH2 5'-UTR A-357G, ALDH1B1 ala86val and ALDH1B1 arg107leu. The allele distribution differed significantly between Inuit and the general population of Denmark. A protective effect on heavy drinking was found for the TT genotype of the ALDH1B1 arg107leu SNP (OR=0.59; 95% CI 0.37-0.92), present in 3% of pure Inuit and 37% of Danes. The ADH1C GG genotype was associated with heavy drinking and a positive CAGE test (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.05-1.72). It was present in 27% of Inuit and 18% of Danes. The Asian genotype pattern with a high frequency of the ADH1B A allele and an ALDH2 gene coding for an inactive enzyme was not present in Greenland. ADH1C and ALDH1B1 arg107leu SNPs play a role in the shaping of drinking patterns among the Inuit in Greenland. A low frequency of the ALDH1B1 arg107leu TT genotype compared with the general population in Denmark deserves further study. This genotype was protective of heavy drinking among the Inuit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Arachis hypogaea nutshell extract on lipid metabolic enzymes and obesity parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Diego A; Ilic, Nebojsa; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya

    2006-05-08

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) shell extracts (PSE) on lipases and to evaluate its potential development for the treatment of obesity. The peanut shells were extracted in 95% ethanol, and the extracts were screened for inhibitory effects on pancreatic lipase (PL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities as well as on lipolysis of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We also examined in vivo whether PSE could prevent the body weight gain induced by feeding a high-fat diet to male Wistar rats for 12 weeks. PSE inhibits a number of lipases, including PL, LPL and, possibly, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). PSE-treated Wistar rats showed increased fecal lipid excretion respect to the control group. Body weight and body weight gain, and liver size, were significantly lower in rats fed the high-fat diet with 1% of PSE (w:w diet) than in those fed the high-fat diet alone. The rats treated with PSE showed reduced triacylglycerol content in the liver, as well as the serum glucose and insulin. The inhibitory activity of PSE on the lipid metabolic enzymes and the increase in fecal fat excretion suggests that PSE might be useful as a treatment to reduce the dietary fat absorption. The observed reduction in intracellular lipolytic activity of cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes may reduce the levels of circulating free fatty acids. The observed effects are likely induced by more than one bioactive component of PSE. The PSE actions may, at least in part, be attributed to the inhibition of fat absorption in the digestive tract and the reduction of the adipocyte lipolysis.

  3. Association between polymorphisms of folate-metabolizing enzymes and risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, C; Redondo, M; Reyes-Engel, A; Perea-Milla, E; Gaitan, M J; Machuca, J; Diaz, F; Caballero, J; Carnero, J

    2008-07-01

    Polymorphisms of the genes 5'-10'-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, 677CT and 1298AC), methionine synthase (MTR, 2756AC) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, 66AC) provoke variations in enzyme activity, which can lead to alterations in the metabolism of folates and in the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), the most active methyl donor in the body. This could play an important role in carcinogenesis through the degree of DNA methylation and of nucleotide synthesis. In the present study, four polymorphisms were studied, two of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, and the other two of methionine synthase and methionine synthase reductase. Our aim was to study the association between prostate carcinoma susceptibility and these polymorphisms. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 182 patients (mean age: 70.7+/-7.29 years) with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma and in 205 control subjects (mean age: 70.3+/-7.82 years) diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes. Comparison of the MTHFR CT and TT genotypes in patients and the controls revealed significant differences (0.57 vs 0.38) (OR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.46-3.30) and (0.06 vs 0.15) (OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.17-0.73), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between patients and controls with respect to the MTHFR 1298AC, the MTR 2756AC and the MTRR 66AC polymorphisms. However, among the patients, the MTR 2756 allele C was related to a high Gleason score. We conclude that the polymorphism MTHFR C677T is clearly related to prostatic carcinogenesis, on the contrary to the other polymorphisms studied, although the MTR 2756 allele C acts as a factor of tumor aggressiveness, this being found in tumors with high carcinogenic potential.

  4. Clustering of metabolic risk factors is associated with high-normal levels of liver enzymes among 6- to 8-year-old children: the PANIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitasalo, Anna; Laaksonen, David E; Lindi, Virpi; Eloranta, Aino-Maija; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Tompuri, Tuomo; Väisänen, Sari; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A

    2012-10-01

    We studied the associations of clustering of metabolic risk factors with plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in healthy prepubertal children. The subjects were a representative population sample of 492 children 6-8 years of age. We assessed body fat percentage (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, ALT, GGT, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and calculated a continuous metabolic syndrome score variable. We also used factor analysis to examine whether high-normal liver enzymes are a feature of metabolic syndrome among children. Children with overweight or obesity, defined by International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) criteria, had a 2.1-times higher risk of having ALT and a 4.5-times higher risk of having GGT in the highest fifth of its distribution than normal weight children. Children in the highest sex-specific third of metabolic syndrome score, body fat percentage, waist circumference, and insulin had a two to three times higher risk of being in the highest fifth of ALT and GGT. Moreover, children in the highest third of glucose and hsCRP had a 2.5-fold risk of being in the highest fifth of GGT. First-order factor analysis yielded three factors; the first included insulin, glucose, and triglycerides; the second waist circumference, insulin, GGT, and hsCRP; and the third HDL-C, triglycerides, waist circumference, and insulin. Second-order factor analysis yielded a single metabolic syndrome factor, explaining 64.1% of the variance. Clustering of metabolic risk factors, particularly excess body fat, is associated with high-normal levels of ALT and GGT in prepubertal children. High-normal levels of liver enzymes, especially GGT, and systemic low-grade inflammation could be considered features of metabolic

  5. Visceral metabolism and efficiency of energy use by ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozloski Gilberto Vilmar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The visceral system (liver and portal-drained viscera represents an interface between diet and the animal, and it acts as the main site of regulation of nutrients that are used for maintenance, growth, lactation, reproduction, and physical activities of animals. However the functions carried out by visceral organs have, however, a significant energetic cost and are influenced by a variety of factors, such as the level of feed intake and diet composition, among others. As a result, variable quantities of substances are metabolized by them and, thus, the pattern and the quantity of nutrients available to the peripheral tissues can be quite different from those absorbed at the intestinal lumen. Probably, the major source of variation in the efficiency of utilization of metabolizable energy among feeds is associated mainly with visceral metabolism and it is unlikely that the ratio ketogenic/glucogenic of absorbed substances has determinant effect under physiological conditions.

  6. Reprogramming of mitochondrial energy metabolism in malignant neoplasms

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    A. A. Kaplia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The novel ideas of fundamental role of mitochondria in the maintenance of viability of malignant cells have been reviewed. The modern state of research is considered in detail, including: mitochondrial control of the cellular redox state, sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in inner mitochondrial membrane and antioxidant protection systems. Specificities of the structural-functional mitochondrial remodelling in malignant tumors, the mechanisms of the energy metabolism reprogramming, enhancement of the ROS production and adaptation to the hypoxic conditions and metabolic stress are analyzed. The available data including our research on transplanted tumors indicate that cytotoxic action of sodium dichloroacetate (the inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase depends on biological properties of tumors and intensity of structural-functional mitochondrial rearrangement. Dichloroacetate turned out to be effective for sarcoma 37, but not for Lewis lung carcinoma.

  7. Metabolism of citral, the major constituent of lemongrass oil, in the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, and effects of enzyme inhibitors on toxicity and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Jun-Hyung; Isman, Murray B

    2016-10-01

    Although screening for new and reliable sources of botanical insecticides remains important, finding ways to improve the efficacy of those already in use through better understanding of their modes-of-action or metabolic pathways, or by improving formulations, deserves greater attention as the latter may present lesser regulation hurdles. Metabolic processing of citral (a combination of the stereoisomers geranial and neral), a main constituent of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil has not been previously examined in insects. To address this, we investigated insecticidal activities of lemongrass oil and citral, as well as the metabolism of citral in larvae of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, in associations with well-known enzyme inhibitors. Among the inhibitors tested, piperonyl butoxide showed the highest increase in toxicity followed by triphenyl phosphate, but no synergistic interaction between the inhibitors was observed. Topical application of citral to fifth instar larvae produced mild reductions in food consumption, and frass analysis after 24h revealed geranic acid (99.7%) and neric acid (98.8%) as major metabolites of citral. Neither citral nor any other metabolites were found following in vivo analysis of larvae after 24h, and no significant effect of enzyme inhibitors was observed on diet consumption or citral metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  9. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia – host cell interactions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. Results RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Conclusions Giardia affects the host’s arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy. PMID:24228819

  10. The metabolic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase acts as a transcriptional regulator in pathogenic Francisella

    OpenAIRE

    Ziveri, Jason; Tros, Fabiola; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Chhuon, Cerina; Audry, Mathilde; Dupuis, Marion; Barel, Monique; Korniotis, Sarantis; Fillatreau, Simon; Gales, Lara; Cahoreau, Edern; Charbit, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme fructose-bisphosphate aldolase occupies a central position in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. Beyond its housekeeping role in metabolism, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase has been involved in additional functions and is considered as a potential target for drug development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, we address the role of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase in the bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida. We demonstrate that fructose-bisphosphate aldolase is important for ...

  11. Metabolic models to investigate energy limited anaerobic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J; Premier, G C; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Kleerebezem, R

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is shifting from a philosophy of solely pollutants removal to a philosophy of combined resource recovery and waste treatment. Simultaneous wastewater treatment with energy recovery in the form of energy rich products, brings renewed interest to non-methanogenic anaerobic bioprocesses such as the anaerobic production of hydrogen, ethanol, solvents, VFAs, bioplastics and even electricity from microbial fuel cells. The existing kinetic-based modelling approaches, widely used in aerobic and methanogenic wastewater treatment processes, do not seem adequate in investigating such energy limited microbial ecosystems. The great diversity of similar microbial species, which share many of the fermentative reaction pathways, makes quantify microbial groups very difficult and causes identifiability problems. A modelling approach based on the consideration of metabolic reaction networks instead of on separated microbial groups is suggested as an alternative to describe anaerobic microbial ecosystems and in particular for the prediction of product formation as a function of environmental conditions imposed. The limited number of existing relevant fermentative pathways in conjunction with the fact that anaerobic reactions proceed very close to thermodynamic equilibrium reduces the complexity of such approach and the degrees of freedom in terms of product formation fluxes. In addition, energy limitation in these anaerobic microbial ecosystems makes plausible that selective forces associated with energy further define the system activity by favouring those conversions/microorganisms which provide the most energy for growth under the conditions imposed.

  12. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-12-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell's antenna to obesity and type II diabetes.

  13. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and epigenetics of Nrf2-regulated xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and transporters by dietary phytochemical and cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Lee, Jong Hun; Cheung, Ka Lung; Shu, Limin; Chen, Chi; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2013-07-01

    Cancer chemopreventive activities of various phytochemicals have been attributed to the modulation of xenobiotic disposition, which includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. The interaction between xenobiotics and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) is bidirectional. XMEs are responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics such as bioactivation and detoxification. Conversely, xenobiotics affect XMEs through transcriptional regulation (induction or suppression) and post-translational interactions (inhibition or activation). Similar relationships also exist between xenobiotics and their transporters. Studies conducted over the past decade have demonstrated that the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), plays a critical role in the regulation of detoxifying enzymes and transporters through a signaling system that senses and responds to redox imbalance. The role of Nrf2 in the interaction between chemopreventive phytochemicals and detoxifying enzymes/transporters has become an important topic in cancer chemoprevention. In this review, the genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to Nrf2-mediated regulation of detoxifying XMEs and transporters are discussed in the context of cancer chemoprevention. Phytochemicals may modulate the genome as well as epigenome, altering the regulation of XMEs and transporters, which may be critical for both cancer chemoprevention and the prevention of other oxidative stress- and inflammatory-related diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological pathologies. The pharmacogenomic expression of XMEs and transporters, with an emphasis on both genomics and epigenetics, will also be discussed.

  14. Effect of vitamin A status of rats on metabolizing enzymes after exposure to tobacco extract or N'-nitrosonornicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U J; Ammigan, N; Nagabhushan, M; Amonkar, A J; Bhide, S V

    1991-01-01

    The effects of N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and tobacco extract on hepatic and pulmonary biotransformation enzymes were studied in rats fed vitamin A-sufficient or -deficient for semisynthetic diets. Basal levels of cytochrome P450, benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, benzphetamine demethylase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione were lower in the group on the deficient diet. Treatment with tobacco extract or NNN significantly increased the levels of these enzymes in the sufficient diet group. However, in the deficient group, phase I enzymes were significantly increased, but glutathione and glutathione S-transferase levels were drastically reduced. Urine from animals on the deficient diet and treated with tobacco extract or NNN were mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella/microsome test. The results suggest that altered metabolism resulting from a vitamin A-deficient diet may be an important factor in susceptibility to carcinogens.

  15. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations featured similar genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters: a DMET Plus microarray assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, SoJeong; An, Hyungmi; Lee, Howard; Lee, Sangin; Ieiri, Ichiro; Lee, Youngjo; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hirota, Takeshi; Fukae, Masato; Yoshida, Kenji; Nagatsuka, Shinichiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Shin, Dong Wan; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Chung, Jae-Yong; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Interethnic differences in genetic polymorphism in genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters are one of the major factors that cause ethnic differences in drug response. This study aimed to investigate genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism, transport, and excretion among Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations, the three major East Asian ethnic groups. The frequencies of 1936 variants representing 225 genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters were determined from 786 healthy participants (448 Korean, 208 Japanese, and 130 Chinese) using the Affymetrix Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters Plus microarray. To compare allele or genotype frequencies in the high-dimensional data among the three East Asian ethnic groups, multiple testing, principal component analysis (PCA), and regularized multinomial logit model through least absolute shrinkage and selection operator were used. On microarray analysis, 1071 of 1936 variants (>50% of markers) were found to be monomorphic. In a large number of genetic variants, the fixation index and Pearson's correlation coefficient of minor allele frequencies were less than 0.034 and greater than 0.95, respectively, among the three ethnic groups. PCA identified 47 genetic variants with multiple testing, but was unable to discriminate ethnic groups by the first three components. Multinomial least absolute shrinkage and selection operator analysis identified 269 genetic variants that showed different frequencies among the three ethnic groups. However, none of those variants distinguished between the three ethnic groups during subsequent PCA. Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations are not pharmacogenetically distant from one another, at least with regard to drug disposition, metabolism, and elimination.

  16. Ginsenoside Rb1 improves energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle of an animal model of postoperative fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shan-Jun; Li, Ning; Zhou, Feng; Dong, Qian-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Postoperative fatigue syndrome (POFS) is a common clinical complication followed by almost every major abdominal surgery. Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1), a principle ginsenoside in ginseng, could exert a potent anti-fatigue effect on POFS. However, the mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies revealed that alterations in the energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle may play a vital role in the development and progression of fatigue. In the present study, we investigate the effect of GRb1 on energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of POFS induced by major small intestinal resection. GRb1 (10 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administrated once daily for 1, 3, 7, and 10 d from the operation day, respectively. The locomotor activity was recorded every day, and total food intake was calculated starting from 24 h after surgery. After GRb1 treatment was completed, blood and skeletal muscle were sampled. The level of blood glucose was determined by an automatic biochemical analyzer. The content of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in skeletal muscle was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The activity of energy metabolic enzymes Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, pyruvate kinase, and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) was assessed by commercially available kits. The results revealed that GRb1 could increase locomotor activity of POFS rats and significantly increase their total food intake postoperatively (P muscle of POFS rats (P muscle of POFS rats was enhanced by GRb1 (P 0.05). These results suggest that GRb1 may improve skeletal muscle energy metabolism in POFS, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with an increase in the content of ATP and an enhancement in the activity of energy metabolic enzymes such as Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase ATPase and SDH in the skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of enzymes supplementation on digestibility and energy utilizations of broilers diets with different metabolizable energy level

    OpenAIRE

    Glamočić, D.; Polovinski-Horvatović, M.; Ivković, M.; Beuković, D.; Bjedov, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this 3х2 factorial design trial with three different levels of metabolizable energy (13.4, 13.00, 12.6 MJ/kg), with and without exogenous enzymes (nutrition density was reduced by introducing sunflower meal in different percentage to diet (0, 8 и 16%)), the goal was to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes Roxazyme G2G (cellulase (endo-1,4-(β-glucanase), β- glucanase (endo-1,3(4)-β-glucanase) and xylanase (endo-1,4- β xylanase)) on digestibility a...

  18. Phenotypic knockouts of selected metabolic pathways by targeting enzymes with camel-derived nanobodies (V(HH)s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José I; Fraile, Sofía; Zafra, Olga; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-07-01

    Surveying the dynamics of metabolic networks of Gram-negative bacteria often requires the conditional shutdown of enzymatic activities once the corresponding proteins have been produced. We show that given biochemical functions can be entirely suppressed in vivo with camel antibodies (VHHs, nanobodies) that target active sites of cognate enzymes expressed in the cytoplasm. As a proof of principle, we raised VHHs against 2,5-dihydroxypyridine dioxygenase (NicX) of Pseudomonas putida, involved in nicotinic acid metabolism. Once fused to a thioredoxin domain, the corresponding nanobodies inhibited the enzyme both in Escherichia coli and in P. putida cells, which then accumulated the metabolic substrate of NicX. VHHs were further engineered to track the antigen in vivo by C-terminal fusion to a fluorescent protein. Conditional expression of the resulting VHHs allows simultaneously to track and target proteins of interest and enables the design of transient phenotypes without mutating the genetic complement of the bacteria under study. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic alterations and shifts in energy allocations are corequisites for the expression of extended longevity genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Robert; Buck, Steven; Hwangbo, Dae-Sung; Lane, Mark

    2002-04-01

    Evolutionary theories suggest that the expression of extended longevity depends on the organism's ability to shift energy from reproduction to somatic maintenance. New data led us to reexamine our older data and integrate the two into a larger picture of the genetic and metabolic alterations required if the animal is to live long. Our Ra normal-lived control strain can express any one of three different extended longevity phenotypes, only one of which involves significant and proportional increases in both mean and maximum longevity and thus a delayed onset of senescence. This phenotype is dependent on the up-regulation of the antioxidant defense system (ADS) genes and enzymes. Animals that express this phenotype typically have a pattern of altered specific activities in metabolically important enzymes, suggesting they are necessary to support the NAD+/NADP+ reducing system required for the continued high ADS enzyme activities. Fecundity data suggests that the energy required for this higher level of somatic maintenance initially came from a reduced egg production. This was only transient, however, for the females significantly increased their fecundity in later generations while still maintaining their longevity. The energy required for this enhanced fecundity was probably obtained from an increased metabolic efficiency, for the mitochondria of the La long-lived strain are metabolically more efficient and have a lower leakage of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the cytosol. Selection pressures that do not lead to these shifts in energy allocations result in extended longevity phenotypes characterized by increased early survival or increased late survival but not by a delayed onset of senescence.

  20. The SCFA receptor GPR43 and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo eKimura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Free fatty acids (FFAs are essential nutrients and act as signaling molecules in various cellular processes via binding with FFA receptors. Of these receptors, GPR43 is activated by short chain fatty acids (SCFAs; e.g., acetate, propionate, and butyrate. During feeding, SCFAs are produced by microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, and these SCFAs become important energy sources for the host. The gut microbiota affects nutrient acquisition and energy regulation of the host and can influence the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Recently, GPR43 has been reported to regulate host energy homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract and adipose tissues. Hence, GPR43 is also thought to be a potential drug target for metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, we summarize the identification, structure, and activities of GPR43, with a focus on host energy regulation, and present an essential overview of our current understanding of its physiological roles in host energy regulation that is mediated by gut microbiota. We also discuss the potential for GPR43 as a therapeutic target.

  1. Donepezil regulates energy metabolism and favors bone mass accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimar, Hazem; Alebrahim, Sharifa; Manickam, Garthiga; Al-Subaie, Ahmed; Abu-Nada, Lina; Murshed, Monzur; Tamimi, Faleh

    2016-03-01

    The autonomous nervous system regulates bone mass through the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) favors bone loss whereas the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) promotes bone mass accrual. Donepezil, a central-acting cholinergic agonist, has been shown to down-regulate SNS and up-regulate PNS signaling tones. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of donepezil could have beneficial effects in regulating bone mass. To test our hypothesis, two groups of healthy female mice were treated either with donepezil or saline. Differences in body metabolism and bone mass of the treated groups were compared. Body and visceral fat weights as well as serum leptin level were increased in donepezil-treated mice compared to control, suggesting that donepezil effects on SNS influenced metabolic activity. Donepezil-treated mice had better bone quality than controls due to a decrease in osteoclasts number. These results indicate that donepezil is able to affect whole body energy metabolism and favors bone mass in young female WT mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurring adaptation effect on energy metabolism of atrophic shin muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasyev М.А.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to recurring adaptation effect on energy metabolism of atrophic shin muscles. The purpose: Investigation of markers of activity of muscular fibers of gravitation-dependent muscles in condition of early posthypoki-netic readaptation. Materials. Muscles-antagonists have been taken from the shin area of hind limbs of a rat. Methods. Immunohistochemical dyeing of myofibrils of different type (I and II on glycogen and triglycerides have been used. Results. We have revealed dynamic changes of the endocellular contents of researched energy substrata on different terms of the period of posthypokinetic restoration. Conclusion. Investigated substrata my serve as adequate functional markers of muscles in the conditions under the study

  3. Methods for Efficiently and Accurately Computing Quantum Mechanical Free Energies for Enzyme Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, F L; Hudson, P S; Boresch, S; Woodcock, H L

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity is inherently linked to free energies of transition states, ligand binding, protonation/deprotonation, etc.; these free energies, and thus enzyme function, can be affected by residue mutations, allosterically induced conformational changes, and much more. Therefore, being able to predict free energies associated with enzymatic processes is critical to understanding and predicting their function. Free energy simulation (FES) has historically been a computational challenge as it requires both the accurate description of inter- and intramolecular interactions and adequate sampling of all relevant conformational degrees of freedom. The hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) framework is the current tool of choice when accurate computations of macromolecular systems are essential. Unfortunately, robust and efficient approaches that employ the high levels of computational theory needed to accurately describe many reactive processes (ie, ab initio, DFT), while also including explicit solvation effects and accounting for extensive conformational sampling are essentially nonexistent. In this chapter, we will give a brief overview of two recently developed methods that mitigate several major challenges associated with QM/MM FES: the QM non-Boltzmann Bennett's acceptance ratio method and the QM nonequilibrium work method. We will also describe usage of these methods to calculate free energies associated with (1) relative properties and (2) along reaction paths, using simple test cases with relevance to enzymes examples. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Global transcriptome analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) liver after in vivo methylmercury exposure suggests effects on energy metabolism pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadetie, Fekadu; Karlsen, Odd Andre; Lanzén, Anders; Berg, Karin; Olsvik, Pål; Hogstrand, Christer; Goksøyr, Anders

    2013-01-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widely distributed contaminant polluting many aquatic environments, with health risks to humans exposed mainly through consumption of seafood. The mechanisms of toxicity of MeHg are not completely understood. In order to map the range of molecular targets and gain better insights into the mechanisms of toxicity, we prepared Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) 135k oligonucleotide arrays and performed global analysis of transcriptional changes in the liver of fish treated with MeHg (0.5 and 2 mg/kg of body weight) for 14 days. Inferring from the observed transcriptional changes, the main pathways significantly affected by the treatment were energy metabolism, oxidative stress response, immune response and cytoskeleton remodeling. Consistent with known effects of MeHg, many transcripts for genes in oxidative stress pathways such as glutathione metabolism and Nrf2 regulation of oxidative stress response were differentially regulated. Among the differentially regulated genes, there were disproportionate numbers of genes coding for enzymes involved in metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids and glucose. In particular, many genes coding for enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation were up-regulated. The coordinated effects observed on many transcripts coding for enzymes of energy pathways may suggest disruption of nutrient metabolism by MeHg. Many transcripts for genes coding for enzymes in the synthetic pathways of sulphur containing amino acids were also up-regulated, suggesting adaptive responses to MeHg toxicity. By this toxicogenomics approach, we were also able to identify many potential biomarker candidate genes for monitoring environmental MeHg pollution. These results based on changes on transcript levels, however, need to be confirmed by other methods such as proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential regulation of metabolic parameters by energy deficit and hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitka, Tamás; Tuza, Sebestyén; Varga, Balázs; Horváth, Csilla; Kovács, Péter

    2015-10-01

    Hypocaloric diet decreases both energy expenditure (EE) and respiratory exchange rate (RER), affecting the efficacy of dieting inversely. Energy deficit and hunger may be modulated separately both in human and animal studies by drug treatment or food restriction. Thus it is important to separate the effects of energy deficit and hunger on EE and RER. Three parallel and analogous experiments were performed using three pharmacologically distinct anorectic drugs: rimonabant, sibutramine and tramadol. Metabolic parameters of vehicle- and drug-treated and pair-fed diet-induced obese mice from the three experiments underwent common statistical analysis to identify effects independent of the mechanisms of action. Diet-induced obesity (DIO) test of tramadol was also performed to examine its anti-obesity efficacy. RER was decreased similarly by drug treatments and paired feeding throughout the experiment irrespective of the cause of reduced food intake. Contrarily, during the passive phase, EE was decreased more by paired feeding than by both vehicle and drug treatment irrespective of the drug used. In the active phase, EE was influenced by the pharmacological mechanisms of action. Tramadol decreased body weight in the DIO test. Our results suggest that RER is mainly affected by the actual state of energy balance; conversely, EE is rather influenced by hunger. Therefore, pharmacological medications that decrease hunger may enhance the efficacy of a hypocaloric diet by maintaining metabolic rate. Furthermore, our results yield the proposal that effects of anorectic drugs on EE and RER should be determined compared to vehicle and pair-fed groups, respectively, in animal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endocrine Regulation of Bone and Energy Metabolism in Hibernating Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Alison H.; Florant, Gregory L.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination among organs is required to maintain homeostasis throughout hibernation. This is particularly true in balancing bone remodeling processes (bone formation and resorption) in hibernators experiencing nutritional deprivation and extreme physical inactivity, two factors normally leading to pronounced bone loss in non-hibernating mammals. In recent years, important relationships between bone, fat, reproductive, and brain tissues have come to light. These systems share interconnected regulatory mechanisms of energy metabolism that potentially protect the skeleton during hibernation. This review focuses on the endocrine and neuroendocrine regulation of bone/fat/energy metabolism in hibernators. Hibernators appear to have unique mechanisms that protect musculoskeletal tissues while catabolizing their abundant stores of fat. Furthermore, the bone remodeling processes that normally cause disuse-induced bone loss in non-hibernators are compared to bone remodeling processes in hibernators, and possible adaptations of the bone signaling pathways that protect the skeleton during hibernation are discussed. Understanding the biological mechanisms that allow hibernators to survive the prolonged disuse and fasting associated with extreme environmental challenges will provide critical information regarding the limit of convergence in mammalian systems and of skeletal plasticity, and may contribute valuable insight into the etiology and treatment of human diseases. PMID:24556365

  7. Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its constituents increase the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji; Tanaka, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Teruki; Matuoka, Koozi; Anno, Takahiko

    2005-01-01

    The effects of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its phenolic compounds, thymol and carvacrol, on the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, i.e., phase I enzymes such as 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) and phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and quinone reductase (QR), were investigated. Mice were fed with a diet containing thyme (0.5% or 2.0%) or treated orally with thymol (50-200 mg/kg) or carvacrol (50-200 mg/kg) once a day for 7 successive days, and then the enzyme activities in the livers were analyzed. Dietary administration of 2% thyme caused slightly but significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.1-1.4-fold. Thymol (200 mg/kg) treatment resulted in significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.9-fold, and carvacrol (200 mg/kg) treatment caused significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.7-fold. Thymol-treated animals had significantly higher protein levels of GST alpha and GST micro, and carvacrol-treated animals had significantly higher levels of GST micro. These results imply that thyme contains bifunctional inducers (i.e., substances capable of inducing both phase I and phase II enzymes) and that thymol and carvacrol may account for the effects of thyme.

  8. Requirement of a specific group of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme for growth of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under impaired metabolism of glycerophospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2010-10-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we screened for yeast mutants showing high sensitivity to Aureobasidin A, an inhibitor of inositol phosphorylceramide synthase, and found that a lack of SAC1 encoding phosphoinositides phosphatase causes high sensitivity to the inhibitor. Double mutation analysis involving the SAC1 and non-essential sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme genes revealed that csg1Δ, csg2Δ, ipt1Δ or scs7Δ causes synthetic lethality with deletion of SAC1. As previously reported, SAC1-repressed cells exhibited a reduced cellular phosphatidylserine (PS) level, and overexpression of PSS1 encoding PS synthase complemented the growth defects of scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells under SAC1-repressive conditions. Furthermore, repression of PSS1 expression resulted in synthetic growth defect with the deletion of CSG1, IPT1 or SCS7. The growth defects of scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells under SAC1- or PSS1-repressive conditions were also complemented by overexpression of Arf-GAP AGE1, which encodes a protein related to membrane trafficking. Under SAC1-repressive conditions, scs7Δ, csg1Δ and ipt1Δ cells showed defects in vacuolar morphology, which were complemented by overexpression of each of PSS1 and AGE1. These results suggested that a specific group of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzyme is required for yeast cell growth under impaired metabolism of glycerophospholipids.

  9. The metabolic ER stress sensor IRE1α suppresses alternative activation of macrophages and impairs energy expenditure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bo; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chi; Xia, Zhixiong; Dai, Jianli; Shao, Mengle; Zhao, Feng; He, Shengqi; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Mingliang; Nan, Fajun; Li, Jia; Liu, Jianmiao; Liu, Jianfeng; Jia, Weiping; Qiu, Yifu; Song, Baoliang; Han, Jing-Dong J; Rui, Liangyou; Duan, Sheng-Zhong; Liu, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, both of which promote metabolic disease progression. Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) are key players orchestrating metabolic inflammation, and ER stress enhances macrophage activation. However, whether ER stress pathways underlie ATM regulation of energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we identified inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) as a critical switch governing M1-M2 macrophage polarization and energy balance. Myeloid-specific IRE1α abrogation in Ern1 f/f ; Lyz2-Cre mice largely reversed high-fat diet (HFD)-induced M1-M2 imbalance in white adipose tissue (WAT) and blocked HFD-induced obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, WAT browning and energy expenditure were significantly higher in Ern1 f/f ; Lyz2-Cre mice. Furthermore, IRE1α ablation augmented M2 polarization of macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Thus, IRE1α senses protein unfolding and metabolic and immunological states, and consequently guides ATM polarization. The macrophage IRE1α pathway drives obesity and metabolic syndrome through impairing BAT activity and WAT browning.

  10. Harvesting biomechanical energy or carrying batteries? An evaluation method based on a comparison of metabolic power

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2015-01-01

    ... (or any other power supply, e.g., solar panels), which provide equal amount of energy. Energy harvesting is preferred over batteries if the metabolic power required to harvest the energy is lower than that required to carry the batteries...

  11. Carbon metabolism of peach fruit after harvest: changes in enzymes involved in organic acid and sugar level modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsani, Julia; Budde, Claudio O; Porrini, Lucía; Lauxmann, Martin A; Lombardo, Verónica A; Murray, Ricardo; Andreo, Carlos S; Drincovich, María F; Lara, María V

    2009-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) is a climacteric fruit that ripens after harvest, prior to human consumption. Organic acids and soluble sugars contribute to the overall organoleptic quality of fresh peach; thus, the integrated study of the metabolic pathways controlling the levels of these compounds is of great relevance. Therefore, in this work, several metabolites and enzymes involved in carbon metabolism were analysed during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit cv 'Dixiland'. Depending on the enzyme studied, activity, protein level by western blot, or transcript level by quantitative real time-PCR were analysed. Even though sorbitol did not accumulate at a high level in relation to sucrose at harvest, it was rapidly consumed once the fruit was separated from the tree. During the ripening process, sucrose degradation was accompanied by an increase of glucose and fructose. Specific transcripts encoding neutral invertases (NIs) were up-regulated or down-regulated, indicating differential functions for each putative NI isoform. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was markedly induced, and may participate as a glycolytic shunt, since the malate level did not increase during post-harvest ripening. The fermentative pathway was highly induced, with increases in both the acetaldehyde level and the enzymes involved in this process. In addition, proteins differentially expressed during the post-harvest ripening process were also analysed. Overall, the present study identified enzymes and pathways operating during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit, which may contribute to further identification of varieties with altered levels of enzymes/metabolites or in the evaluation of post-harvest treatments to produce fruit of better organoleptic attributes.

  12. Restoration of energy metabolism in leukemic mice treated by a siddha drug--Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugapriya, Dhanasekaran; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2008-05-09

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disorder characterized by proliferation of hematopoietic cells that possess the BCR-ABL fusion gene resulting in the production of a 210 kDa chimeric tyrosine kinase protein. CML, when left untreated, progresses to a blast phase during which the disease turns aggressive and shows poor response to known treatment regimens. We have studied a Siddha herbal agent, Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract (SA) for its antileukemic activity and its effect on the changes in energy metabolism in leukemic mice. Leukemia was induced in BALB/c mice by tail vein injection of BCR-ABL(+) 12B1 murine leukemia cell line. This resulted in an aggressive leukemia, similar to CML in blast crisis, myeloid subtype, confirmed by histopathological study and RT-PCR for the p210 mRNA in the peripheral blood, spleen and liver. Leukemia-bearing mice showed a significant increase in lipid peroxides, glycolytic enzymes, a decrease in gluconeogenic enzymes and significant decrease in the activities of TCA cycle and respiratory chain enzymes as compared to control animals. SA treatment was compared with standard drug imatinib mesylate. SA administration to leukemic animals resulted in clearance of the leukemic cells from the bone marrow and internal organs on histopathological examination and this was confirmed by RT-PCR for the p210 mRNA. Treatment with SA significantly reversed the changes seen in the levels of the lipid peroxides, the glycolytic enzymes, the gluconeogenic enzymes and the mitochondrial enzymes. These effects are probably due to the flavonoids, polyphenols and other compounds present in SA which result in total regression of leukemia and correction of the alterations in energy metabolism. Study of animals treated with SA alone did not reveal any adverse effects. On the basis of the observed results, SA can be considered as a readily accessible, promising and novel antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent.

  13. Characterisation of genes encoding key enzymes involved in sugar metabolism of apple fruit in controlled atmosphere storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhu; Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2013-12-15

    Sugars are essential contributors to fruit flavour. Controlled atmosphere (CA) storage has been proved to be beneficial for maintaining harvested fruit quality. To explore regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in fruit stored in CA condition, we cloned several genes, encoding key enzymes, involved in sugar metabolism in apple fruit, and analyzed sugar contents, along with gene expression and enzyme activities in fruits stored in air and CA. The results indicated that CA could maintain higher contents of sugars, including sucrose, fructose and glucose. Expression levels of key genes, such as sucrose synthase (SS), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), fructokinase (FK) and hexokinase (HK), were shown to be correlated with the corresponding enzyme activities. We found that activities of neutral invertase (NI), vacuolar invertase (VI), FK and HK were inhibited, but SPS activity was promoted in apple fruit stored in CA, suggesting that CA storage could enhance sucrose synthesis and delay hydrolysis of sucrose and hexose. These findings provided molecular evidence to explain why higher sugar levels in harvested fruit are maintained under CA storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of mitogen-activated protein kinase docking sites in enzymes that metabolize phosphatidylinositols and inositol phosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Colin T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reversible interactions between the components of cellular signaling pathways allow for the formation and dissociation of multimolecular complexes with spatial and temporal resolution and, thus, are an important means of integrating multiple signals into a coordinated cellular response. Several mechanisms that underlie these interactions have been identified, including the recognition of specific docking sites, termed a D-domain and FXFP motif, on proteins that bind mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. We recently found that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1 directly binds to extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2, a MAPK, via a D-domain-dependent mechanism. In addition, we identified D-domain sequences in several other PLC isozymes. In the present studies we sought to determine whether MAPK docking sequences could be recognized in other enzymes that metabolize phosphatidylinositols (PIs, as well as in enzymes that metabolize inositol phosphates (IPs. Results We found that several, but not all, of these enzymes contain identifiable D-domain sequences. Further, we found a high degree of conservation of these sequences and their location in human and mouse proteins; notable exceptions were PI 3-kinase C2-γ, PI 4-kinase type IIβ, and inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase. Conclusion The results indicate that there may be extensive crosstalk between MAPK signaling and signaling pathways that are regulated by cellular levels of PIs or IPs.

  15. Chromatographic assay to study the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of dopamine and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lindsay D; Baker, Hannah; Yeoman, Mark S; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-03-21

    Serotonin and dopamine are crucial regulators of signalling in the peripheral and central nervous systems. We present an ex-vivo, isocratic chromatographic method that allows for the measurement of tyrosine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin and 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in a model central nervous (CNS) system, to study the role of key enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine. By utilising a sample splitting technique, we could test a single CNS sample at multiple time points under various pharmacological treatments. In, addition, we were able to conduct this assay by utilising the endogenous biochemical components of the CNS to study the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, negating the requirement of additional enzyme activators or stabilisers in the biological matrix. Finally we utilised NSD-1015, an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase enzyme inhibitor used to study the synthesis of dopamine and serotonin to monitor alterations in levels of key neurochemicals. 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine dihydrochloride (NSD-1015) was able to reduce levels of serotonin and dopamine, whilst elevating precursors L-DOPA and 5-HTP.

  16. The metabolic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase acts as a transcriptional regulator in pathogenic Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziveri, Jason; Tros, Fabiola; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Chhuon, Cerina; Audry, Mathilde; Dupuis, Marion; Barel, Monique; Korniotis, Sarantis; Fillatreau, Simon; Gales, Lara; Cahoreau, Edern; Charbit, Alain

    2017-10-11

    The enzyme fructose-bisphosphate aldolase occupies a central position in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. Beyond its housekeeping role in metabolism, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase has been involved in additional functions and is considered as a potential target for drug development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, we address the role of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase in the bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida. We demonstrate that fructose-bisphosphate aldolase is important for bacterial multiplication in macrophages in the presence of gluconeogenic substrates. In addition, we unravel a direct role of this metabolic enzyme in transcription regulation of genes katG and rpoA, encoding catalase and an RNA polymerase subunit, respectively. We propose a model in which fructose-bisphosphate aldolase participates in the control of host redox homeostasis and the inflammatory immune response.The enzyme fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) plays central roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Here, Ziveri et al. show that FBA of the pathogen Francisella novicida acts, in addition, as a transcriptional regulator and is important for bacterial multiplication in macrophages.

  17. Investigation on the Metabolic Regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli by Enzyme Activities and Intracellular Metabolite Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor ‘Aini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated analysis of the cell growth characteristics, enzyme activities, intracellular metabolite concentrations was made to investigate the metabolic regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli based on batch culture and continuous culture which was performed at the dilution rate of 0.2h-1. The enzymatic study identified that pathways of pentose phosphate, ED pathway and glyoxylate shunt were all active in pgi mutant. The glycolysis enzymes i.e glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose diphosphatase, pyruvate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase were down regulated implying that the inactivation of pgi gene reduced the carbon flux through glycolytic pathway. Meanwhile, the pentose phosphate pathway was active as a major route for intermediary carbohydrate metabolism instead of glycolysis. The pentose phosphate pathway generates most of the major reducing co-factor NADPH as shown by the increased of NADPH/NADP+ ratio in the mutant when compared with the parent strain. The fermentative enzymes such as acetate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were down regulated in the mutant. Knockout of pgi gene results in the significant increase in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and decrease in the concentration of oxaloacetate. The slow growth rate of the mutant was assumed to be affected by the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate and imbalance of NADPH reoxidation.

  18. Metabolic control by sirtuins and other enzymes that sense NAD(+), NADH, or their ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Kristin A; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-01-01

    NAD(+) is a dinucleotide cofactor with the potential to accept electrons in a variety of cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. In its reduced form, NADH is a ubiquitous cellular electron donor. NAD(+), NADH, and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio have long been known to control the activity of several...... oxidoreductase enzymes. More recently, enzymes outside those participating directly in redox control have been identified that sense these dinucleotides, including the sirtuin family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacylases. In this review, we highlight examples of non-redox enzymes that are controlled by NAD...

  19. Metabolic Plasiticy in Cancers—Distinct Role of Glycolytic Enzymes GPI, LDHs or Membrane Transporters MCTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Ždralević

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on cancer metabolism has recently re-surfaced as a major focal point in cancer field with a reprogrammed metabolism no longer being considered as a mere consequence of oncogenic transformation, but as a hallmark of cancer. Reprogramming metabolic pathways and nutrient sensing is an elaborate way by which cancer cells respond to high bioenergetic and anabolic demands during tumorigenesis. Thus, inhibiting specific metabolic pathways at defined steps should provide potent ways of arresting tumor growth. However, both animal models and clinical observations have revealed that this approach is seriously limited by an extraordinary cellular metabolic plasticity. The classical example of cancer metabolic reprogramming is the preference for aerobic glycolysis, or Warburg effect, where cancers increase their glycolytic flux and produce lactate regardless of the presence of the oxygen. This allows cancer cells to meet the metabolic requirements for high rates of proliferation. Here, we discuss the benefits and limitations of disrupting fermentative glycolysis for impeding tumor growth at three levels of the pathway: (i an upstream block at the level of the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI, (ii a downstream block at the level of lactate dehydrogenases (LDH, isoforms A and B, and (iii the endpoint block preventing lactic acid export (MCT1/4. Using these examples of genetic disruption targeting glycolysis studied in our lab, we will discuss the responses of different cancer cell lines in terms of metabolic rewiring, growth arrest, and tumor escape and compare it with the broader literature.

  20. Controlled sumoylation of the mevalonate pathway enzyme HMGS-1 regulates metabolism during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapir, Amir; Tsur, Assaf; Koorman, Thijs; Ching, Kaitlin; Mishra, Prashant; Bardenheier, Annabelle; Podolsky, Lisa; Bening-Abu-Shach, Ulrike; Boxem, Mike; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Broday, Limor; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic pathways are critically regulated during development and aging but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. One key metabolic cascade in eukaryotes is the mevalonate pathway. It catalyzes the synthesis of sterol and nonsterol isoprenoids, such as

  1. Enzyme Supplementation of Broiler Feeds with Reduced Mineral and Energy Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JO Nunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT An experiment was conducted with the purpose of evaluating enzyme blends on the performance, carcass traits, and bone mineralization of broilers. In total, 928 one-day-old Cobb 500 male chicks of were used. A completely randomized design with four treatments with eight replicates of 29 birds each was adopted. The evaluated treatments were: 1- Positive Control (PC, feed containing the nutritional recommendations of the genetic company's manual; 2- Negative Control (NC, feed with reductions of 75 kcal/kg AME and 0.10 and 0.12 percent points of phosphorus and calcium, respectively; 3 - NC + enzyme blend (amylase + b-glucanase, xylanase, and phytase; 250 g/t of feed and 4 - NC + enzyme complex (phytase, amylase, xylanase, glucanase, pectinase, cellulase, and protease; 200 g/t of feed. Birds fed the diet with reduced nutrient levels (NC presented the worst performance (p0.05 carcass or parts yields. The broilers fed the reduced-nutrient and energy diet presented lower (p<0.05 tibial ash, calcium, and phosphorus contents that the other treatments. The use of enzyme combinations improved the performance of broilers fed diets with reduced nutrient and energy levels.

  2. Electrostatic Spray Ionization from 384-Well Microtiter Plates for Mass Spectrometry Analysis-Based Enzyme Assay and Drug Metabolism Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Zhong, Xiaoqin; Belghith, Emna; Deng, Yan; Lin, Tzu-En; Tobolkina, Elena; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2017-06-06

    We have realized the direct ionization of samples from wells of microtiter plates under atmospheric conditions for mass spectrometry analysis without any liquid delivery system or any additional interface. The microtiter plate is a commercially available 384-well plate without any modification, working as a container and an emitter for electrostatic spray ionization of analytes. The approach provides high throughput for the large batches of reactions and both the qualitative and quantitative analysis of a single compound or mixture. The limits of detection in small drug molecules, peptides, and proteins are similar in comparison with standard direct infusion electrospray ionization. The analysis time per well is only seconds. These analytical merits benefit many microtiter plate-based studies, such as combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening in enzyme assay or drug metabolism. Herein, we illustrate the application in enzyme assay using tyrosine oxidation catalyzed by tyrosinase in the presence or absence of inhibitors. The potential application in drug development is also demonstrated with cytochrome P450-catalyzed metabolic reactions of two drugs in microtiter plates followed with direct ESTASI-MS/MS-based characterization of the metabolism products.

  3. Role of sleep and circadian disruption on energy expenditure and in metabolic predisposition to human obesity and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHill, A W; Wright, K P

    2017-02-01

    Weight gain, obesity and diabetes have reached alarming levels in the developed world. Traditional risk factors such as over-eating, poor nutritional choices and lack of exercise cannot fully account for the high prevalence of metabolic disease. This review paper examines the scientific evidence on two novel risk factors that contribute to dys-regulated metabolic physiology: sleep disruption and circadian misalignment. Specifically, fundamental relationships between energy metabolism and sleep and circadian rhythms and the impact of sleep and circadian disruption on metabolic physiology are examined. Millions of individuals worldwide do not obtain sufficient sleep for healthy metabolic function, and many participate in shift work and social activities at times when the internal physiological clock is promoting sleep. These behaviours predispose an individual for poor metabolic health by promoting excess caloric intake in response to reduced sleep, food intake at internal biological times when metabolic physiology is not prepared, decreased energy expenditure when wakefulness and sleep are initiated at incorrect internal biological times, and disrupted glucose metabolism during short sleep and circadian misalignment. In addition to the traditional risk factors of poor diet and exercise, disturbed sleep and circadian rhythms represent modifiable risk factors for prevention and treatment of metabolic disease and for promotion of healthy metabolism. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  4. [Changes of myocardial enzymes related to glycolysis and fatty acid metabolism in chronic myocardial ischemia: experiment with pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jing; Wang, Hong-yue; Pu, Jie-lin; Zheng, Ying-li; Shen, Rui; Yang, Min-fu; He, Zuo-xiang

    2008-08-12

    To investigate the changes myocardial enzymes related to glycolysis and fatty acid metabolism in chronic myocardial ischemia and to evaluate the relationship between the gene expression of glycolytic metabolism related enzymes and myocardial viability. Fourteen Chinese experimental pigs underwent placement of arterial ring into the left anterior descending coronary artery so as to establish models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. (18)F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose single photon emission computed tomography was conducted to observe the viability of the myocardium. One week later the pigs were killed with their hearts taken out. Specimens of ischemic zone, infarction zone, and non-ischemic zone were obtained. RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1, GLUT4, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), and heart-fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP). Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the protein expression of Glut1 and Glut4. Periodic Acid Schiff-hematoxylin staining was conducted to detect the glycogen. Pathological examination showed 5 pigs with myocardial infarction and 5 pigs with ischemia. In the pigs with ischemia, the mRNA expression levels of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in the ischemic zone were 9466 +/- 9033 and 60 398 +/- 64 699 respectively, both significantly higher than those in the control zone (5854 +/- 5287 and 34 188 +/- 44 714 respectively, P = 0.043, P = 0.043). the RNA expression of H-FABP in the ischemic zone was 18 123 +/- 15 925, significantly lower than that in the control zone (50 718 +/- 62 412, P = 0.043), and there was no significant difference in the mRNA expression level of MCAD. In the pigs with infarction the mRNA expression of level of H-FABP in the infarction zone was 21 919 +/- 15 224, significantly lower than that in the control zone (87 545 +/- 92 990, P = 0.043), and there were not significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the GLUT1, GLUT4, and MCAD genes (all P > 0.05). The m

  5. Differential effects of dietary flavonoids on drug metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in female rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, V.; Lauridsen, S.T.; Dragsted, L.O.

    1999-01-01

    1. Gavage administration of the natural flavonoids tangeretin, chrysin, apigenin, naringenin, genistein and quercetin for 2 consecutive weeks to the female rat resulted in differential effects on selected phase 1 and 2 enzymes in liver, colon and heart as well as antioxidant enzymes in red brood......) significantly protected against, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced oxidative stress. Hepatic PhIP-DNA adduct formation was not affected by any of the administered flavonoids, whereas PhIP-DNA adduct formation in colon was slightly, but significantly, inhibited by quercetin......, genistein, tangeretin and BNF. 5. The observed effects of chrysin, quercetin and genistein on antioxidant enzymes, concurrently with a protection against oxidative stress, suggest a feedback mechanism on the antioxidant enzymes triggered by the flavonoid antioxidants. 6. Despite the use of high flavonoid...

  6. Energy requirements, protein-energy metabolism and balance, and carbohydrates in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, William W; Brown, Laura D; Denne, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Energy is necessary for all vital functions of the body at molecular, cellular, organ, and systemic levels. Preterm infants have minimum energy requirements for basal metabolism and growth, but also have requirements for unique physiology and metabolism that influence energy expenditure. These include body size, postnatal age, physical activity, dietary intake, environmental temperatures, energy losses in the stool and urine, and clinical conditions and diseases, as well as changes in body composition. Both energy and protein are necessary to produce normal rates of growth. Carbohydrates (primarily glucose) are principle sources of energy for the brain and heart until lipid oxidation develops over several days to weeks after birth. A higher protein/energy ratio is necessary in most preterm infants to approximate normal intrauterine growth rates. Lean tissue is predominantly produced during early gestation, which continues through to term. During later gestation, fat accretion in adipose tissue adds increasingly large caloric requirements to the lean tissue growth. Once protein intake is sufficient to promote net lean body accretion, additional energy primarily produces more body fat, which increases almost linearly at energy intakes >80-90 kcal/kg/day in normal, healthy preterm infants. Rapid gains in adiposity have the potential to produce later life obesity, an increasingly recognized risk of excessive energy intake. In addition to fundamental requirements for glucose, protein, and fat, a variety of non-glucose carbohydrates found in human milk may have important roles in promoting growth and development, as well as production of a gut microbiome that could protect against necrotizing enterocolitis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Quantitative analysis of energy metabolic pathways in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by selected reaction monitoring assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Pavlou, Maria P; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the quantitative response of energy metabolic pathways in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells to hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and estradiol stimulation, we developed a targeted proteomics assay for accurate quantification of protein expression in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways. Cell growth conditions were selected to roughly mimic the exposure of cells in the cancer tissue to the intermittent hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and hormonal stimulation. Targeted proteomics assay allowed for reproducible quantification of 76 proteins in four different growth conditions after 24 and 48 h of perturbation. Differential expression of a number of control and metabolic pathway proteins in response to the change of growth conditions was found. Elevated expression of the majority of glycolytic enzymes was observed in hypoxia. Cancer cells, as opposed to near-normal MCF-10A cells, exhibited significantly increased expression of key energy metabolic pathway enzymes (FBP1, IDH2, and G6PD) that are known to redirect cellular metabolism and increase carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Our quantitative proteomic protocol is based on a mass spectrometry-compatible acid-labile detergent and is described in detail. Optimized parameters of a multiplex selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay for 76 proteins, 134 proteotypic peptides, and 401 transitions are included and can be downloaded and used with any SRM-compatible mass spectrometer. The presented workflow is an integrated tool for hypothesis-driven studies of mammalian cells as well as functional studies of proteins, and can greatly complement experimental methods in systems biology, metabolic engineering, and metabolic transformation of cancer cells.

  8. Energy metabolism in infants with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydegger, Andreas; Bines, Julie E

    2006-01-01

    Failure to thrive is common in children with congenital heart disease and influences the metabolic response to injury and outcome after corrective cardiac surgery. Energy imbalance is a major contributing factor. However, the published literature is difficult to interpret as studies generally involve small patient numbers with a diverse range of types and severity of cardiac lesions and genetic and/or prenatal factors. The age and time of corrective surgery affects the potential for nutritional recovery. Although the immediate postoperative period is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, low total and resting energy expenditure are reported within 24 h of surgery. After 5 d, resting energy expenditure returns to preoperative levels. Significant improvements in weight and growth occur within months after corrective surgery. However, limited postoperative recovery in nutritional status and growth occurs in infants with a low birth weight, intellectual deficit, or residual malformation. Further studies are needed to inform the timing of corrective cardiac surgery to maximize nutritional outcomes and to identify those infants who may benefit from aggressive preoperative nutrition support.

  9. Polymorphisms of the folate metabolizing enzymes: Association with SLE susceptibility and in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Saeedeh; Keshavarzi, Farshid; Mohammadpour-Gharehbagh, Abbas; Moodi, Mahdieh; Mousavi, Mahdieh; Karimian, Mohammad; Sandoughi, Mahnaz

    2017-12-30

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a typical autoimmune disorder with multiple organ involvement and unknown etiology. It has been shown that polymorphic variants of the genes encoding key enzymes of folate and methionine metabolism may influence DNA methylation. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 150 SLE patients and 160 controls, matching age, sex, and ethnicity. MTHFR rs1801133C>T and MTR rs1805087A>G polymorphisms were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. MTHFR rs1801131A>C genotype was determined by the tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (Tetra-ARMS), and DHFR rs70991108 polymorphisms' genotyping was performed by PCR methods. In-silico approach was used to analyses the effects of these variations on the structure of mRNA and protein. MTHFR rs1801131AC+CC genotypes were significantly higher in the SLE patients compared to the controls (37 vs. 26%, OR 1.7 (95% CI 1-2.8); p=0.03). The frequency of MTHFR rs1801131C allele was significantly higher in the SLE patients than the controls (22 vs. 15%, p=0.02). However, there was no association between MTHFR rs1801133C>T polymorphism and SLE. The frequency of CT haplotype of MTHFR rs1801133C>T and rs1801131A>C polymorphisms was significantly higher in the SLE patients (20 vs. 12%), and CT haplotype may be potentially a risk factor for SLE susceptibility [OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.9); p=0.006]. There was no association between alleles and genotypes of DHFR rs70991108 polymorphism and SLE susceptibility. The frequency of MTR rs1805087AG genotype was less frequent in the SLE patients compared to the controls, and this genotype could decrease the SLE risk (35 vs. 48%), (OR, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4 to 0.9), p=0.03). In silico-analysis showed that both of MTHFR rs1801133C>T and rs1801131A>C SNPs made fundamental changes in the secondary structure of MTHFR-mRNA (p=0.0412 and p=0.1641; pC variation showed a significant effect on MTHFR

  10. Association of liver enzymes with metabolic syndrome and carotid atherosclerosis in young adults. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Juha; Magnussen, Costan G; Kähönen, Mika; Loo, Britt-Marie; Marniemi, Jukka; Jula, Antti; Saarikoski, Liisa A; Huupponen, Risto; Viikari, Jorma S A; Raitakari, Olli T; Juonala, Markus

    2012-03-01

    We examined whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) predicts increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels in young adults, whether spontaneous recovery from MetS has a favorable effect on liver enzyme activities, and whether these enzymes contribute to the atherogenicity of MetS (assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT)). The study included 1,553 subjects (base-line age 31.5 ± 5.0 years). ALT and GGT were measured in 2007. MetS was diagnosed by the new Joint Interim Societies definition. ALT and GGT levels were higher in subjects with MetS compared to those without in 2007. The association was independent of alcohol intake and BMI. In multivariable models adjusted for base-line age, LDL cholesterol, CRP, alcohol intake, and adiponectin, MetS in 2001 predicted increased ALT (β ± SEM = 0.320 ± 0.062, P adults MetS may induce liver enzyme changes that indicate increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, but we found no evidence that increased enzyme levels would amplify the atherogenicity of MetS.

  11. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...... find decreases of both CBF and CMRO(2) but increased OEF, while others find no change, and yet other find divergent changes. In this reanalysis of previously published results from positron emission tomography of healthy volunteers, we determined CMRO(2) and CBF in 66 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 81......, and in the temporal cortex. Because of the inverse relation between OEF and capillary oxygen tension, increased OEF can compromise oxygen delivery to neurons, with possible perturbation of energy turnover. The results establish a possible mechanism of progression from healthy to unhealthy brain aging, as the regions...

  12. Changes in activity of hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes of tiger puffer (Takifugu rubripes) exposed to paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, J K; Lee, J S; Shim, W J; Aarakawa, O; Takatani, T; Honda, S; Noguchi, T

    2008-07-01

    Attempts were made to examine the effect of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSP) on hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) of tiger puffer (Takifugu rubripes). Two groups of nontoxic tiger fish were analyzed, and one group was fed with a PSP-containing diet (PSP group), and another with a PSP-free diet (control group). After 60 days of feeding, they were compared to each other mainly in terms of the activity of XMEs. Both groups did not differ from each other significantly in body weight gain, hepatosomatic index, and condition factor Hepatic level of cytochrome P450 was lower in PSP group than control group. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) exhibited a reduced activity in PSP group than control group. Statistical analysis found that the activity or concentration of those enzymes correlated with the hepatic level of PSR with r2=0.497-0.611.

  13. Evaluation of the energy efficiency of enzyme fermentation by mechanistic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaek, Mads O; Gernaey, Krist V; Hansen, Morten S; Stocks, Stuart M

    2012-04-01

    Modeling biotechnological processes is key to obtaining increased productivity and efficiency. Particularly crucial to successful modeling of such systems is the coupling of the physical transport phenomena and the biological activity in one model. We have applied a model for the expression of cellulosic enzymes by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei and found excellent agreement with experimental data. The most influential factor was demonstrated to be viscosity and its influence on mass transfer. Not surprisingly, the biological model is also shown to have high influence on the model prediction. At different rates of agitation and aeration as well as headspace pressure, we can predict the energy efficiency of oxygen transfer, a key process parameter for economical production of industrial enzymes. An inverse relationship between the productivity and energy efficiency of the process was found. This modeling approach can be used by manufacturers to evaluate the enzyme fermentation process for a range of different process conditions with regard to energy efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Influence of dietary macronutrients on induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by Coleus forskohlii extract in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokotani, Kaori; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    From studies in mice, we have reported that Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE), a popular herbal weight-loss ingredient, markedly induced hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), and interacted with co-administered drugs. This study was designed to examine how the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by CFE was influenced by different levels of macronutrients in the diet. Mice were fed a non-purified diet or semi-purified diet with and without CFE (0.3-0.5%) for 14-18 d, and changes in the ratio of liver weight to body weight, an indicator of hepatic CYP induction, and hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes were analyzed. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, content and activities of CYPs, and activity of glutathione S-transferase were higher in a semi-purified standard diet (AIN93G formula) group than in high sucrose (62.9%) and high fat (29.9%) diet groups. Different levels of protein (7%, 20%, and 33%) in the diets did not influence CFE-induced CYP induction or increase the ratio of liver weight to body weight. The effect of CFE on the ratio of liver weight to body weight was higher with a semi-purified diet than with a non-purified diet, and was similar between dietary administration and intragastric gavage when the CFE dose and the diet were the same. There was a positive correlation between CFE-induced CYP induction and the content of starch in the diets, suggesting that dietary starch potentiates CFE-induced CYP induction in mice. The mechanism of enhanced CYP induction remains unclear.

  15. Serotonin (5-HT affects expression of liver metabolic enzymes and mammary gland glucose transporters during the transition from pregnancy to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to demonstrate the ability of feeding serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine precursors to increase 5-HT production during the transition from pregnancy to lactation and the effects this has on maternal energy metabolism in the liver and mammary gland. Pregnant rats (n = 45 were fed one of three diets: I control (CON, II CON supplemented with 0.2% 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP or III CON supplemented with 1.35% L-tryptophan (L-TRP, beginning on d13 of pregnancy through d9 of lactation (d9. Serum (pre and post-partum, milk (daily, liver and mammary gland tissue (d9 were collected. Serum 5-HT was increased in the 5-HTP fed dams beginning on d20 of gestation and remained elevated through d9, while it was only increased on d9 in the L-TRP fed dams. 5-HT levels were increased in mammary gland and liver of both groups. Additionally, 5-HTP fed dams had serum and milk glucose levels similar to the CON, while L-TRP had decreased serum (d9 and milk glucose (all dates evaluated. Feeding 5-HTP resulted in increased mRNA expression of key gluconeogenic and glycolytic enzymes in liver and glucose transporters 1 and 8 (GLUT-1, -8 in the mammary gland. We demonstrated the location of GLUT-8 in the mammary gland both in the epithelial and vascular endothelial cells. Finally, phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK, a known regulator of intracellular energy status, was elevated in mammary glands of 5-HTP fed dams. Our results suggest that increasing 5-HT production during the transition from pregnancy to lactation increases mRNA expression of enzymes involved in energy metabolism in the liver, and mRNA abundance and distribution of glucose transporters within the mammary gland. This suggests the possibility that 5-HT may be involved in regulating energy metabolism during the transition from pregnancy to lactation.

  16. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Marcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar, E-mail: adebracht@uol.com.br

    2011-12-15

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 {mu}M, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 {mu}M, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and

  17. A comparative study on the metabolism of Epimedium koreanum Nakai-prenylated flavonoids in rats by an intestinal enzyme (lactase phlorizin hydrolase) and intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xia; Qu, Ding; Liu, Congyan

    2013-12-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the significance of the intestinal hydrolysis of prenylated flavonoids in Herba Epimedii by an intestinal enzyme and flora. Flavonoids were incubated at 37 °C with rat intestinal enzyme and intestinal flora. HPLC-UV was used to calculate the metabolic rates of the parent drug in the incubation and LC/MS/MS was used to determine the chemical structures of metabolites generated by different flavonoid glycosides. Rates of flavonoid metabolism by rat intestinal enzyme were quicker than those of intestinal flora. The sequence of intestinal flora metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin B>epimedin A>epimedin C>baohuoside I, whereas the order of intestinal enzyme metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin A>epimedin C>epimedin B>baohuoside I. Meanwhile, the LC/MS/MS graphs showed that icariin produced three products, epimedin A/B/C had four and baohuoside I yielded one product in incubations of both intestinal enzyme and flora, which were more than the results of HPLC-UV due to the fact LC/MS/MS has lower detectability and higher sensitivity. Moreover, the outcomes indicated that the rate of metabolization of flavonoids by intestinal enzyme were faster than those of intestinal flora, which was consistent with the HPLC-UV results. In conclusion, the metabolic pathways of the same components by intestinal flora and enzyme were the same. What's more, an intestinal enzyme such as lactase phlorizin hydrolase exhibited a more significant metabolic role in prenylated flavonoids of Herba Epimedi compared with intestinal flora.

  18. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro......-structure was achieved by decreasing starch branching and increasing starch-bound phosphate content in the barley caryopsis starch by RNAi suppression of all three Starch Branching Enzyme (SBE) isoforms or overexpression of potato Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD). The resulting lines displayed Amylose-Only (AO) and Hyper...... high levels of some important stress-related metabolites and potentially protective metabolites, possibly to elude deleterious effects. Investigations on starch molecular structure revealed significant increase in starch phosphate and amylose content in HP and AO respectively with obvious differences...

  19. Fine quantitative trait loci mapping of carbon and nitrogen metabolism enzyme activities and seedling biomass in the intermated maize IBM mapping population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the genetic basis of nitrogen and carbon metabolism will accelerate development of plant varieties with high yield and improved nitrogen use efficiency. In this study, we measured the activities of ten enzymes from carbon and nitrogen metabolism and seedling/juvenile biomass in the mai...

  20. Construction and analysis of the model of energy metabolism in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixiang; Sun, Xiao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Genome-scale models of metabolism have only been analyzed with the constraint-based modelling philosophy and there have been several genome-scale gene-protein-reaction models. But research on the modelling for energy metabolism of organisms just began in recent years and research on metabolic weighted complex network are rare in literature. We have made three research based on the complete model of E. coli's energy metabolism. We first constructed a metabolic weighted network using the rates of free energy consumption within metabolic reactions as the weights. We then analyzed some structural characters of the metabolic weighted network that we constructed. We found that the distribution of the weight values was uneven, that most of the weight values were zero while reactions with abstract large weight values were rare and that the relationship between w (weight values) and v (flux values) was not of linear correlation. At last, we have done some research on the equilibrium of free energy for the energy metabolism system of E. coli. We found that E(out) (free energy rate input from the environment) can meet the demand of E(ch)(in) (free energy rate dissipated by chemical process) and that chemical process plays a great role in the dissipation of free energy in cells. By these research and to a certain extend, we can understand more about the energy metabolism of E. coli.

  1. Construction and analysis of the model of energy metabolism in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixiang Xu

    Full Text Available Genome-scale models of metabolism have only been analyzed with the constraint-based modelling philosophy and there have been several genome-scale gene-protein-reaction models. But research on the modelling for energy metabolism of organisms just began in recent years and research on metabolic weighted complex network are rare in literature. We have made three research based on the complete model of E. coli's energy metabolism. We first constructed a metabolic weighted network using the rates of free energy consumption within metabolic reactions as the weights. We then analyzed some structural characters of the metabolic weighted network that we constructed. We found that the distribution of the weight values was uneven, that most of the weight values were zero while reactions with abstract large weight values were rare and that the relationship between w (weight values and v (flux values was not of linear correlation. At last, we have done some research on the equilibrium of free energy for the energy metabolism system of E. coli. We found that E(out (free energy rate input from the environment can meet the demand of E(ch(in (free energy rate dissipated by chemical process and that chemical process plays a great role in the dissipation of free energy in cells. By these research and to a certain extend, we can understand more about the energy metabolism of E. coli.

  2. Effect of various diets on the expression of phase-I drug-metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-01-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that diets can alter the metabolism of drugs; however, it is difficult to compare the effects of multiple diets on drug metabolism among different experimental settings. Phase-I-related genes play a major role in the biotransformation of pro-drugs and drugs. 2. In the current study, effects of nine diets on the mRNA expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice were simultaneously investigated. Compared to the AIN-93M purified diet (control), 73 of the 132 critical phase-I drug-metabolizing genes were differentially regulated by at least one diet. Diet restriction produced the largest number of changed genes (51), followed by the atherogenic diet (27), high-fat diet (25), standard rodent chow (21), western diet (20), high-fructose diet (5), EFA deficient diet (3) and low n-3 FA diet (1). The mRNAs of the Fmo family changed most, followed by Cyp2b and 4a subfamilies, as well as Por (from 1121- to 21-fold increase of theses mRNAs). There were 59 genes not altered by any of these diets. 3. The present results may improve the interpretation of studies with mice and aid in determining effective and safe doses for individuals with different nutritional diets.

  3. Sulfatases and radical SAM enzymes: emerging themes in glycosaminoglycan metabolism and the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Humans live in a permanent association with bacterial populations collectively called the microbiota. In the last 10 years, major advances in our knowledge of the microbiota have shed light on its critical roles in human physiology. The microbiota has also been shown to be a major factor in numerous pathologies including obesity or inflammatory disorders. Despite tremendous progresses, our understanding of the key functions of the human microbiota and the molecular basis of its interactions with the host remain still poorly understood. Among the factors involved in host colonization, two enzymes families, sulfatases and radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes, have recently emerged as key enzymes. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Natural variations in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes: developing tools for coral monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougée, L. R. A.; Richmond, R. H.; Collier, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The continued deterioration of coral reefs worldwide demonstrates the need to develop diagnostic tools for corals that go beyond general ecological monitoring and can identify specific stressors at sublethal levels. Cellular diagnostics present an approach to defining indicators (biomarkers) that have the potential to reflect the impact of stress at the cellular level, allowing for the detection of intracellular changes in corals prior to outright mortality. Detoxification enzymes, which may be readily induced or inhibited by environmental stressors, present such a set of indicators. However, in order to apply these diagnostic tools for the detection of stress, a detailed understanding of their normal, homeostatic levels within healthy corals must first be established. Herein, we present molecular and biochemical evidence for the expression and activity of major Phase I detoxification enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP450), CYP2E1, and CYP450 reductase, as well as the Phase II enzymes UDP, glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), β-glucuronidase, glutathione- S-transferase (GST), and arylsulfatase C (ASC) in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. Additionally, we characterized enzyme expression and activity variations over a reproductive cycle within a coral's life history to determine natural endogenous changes devoid of stress exposure. Significant changes in enzyme activity over the coral's natural lunar reproductive cycle were observed for CYP2E1 and CYP450 reductase as well as UGT and GST, while β-glucuronidase and ASC did not fluctuate significantly. The data represent a baseline description of `health' for the expression and activity of these enzymes that can be used toward understanding the impact of environmental stressors on corals. Such knowledge can be applied to address causes of coral reef ecosystem decline and to monitor effectiveness of mitigation strategies. Achieving a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships between putative stressors and biological

  5. Energy Metabolism Disorder as a Contributing Factor of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Proteomic and Metabolomic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yu Yang

    Full Text Available To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the different metabolites were screened in synovial fluid by metabolomics.Synovial fluid from 25 RA patients and 10 normal subjects were analyzed by GC/TOF MS analysis so as to give a broad overview of synovial fluid metabolites. The metabolic profiles of RA patients and normal subjects were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. Different proteins were verified by qPCR and western blot. Different metabolites were verified by colorimetric assay kit in 25 inactive RA patients, 25 active RA patients and 20 normal subjects. The influence of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α pathway on catabolism was detected by HIF-1α knockdown.A subset of 58 metabolites was identified, in which the concentrations of 7 metabolites related to energy metabolism were significantly different as shown by importance in the projection (VIP (VIP ≥ 1 and Student's t-test (p<0.05. In the 7 metabolites, the concentration of glucose was decreased, and the concentration of lactic acid was increased in the synovial fluid of RA patients than normal subjects verified by colorimetric assay Kit. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis shows that the concentration of glucose and lactic acid in synovial fluid could be used as dependable biomarkers for the diagnosis of active RA, provided an AUC of 0.906 and 0.922. Sensitivity and specificity, which were determined by cut-off points, reached 84% and 96% in sensitivity and 95% and 85% in specificity, respectively. The verification of different proteins identified in our previous proteomic study shows that the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were up-regulated (PFKP and LDHA, and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated (CS, DLST, PGD, ACSL4, ACADVL and HADHA in RA patients. The expression of HIF-1α and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were decreased and the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were

  6. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R.; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as “capacitors for energy and metabolism.” Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell. PMID:26771520

  7. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  8. Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Changes of Free-Flying Migrating Northern Bald Ibis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Bairlein

    Full Text Available Many migrating birds undertake extraordinary long flights. How birds are able to perform such endurance flights of over 100-hour durations is still poorly understood. We examined energy expenditure and physiological changes in Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremite during natural flights using birds trained to follow an ultra-light aircraft. Because these birds were tame, with foster parents, we were able to bleed them immediately prior to and after each flight. Flight duration was experimentally designed ranging between one and almost four hours continuous flights. Energy expenditure during flight was estimated using doubly-labelled-water while physiological properties were assessed through blood chemistry including plasma metabolites, enzymes, electrolytes, blood gases, and reactive oxygen compounds. Instantaneous energy expenditure decreased with flight duration, and the birds appeared to balance aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, using fat, carbohydrate and protein as fuel. This made flight both economic and tolerable. The observed effects resemble classical exercise adaptations that can limit duration of exercise while reducing energetic output. There were also in-flight benefits that enable power output variation from cruising to manoeuvring. These adaptations share characteristics with physiological processes that have facilitated other athletic feats in nature and might enable the extraordinary long flights of migratory birds as well.

  9. Metabolic regulation rather than de novo enzyme synthesis dominates the osmo-adaptation of yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Jildau; Kiewiet, Jose; Lindenbergh, Alexander; van Eunen, Karen; Siderius, Marco; Bakker, Barbara M.

    Intracellular accumulation of glycerol is essential for yeast cells to survive hyperosmotic stress. Upon hyperosmotic stress the gene expression of enzymes in the glycerol pathway is strongly induced. Recently, however, it was shown that this gene-expression response is not essential for survival of

  10. Metabolic regulation rather than de novo enzyme synthesis dominates the osmo-adaptation of yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, J.; Kiewiet, J.A.L.; Lindenbergh, A; Van Eunen, K.; Siderius, M.H.; Bakker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycerol is essential for yeast cells to survive hyperosmotic stress. Upon hyperosmotic stress the gene expression of enzymes in the glycerol pathway is strongly induced. Recently, however, it was shown that this gene-expression response is not essential for survival of

  11. Metabolic regulation rather than de novo enzyme synthesis dominates the osmo-adaptation of yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, J; Kiewiet, J; Lindenbergh, A; Eunen, K, van; Siderius, M; Bakker, BM

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycerol is essential for yeast cells to survive hyperosmotic stress. Upon hyperosmotic stress the gene expression of enzymes in the glycerol pathway is strongly induced. Recently, however, it was shown that this gene-expression response is not essential for survival of

  12. Genetic variation in alcohol metabolizing enzymes among Inuit and its relation to drinking patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Mikkelsen, Stine Schou; Becker, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    A allele and an ALDH2 gene coding for an inactive enzyme was not present in Greenland. CONCLUSIONS: ADH1C and ALDH1B1 arg107leu SNPs play a role in the shaping of drinking patterns among the Inuit in Greenland. A low frequency of the ALDH1B1 arg107leu TT genotype compared with the general population...

  13. Effects of prolonged recombinant human erythropoietin administration on muscle membrane transport systems and metabolic marker enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C; Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L

    2007-01-01

    performance by approximately 54%. Membrane transport systems and carbonic anhydrases involved in pH regulation remained unchanged. Of the Na(+), K(+)-pump isoforms only the density of the alpha2 subunit was decreased (by 22%) after treatment. The marker enzymes cytochrom c and hexokinase remained unchanged...

  14. Determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes in phenolic-rich grapevine tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Convigton, E. D.; Roitsch, Thomas; Dernastia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2016), s. 757-762 ISSN 1318-0207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : AGPase * carbohydrates * invertases * sucrose synthase * panel of enzyme activity assays * phytoplasma Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2016

  15. Testing Biochemistry Revisited : How In Vivo Metabolism Can Be Understood from In Vitro Enzyme Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Kiewiet, Jose A. L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was

  16. Testing biochemistry revisited: how in vivo metabolism can be understood from in vitro enzyme kinetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Kiewiet, J.A.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was

  17. Nuclear receptor-mediated induction of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters by anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Role of nuclear receptors in adverse anticancer drug reactions? Unwanted drug-drug interactions and the development of multidrug resistance are ongoing concerns in the treatment of cancer patients. A common factor that is shared by both phenomena is enzyme induction. Especially, the induction of

  18. Sucrose non-fermenting related kinase enzyme is essential for cardiac metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Cossette

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have identified a novel member of the AMPK family, namely Sucrose non-fermenting related kinase (Snrk, that is responsible for maintaining cardiac metabolism in mammals. SNRK is expressed in the heart, and brain, and in cell types such as endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes (CMs. Snrk knockout (KO mice display enlarged hearts, and die at postnatal day 0. Microarray analysis of embryonic day 17.5 Snrk hearts, and blood profile of neonates display defect in lipid metabolic pathways. SNRK knockdown CMs showed altered phospho-acetyl-coA carboxylase and phospho-AMPK levels similar to global and endothelial conditional KO mouse. Finally, adult cardiac conditional KO mouse displays severe cardiac functional defects and lethality. Our results suggest that Snrk is essential for maintaining cardiac metabolic homeostasis, and shows an autonomous role for SNRK during mammalian development.

  19. Adaptive Evolution of Energy Metabolism-Related Genes in Hypoxia-Tolerant Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Yin, Daiqing; Liu, Yanzhi; Seim, Inge; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Animals that are able to sustain life under hypoxic conditions have long captured the imagination of biologists and medical practitioners alike. Although the associated morphological modifications have been extensively described, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of hypoxia tolerance are not well understood. To provide such insights, we investigated genes in four major energy metabolism pathways, and provide evidence of distinct evolutionary paths to mammalian hypoxia-tolerance. Positive selection of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway mainly occurred in terrestrial hypoxia-tolerant species; possible adaptations to chronically hypoxic environments. The strongest candidate for positive selection along cetacean lineages was the citrate cycle signaling pathway, suggestive of enhanced aerobic metabolism during and after a dive. Six genes with cetacean-specific amino acid changes are rate-limiting enzymes involved in the gluconeogenesis pathway, which would be expected to enhance the lactate removal after diving. Intriguingly, 38 parallel amino acid substitutions in 29 genes were observed between hypoxia-tolerant mammals. Of these, 76.3% were radical amino acid changes, suggesting that convergent molecular evolution drives the adaptation to hypoxic stress and similar phenotypic changes. This study provides further insights into life under low oxygen conditions and the evolutionary trajectories of hypoxia-tolerant species.

  20. Adaptive Evolution of Energy Metabolism-Related Genes in Hypoxia-Tolerant Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals that are able to sustain life under hypoxic conditions have long captured the imagination of biologists and medical practitioners alike. Although the associated morphological modifications have been extensively described, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of hypoxia tolerance are not well understood. To provide such insights, we investigated genes in four major energy metabolism pathways, and provide evidence of distinct evolutionary paths to mammalian hypoxia-tolerance. Positive selection of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway mainly occurred in terrestrial hypoxia-tolerant species; possible adaptations to chronically hypoxic environments. The strongest candidate for positive selection along cetacean lineages was the citrate cycle signaling pathway, suggestive of enhanced aerobic metabolism during and after a dive. Six genes with cetacean-specific amino acid changes are rate-limiting enzymes involved in the gluconeogenesis pathway, which would be expected to enhance the lactate removal after diving. Intriguingly, 38 parallel amino acid substitutions in 29 genes were observed between hypoxia-tolerant mammals. Of these, 76.3% were radical amino acid changes, suggesting that convergent molecular evolution drives the adaptation to hypoxic stress and similar phenotypic changes. This study provides further insights into life under low oxygen conditions and the evolutionary trajectories of hypoxia-tolerant species.

  1. Mitochondrial energy metabolism is required for lifespan extension by the spastic paraplegia-associated protein spartin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ring

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias, a group of neurodegenerative disorders, can be caused by loss-of-function mutations in the protein spartin. However, the physiological role of spartin remains largely elusive. Here we show that heterologous expression of human or Drosophila spartin extends chronological lifespan of yeast, reducing age-associated ROS production, apoptosis, and necrosis. We demonstrate that spartin localizes to the proximity of mitochondria and physically interacts with proteins related to mitochondrial and respiratory metabolism. Interestingly, Nde1, the mitochondrial external NADH dehydrogenase, and Pda1, the core enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, are required for spartin-mediated cytoprotection. Furthermore, spartin interacts with the glycolysis enhancer phospo-fructo-kinase-2,6 (Pfk26 and is sufficient to complement for PFK26-deficiency at least in early aging. We conclude that mitochondria-related energy metabolism is crucial for spartin’s vital function during aging and uncover a network of specific interactors required for this function.

  2. Polyphenols rich fraction from Geoffroea decorticans fruits flour affects key enzymes involved in metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress and inflammatory process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Alberto, M R; Cuello, S; Torres, S; Pérez, J; Quispe, C; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-01-01

    Geoffroea decorticans (chañar), is widely distributed throughout Northwestern Argentina. Its fruit is consumed as flour, arrope or hydroalcoholic beverage. The chañar fruits flour was obtained and 39 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified by HPLC-MS/MS(n). The compounds comprised caffeic acid glycosides, simple phenolics (protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid), a glycoside of vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid and its phenethyl ester as well as free and glycosylated flavonoids. The polyphenols enriched extract with and without gastroduodenal digestion inhibited enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome, including α-amylase, α-glucosidase, lipase and hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA reductase. The polyphenolic extract exhibited antioxidant activity by different mechanisms and inhibited the pro-inflammatory enzymes (ciclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2). The polyphenolic extract did not showed mutagenic effect by Ames test against Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. These findings add evidence that chañar fruit flour may be considered a functional food with preventive properties against diseases associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibitory effects of palm tocotrienol-rich fraction supplementation on bilirubin-metabolizing enzymes in hyperbilirubinemic adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof Kamisah

    Full Text Available Phenylhydrazine, a hemolytic agent, is widely used as a model of experimental hyperbilirubinemia. Palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF was shown to exert beneficial effects in hyperbilirubinemic rat neonates.To investigate the effects of palm TRF supplementation on hepatic bilirubin-metabolizing enzymes and oxidative stress status in rats administered phenylhydrazine.Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into two groups; one group was intraperitoneally injected with palm TRF at the dose of 30 mg/kg/day, while another group was only given vehicle (control (vitamin E-free palm oil for 14 days. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, each group was further subdivided into another two groups. One group was administered phenylhydrazine (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally and another group was administered normal saline. Twenty-four hours later, blood and liver were collected for biochemical parameter measurements.Phenylhydrazine increased plasma total bilirubin level and oxidative stress in the erythrocytes as well as in the liver, which were reduced by the pretreatment of palm TRF. Palm TRF also prevented the increases in hepatic heme oxygenase, biliverdin reductase and UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities induced by phenylhydrazine.Palm tocotrienol-rich fraction was able to afford protection against phenylhydrazine-induced hyperbilirubinemia, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting bilirubin-metabolizing enzymes in the liver.

  4. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  5. Changes in cardiac energy metabolic pathways in overweighed rats fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrego, Javier; de las Heras, Natalia; Zamorano-León, Jose J; Mateos-Cáceres, Petra J; Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Valero-Muñoz, Maria; Lahera, Vicente; López-Farré, Antonio J

    2013-03-01

    Heart produces ATP through long-chain fatty acids beta oxidation. To analyze whether in ventricular myocardium, high-fat diet may modify the expression of proteins associated with energy metabolism before myocardial function was affected. Wistar Kyoto rats were divided into two groups: (a) rats fed standard diet (control; n = 6) and (b) rats fed high-fat diet (HFD; n = 6). Proteins from left ventricles were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and Western blotting. Rats fed with HFD showed higher body weight, insulin, glucose, leptin and total cholesterol plasma levels as compared with those fed with standard diet. However, myocardial functional parameters were not different between them. The protein expression of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, acyl-CoA hydrolase mitochondrial precursor and enoyl-CoA hydratase, three long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation-related enzymes, and carnitine-O-palmitoyltransferase I was significantly higher in left ventricles from HFD rats. Protein expression of triosephosphate isomerase was higher in left ventricles from HFD rats than in those from control. Two α/β-enolase isotypes and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate isomerase were significantly increased in HFD rats as compared with control. Pyruvate and lactate contents were similar in HFD and control groups. Expression of proteins associated with Krebs cycle and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was higher in HFD rats. Expression of proteins involved in left ventricle metabolic energy was enhanced before myocardial functionality was affected in rats fed with HFD. These findings may probably indicate higher cardiac energy requirement due to weight increase by HFD.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  7. Influence of mTOR in energy and metabolic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haissaguerre, Magalie; Saucisse, Nicolas; Cota, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    The mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin couples a variety of different environmental signals, including nutrients and hormones, with the regulation of several energy-demanding cellular functions, spanning from protein and lipid synthesis to mitochondrial activity and cytoskeleton dynamics. mTOR forms two distinct protein complexes in cells, mTORC1 and mTORC2. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the roles played by these two complexes in the regulation of whole body metabolic homeostasis. Studies carried out in the past few years have shown that mTORC1 activity in the hypothalamus varies by cell and stimulus type, and that this complex is critically implicated in the regulation of food intake and body weight and in the central actions of both nutrients and hormones, such as leptin, ghrelin and triiodothyronine. As a regulator of cellular anabolic processes, mTORC1 activity in the periphery favors adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucose uptake and beta-cell mass expansion. Much less is known about the function of mTORC2 in the hypothalamus, while in peripheral organs this second complex exerts roles strikingly similar to those described for mTORC1. Deregulation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Insights on the exact relationship between mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the context of the regulation of metabolic homeostasis and on the specific molecular mechanisms engaged by these two complexes in such regulation may provide new avenues for therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic effects of dark chocolate consumption on energy, gut microbiota, and stress-related metabolism in free-living subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Rezzi, Serge; Peré-Trepat, Emma; Kamlage, Beate; Collino, Sebastiano; Leibold, Edgar; Kastler, Jürgen; Rein, Dietrich; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil

    2009-12-01

    Dietary preferences influence basal human metabolism and gut microbiome activity that in turn may have long-term health consequences. The present study reports the metabolic responses of free living subjects to a daily consumption of 40 g of dark chocolate for up to 14 days. A clinical trial was performed on a population of 30 human subjects, who were classified in low and high anxiety traits using validated psychological questionnaires. Biological fluids (urine and blood plasma) were collected during 3 test days at the beginning, midtime and at the end of a 2 week study. NMR and MS-based metabonomics were employed to study global changes in metabolism due to the chocolate consumption. Human subjects with higher anxiety trait showed a distinct metabolic profile indicative of a different energy homeostasis (lactate, citrate, succinate, trans-aconitate, urea, proline), hormonal metabolism (adrenaline, DOPA, 3-methoxy-tyrosine) and gut microbial activity (methylamines, p-cresol sulfate, hippurate). Dark chocolate reduced the urinary excretion of the stress hormone cortisol and catecholamines and partially normalized stress-related differences in energy metabolism (glycine, citrate, trans-aconitate, proline, beta-alanine) and gut microbial activities (hippurate and p-cresol sulfate). The study provides strong evidence that a daily consumption of 40 g of dark chocolate during a period of 2 weeks is sufficient to modify the metabolism of free living and healthy human subjects, as per variation of both host and gut microbial metabolism.

  9. TM6SF2 and MAC30, new enzyme homologues in sterol metabolism and common metabolic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eSanchez-Pulido

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carriers of the Glu167Lys coding variant in the TM6SF2 gene have recently been identified as being more susceptible to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, yet exhibit lower levels of circulating lipids and hence are protected against cardiovascular disease. Despite the physiological importance of these observations, the molecular function of TM6SF2 remains unknown, and no sequence similarity with functionally characterised proteins has been identified. In order to trace its evolutionary history and to identify functional domains, we embarked on a computational protein sequence analysis of TM6SF2. We identified a new domain, the EXPERA domain, which is conserved among TM6SF, MAC30/TMEM97 and EBP (D8,D7 sterol isomerase protein families. EBP mutations are the cause of chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked dominant (CDPX2, also known as Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, a defective cholesterol biosynthesis disorder. Our analysis of evolutionary conservation among EXPERA domain-containing families and the previously suggested catalytic mechanism for the EBP enzyme, indicate that TM6SF and MAC30/TMEM97 families are both highly likely to possess, as for the EBP family, catalytic activity as sterol isomerases. This unexpected prediction of enzymatic functions for TM6SF and MAC30/TMEM97 is important because it now permits detailed experiments to investigate the function of these key proteins in various human pathologies, from cardiovascular disease to cancer.

  10. Energy metabolic rate in breeding avocets Recurvirostra avosetta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotker, H; Kolsch, G; Visser, GH

    We measured the field metabolic rates of six incubating Avocets by the doubly-labelled water method in a colony on the North-Frisian Wadden Sea coast in 1994. The Avocets had a mean field metabolic rate of 5.04 W (SD+/-0.33 W), which is only 2.3 times their basal metabolic rate as calculated by the

  11. An Association Study Between Gene Polymorphisms of Folic Acid Metabolism Enzymes and Biochemical and Hormonal Parameters in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetik Vardarlı, Aslı; Zengi, Ayhan; Bozok Çetintaş, Vildan; Karadeniz, Muammer; Tamsel, Sadık; Küçükaslan, Ali Şahin; Köse, Timur; Saygılı, Füsun; Eroglu, Zuhal

    2015-08-01

    Folate metabolism is fundamental to several biological functions and required for cell replication, division, and survival. The mammalian folic acid cycle is highly complex and the enzymes, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), have crucial roles in this metabolic pathway. The common polymorphisms of the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C), MTRR (A66G), and MTR (A2756G) enzymes are well documented as folate deficiency-related disorders, but their roles have not been examined in acromegalic patients. The aim of this study was to compare the genotypic distribution of these gene polymorphisms between patients with acromegaly and controls and explore whether these polymorphisms were associated with biochemical and hormonal parameters in acromegaly. We examined 91 acromegaly patients and 112 healthy subjects who were compared in terms of age and gender. Blood specimens of the subjects were collected in tubes containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes and genotyping of the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) gene polymorphisms was assessed by melting temperature analyses after real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whereas MTRR A66G and MTR A2756G gene polymorphism analyses were performed by PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism from the isolated DNA of the subjects. MTHFR-677TT genotype frequency was significantly higher in the acromegaly group than the control group (p=0.017), and a significant increase was found in fibrinogen (p=0.032) levels in 677TT-carrying acromegaly patients. MTRR-66AA genotype was significantly higher in the control group than the acromegaly group (p=0.004). Total cholesterol (p=0.048) and C-reactive protein (p=0.046) levels decreased significantly in 66AA genotypes. Although MTR-2756AG genotype frequency was not different between the control and acromegaly groups, 2756AG genotype-carrying individuals have higher left

  12. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol(-1), an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO(2) concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO(2) on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO(2) levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO(2) concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO(2) concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO(2) concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the

  13. Impact of enzalutamide and its main metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide on pharmacokinetically important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Johanna; Kocher, Jutta; Mueller, Corina; Rosenzweig, Stephanie; Theile, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Enzalutamide is a new drug against castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent data indicate profound induction of drug metabolizing enzymes (e.g. cytochrome P450 isoenzyme (CYP) 3A4) but comprehensive in vitro data on other CYP enzymes, drug conjugating enzymes or drug transporters is scarce. Moreover, the mechanisms of induction are poorly investigated and the effects of the active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide are unknown. Using LS180 cells as an induction model and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, our study demonstrated a concentration-dependent induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A5, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, ABCB1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 mRNA. Induction of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 was confirmed by Western blot analysis and is likely mediated by activation of the nuclear receptor pregnane x receptor, elucidated by a luciferase-based reporter gene assay. Enzalutamide's main active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide exhibited only weak induction properties. mRNA expression of UGT2B7 was suppressed by enzalutamide and its metabolite. Both compounds are apparently not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). N-desmethyl enzalutamide more potently inhibited important drug transporters (P-gp, BCRP, OATPs) than enzalutamide. Taken together, the pharmacokinetics of concurrently administered drugs is likely altered during enzalutamide therapy. Levels of metabolically (mainly CYP3A4) eliminated drugs are expected to be decreased, whereas the abundance of compounds with solely transporter-determined pharmacokinetics (P-gp, OATPs) is likely enhanced. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Compounds from Terminalia mantaly L. (Combretaceae Stem Bark Exhibit Potent Inhibition against Some Pathogenic Yeasts and Enzymes of Metabolic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthe Aimée Tchuente Tchuenmogne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathogenic yeasts resistance to current drugs emphasizes the need for new, safe, and cost-effective drugs. Also, new inhibitors are needed to control the effects of enzymes that are implicated in metabolic dysfunctions such as cancer, obesity, and epilepsy. Methods: The anti-yeast extract from Terminalia mantaly (Combretaceae was fractionated and the structures of the isolated compounds established by means of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. Activity was assessed against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei using the microdilution method, and against four enzymes of metabolic significance: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase I and II, and glutathione S-transferase. Results: Seven compounds, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside; 3-O-methylellagic acid; arjungenin or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid; arjunglucoside or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid glucopyranoside; 2α,3α,24-trihydroxyolean-11,13(18-dien-28-oïc acid; stigmasterol; and stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside were isolated from the extract. Among those, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-O-methylellagic acid, and arjunglucoside showed anti-yeast activity comparable to that of reference fluconazole with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC below 32 µg/mL. Besides, Arjunglucoside potently inhibited the tested enzymes with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 below 4 µM and inhibitory constant (Ki <3 µM. Conclusions: The results achieved indicate that further SAR studies will likely identify potent hit derivatives that should subsequently enter the drug development pipeline.

  15. [Effects of NaCl stress on the growth, antioxidant enzyme activities and reactive oxygen metabolism of grafted eggplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Lu; Zhu, Yue-Lin; Hu, Chun-Mei; Wei, Guo-Ping; Yang, Li-Fei; Zhang, Gu-Wen

    2007-03-01

    By the method of hydroponics and with the salt-tolerant eggplant cultivar 'Torvum Vigor' (Solanum torvum) from Japan as rootstock and the cultivar 'Suqiqie' (Solanum melongena L. ) as scion, this paper studied the differences between grafted and own-root seedlings in their photosynthetic characteristics, antioxidant enzyme activities, and reactive oxygen metabolism under 80 mmol x L(-1) NaCl stress. The results showed that under NaCl stress, the dry mass, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate of grafted seedlings were 67.8%, 8. 8% and 31.1% higher than those of own-root seedlings, respectively, and the antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly higher while the O2* producing rate and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondiadehyde (MDA) contents were significantly lower in grafted seedlings leaves than in own-root seedlings. For both grafted and own-root seedlings, NaCl stress reduced the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate, but increased the O2* producing rate and the H2O2 and MDA contents significantly. However, the growth of grafted seedlings was less affected by NaCl stress. The stronger salt tolerance of grafted eggplant seedlings was related to their higher antioxidant enzyme activities and less oxidative damage.

  16. Modulation of Masheri- and benzo[a]pyrene-inducible carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes by dietary vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammigan, N; Nair, U J; Bhide, S V

    1990-10-01

    The modulatory role of dietary vitamin A on the carcinogen metabolizing enzymes was studied in masheri extract and benzo[a]pyrene-treated rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed vitamin A deficient (SR-) and vitamin A sufficient (SR+) semisynthetic diets for 12 weeks. ME/B[a]P treatment significantly increased the phase I activating enzymes in both SR- and SR+ groups. However, a higher percentage increase in enzyme activities was observed in both liver and lung of the SR- animals compared to the SR+ groups. Glutathione content and activity of glutathione S-transferase were decreased in both liver and lung of SR- animals on treatment with either ME or B[a]P. In the SR+ group, an increase in GSH content and GST activity was observed following the ME/B[a]P treatment. The hepatic pool of vitamin A was depleted while that of vitamin C was increased after ME or B[a]P treatment in both SR- and SR+ groups.

  17. Dose-response effects of lycopene on selected drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, V.; Lauridsen, S. T.; Daneshvar, B.

    2000-01-01

    The administration of lycopene to female rats at doses ranging from 0.001 to 0.1 g/kg b.w, per day for 2 weeks was found to alter the drug-metabolizing capacity and antioxidant status of the exposed animals. An investigation of four cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes revealed that benzyloxyresorufin......,4-dichloronitrobenzene and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, was significantly induced at the 0.1 g/kg b.w. per day dose, whereas no effect was observed at the remaining lycopene doses. Analysis of the antioxidant status of thr blood compartment revealed that three out of four antioxidant enzymes were affected by lycopene...... treatment. The activity of superoxide dismutase was thus significantly induced at lycopene doses of 0.005 and 0.05 g/kg b.w, whereas glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase was only induced at the 0.005 g/kg b.w. per day dose. For all antioxidant enzymes investigated, the activities seemed...

  18. Enzyme Basis for pH Regulation of Citrate and Pyruvate Metabolism by Leuconostoc oenos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Ana; Lolkema, Juke S.; Konings, Wilhelmus; Santos, Helena

    Citrate and pyruvate metabolism by nongrowing cells of Leuconostoc oenos was investigated. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the pathway of citrate breakdown and to probe citrate or pyruvate utilization, noninvasively, in living cell suspensions. The utilization

  19. Chemical Screening for Bioactivated Electrophilic Metabolites Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA's ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracterization...

  20. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Roberto, Francisco F; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-20

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  1. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Lee, Brady D.; Reed, David William; Roberto, Francisco F.; Thompson, David N.

    2018-01-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  2. Effects of lemongrass oil and citral on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Chun; Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Chang, Chun-Hua; Liu, Yun-Ta; Yao, Hsien-Tsung

    2018-01-01

    The essential oil from a lemongrass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus [lemongrass oil (LO)] is used in various food and aroma industry products and exhibits biological activities, such as anticancer and antimicrobial activities. To investigate the effects of 200 LO (200 mg/kg) and 400 LO (400 mg/kg) and its major component, citral (240 mg/kg), on drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in the liver, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a pelleted diet and administered LO or citral by gavage for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of feeding, the effects of LO and citral on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen were determined. The results showed that rats treated with 400 LO or citral had significantly reduced hepatic testosterone 6β-hydroxylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activities. In addition, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity was significantly increased by citral, and Uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP) glucurosyltransferase activity was significantly increased by 400 LO in the rat liver. Treatment with 400 LO or citral reduced lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species levels in the liver. After acetaminophen treatment, however, LO and citral treatment resulted in little or no change in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity and acetaminophen-protein adducts content in the liver. Our results indicate that LO and citral may change the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes and reduce oxidative stress in the liver. However, LO and citral may not affect the detoxification of acetaminophen. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effects of lemongrass oil and citral on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil from a lemongrass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus [lemongrass oil (LO] is used in various food and aroma industry products and exhibits biological activities, such as anticancer and antimicrobial activities. To investigate the effects of 200 LO (200 mg/kg and 400 LO (400 mg/kg and its major component, citral (240 mg/kg, on drug-metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress, and acetaminophen toxicity in the liver, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a pelleted diet and administered LO or citral by gavage for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of feeding, the effects of LO and citral on the metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen were determined. The results showed that rats treated with 400 LO or citral had significantly reduced hepatic testosterone 6β-hydroxylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activities. In addition, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity was significantly increased by citral, and Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP glucurosyltransferase activity was significantly increased by 400 LO in the rat liver. Treatment with 400 LO or citral reduced lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species levels in the liver. After acetaminophen treatment, however, LO and citral treatment resulted in little or no change in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity and acetaminophen-protein adducts content in the liver. Our results indicate that LO and citral may change the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes and reduce oxidative stress in the liver. However, LO and citral may not affect the detoxification of acetaminophen.

  4. MODULATION OF CARCINOGEN-METABOLIZING ENZYME BY MADINAH MINT (Mentha spp) IN RAT LIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Barbour, Elie K.; EA, Huwait; Moselhy, Said S.; Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was undertaken to assess whether boiling water mint extract (BWME) modulates the cytochrome P450 mixed function oxidase system. Materials and methods: Male albino rats were randomly divided into two groups, comprising 12 animals each. The first group served as control, whereas the second was maintained on BWME (10 % w/v) as its sole drinking liquid for six weeks. Liver microsomal were separated and subjected for phase I and II enzymes (cytochrome P450 mixed function oxidase) analysis Results: The results obtained showed that, BWME caused a significant elevation in the activity of epoxide hydrolase (pmint-treated hepatic microsomal compared with the controls. Conclusion: It can be concluded that BWME has the potential to suppress the activity of cytochrome enzymes involved in the bio-activation of chemical carcinogen; hence may display chemo preventive activity. PMID:28480358

  5. Expression of the cyanobacterial enzyme cyanase increases cyanate metabolism and cyanate tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebeish, Rashad; Al-Zoubi, Omar

    2017-04-01

    Cyanate and its derivatives are considered as environmental hazardous materials. Cyanate is released to the environment through many chemical industries and mining wastewater. Cyanase enzyme converts cyanate into CO2 and NH3 in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. At low cyanate concentrations, the endogenous plant cyanases play a vital role in cyanate detoxification. However, such cyanate biodegradation system is probably insufficient due to the excess cyanate concentrations at contaminated sites. In this study, we have transferred the activity of the cyanobacterial cyanase into Arabidopsis thaliana plants in order to enhance plant resistance against cyanate toxicity. The enzyme was shown to be active in planta. Transgenic plants exposed to cyanate, either applied by foliar spray or supplemented in growth medium, showed less reduction in pigment contents, antioxidant enzymes, carbohydrate contents, and reduced levels of plant growth retardation. Plant growth assays under cyanate stress showed enhanced growth and biomass accumulation in cyanase overexpressors compared to control plants. Results of this study provide evidence for developing novel eco-friendly phytoremediation systems for cyanate detoxification.

  6. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  7. Actions of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate metabolism and ATP levels in vivo and in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Marcos Rodrigues; Bracht, Lívia; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2018-01-01

    p-Synephrine is one of the main active components of the fruit of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange). Extracts of the bitter orange and other preparations containing p-synephrine have been used worldwide to promote weight loss and for sports performance. The purpose of the study was to measure the action of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate and energy metabolism and the levels of adenine mononucleotides. Enzymes and adenine mononucleotides were measured in the isolated perfused rat liver and in vivo after oral administration of the drug (50 and 300 mg/kg) by using standard techniques. p-Synephrine increased the activity of glycogen phosphorylase in vivo and in the perfused liver. It decreased, however, the activities of pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also in vivo and in the perfused liver. p-Synephrine increased the hepatic pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase is consistent with the reported increased glycogenolysis in the perfused liver and increased glycemia in rats. The decrease in the pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicates that p-synephrine is potentially capable of inhibiting the transformation of carbohydrates into lipids. The capability of increasing the adenosine triphosphate-adenosine diphosphate pool indicates a beneficial effect of p-synephrine on the cellular energetics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Thermal physiology and metabolism : Interplay between heat generation and energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Mammal metabolism is intimately connected to the maintenance of body temperature. While metabolic pathways invariably produce heat as a by-product, the natural heat present in the environment also plays a role in defining the adaptive metabolism and general physiology of an organism. This thesis aims to discuss basic aspects of energy expenditure and their interactions with energy stores and body composition. In Paper I, we apply a new technique – high-resolution laser-Doppler imaging – to de...

  9. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  10. NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase- a metabolic repair enzyme and its role in Bacillus subtilis stress adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Petrovova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR, which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase, which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. METHODS AND RESULTS: We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin, citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase, and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase. Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase were altered after ethanol stress. CONCLUSION: We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells.

  11. Neural expression and post-transcriptional dosage compensation of the steroid metabolic enzyme 17β-HSD type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wise Petra M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, the estrogenic steroid estradiol (E2 is especially effective at promoting growth of the neural circuit specialized for song. In this species, only the males sing and they have a much larger and more interconnected song circuit than females. Thus, it was surprising that the gene for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4, an enzyme that converts E2 to a less potent estrogen, had been mapped to the Z sex chromosome. As a consequence, it was likely that HSD17B4 was differentially expressed in males (ZZ and females (ZW because dosage compensation of Z chromosome genes is incomplete in birds. If a higher abundance of HSD17B4 mRNA in males than females was translated into functional enzyme in the brain, then contrary to expectation, males could produce less E2 in their brains than females. Results Here, we used molecular and biochemical techniques to confirm the HSD17B4 Z chromosome location in the zebra finch and to determine that HSD17B4 mRNA and activity were detectable in the early developing and adult brain. As expected, HSD17B4 mRNA expression levels were higher in males compared to females. This provides further evidence of the incomplete Z chromosome inactivation mechanisms in birds. We detected HSD17B4 mRNA in regions that suggested a role for this enzyme in the early organization and adult function of song nuclei. We did not, however, detect significant sex differences in HSD17B4 activity levels in the adult brain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSD17B4 gene is expressed and active in the zebra finch brain as an E2 metabolizing enzyme, but that dosage compensation of this Z-linked gene may occur via post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  12. NAD(P)H-Hydrate Dehydratase- A Metabolic Repair Enzyme and Its Role in Bacillus subtilis Stress Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Lukas; Streitova, Eliska; Licha, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR), which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase), which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(P)H-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. Methods and Results We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin), citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase), glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase), and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase). Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase) were altered after ethanol stress. Conclusion We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells. PMID:25393291

  13. Oral administration of Nigella sativa oil ameliorates the effect of cisplatin on membrane enzymes, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative damage in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Zeba; Afsar, Mohammad; Rizwan, Sana; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Khan, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is a potent anti-cancer drug widely used against solid tumors. However, it exhibits pronounced adverse effects including hepatotoxicity. Several strategies were attempted to prevent CP hepatotoxicity but were not found suitable for therapeutic application. Nigella sativa has been shown to prevent/reduce the progression of certain type of cardiovascular, kidney and liver diseases. Present study investigates whether N. sativa oil (NSO) can prevent CP induced hepatotoxic effects. Rats were divided into four groups viz. control, CP, NSO and CPNSO. Animals in CPNSO and NSO group were administered NSO (2 ml/kg bwt, orally) with or without single hepatotoxic dose of CP (6 mg/kg bwt, i.p.) respectively. CP hepatotoxicity was recorded by increased serum ALT and AST activities. CP treatment caused oxidant/antioxidant imbalances as reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Furthermore, the activities of various carbohydrate metabolism and membrane enzymes were altered by CP treatment. In contrast, NSO administration to CP treated rats, markedly ameliorated the CP elicited deleterious alterations in liver. Histopathological observations showed extensive liver damage in CP treated animals while greatly reduced tissue injury in CPNSO group. In conclusion, NSO appears to protect CP induced hepatotoxicity by improving energy metabolism and strengthening antioxidant defense mechanism.

  14. Oral administration of Nigella sativa oil ameliorates the effect of cisplatin on membrane enzymes, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative damage in rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Farooqui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CP is a potent anti-cancer drug widely used against solid tumors. However, it exhibits pronounced adverse effects including hepatotoxicity. Several strategies were attempted to prevent CP hepatotoxicity but were not found suitable for therapeutic application. Nigella sativa has been shown to prevent/reduce the progression of certain type of cardiovascular, kidney and liver diseases. Present study investigates whether N. sativa oil (NSO can prevent CP induced hepatotoxic effects. Rats were divided into four groups viz. control, CP, NSO and CPNSO. Animals in CPNSO and NSO group were administered NSO (2 ml/kg bwt, orally with or without single hepatotoxic dose of CP (6 mg/kg bwt, i.p. respectively. CP hepatotoxicity was recorded by increased serum ALT and AST activities. CP treatment caused oxidant/antioxidant imbalances as reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Furthermore, the activities of various carbohydrate metabolism and membrane enzymes were altered by CP treatment. In contrast, NSO administration to CP treated rats, markedly ameliorated the CP elicited deleterious alterations in liver. Histopathological observations showed extensive liver damage in CP treated animals while greatly reduced tissue injury in CPNSO group. In conclusion, NSO appears to protect CP induced hepatotoxicity by improving energy metabolism and strengthening antioxidant defense mechanism.

  15. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  16. Influence of diet supplementation with green tea extract on drug-metabolizing enzymes in a mouse model of monosodium glutamate-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boušová, Iva; Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Szotáková, Barbora; Hanušová, Veronika; Tománková, Veronika; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Lišková, Barbora; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-02-01

    Consumption of dietary supplements with green tea extract (GTE) is popular for weight management, but it may be accompanied by various side effects, including interactions with drugs. The aim of the present in vivo study was to evaluate the effect of defined GTE (Polyphenon 60) in three dosage schemes on insulin, leptin and drug-metabolizing enzymes in obese mice. Experimental obesity was induced by repeated s.c. application of monosodium glutamate to newborn mice. Green tea extract was administered in three dosage schemes in chow diet. The plasmatic levels of insulin and leptin were assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Enzyme activities and mRNA expressions of drug-metabolizing enzymes (totally 13) were analyzed in liver and small intestine using spectrophotometric and HPLC assays and RT-PCR, respectively. GTE-treatment decreased insulin and leptin levels. Eleven enzymes were significantly affected by GTE-treatment. Long-term administration of 0.01% GTE caused increase in the activity and mRNA level of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) ortholog in the liver as well as in the small intestine. Interestingly, short-term overdose by GTE (0.1%) had more pronounced effects on enzyme activities and mRNA expressions than long-term overdose. GTE-mediated induction of CYP3A4 ortholog, the main drug-metabolizing enzyme, could result in decreased efficacy of simultaneously or subsequently administered drug in obese individuals.

  17. Hepatic steroid metabolizing enzyme activity during early, mid, and late bovine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, C G; Camacho, L E; Swanson, K C; Vonnahme, K A; Lemley, C O

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to examine hepatic steroid inactivating enzymes throughout gestation and determine the effect of early to mid-gestation maternal nutrient restriction followed by realimentation on the activity of these enzymes. On day 30 of gestation, cows were assigned to dietary treatments: control (CON; 100% National Research Council; n = 18) and restricted (RES; 60% National Research Council; n = 30). On day 85, cows were slaughtered (CON, n = 6 and RES, n = 6), remained on control (CC, n = 12) and restricted (RR, n = 12), or were realimented to control (RC, n = 11). On day 140, cows were slaughtered (CC, n = 6; RR, n = 6; RC, n = 5), remained on control (CCC, n = 6; RCC, n = 5), or were realimented to control (RRC, n = 6). On day 254, all remaining cows were slaughtered. Jugular blood samples were collected before the slaughter for steroid analysis. At slaughter, maternal liver samples were collected for hepatic enzyme activity analysis. Activity of cytochrome P450 3A decreased (P = 0.05) from mid- to late-gestation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha DNA binding activity was increased (P gestation vs day 85. Concentrations of estradiol-17β (E2) increased (P gestation proceeded, whereas progesterone concentrations (P4) tended to increase (P = 0.06) from mid- to late-gestation. Activity of cytochrome P450 1A and 2C were decreased (P period of nutrient realimentation from mid- to late-gestation increased (P period of nutrient realimentation. In addition, significant negative correlations were observed for cytochrome P450 3A activity vs E2 (r(2) = -0.30; P gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Starch Granule Re-Structuring by Starch Branching Enzyme and Glucan Water Dikinase Modulation Affects Caryopsis Physiology and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Shahnoor S.; Obata, Toshihiro; Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Schwahn, Kevin; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Mateiu, Ramona V.; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Starch is of fundamental importance for plant development and reproduction and its optimized molecular assembly is potentially necessary for correct starch metabolism. Re-structuring of starch granules in-planta can therefore potentially affect plant metabolism. Modulation of granule micro-structure was achieved by decreasing starch branching and increasing starch-bound phosphate content in the barley caryopsis starch by RNAi suppression of all three Starch Branching Enzyme (SBE) isoforms or overexpression of potato Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD). The resulting lines displayed Amylose-Only (AO) and Hyper-Phosphorylated (HP) starch chemotypes, respectively. We studied the influence of these alterations on primary metabolism, grain composition, starch structural features and starch granule morphology over caryopsis development at 10, 20 and 30 days after pollination (DAP) and at grain maturity. While HP showed relatively little effect, AO showed significant reduction in starch accumulation with re-direction to protein and β-glucan (BG) accumulation. Metabolite profiling indicated significantly higher sugar accumulation in AO, with re-partitioning of carbon to accumulate amino acids, and interestingly it also had high levels of some important stress-related metabolites and potentially protective metabolites, possibly to elude deleterious effects. Investigations on starch molecular structure revealed significant increase in starch phosphate and amylose content in HP and AO respectively with obvious differences in starch granule morphology at maturity. The results demonstrate that decreasing the storage starch branching resulted in metabolic adjustments and re-directions, tuning to evade deleterious effects on caryopsis physiology and plant performance while only little effect was evident by increasing starch-bound phosphate as a result of overexpressing GWD. PMID:26891365

  19. Electrical stimulation affects metabolic enzyme phosphorylation, protease activation and meat tenderization in beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, C.B.; Li, J.; Zhou, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of sarcoplasmic proteins in bovine longissimus muscle to low-voltage electrical stimulation (ES, 80 V, 35 s) after dressing and its contribution to meat tenderization at early postmortem time. Proteome analysis showed that ES resulted......, as well as pH decline and more preferred pH/temperature decline mode. Finally, ES accelerated meat tenderization with lower (P ... tenderization of beef. Our results suggested the possible importance of activation of µ-calpain, phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic proteins and release of lysosomal enzymes for ES-induced tenderization of beef muscle....

  20. Energy metabolism of overweight women before, during and after weight reduction, assessed by indirect calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested that periods of low energy intake evoke compensatory adaptations in energy metabolism, which retard weight loss, and promote weight regain when energy intake returns to normal. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether a slimming (low-energy) diet based on

  1. Pioglitazone acutely reduces energy metabolism and insulin secretion in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamontagne, Julien; Jalbert-Arsenault, Elise; Pepin, Emilie; Peyot, Marie-Line; Ruderman, Neil B; Nolan, Christopher J; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Poitout, Vincent; Prentki, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the insulin-sensitizing drug pioglitazone acutely reduces insulin secretion and causes metabolic deceleration in vivo independently of change in insulin sensitivity...

  2. alpha-Naphthylisothiocyanate induced alterations in hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and liver morphology: implications concerning anticarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, T B; Popp, J A; Graichen, M E; Dent, J G

    1981-01-01

    Alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is a biliary toxin with anticarcinogenic properties. The studies described were designed to investigate the effects of continuous ANIT feeding on liver function. Male F-344 rats were fed ANIT at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% of the diet for 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Microscopic evaluation of liver sections revealed time- and dose- dependent bile duct proliferation, bile duct cell hypertrophy, and focal hepatocytic necrosis. Liver derived serum enzyme activity and serum bilirubin concentrations were increased in a fashion which correlated closely with the histological observations. A dose dependent decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 content, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity, and benzphetamine-N-demethylase activity was observed after 2 and 4 weeks of feeding ANIT. However, these enzyme activities returned to control values at 6 weeks in all except the 0.1% group. ANIT increased microsomal epoxide hydrolase and cytosolic DT-diaphorase activity (200-6005 of control). The enhancement was dose related and peaked at 2 and 4 weeks for epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase, respectively. Both epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase activity remained elevated at 6 weeks. These results suggest that ANIT mediated anticarcinogenesis, previously hypothesized to be the result of reduced mixed function oxidase activity, also may be accounted for by enhanced epoxide hydrolase and DT-diaphorase activity.

  3. Chlorophyll-derived fatty acids regulate expression of lipid metabolizing enzymes in liver - a nutritional opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfrum Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional values of fatty acid classes are normally discussed on the basis of their saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated structures with implicit understanding that they are straight-chain. Here we focus on chlorophyll-derived phytanic and pristanic acids that are minor isoprenoid branched-chain lipid constituents in food, but of unknown nutritional value. After describing the enzyme machinery that degrades these nutrient fatty acids in the peroxisome, we show by the criteria of a mouse model and of a human cell culture model that they induce with high potency expression of enzymes responsible for beta-oxidation of straight-chain fatty acids in the peroxisome. We summarize present mechanistic knowledge on fatty acid signaling to the nucleus, which involves protein/protein contacts between peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR and fatty acid binding protein (FABP. In this signaling event the branched-chain fatty acids are the most effective ones. Finally, on the basis of this nutrient-gene interaction we discuss nutritional opportunities and therapeutic aspects of the chlorophyll-derived fatty acids.

  4. Thermodynamics of the living organisms. Allometric relationship between the total metabolic energy, chemical energy and body temperature in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2017-11-01

    The study present relationship between the total metabolic energy (ETME(c), J) derived as a function of body chemical energy (Gchem, J) and absolute temperature (Tb, K) in mammals: ETME(c) =Gchem (Tb/Tn). In formula the temperature Tn =2.73K appears normalization temperature. The calculated total metabolic energy ETME(c) differs negligible from the total metabolic energy ETME(J), received as a product between the basal metabolic rate (Pm, J/s) and the lifespan (Tls, s) of mammals: ETME = Pm×Tls. The physical nature and biological mean of the normalization temperature (Tn, K) is unclear. It is made the hypothesis that the kTn energy (where k= 1.3806×10-23 J/K -Boltzmann constant) presents energy of excitation states (modes) in biomolecules and body structures that could be in equilibrium with chemical energy accumulated in body. This means that the accumulated chemical energy allows trough all body molecules and structures to propagate excitations states with kTn energy with wavelength in the rage of width of biological membranes. The accumulated in biomolecules chemical energy maintains spread of the excited states through biomolecules without loss of energy.

  5. Utilização do triticale e de enzimas em dietas para suínos: digestibilidade e metabolismo Utilization of triticale and of enzymes in pig diets: digestibility and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hauschild

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da inclusão de níveis de triticale sobre o valor nutritivo de dietas para suínos com ou sem enzimas. Foram utilizados 24 suínos machos, castrados, com peso inicial de 59kg, alojados em gaiolas metabólicas. O delineamento foi de blocos ao acaso em arranjo fatorial 3 x 2 (níveis de triticale, 0, 30 e 60%, com ou sem enzimas, com quatro repetições cada. A inclusão de triticale na dieta em até 60% e a adição de enzimas não influenciou (P>0,05 a digestibilidade da matéria seca, fósforo, energia bruta, metabolização da energia, energia digestível e metabolizável e o balanço do N. Os valores médios de energia digestível e metabolizável foram de 3.537 e 3.435kcal. Houve interação triticale x enzimas na proteína digestível aparente (PDa (PThe effect of triticale levels with or without enzyme supplementation on nutritive value of pig’s diet was evaluated using twenty four barrows weighting 59kg, housed in metabolic crates. A complete randomized experimental block design in a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement (triticale levels -0, 30 e 60% with or without enzymes with four replicates each was utilized. No effects of triticale levels and enzymes supplementation (P>0.05 were observed on dry matter digestibility, phosphorus, crude energy, metabolization of energy, digestible and metabolizable energy and nitrogen balance. The average values of digestible and metabolizable energy were 3,537 e 3,435kcal. An interaction triticale x enzymes effect on apparent digestible protein (DPa (P<0.01 was observed. Apparent digestible protein for 60% triticale diets without enzymes supplementation was 6% lower than control diet while DPa of 30 and 60% triticale diets with enzymes supplementation were similar to DPa of the control diet and 5% higher than 60% triticale diets without enzyme supplementation. The inclusion of 60% triticale in pig diets reduces the DPa. Enzymes supplementation improves the DPa for diets containing 30 and

  6. Microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in the olive baboon (papio anabis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Thurlow, Brenda J.; Wakhisi, Johnston

    1975-01-01

    1.1. The activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes—azo reductase, nitroreductase, p-hydroxylation, N-demethylation, O-demethylation, NADPH cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P P-450—in the olive baboon are lower than in other animal species, e.g. mouse, rat, guinea-pig. 2. 2. The level...... is comparable with the level in man for N-demethylation, azo reductase, O-demethylation and NADPH cytochrome c reductase. 3. 3. The ratio of the activity of the p-hydroxylation as compared with cytochrome P-450 is very similar in baboon and man. 4. 4. Arylsulfatase is localized in the lysosomal fraction...

  7. Differentiated effect of ageing on the enzymes of Krebs' cycle, electron transfer complexes and glutamate metabolism of non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria from cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, R F; Gorini, A; Hoyer, S

    2006-11-01

    The effect of ageing on the activity of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism was studied in three different types of mitochondria of cerebral cortex of 1-year old and 2-year old male Wistar rats. We assessed the maximum rate (V(max)) of the mitochondrial enzyme activities in non-synaptic perikaryal mitochondria, and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria. The results indicated that: (i) in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex the values of the catalytic activities of the enzymes markedly differed in the various populations of mitochondria; (ii) in intra-synaptic mitochondria, ageing affected the catalytic properties of the enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism; (iii) these changes were more evident in intra-synaptic "heavy" than "light" mitochondria. These results indicate a different age-related vulnerability of subpopulations of mitochondria in vivo located into synapses than non-synaptic ones.

  8. Energy metabolism of hyperthyroid gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas-Chacoff, L.; Ruiz-Jarabo, I.; Arjona, F.J.; Laiz-Carrion, R.; Flik, G.; Klaren, P.H.; Mancera, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, in particular 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine or T3, are involved in multiple physiological processes in mammals such as protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. However, the metabolic actions of T3 in fish are still not fully elucidated. We therefore tested the effects of T3 on Sparus

  9. Discovery and therapeutic potential of drugs that shift energy metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Sheth, Sunil A.; Nilsson, Roland; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Perocchi, Fabiana; Chen, William; Clish, Clary B.; Ayata, Cenk; Brookes, Paul S.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2010-01-01

    Most cells can dynamically shift their relative reliance on glycolytic versus oxidative metabolism in response to nutrient availability, during development, and in disease. Studies in model systems have shown that re-directing energy metabolism from respiration to glycolysis can suppress oxidative damage and cell death in ischemic injury. At present we have a limited set of drugs that safely toggle