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Sample records for energy generalized phantom

  1. Dissipative generalized Chaplygin gas as phantom dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Lepe, Samuel; Pena, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The generalized Chaplygin gas, characterized by the equation of state p=-A/ρ α , has been considered as a model for dark energy due to its dark-energy-like evolution at late times. When dissipative processes are taken into account, within the framework of the standard Eckart theory of relativistic irreversible thermodynamics, cosmological analytical solutions are found. Using the truncated causal version of the Israel-Stewart formalism, a suitable model was constructed which crosses the w=-1 barrier. The future-singularities encountered in both approaches are of a new type, and not included in the classification presented by Nojiri and Odintsov [S. Nojiri, S.D. Odintsov, Phys. Rev. D 72 (2005) 023003

  2. Dissipative generalized Chaplygin gas as phantom dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas y Matematicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)]. E-mail: slepe@ucv.cl; Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de la Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)]. E-mail: fcampos@ufro.cl

    2007-03-15

    The generalized Chaplygin gas, characterized by the equation of state p=-A/{rho}{sup {alpha}}, has been considered as a model for dark energy due to its dark-energy-like evolution at late times. When dissipative processes are taken into account, within the framework of the standard Eckart theory of relativistic irreversible thermodynamics, cosmological analytical solutions are found. Using the truncated causal version of the Israel-Stewart formalism, a suitable model was constructed which crosses the w=-1 barrier. The future-singularities encountered in both approaches are of a new type, and not included in the classification presented by Nojiri and Odintsov [S. Nojiri, S.D. Odintsov, Phys. Rev. D 72 (2005) 023003].

  3. Puzzles of dark energy in the Universe—phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to some simple approach based on general physics tools to describe the physical properties of a hypothetical particle which can be the source of dark energy in the Universe known as phantom. Phantom is characterized by the fact that it possesses negative momentum and kinetic energy and that it gives dominant negative pressure which acts as antigravity. We consider a phantom harmonic oscillator in comparison to a standard harmonic oscillator. By using the first law of thermodynamics we explain why the energy density of the Universe grows when it is filled with phantom. We also show how the collision of phantom with a standard particle leads to extraction of energy from the former by the latter (i.e. from phantom to the standard) if their masses are different. The most striking of our conclusions is that the collision of phantom and standard particles of the same mass is impossible unless both of them are at rest and suddenly start moving with opposite velocities and kinetic energies. This effect is a classic analog of quantum mechanical particle pair creation in a strong electric field or physical vacuum. (paper)

  4. Wormholes supported by phantom energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Guzman, F. S.; Montelongo-Garcia, N.; Zannias, T.

    2009-01-01

    By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we demonstrate the existence of spherical, asymptotically flat traversable wormholes supported by exotic matter whose stress tensor relative to the orthonormal frame of Killing observers takes the form of a perfect fluid possessing anisotropic pressures and subject to linear equations of state: τ=λρc 2 , P=μρc 2 . We show that there exists a four parameter family of asymptotically flat spherical wormholes parametrized by the area of the throat A(0), the gradient Λ(0) of the red shift factor evaluated on the throat as well as the values of (λ,μ). The latter are subject to restrictions: λ>1 and 2μ>λ or λ<0 and 2μ<-|λ|. For particular values of (λ,μ), the stress tensor may be interpreted as representing a phantom configuration, while for other values represents exotic matter. All solutions have the property that the two asymptotically flat ends possess finite Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass.

  5. Dark energy: Vacuum fluctuations, the effective phantom phase, and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, E.; Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Wang Peng

    2005-01-01

    We aim at the construction of dark energy models without exotic matter but with a phantomlike equation of state (an effective phantom phase). The first model we consider is decaying vacuum cosmology where the fluctuations of the vacuum are taken into account. In this case, the phantom cosmology (with an effective, observational ω being less than -1 ) emerges even for the case of a real dark energy with a physical equation of state parameter ω larger than -1. The second proposal is a generalized holographic model, which is produced by the presence of an infrared cutoff. It also leads to an effective phantom phase, which is not a transient one as in the first model. However, we show that quantum effects are able to prevent its evolution towards a big rip singularity

  6. Dual Energy Tomosynthesis breast phantom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Fountos, G.; Messaris, G.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dual energy (DE) imaging technique has been applied to many theoretical and experimental studies. The aim of the current study is to evaluate dual energy in breast tomosynthesis using commercial tomosynthesis system in terms of its potential to better visualize microcalcifications (μCs). The system uses a tungsten target X-ray tube and a selenium direct conversion detector. Low-energy (LE) images were acquired at different tube voltages (28, 30, 32 kV), while high-energy images at 49 kV. Fifteen projections, for the low- and high-energy respectively, were acquired without grid while tube scanned continuously. Log-subtraction algorithm was used in order to obtain the DE images with the weighting factor, w, derived empirically. The subtraction was applied to each pair of LE and HE slices after reconstruction. The TORMAM phantom was imaged with the different settings. Four regions-of-interest including μCs were identified in the inhomogeneous part of the phantom. The μCs in DE images were more clearly visible compared to the low-energy images. Initial results showed that DE tomosynthesis imaging is a promising modality, however more work is required.

  7. Crossing the phantom divide: Dark energy internal degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Dark energy constraints have forced viable alternatives that differ substantially from a cosmological constant Λ to have an equation of state w that evolves across the phantom divide set by Λ. Naively, crossing this divide makes the dark energy gravitationally unstable, a problem that is typically finessed by unphysically ignoring the perturbations. While this procedure does not affect constraints near the favored cosmological constant model it can artificially enhance the confidence with which alternative models are rejected. Similar to the general problem of stability for w<0, the solution lies in the internal degrees of freedom in the dark energy sector. We explicitly show how to construct a two scalar field model that crosses the phantom divide and mimics the single field behavior on either side to substantially better than 1% in all observables. It is representative of models where the internal degrees of freedom keep the dark energy smooth out to the horizon scale independently of the equation of state

  8. Phantom energy accretion onto black holes in a cyclic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Chengyi

    2008-01-01

    Black holes pose a serious problem in cyclic or oscillating cosmology. It is speculated that, in the cyclic universe with phantom turnarounds, black holes will be torn apart by phantom energy prior to turnaround before they can create any problems. In this paper, using the mechanism of phantom accretion onto black holes, we find that black holes do not disappear before phantom turnaround. But the remanent black holes will not cause any problems due to Hawking evaporation.

  9. Thermodynamics of Phantom Energy Accreting onto a Black Hole in Einstein—Power—Maxwell Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, G.; Ramzan, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the phantom energy accretion onto a 3D black hole formulated in the Einstein—Power—Maxwell theory, and present the conditions for critical accretion of phantom energy onto the black hole. Further, we discuss the thermodynamics of phantom energy accreting onto the black hole and find that the first law of thermodynamics is easily satisfied while the second law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics remain invalid and conditionally valid, respectively. The results for the Banados—Teitelboim—Zanelli black hole can be recovered by taking Maxwellian contribution equal to zero

  10. A Unified Model of Phantom Energy and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Max; Singleton, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    To explain the acceleration of the cosmological expansion researchers have considered an unusual form of mass-energy generically called dark energy. Dark energy has a ratio of pressure over mass density which obeys w = p/ρ theories based on graded Lie algebras naturally have such a negative kinetic energy and thus give a model for phantom energy in a less ad hoc manner. We find that the model also contains ordinary scalar fields and anti-commuting (Grassmann) vector fields which act as a form of two component dark matter. Thus from a gauge theory based o! n a graded algebra we naturally obtained both phantom energy and dark matter.

  11. A Unified Model of Phantom Energy and Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Singleton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To explain the acceleration of the cosmological expansion researchers have considered an unusual form of mass-energy generically called dark energy. Dark energy has a ratio of pressure over mass density which obeys $w=p/ ho <-1/3$. This form of mass-energy leads to accelerated expansion. An extreme form of dark energy, called phantom energy, has been proposed which has $w=p/ ho <-1$. This possibility is favored by the observational data. The simplest model for phantom energy involves the introduction of a scalar field with a negative kinetic energy term. Here we show that theories based on graded Lie algebras naturally have such a negative kinetic energy and thus give a model for phantom energy in a less ad hoc manner. We find that the model also contains ordinary scalar fields and anti-commuting (Grassmann vector fields which act as a form of two component dark matter. Thus from a gauge theory based on a graded algebra we naturally obtained both phantom energy and dark matter.

  12. Equation of state description of the dark energy transition between quintessence and phantom regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2006-01-01

    The dark energy crossing of the cosmological constant boundary (the transition between the quintessence and phantom regimes) is described in terms of the implicitly defined dark energy equation of state. The generalizations of the models explicitly constructed to exhibit the crossing provide the insight into the cancellation mechanism which makes the transition possible

  13. Energy Efficient Resource Allocation for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE. First, we consider sparsely deployed cells experiencing negligible interference and assume perfect channel state information (CSI). For this setting, we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus number of users, and phantom cells share of the total available resource units (RUs). We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It is found that increasing phantom cells share of RUs decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. Second, we consider the densely deployed phantom cellular networks and model the EE optimization problem having into consideration the inevitable interference and imperfect channel estimation. To this end, we propose three resource allocation strategies aiming at optimizing the EE performance metric of this network. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of changing some of the system parameters on the performance of the proposed strategies, such as phantom cells share of RUs, number of deployed phantom cells within a macro cell coverage, number of pilots and the maximum power available for transmission by the phantom cells BSs. It is found that increasing the number of pilots deteriorates the EE performance of the whole setup, while increasing maximum power available for phantom cells transmissions reduces the EE of the whole setup in a

  14. Supernovae type Ia data favour coupled phantom energy

    OpenAIRE

    Majerotto, Elisabetta; Sapone, Domenico; Amendola, Luca

    2004-01-01

    We estimate the constraints that the recent high-redshift sample of supernovae type Ia put on a phenomenological interaction between dark energy and dark matter. The interaction can be interpreted as arising from the time variation of the mass of dark matter particles. We find that the coupling correlates with the equation of state: roughly speaking, a negative coupling (in our sign convention) implies phantom energy ($w_{\\phi}

  15. PVAL breast phantom for dual energy calcification detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukou, V; Martini, N; Velissarakos, K; Gkremos, D; Michail, C; Kandarakis, I; Fountos, G; Fountzoula, C; Bakas, A

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications are the main indicator for breast cancer. Dual energy imaging can enhance the detectability of calcifications by suppressing the tissue background. Two digital images are obtained using two different spectra, for the low- and high-energy respectively, and a weighted subtracted image is produced. In this study, a dual energy method for the detection of the minimum breast microcalcification thickness was developed. The used integrated prototype system consisted of a modified tungsten anode X-ray tube combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor. The breast equivalent phantom used was an elastically compressible gel of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL). Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate microcalcifications with thicknesses ranging from 50 to 500 μm. The custom made phantom was irradiated with 40kVp and 70kVp. Tungsten (W) anode spectra filtered with 100μm Cadmium and 1000pm Copper, for the low- and high-energy, respectively. Microcalcifications with thicknesses 300μm or higher can be detected with mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.62mGy. (paper)

  16. Dual-energy imaging in full-field digital mammography: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taibi, A; Fabbri, S; Baldelli, P; Maggio, C di; Gennaro, G; Marziani, M; Tuffanelli, A; Gambaccini, M

    2003-01-01

    A dual-energy technique which employs the basis decomposition method is being investigated for application to digital mammography. A three-component phantom, made up of plexiglas, polyethylene and water, was doubly exposed with the full-field digital mammography system manufactured by General Electric. The 'low' and 'high' energy images were recorded with a Mo/Mo anode-filter combination and a Rh/Rh combination, respectively. The total dose was kept within the acceptable levels of conventional mammography. The first hybrid images obtained with the dual-energy algorithm are presented in comparison with a conventional radiograph of the phantom. Image-quality characteristics at contrast cancellation angles between plexiglas and water are discussed. Preliminary results show that a combination of a standard Mo-anode 28 kV radiograph with a Rh-anode 49 kV radiograph provides the best compromise between image-quality and dose in the hybrid image

  17. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material. (paper)

  18. Holographic Dark Energy with Generalized Chaplygin Gas in Higher Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, S.; Saha, A.; Paul, B. C.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate holographic dark energy (HDE) correspondence of interacting Generalized Chaplygin Gas (GCG) in the framework of compact Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology. The evolution of the modified HDE with corresponding equation of state is obtained here. Considering the present value of the density parameter a stable configuration is found which accommodates Dark Energy (DE). We note a connection between DE and Phantom fields. It reveals that the DE might have evolved from a Phantom state in the past.

  19. Monte Carlo-based investigation of water-equivalence of solid phantoms at 137Cs energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwakarma, Ramkrushna S.; Palani Selvam, T.; Sahoo, Sridhar; Mishra, Subhalaxmi; Chourasiya, Ghanshyam

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of solid phantom materials such as solid water, virtual water, plastic water, RW1, polystyrene, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for their equivalence to liquid water at 137 Cs energy (photon energy of 662 keV) under full scatter conditions is carried out using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. Monte Carlo-based EGSnrc code system was used in the work to calculate distance-dependent phantom scatter corrections. The study also includes separation of primary and scattered dose components. Monte Carlo simulations are carried out using primary particle histories up to 5 x 10 9 to attain less than 0.3% statistical uncertainties in the estimation of dose. Water equivalence of various solid phantoms such as solid water, virtual water, RW1, PMMA, polystyrene, and plastic water materials are investigated at 137 Cs energy under full scatter conditions. The investigation reveals that solid water, virtual water, and RW1 phantoms are water equivalent up to 15 cm from the source. Phantom materials such as plastic water, PMMA, and polystyrene phantom materials are water equivalent up to 10 cm. At 15 cm from the source, the phantom scatter corrections are 1.035, 1.050, and 0.949 for the phantoms PMMA, plastic water, and polystyrene, respectively. (author)

  20. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    considered and the specific goals to be achieved at different stages of implementation, all of which are consistent with the Basic Principles. The four Objectives publications include Nuclear General Objectives, Nuclear Power Objectives, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Objectives, and Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning Objectives. All four Objectives publications follow the same structure. For each topic in the area, the objectives are described in accordance with the sequence in the Basic Principles publication. Within each of these four Objectives publications, the individual topics that make up each area are addressed. The topics included in Nuclear General Objectives are Energy Systems Analysis and Development of Strategies for Nuclear Energy, Economics, Infrastructure, Management Systems, Human Resources and Knowledge Management. The diversity of the topics contained in Nuclear General Objectives necessitated incorporating some repetition in order to simplify access to the relevant information for the various interested audiences.

  1. Analytical expression for the phantom generated bremsstrahlung background in high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorcini, B.B.; Hyoedynmaa, S; Brahme, A.

    1995-01-01

    Qualification of the bremsstrahlung photon background generated by an electron beam in a phantom is important for accurate high energy electron beam dosimetry in radiation therapy. An analytical expression has been derived for the background of phantom generated bremsstrahlung photons in plane parallel electron beams normally incident on phantoms of any atomic number between 4 and 92 (Be, C, H 2 O, Al, Cu, Ag, Pb and U). The expression can be used with fairly good accuracy in the energy range between 1 and 50 MeV. The expression is globally based on known scattering power and radiation and collision stopping power data for the phantom material at the mean energy of the incident electrons. The depth dose distribution due to the bremsstrahlung generated in the phantom is derived by folding the bremsstrahlung energy fluence with a simple analytical one-dimensional photon energy deposition kernel. The energy loss of the primary electrons and the generation, attenuation and absorption of bremsstrahlung photons are taken into account in the analytical formula. The photon energy deposition kernel is used to account for the bremsstrahlung produced at one depth that will contribute to the down stream dose. A simple analytical expression for photon energy deposition kernel is consistent with the classical analytical relation describing the photon depth dose distribution. From the surface to the practical range the photon dose increases almost linearly due to accumulation and buildup of the photon produced at different phantom layers. At depths beyond the practical range a simple exponential function can be use to describe the bremsstrahlung attenuation in the phantom. For comparison Monte Carlo calculated distributions using ITS3 Monte Carlo Code were used. Good agreement is found between the analytical expression and Monte Carlo calculation. Deviations of 5% from Monte Carlo calculated bremmstrahlung background are observed for high atomic number materials. The method can

  2. Electron beam absorption in solid and in water phantoms: depth scaling and energy-range relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosswendt, B.; Roos, M.

    1989-01-01

    In electron dosimetry energy parameters are used with values evaluated from ranges in water. The electron ranges in water may be deduced from ranges measured in solid phantoms. Several procedures recommended by national and international organisations differ both in the scaling of the ranges and in the energy-range relations for water. Using the Monte Carlo method the application of different procedures for electron energies below 10 MeV is studied for different phantom materials. It is shown that deviations in the range scaling and in the energy-range relations for water may accumulate to give energy errors of several per cent. In consequence energy-range relations are deduced for several solid phantom materials which enable a single-step energy determination. (author)

  3. [Development of a digital chest phantom for studies on energy subtraction techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Norio; Taniguchi, Anna; Noto, Kimiya; Shimosegawa, Masayuki; Ogura, Toshihiro; Doi, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Digital chest phantoms continue to play a significant role in optimizing imaging parameters for chest X-ray examinations. The purpose of this study was to develop a digital chest phantom for studies on energy subtraction techniques under ideal conditions without image noise. Computed tomography (CT) images from the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium) were employed to develop a digital chest phantom. The method consisted of the following four steps: 1) segmentation of the lung and bone regions on CT images; 2) creation of simulated nodules; 3) transformation to attenuation coefficient maps from the segmented images; and 4) projection from attenuation coefficient maps. To evaluate the usefulness of digital chest phantoms, we determined the contrast of the simulated nodules in projection images of the digital chest phantom using high and low X-ray energies, soft tissue images obtained by energy subtraction, and "gold standard" images of the soft tissues. Using our method, the lung and bone regions were segmented on the original CT images. The contrast of simulated nodules in soft tissue images obtained by energy subtraction closely matched that obtained using the gold standard images. We thus conclude that it is possible to carry out simulation studies based on energy subtraction techniques using the created digital chest phantoms. Our method is potentially useful for performing simulation studies for optimizing the imaging parameters in chest X-ray examinations.

  4. A note on crossing the phantom divide in hybrid dark energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2006-01-01

    Recently a lot of attention has been given to building dark energy models in which the equation-of-state parameter w can cross the phantom divide w=-1. However, to our knowledge, these models with crossing the phantom divide only provide the possibility that w can cross -1. They do not answer another question: why crossing phantom divide occurs recently? Since in many existing models whose equation-of-state parameter can cross the phantom divide, w undulates around -1 randomly, why are we living in an epochw<-1? This can be regarded as the second cosmological coincidence problem. In this Letter, we propose a possible approach to alleviate this problem within a hybrid dark energy model

  5. Interacting polytropic gas model of phantom dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Ghaffari, S.; Fehri, J.

    2009-01-01

    By introducing the polytropic gas model of interacting dark energy, we obtain the equation of state for the polytropic gas energy density in a non-flat universe. We show that for an even polytropic index by choosing K>Ba (3)/(n) , one can obtain ω Λ eff <-1, which corresponds to a universe dominated by phantom dark energy. (orig.)

  6. Energy-Efficient Resource Allocation for Phantom Cellular Networks with Imperfect CSI

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr Mohamed Abdelaziz

    2017-03-28

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for a two-tier phantom cellular network, The optimization framework includes both EE and SE. We consider densely deployed phantom cellular networks and model the EE optimization problem taking into consideration the inevitable interference in this setup and imperfect channel estimation impairments. To this end, we propose three resource allocation strategies aiming at optimizing this network EE performance metric. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of changing some system parameters on the performance of these strategies, such as phantom cells resource units share, number of deployed phantom cells within a macro cell , number of pilots, and the phantom cells transmission power budget. It is found that increasing the number of pilots will deteriorate the EE performance of the whole setup, while increasing phantom cells transmission power budget will not affect the EE of the whole setup significantly. In addition, we observed that it is always useful to allocate most of the network resource units to the phantom cells tier.

  7. Energy-Efficient Resource Allocation for Phantom Cellular Networks with Imperfect CSI

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr Mohamed Abdelaziz; Amin, Osama; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for a two-tier phantom cellular network, The optimization framework includes both EE and SE. We consider densely deployed phantom cellular networks and model the EE optimization problem taking into consideration the inevitable interference in this setup and imperfect channel estimation impairments. To this end, we propose three resource allocation strategies aiming at optimizing this network EE performance metric. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of changing some system parameters on the performance of these strategies, such as phantom cells resource units share, number of deployed phantom cells within a macro cell , number of pilots, and the phantom cells transmission power budget. It is found that increasing the number of pilots will deteriorate the EE performance of the whole setup, while increasing phantom cells transmission power budget will not affect the EE of the whole setup significantly. In addition, we observed that it is always useful to allocate most of the network resource units to the phantom cells tier.

  8. Phantom dark energy with varying-mass dark matter particles: Acceleration and cosmic coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate several varying-mass dark matter particle models in the framework of phantom cosmology. We examine whether there exist late-time cosmological solutions, corresponding to an accelerating universe and possessing dark energy and dark matter densities of the same order. Imposing exponential or power-law potentials and exponential or power-law mass dependence, we conclude that the coincidence problem cannot be solved or even alleviated. Thus, if dark energy is attributed to the phantom paradigm, varying-mass dark matter models cannot fulfill the basic requirement that led to their construction.

  9. Does the mass of a black hole decrease due to the accretion of phantom energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Changjun; Chen Xuelei; Faraoni, Valerio; Shen Yougen

    2008-01-01

    According to Babichev et al., the accretion of a phantom test fluid onto a Schwarzschild black hole will induce the mass of the black hole to decrease, however the backreaction was ignored in their calculation. Using new exact solutions describing black holes in a background Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, we find that the physical black hole mass may instead increase due to the accretion of phantom energy. If this is the case, and the future universe is dominated by phantom dark energy, the black hole apparent horizon and the cosmic apparent horizon will eventually coincide and, after that, the black hole singularity will become naked in finite comoving time before the big rip occurs, violating the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  10. The role of phantom and treatment head generated bremsstrahlung in high-energy electron beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorcini, B.B.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Brahme, A.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression has been derived for the phantom generated bremsstrahlung photons in plane-parallel monoenergetic electron beams normally incident on material of any atomic number (Be, H 2 O, Al, Cu and U). The expression is suitable for the energy range from 1 to 50 MeV and it is solely based on known scattering power and radiative and collision stopping power data for the material at the incident electron energy. The depth dose distribution due to the bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons in the phantom is derived by convolving the bremsstrahlung energy fluence produced in the phantom with a simple analytical energy deposition kernel. The kernel accounts for both electrons and photons set in motion by the bremsstrahlung photons. The energy loss by the primary electrons, the build-up of the electron fluence and the generation, attenuation and absorption of bremsstrahlung photons are all taken into account in the analytical formula. The longitudinal energy deposition kernel is derived analytically and it is consistent with both the classical biexponential relation describing the photon depth dose distribution and the exponential attenuation of the primary photons. For comparison Monte Carlo calculated energy deposition distributions using ITS3 code were used. Good agreement was found between the results with the analytical expression and the Monte Carlo calculation. For tissue equivalent materials, the maximum total energy deposition differs by less than 0.2% from Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions. The result can be used to estimate the depth dependence of phantom generated bremsstrahlung in different materials in therapeutic electron beams and the bremsstrahlung production in different electron absorbers such as scattering foils, transmission monitors and photon and electron collimators. By subtracting the phantom generated bremsstrahlung from the total bremsstrahlung background the photon contamination generated in the treatment head can be

  11. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  12. Segmentation and quantification of materials with energy discriminating computed tomography: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Huy Q.; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate whether a computed tomography (CT) system based on CdZnTe (CZT) detectors in conjunction with a least-squares parameter estimation technique can be used to decompose four different materials. Methods: The material decomposition process was divided into a segmentation task and a quantification task. A least-squares minimization algorithm was used to decompose materials with five measurements of the energy dependent linear attenuation coefficients. A small field-of-view energy discriminating CT system was built. The CT system consisted of an x-ray tube, a rotational stage, and an array of CZT detectors. The CZT array was composed of 64 pixels, each of which is 0.8x0.8x3 mm. Images were acquired at 80 kVp in fluoroscopic mode at 50 ms per frame. The detector resolved the x-ray spectrum into energy bins of 22-32, 33-39, 40-46, 47-56, and 57-80 keV. Four phantoms were constructed from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene, polyoxymethylene, hydroxyapatite, and iodine. Three phantoms were composed of three materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (50, 150, 250, and 350 mg/ml) and iodine (4, 8, 12, and 16 mg/ml) contrast elements. One phantom was composed of four materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (150 and 350 mg/ml) and iodine (8 and 16 mg/ml). Calibrations consisted of PMMA phantoms with either hydroxyapatite (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/ml) or iodine (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 mg/ml) embedded. Filtered backprojection and a ramp filter were used to reconstruct images from each energy bin. Material segmentation and quantification were performed and compared between different phantoms. Results: All phantoms were decomposed accurately, but some voxels in the base material regions were incorrectly identified. Average quantification errors of hydroxyapatite/iodine were 9.26/7.13%, 7.73/5.58%, and 12.93/8.23% for the three-material PMMA, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene phantoms, respectively. The average errors for the four

  13. Generalization of conditioned suppression during salicylate-induced phantom auditory perception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J F; Jastreboff, P J

    1991-01-01

    Tonal frequency generalization was examined in a total of 114 pigmented male rats, 60 of which were tested under the influence of salicylate-induced phantom auditory perception, introduced before or after lick suppression training. Thirty control subjects received saline injections, and the remaining 24 subjects served as noninjected controls of tonal background effects on generalization. Rats were continuously exposed to background noise alone or with a superimposed tone. Offset of background noise alone (Experiment I), or combined with onset or continuation of the tone (Experiments II and III) served as the conditioned stimulus (CS). In Experiment I, tone presentations were introduced only after suppression training. Depending on the time of salicylate introduction, a strong and differential influence on generalization gradients was observed, which is consistent with subjects' detection of salicylate-induced, high-pitched sound. Moreover, when either 12- or 3 kHz tones were introduced before or after Pavlovian training to mimic salicylate effects in 24 rats, the distortions in generalization gradients resembled trends obtained from respective salicylate injected groups. Experiments II and III were aimed at evaluating the masking effect of salicylate-induced phantom auditory perception on external sounds, with a 5- or a 10-kHz tone imposed continuously on the noise or presented only during the CS. Tests of tonal generalization to frequencies ranging from 4- to 11- kHz showed that in this experimental context salicylate-induced perception did not interfere with the dominant influence of external tones, a result that further strengthens the conclusion of Experiment I.

  14. Tissue Cancellation in Dual Energy Mammography Using a Calibration Phantom Customized for Direct Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seokmin; Kang, Dong-Goo

    2014-01-01

    An easily implementable tissue cancellation method for dual energy mammography is proposed to reduce anatomical noise and enhance lesion visibility. For dual energy calibration, the images of an imaging object are directly mapped onto the images of a customized calibration phantom. Each pixel pair of the low and high energy images of the imaging object was compared to pixel pairs of the low and high energy images of the calibration phantom. The correspondence was measured by absolute difference between the pixel values of imaged object and those of the calibration phantom. Then the closest pixel pair of the calibration phantom images is marked and selected. After the calibration using direct mapping, the regions with lesion yielded different thickness from the background tissues. Taking advantage of the different thickness, the visibility of cancerous lesions was enhanced with increased contrast-to-noise ratio, depending on the size of lesion and breast thickness. However, some tissues near the edge of imaged object still remained after tissue cancellation. These remaining residuals seem to occur due to the heel effect, scattering, nonparallel X-ray beam geometry and Poisson distribution of photons. To improve its performance further, scattering and the heel effect should be compensated.

  15. Electricity's "Disappearing Act": Understanding Energy Consumption and Phantom Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, Bryan; Mahfouz, Tarek; Jones, James

    2011-01-01

    Energy exists in many forms and can be converted from one form to another. However, this conversion is not 100% efficient, and energy is lost in the form of heat during conversion. In addition, approximately 6% of the monthly consumption of the average American household's electricity is neither lost nor used by its residents. These losses are…

  16. Optimized Energy Efficiency and Spectral Efficiency Resource Allocation Strategies for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr, M.; Amin, Osama; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    Multi-teir hetrogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-teir architecture known as Phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that computes the SE and EE resource allocation for Phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and the ration of Phantom cellresource blocks to the total number or resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to acheive improved SE or EE performance at a non-significant loss in EE or SE performance, respectively. It was found that the system parameters can be tuned so that the EE solution does not yield a significant loss in the SE performance.

  17. Phantom of the Hartle-Hawking instanton: connecting inflation with dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin; Qiu, Taotao; Yeom, Dong-han

    2016-01-01

    If the Hartle-Hawking wave function is the correct boundary condition of our universe, the history of our universe will be well approximated by an instanton. Although this instanton should be classicalized at infinity, as long as we are observing a process of each history, we may detect a non-classicalized part of field combinations. When we apply it to a dark energy model, this non-classicalized part of fields can be well embedded to a quintessence and a phantom model, i.e., a quintom model. Because of the property of complexified instantons, the phantomness will be naturally free from a big rip singularity. This phantomness does not cause perturbative instabilities, as it is an effect emergent from the entire wave function. Our work may thus provide a theoretical basis for the quintom models, whose equation of state can cross the cosmological constant boundary phenomenologically. (orig.)

  18. Optimized Energy Efficiency and Spectral Efficiency Resource Allocation Strategies for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr, M.

    2016-01-06

    Multi-teir hetrogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-teir architecture known as Phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that computes the SE and EE resource allocation for Phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and the ration of Phantom cellresource blocks to the total number or resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to acheive improved SE or EE performance at a non-significant loss in EE or SE performance, respectively. It was found that the system parameters can be tuned so that the EE solution does not yield a significant loss in the SE performance.

  19. Phantom of the Hartle-Hawking instanton: connecting inflation with dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pisin; Qiu, Taotao; Yeom, Dong-han

    2016-02-01

    If the Hartle-Hawking wave function is the correct boundary condition of our universe, the history of our universe will be well approximated by an instanton. Although this instanton should be classicalized at infinity, as long as we are observing a process of each history, we may detect a non-classicalized part of field combinations. When we apply it to a dark energy model, this non-classicalized part of fields can be well embedded to a quintessence and a phantom model, i.e., a quintom model. Because of the property of complexified instantons, the phantomness will be naturally free from a big rip singularity. This phantomness does not cause perturbative instabilities, as it is an effect emergent from the entire wave function. Our work may thus provide a theoretical basis for the quintom models, whose equation of state can cross the cosmological constant boundary phenomenologically.

  20. Phantom of the Hartle-Hawking instanton: connecting inflation with dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin [National Taiwan University, Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, Taipei (China); Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); Qiu, Taotao [Central China Normal University, Institute of Astrophysics, Wuhan (China); Yeom, Dong-han [National Taiwan University, Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, Taipei (China)

    2016-02-15

    If the Hartle-Hawking wave function is the correct boundary condition of our universe, the history of our universe will be well approximated by an instanton. Although this instanton should be classicalized at infinity, as long as we are observing a process of each history, we may detect a non-classicalized part of field combinations. When we apply it to a dark energy model, this non-classicalized part of fields can be well embedded to a quintessence and a phantom model, i.e., a quintom model. Because of the property of complexified instantons, the phantomness will be naturally free from a big rip singularity. This phantomness does not cause perturbative instabilities, as it is an effect emergent from the entire wave function. Our work may thus provide a theoretical basis for the quintom models, whose equation of state can cross the cosmological constant boundary phenomenologically. (orig.)

  1. Phantom dark energy and cosmological solutions without the Big Bang singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baushev, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis is rapidly gaining popularity that the dark energy pervading our universe is extra-repulsive (-p>ρ). The density of such a substance (usually called phantom energy) grows with the cosmological expansion and may become infinite in a finite time producing a Big Rip. In this Letter we analyze the late stages of the universe evolution and demonstrate that the presence of the phantom energy in the universe is not enough in itself to produce the Big Rip. This singularity occurrence requires the fulfillment of some additional, rather strong conditions. A more probable outcome of the cosmological evolution is the decay of the phantom field into 'normal' matter. The second, more intriguing consequence of the presence of the phantom field is the possibility to introduce a cosmological scenario that does not contain a Big Bang. In the framework of this model the universe eternally expands, while its density and other physical parameters oscillate over a wide range, never reaching the Plank values. Thus, the universe evolution has no singularities at all.

  2. General Relativity and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  3. The energy spectrum of 662 keV photons in a water equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Ozmutlu, E.N.; Yalcin, S.; Gundogdu, O.; Sharaf, J.M.; Bradley, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation is made on the energy spectrum of photons originating from interactions of 662 keV primary gamma-ray photons emitted by a point source positioned at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom of dimensions 19 cm×19 cm×24 cm. Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering have been observed using a 51 mm×51 mm NaI(Tl) detector; good agreement being found between the measured and simulated response functions. The energy spectrum of the gamma photons obtained through the Monte Carlo simulation reveals local maxima at about 100 keV and 210 keV, being also observed in the experimental response function. Such spectra can be used as a method of testing the water equivalence of solid phantom media before their use for dosimetry measurements. - Highlights: ► Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering were observed. ► Energy distribution of γ-ray photons from a point source at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom. ► The method can be applied to various detector geometries.

  4. Resource allocation for phantom cellular networks: Energy efficiency vs spectral efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr Mohamed Abdelaziz; Amin, Osama; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Mean-while, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies for phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and phantom cells share of the total number of available resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It was found that increasing phantom cells share of resource blocks decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. © 2016 IEEE.

  5. Resource allocation for phantom cellular networks: Energy efficiency vs spectral efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr M.

    2016-07-26

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Mean-while, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies for phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and phantom cells share of the total number of available resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It was found that increasing phantom cells share of resource blocks decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. © 2016 IEEE.

  6. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  7. Determination of dose correction factor for energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Koo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Na, Seong Ho

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the MOSFET dosimeter has been widely used in various medical applications such as dose verification in radiation therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The MOSFET dosimeter is, however, mainly made of silicon and shows some energy dependence for low energy photons. Therefore, the MOSFET dosimeter tends to overestimate the dose for low energy scattered photons in a phantom. This study determines the correction factors to compensate these dependences of the MOSFET dosimeter in ATOM phantom. For this, we first constructed a computational model of the ATOM phantom based on the 3D CT image data of the phantom. The voxel phantom was then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation code and used to calculate the energy spectrum of the photon field at each of the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom. Finally, the correction factors were calculated based on the energy spectrum of the photon field at the dosimeter locations and the pre-determined energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter. Our result for 60 Co and 137 Cs photon fields shows that the correction factors are distributed within the range of 0.89 and 0.97 considering all the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom

  8. Stability of Thin Shell Wormholes in Born-Infeld Theory Supported by Polytropic Phantom Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eid, Ali [Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2017-02-15

    In the framework of the Darmois-Israel formalism, the dynamical equations of motion of spherically-symmetric thin-shell wormholes supported by a polytropic phantom energy in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory are constructed. A stability analysis of the spherically-symmetric thin-shell wormhole by using the standard potential method is carried out. The existence of stable, static solutions depends on the values of some parameters.

  9. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  10. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa; McCullough, William P.; Mecca, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash "r"e"g"i"s"t"e"r"e"d CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI_v_o_l) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality

  11. General expressions for the volume of organs in the MIRD-phantom and their use to arrive at an Indian ''reference'' man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiv Datta

    1982-01-01

    The general expressions for the volume of body organs have been developed, when their equations are assumed to be of the same form as in the MIRD phantom. Scaling down is then carried out by introducing factors based on the average weight and height of a group of Indian adult males (workers in various units of Department of Atomic Energy, India). The general expressions for the volume of the body organs will be found handy to use when the actual data of the organs (ratios of the lengths of their axes and the volumes) become available. (author)

  12. Compound analysis of gallstones using dual energy computed tomography-Results in a phantom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.co [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Schulz, Julian R., E-mail: julian.schulz@t-online.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Zedler, Barbara, E-mail: zedler@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Department of Forensic Medicine, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Kennedyallee 104, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Graf, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.gt.graf@siemens.co [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Physics and Applications, Siemensstrasse 1, 91313 Forchheim (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The potential of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) for the analysis of gallstone compounds was investigated. The main goal was to find parameters, that can reliably define high percentage (>70%) cholesterol stones without calcium components. Materials and methods: 35 gallstones were analyzed with DECT using a phantom model. Stone samples were put into specimen containers filled with formalin. Containers were put into a water-filled cylindrical acrylic glass phantom. DECT scans were performed using a tube voltage/current of 140 kV/83 mAs (tube A) and 80 kV/340 mAs (tube B). ROI-measurements to determine CT attenuation of each sector of the stones that had different appearance on the CT images were performed. Finally, semi-quantitative infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of these sectors was performed for chemical analysis. Results: ROI-measurements were performed in 45 different sectors in 35 gallstones. Sectors containing >70% of cholesterol and no calcium component (n = 20) on FTIR could be identified with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity on DECT. These sectors showed typical attenuation of -8 {+-} 4 HU at 80 kV and +22 {+-} 3 HU at 140 kV. Even the presence of a small calcium component (<10%) hindered the reliable identification of cholesterol components as such. Conclusion: Dual energy CT allows for reliable identification of gallstones containing a high percentage of cholesterol and no calcium component in this pre-clinical phantom model. Results from in vivo or anthropomorphic phantom trials will have to confirm these results. This may enable the identification of patients eligible for non-surgical treatment options in the future.

  13. Compound analysis of gallstones using dual energy computed tomography-Results in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Schulz, Julian R.; Zedler, Barbara; Graf, Thomas G.; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The potential of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) for the analysis of gallstone compounds was investigated. The main goal was to find parameters, that can reliably define high percentage (>70%) cholesterol stones without calcium components. Materials and methods: 35 gallstones were analyzed with DECT using a phantom model. Stone samples were put into specimen containers filled with formalin. Containers were put into a water-filled cylindrical acrylic glass phantom. DECT scans were performed using a tube voltage/current of 140 kV/83 mAs (tube A) and 80 kV/340 mAs (tube B). ROI-measurements to determine CT attenuation of each sector of the stones that had different appearance on the CT images were performed. Finally, semi-quantitative infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of these sectors was performed for chemical analysis. Results: ROI-measurements were performed in 45 different sectors in 35 gallstones. Sectors containing >70% of cholesterol and no calcium component (n = 20) on FTIR could be identified with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity on DECT. These sectors showed typical attenuation of -8 ± 4 HU at 80 kV and +22 ± 3 HU at 140 kV. Even the presence of a small calcium component (<10%) hindered the reliable identification of cholesterol components as such. Conclusion: Dual energy CT allows for reliable identification of gallstones containing a high percentage of cholesterol and no calcium component in this pre-clinical phantom model. Results from in vivo or anthropomorphic phantom trials will have to confirm these results. This may enable the identification of patients eligible for non-surgical treatment options in the future.

  14. Detection and quantification of coronary calcium from dual energy chest x-rays: Phantom feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Wen, Di; Nye, Katelyn; Gilkeson, Robert C; Eck, Brendan; Jordan, David; Wilson, David L

    2017-10-01

    We have demonstrated the ability to identify coronary calcium, a reliable biomarker of coronary artery disease, using nongated, 2-shot, dual energy (DE) chest x-ray imaging. Here we will use digital simulations, backed up by measurements, to characterize DE calcium signals and the role of potential confounds such as beam hardening, x-ray scatter, cardiac motion, and pulmonary artery pulsation. For the DE calcium signal, we will consider quantification, as compared to CT calcium score, and visualization. We created stylized and anatomical digital 3D phantoms including heart, lung, coronary calcium, spine, ribs, pulmonary artery, and adipose. We simulated high and low kVp x-ray acquisitions with x-ray spectra, energy dependent attenuation, scatter, ideal detector, and automatic exposure control (AEC). Phantoms allowed us to vary adipose thickness, cardiac motion, etc. We used specialized dual energy coronary calcium (DECC) processing that includes corrections for scatter and beam hardening. Beam hardening over a wide range of adipose thickness (0-30 cm) reduced the change in intensity of a coronary artery calcification (ΔI CAC ) by calcium signal (ΔI CAC ) in DECC images ±9%. If a simulated pulmonary artery fills with blood between exposures, it can give rise to a residual signal in DECC images, explaining pulmonary artery visibility in some clinical images. Residual misregistration can be mostly compensated by integrating signals in an enlarged region encompassing registration artifacts. DECC calcium score compared favorably to CT mass and volume scores over a number of phantom perturbations. Simulations indicate that proper DECC processing can faithfully recover coronary calcium signals. Beam hardening, errors in scatter estimation, cardiac motion, calcium residual misregistration etc., are all manageable. Simulations are valuable as we continue to optimize DE coronary calcium image processing and quantitative analysis. © 2017 American Association of Physicists

  15. Calcium scoring with dual-energy CT in men and women: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to quantify and compare the potential impact of gender differences on coronary artery calcium scoring with dual-energy CT. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom with four synthetic heart vessels (diameter 3-4.5 mm: female/male left main and left circumflex artery) were scanned with and without female breast plates. Ten repeat scans were acquired in both single- and dual-energy modes and reconstructed at six reconstruction settings: two slice thicknesses (3 mm, 0.6 mm) and three reconstruction algorithms (FBP, IR3, IR5). Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated from the reconstructed data using a segmentation-based approach. Total calcium score (summation of four vessels), and male/female calcium scores (summation of male/female vessels scanned in phantom without/with breast plates) were calculated accordingly. Both Agatston and calcium volume scores were found comparable between single- and dual-energy scans (Pearson r= 0.99, pwomen and men in calcium scoring, and for standardizing imaging protocols for improved gender-specific calcium scoring.

  16. Wormholes supported by phantom energy from Shan-Chen cosmological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Deng [Nankai University, Theoretical Physics Division, Chern Institute of Mathematics, Tianjin (China); Meng, Xin-He [Nankai University, Department of Physics, Tianjin (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State key Lab of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    In the present paper, the exact solutions of spherically symmetrical Einstein field equations describing wormholes supported by phantom energy that violates the null energy condition from Shan-Chen background fluid are obtained. We have considered the important case of the model parameter ψ ∼ 1, which corresponds to the ''saturation effect'', and this regime corresponds to an effective form of ''asymptotic freedom'' for the fluids, but occurring at cosmological rather than subnuclear scales. Then we investigate the allowed range for the values of the model parameters g and ω when the spacetime metrics describe wormholes and discuss the possible singularities of the solutions, finding that the obtained spacetimes are geodesically complete. Furthermore, we construct two traversable wormholes through matching our obtained interior solutions to the exterior Schwarzschild solutions and analyze the traversabilities of the wormholes. Finally, we consider the case of anisotropic pressure and discover that the transverse pressure also crosses the phantom divide -1 with the growth of the wormhole dimension, and it tends to be the same as the radial pressure with the growth of the wormhole radius. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of hepatic fatty infiltration using dual-energy computed tomography: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jung-Hui; Tsai, Chang-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the performance of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for the quantification of liver fat content (LFC). We prepared two phantoms: homogenized mixtures of porcine liver and fat and homogeneous mixtures of liver- and fat-equivalent solutions. Tubes containing mixtures with known fat concentrations were scanned on a dual-source CT scanner using two DE scanning protocols (80 kV/Sn140 kV and 100 kV/Sn140 kV). Attenuation curves obtained from DECT were used to describe attenuations of various degrees of LFC at different energies. LFC was calculated from DECT data and compared with the known LFC. The phantom made of liver/fat mixtures was not used for liver fat quantification because the increase of fat content did not show a decline of CT numbers. This may be due to inhomogeneity as observed in CT images. Attenuation curves obtained from two DE scanning protocols had the ability to discriminate small differences in fat concentrations. Our results also showed a strong correlation between DECT measurements and known LFC (R 2  > 0.99, P < 0.005). DECT will be a reliable tool for liver fat quantification. Furthermore, attenuation curves obtained from DECT data can be used for discriminating various degrees of LFC. (paper)

  18. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients

  19. Characterization of the phantom material virtual water in high-energy photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, M R; Niven, D

    2006-04-01

    The material Virtual Water has been characterized in photon and electron beams. Range-scaling factors and fluence correction factors were obtained, the latter with an uncertainty of around 0.2%. This level of uncertainty means that it may be possible to perform dosimetry in a solid phantom with an accuracy approaching that of measurements in water. Two formulations of Virtual Water were investigated with nominally the same elemental composition but differing densities. For photon beams neither formulation showed exact water equivalence-the water/Virtual Water dose ratio varied with the depth of measurement with a difference of over 1% at 10 cm depth. However, by using a density (range) scaling factor very good agreement (water and Virtual Water at all depths was obtained. In the case of electron beams a range-scaling factor was also required to match the shapes of the depth dose curves in water and Virtual Water. However, there remained a difference in the measured fluence in the two phantoms after this scaling factor had been applied. For measurements around the peak of the depth-dose curve and the reference depth this difference showed some small energy dependence but was in the range 0.1%-0.4%. Perturbation measurements have indicated that small slabs of material upstream of a detector have a small (<0.1% effect) on the chamber reading but material behind the detector can have a larger effect. This has consequences for the design of experiments and in the comparison of measurements and Monte Carlo-derived values.

  20. Reproducibility of trabecular bone score with different scan modes using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni [Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Pastor Lopez, Maria Juana; Ulivieri, Fabio M. [Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Ospedale Maggiore, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Milano (Italy); Mai, Alessandro [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Tecniche di Radiologia Medica, per Immagini e Radioterapia, Milano (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2014-08-12

    The trabecular bone score (TBS) accounts for the bone microarchitecture and is calculated on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We estimated the reproducibility of the TBS using different scan modes compared to the reproducibility bone mineral density (BMD). A spine phantom was used with a Hologic QDR-Discovery A densitometer. For each scan mode [fast array, array, high definition (HD)], 25 scans were automatically performed without phantom repositioning; a further 25 scans were performed with phantom repositioning. For each scan, the TBS was obtained. The coefficient of variation (CoV) was calculated as the ratio between standard deviation and mean; percent least significant change (LSC%) as 2.8 x CoV; reproducibility as the complement to 100 % of LSC%. Differences among scan modes were assessed using ANOVA. Without phantom repositioning, the mean TBS (mm{sup -1}) was: 1.352 (fast array), 1.321 (array), and 1.360 (HD); with phantom repositioning, it was 1.345, 1.332, and 1.362, respectively. Reproducibility of the TBS without phantom repositioning was 97.7 % (fast array), 98.3 % (array), and 98.2 % (HD); with phantom repositioning, it was 97.9 %, 98.7 %, and 98.4 %, respectively. LSC% was ≤2.26 %. Differences among scan modes were all statistically significant (p ≤ 0.019). Reproducibility of BMD was 99.1 % with all scan modes, while LSC% was from 0.86 % to 0.91 %. Reproducibility error of the TBS was 2-3-fold higher than that of BMD. Although statistically significant, differences in TBS among scan modes were within the highest LSC%. Thus, the three scan modes can be considered interchangeable. (orig.)

  1. Interacting holographic dark energy models: a general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S.; Sil, A.

    2014-08-01

    Dark energy models inspired by the cosmological holographic principle are studied in homogeneous isotropic spacetime with a general choice for the dark energy density . Special choices of the parameters enable us to obtain three different holographic models, including the holographic Ricci dark energy (RDE) model. Effect of interaction between dark matter and dark energy on the dynamics of those models are investigated for different popular forms of interaction. It is found that crossing of phantom divide can be avoided in RDE models for β>0.5 irrespective of the presence of interaction. A choice of α=1 and β=2/3 leads to a varying Λ-like model introducing an IR cutoff length Λ -1/2. It is concluded that among the popular choices an interaction of the form Q∝ Hρ m suits the best in avoiding the coincidence problem in this model.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations in CT for the study of the surface air kerma and energy imparted to phantoms of varying size and position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés Lucas, P.; Dance, D. R.; Castellano, I. A.; Vañó, E.

    2004-04-01

    A Monte Carlo computational model of CT has been developed and used to investigate the effect of various physical factors on the surface air kerma length product, the peak surface air kerma, the air kerma length product within a phantom and the energy imparted. The factors investigated were the bow-tie filter and the size, shape and position of a phantom which simulates the patient. The calculations show that the surface air kerma length product and the maximum surface air kerma are mainly dependent on phantom position and decrease along the vertical axis of the CT plane as the phantom surface moves away from the isocentre along this axis. As a result, measurements using standard body dosimetry phantoms may underestimate the skin dose for real patients. This result is specially important for CT fluoroscopic procedures: for an adult patient the peak skin dose can be 37% higher than that estimated with a standard measurement on the body AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) phantom. The results also show that the energy imparted to a phantom is mainly influenced by phantom size and is nearly independent of phantom position (within 3%) and shape (up to 5% variation). However, variations of up to 30% were found for the air kerma to regions within the AAPM body phantom when it is moved vertically. This highlights the importance of calculating doses to organs taking into account their size and position within the gantry.

  3. Optimal Scanning Protocols for Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Stents: An in Vitro Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the optimal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT scanning protocol for peripheral arterial stents while achieving a low radiation dose, while still maintaining diagnostic image quality, as determined by an in vitro phantom study. Methods: Dual-energy scans in monochromatic spectral imaging mode were performed on a peripheral arterial phantom with use of three gemstone spectral imaging (GSI protocols, three pitch values, and four kiloelectron volts (keV ranges. A total of 15 stents of different sizes, materials, and designs were deployed in the phantom. Image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR, and the four levels of monochromatic energy for DECT imaging of peripheral arterial stents were measured and compared to determine the optimal protocols. Results: A total of 36 scans with 180 datasets were reconstructed from a combination of different protocols. There was a significant reduction of image noise with a higher SNR from monochromatic energy images between 65 and 70 keV in all investigated preset GSI protocols (p < 0.05. In addition, significant effects were found from the main effect analysis for these factors: GSI, pitch, and keV (p = 0.001. In contrast, there was significant interaction on the unstented area between GSI and ASIR (p = 0.015 and a very high significant difference between keV and ASIR (p < 0.001. A radiation dose reduction of 50% was achieved. Conclusions: The optimal scanning protocol and energy level in the phantom study were GSI-48, pitch value 0.984, and 65 keV, which resulted in lower image noise and a lower radiation dose, but with acceptable diagnostic images.

  4. Energy Limits in Second Generation High-pitch Dual Source CT - Comparison in an Upper Abdominal Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beeres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to find out how much energy is applicable in second-generation dual source high-pitch computed tomography (CT in imaging of the abdomen. Materials and Methods: We examined an upper abdominal phantom using a Somatom Definition Flash CT-Scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany. The study protocol consisted of a scan-series at 100 kV and 120 kV. In each scan series we started with a pitch of 3.2 and reduced it in steps of 0.2, until a pitch of 1.6 was reached. The current was adjusted to the maximum the scanner could achieve. Energy values, image noise, image quality, and radiation exposure were evaluated. Results: For a pitch of 3.2 the maximum applicable current was 142 mAs at 120 kV and in 100 kV the maximum applicable current was 114 mAs. For conventional abdominal imaging, current levels of 200 to 260 mAs are generally used. To achieve similar current levels, we had to decrease the pitch to 1.8 at 100 kV - at this pitch we could perform our imaging at 204 mAs. At a pitch of 2.2 in 120 kV we could apply a current of 206 mAs. Conclusion: We conclude our study by stating that if there is a need for a higher current, we have to reduce the pitch. In a high-pitch dual source CT, we always have to remember where our main focus is, so we can adjust the pitch to the energy we need in the area of the body that has to be imaged, to find answers to the clinical question being raised.

  5. Symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hongo, Syozo; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures for computation of organ doses exposed to internal and/or external radiation sources. One method is to make mathematical phantoms on the basis of ORNL mathematical phantoms. Parameters to specify organs of Japanese mathematical phantom are determined by interpolations of the ORNL data, which define the organs of Caucasian males and females of various ages, i.e. new born, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and adult, with survey data for Japanese physiques. Another procedure is to build 'symbol phantoms' for the Japanese public. The concept and its method of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for an individual when we have all of his transversal section images obtained by a medical imaging device like MRI, and thus we may achieve more realistic phantoms for Japanese public than the mathematical phantoms. Both studies are in progress in NIRS. (author)

  6. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, M.A., E-mail: M.Bahri@ulg.ac.be [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A. [Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Salmon, E.; Luxen, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Seret, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); ULg-Liege University, Experimental Medical Imaging, Liege (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described . The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm{sup -1} corresponding to 114 {mu}m resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm{sup -1}) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R{sup 2}>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  7. A phantom test of proton-induced dual-energy X-ray angiography using iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Ogawa, M.; Kaneko, J.; Sasa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic-line radiation from heavy metal targets bombarded by MeV proton beams has been tested as an X-ray source for dual-energy K-edge subtraction imaging for human angiography (blood vessel imaging) based on iodinated contrast media. To utilize the strong absorption by iodine (Z=53) at its K-absorption edge (33.2 keV), we used K α -line of La (lanthanum, Z=57) at 33.4 keV. As a reference, also K α X emission of Sn (tin, Z=50) at 25.2 keV was employed. Metallic plates of La and Sn were irradiated by 7-MeV protons to produce these characteristic X-rays. Energy-subtraction method was tested using Lucite phantoms which contain aqueous solutions of KI (potassium iodide) with different concentrations. Also Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 powder was stuffed in these phantoms to simulate bones. The transmission images of the phantoms were recorded on imaging plates. During the exposure, the energy spectra of the X-rays were monitored by a CdTe detector. We found that the contrast of images of iodide solutions taken with La X-rays was higher than that with Sn X-rays. Also the energy subtraction procedure was successfully applied to reduce the graphical noise due to the bones and inhomogeneity of the soft tissue. However, to apply the present method to actual clinical use, the X-ray intensity must be increased by several orders of magnitude. Also the transmission of the 'lower-energy' photons has to be a few orders higher for imaging of objects as thick as human chest. (author)

  8. Energy conditions and stability in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant energy condition in general relativity theory, which says that every observer measures a nonnegative local energy density and a nonspacelike local energy flow, is examined in connection with the types of energy-momentum tensor it permits. The condition that the energy-momentum tensor be ''stable'' in obeying the dominant energy conditions is then defined in terms of a suitable topology on the set of energy-momentum tensors on space-time and the consequences are evaluated and discussed. (author)

  9. In-phantom measurement of absorbed dose to water in medium energy x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, K.

    1996-01-01

    Absorbed dose values in a water phantom derived by the formalism of the IAEA Code of Practice of Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams are a few per cent higher than those based on the procedure following e.g. ICRU Report 23. The maximum deviation exceeds 10% at 100 kV tube potential. The correction factor needed to take into account the differences at the calibration in terms of air kerma free in air and at the measurement in the water phantom can be determined in different ways: In comparing the result of the absorbed dose measurement by means of the ionization chambers with an other, preferably fundamental method of measurement of absorbed dose in the water phantom or by evaluating all component parts of the correction factor separately. The values of the perturbation correction factor in the IAEA Code were determined in the former way by comparing against a graphite extrapolation chamber. A review is given on a recent re-evaluation using former values of the extrapolation chamber measurements and on new determinations using an absorbed dose water calorimeter, a method based on calculated and measured air kerma values and a method of combining the component factors to the overall correction factor. Recent results achieved by the different methods are compared and a change of the data of the IAEA Code is recommended. (author). 31 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  10. MO-AB-BRA-04: Correct Identification of Low-Attenuation Intracranial Hemorrhage and Calcification Using Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in a Phantom System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nute, J; Jacobsen, M; Popnoe, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, TX (United States); UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Wei, W [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Baiu, C [Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI (United States); Schellingerhout, D [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Cody, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intracranial hemorrhage and calcification with Single-Energy CT (SECT) attenuation below 100HU cannot be reliably identified using currently clinically available means. Calcification is typically benign but hemorrhage can carry a risk of intracranial bleeding and contraindicate use of anticoagulant therapies. A biologically-relevant phantom was used to investigate identification of unknown intracranial lesions using dual-energy CT (DECT) as a verification of prior lesion differentiation results. Methods: Prior phantom work investigating calcification and hemorrhage differentiation resulted in 3D-DECT raw data (water density, calcium density, 68keV) for a range of DECT protocol variations: image thicknesses (1.25, 2.5, 3.75, 5mm), CTDIvol (36.7 to 132.6mGy) and reconstruction algorithms (Soft, Standard, Detail). Acquisition-specific raw data were used to create a plane of optimal differentiation based on the geometric bisector of 3D-linear regression of the two lesion distributions. Verification hemorrhage and calcification lesions, ranging in size from 0.5 to 1.5cm, were created at varying attenuation from 50 to 100HU. Lesions were inserted into a biologically-relevant brain phantom and scanned using SECT (3.75mm images, Standard, 67mGy) and a range of DECT protocols (3.75mm images, Standard, [67, 105.6, 132.6mGy]). 3D-DECT data were collected and blinded for analysis. The 3D-DECT distribution of the lesion was then compared to the acquisition-matched geometric bisector plane and the mean lesion value’s position relative to the plane, indicating lesion identity, and the percentage of voxels on the identified side of the plane, indicating identification confidence, were derived. Results: 98% of the 120 lesions investigated were identified correctly as hemorrhage or calcification. 74% were identified with greater than 80% confidence. Increases in CTDIvol and lesion diameter were associated with increased identification confidence. Conclusion: Intracranial

  11. SU-E-T-608: Perturbation Corrections for Alanine Dosimeters in Different Phantom Materials in High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Czarnecki, D; Anton, M; Zink, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Alanine dosimeters are often used for in-vivo dosimetry purposes in radiation therapy. In a Monte Carlo study the influence of 20 different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters was investigated. The investigations were performed in high-energy photon beams, covering the whole range from 60 Co up to 25 MV-X. The aim of the study is the introduction of a perturbation correction k env for alanine dosimeters accounting for the environmental material. Methods: The influence of different surrounding materials on the response of alanine dosimeters was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc code. The photon source was adapted with BEAMnrc to a 60 Co unit and an Elekta (E nom =6, 10, 25 MV-X) linear accelerator. Different tissue-equivalent materials ranging from cortical bone to lung were investigated. In addition to available phantom materials, some material compositions were taken and scaled to different electron densities. The depth of the alanine detectors within the different phantom materials corresponds to 5 cm depth in water, i.e. the depth is scaled according to the electron density (n e /n e,w ) of the corresponding phantom material. The dose was scored within the detector volume once for an alanine/paraffin mixture and once for a liquid water voxel. The relative response, the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water, was calculated and compared to the corresponding ratio under reference conditions. Results: For each beam quality the relative response r and the correction factor for the environment kenv was calculated. k env =0.9991+0.0049 *((n e /n e,w )−0.7659) 3 Conclusion: A perturbation correction factor k env accounting for the phantom environment has been introduced. The response of the alanine dosimeter can be considered independent of the surrounding material for relative electron densities (n e /n e,w ) between 1 and 1.4. For denser materials such as bone or much less dense

  12. Energy and Uncertainty in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperstock, F. I.; Dupre, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The issue of energy and its potential localizability in general relativity has challenged physicists for more than a century. Many non-invariant measures were proposed over the years but an invariant measure was never found. We discovered the invariant localized energy measure by expanding the domain of investigation from space to spacetime. We note from relativity that the finiteness of the velocity of propagation of interactions necessarily induces indefiniteness in measurements. This is because the elements of actual physical systems being measured as well as their detectors are characterized by entire four-velocity fields, which necessarily leads to information from a measured system being processed by the detector in a spread of time. General relativity adds additional indefiniteness because of the variation in proper time between elements. The uncertainty is encapsulated in a generalized uncertainty principle, in parallel with that of Heisenberg, which incorporates the localized contribution of gravity to energy. This naturally leads to a generalized uncertainty principle for momentum as well. These generalized forms and the gravitational contribution to localized energy would be expected to be of particular importance in the regimes of ultra-strong gravitational fields. We contrast our invariant spacetime energy measure with the standard 3-space energy measure which is familiar from special relativity, appreciating why general relativity demands a measure in spacetime as opposed to 3-space. We illustrate the misconceptions by certain authors of our approach.

  13. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-01

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity-in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:T1 scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm2 iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components-acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  14. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm 2 iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues

  15. Phantom dark ghost in Einstein-Cartan gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chiao [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Chen, Pisin [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Astrophysics, Taipei (China); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    A class of dynamical dark energy models is constructed through an extended version of fermion fields corresponding to phantom dark ghost spinors, which are spin 1/2 with mass dimension 1. We find that if these spinors interact with torsion fields in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, then it does not imply any future dark energy singularity or any abrupt event, though the fermion has a negative kinetic energy. In fact, the equation of state of this dark energy model will asymptotically approach the value w = -1 from above without crossing the phantom divide and inducing therefore a de Sitter state. Consequently, we expect the model to be stable because no real phantom fields will be created. At late time, the torsion fields will vanish as the corresponding phantom dark ghost spinors dilute. As would be expected, intuitively, this result is unaffected by the presence of cold dark matter although the proof is not as straightforward as in general relativity. (orig.)

  16. Simple implementation of general dark energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Pearson, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a formalism for the numerical implementation of general theories of dark energy, combining the computational simplicity of the equation of state for perturbations approach with the generality of the effective field theory approach. An effective fluid description is employed, based on a general action describing single-scalar field models. The formalism is developed from first principles, and constructed keeping the goal of a simple implementation into CAMB in mind. Benefits of this approach include its straightforward implementation, the generality of the underlying theory, the fact that the evolved variables are physical quantities, and that model-independent phenomenological descriptions may be straightforwardly investigated. We hope this formulation will provide a powerful tool for the comparison of theoretical models of dark energy with observational data

  17. Absorbed fractions in a voxel-based phantom calculated with the MCNP-4B code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoriyaz, H; dos Santos, A; Stabin, M G; Cabezas, R

    2000-07-01

    A new approach for calculating internal dose estimates was developed through the use of a more realistic computational model of the human body. The present technique shows the capability to build a patient-specific phantom with tomography data (a voxel-based phantom) for the simulation of radiation transport and energy deposition using Monte Carlo methods such as in the MCNP-4B code. MCNP-4B absorbed fractions for photons in the mathematical phantom of Snyder et al. agreed well with reference values. Results obtained through radiation transport simulation in the voxel-based phantom, in general, agreed well with reference values. Considerable discrepancies, however, were found in some cases due to two major causes: differences in the organ masses between the phantoms and the occurrence of organ overlap in the voxel-based phantom, which is not considered in the mathematical phantom.

  18. Dark energy cosmology with generalized linear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babichev, E; Dokuchaev, V; Eroshenko, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Dark energy with the usually used equation of state p = wρ, where w const 0 ), where the constants α and ρ 0 are free parameters. This non-homogeneous linear equation of state provides the description of both hydrodynamically stable (α > 0) and unstable (α < 0) fluids. In particular, the considered cosmological model describes the hydrodynamically stable dark (and phantom) energy. The possible types of cosmological scenarios in this model are determined and classified in terms of attractors and unstable points by using phase trajectories analysis. For the dark energy case, some distinctive types of cosmological scenarios are possible: (i) the universe with the de Sitter attractor at late times, (ii) the bouncing universe, (iii) the universe with the big rip and with the anti-big rip. In the framework of a linear equation of state the universe filled with a phantom energy, w < -1, may have either the de Sitter attractor or the big rip

  19. A robust method for determining the absorbed dose to water in a phantom for low-energy photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T, E-mail: thorsten.schneider@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-06-07

    The application of more and more low-energy photon radiation in brachytherapy-either in the form of low-dose-rate radioactive seeds such as Pd-103 or I-125 or in the form of miniature x-ray tubes-has induced greater interest in determining the absorbed dose to water in water in this energy range. As it seems to be hardly feasible to measure the absorbed dose with calorimetric methods in this low energy range, ionometric methods are the preferred choice. However, the determination of the absorbed dose to water in water by ionometric methods is difficult in this energy range. With decreasing energy, the relative uncertainty of the photon cross sections increases and as the mass energy transfer coefficients show a steep gradient, the spectra of the radiation field must be known precisely. In this work two ionometric methods to determine the absorbed dose to water are evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the uncertainties of the spectra and of the atomic database. The first is the measurement of the air kerma free in air and the application of an MC-based conversion factor to the absorbed dose to water. The second is the determination of the absorbed dose to water by means of an extrapolation chamber as an integral part of a phantom. In the complementing MC-calculations, two assortments of spectra each of which is based on a separate unfolding procedure were used as well as two kinds of databases: the standard PEGS and the recently implemented NIST database of EGSnrc. Experimental results were obtained by using a parallel-plate graphite extrapolation chamber and a free-air chamber. In the case when the water kerma in a phantom is determined from the measurements of air kerma free in air, differences in the order of 10% were found, according to which the database or the kind of spectrum is used. In contrast to this, for the second method, the differences found were about 0.5%.

  20. Potential of gadolinium as contrast material in second generation dual energy computed tomography - An ex vivo phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Malte N; Schabel, Christoph; Krauss, Bernhard; Claussen, Claus D; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph

    To evaluate the potential of gadolinium (Gd) as contrast material (CM) in second generation dual energy computed tomography (DECT). In a phantom model, DECT post-processing was used to increase Gd attenuation using advanced monoenergetic extrapolation (MEI), to create virtual non-contrast images (Gd-VNC) and Gd maps and to quantify Gd content. Dilutions of Gd and iodinated CM (7-296 HU) were filled in syringes, placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with standard DECT protocols (80 &100/Sn140 kV). MEI (40-190 keV) and VNC images as well as Gd maps were computed. The amount of Gd was quantified and the accuracy was compared to iodine images. Linear regression models were calculated to evaluate Gd attenuation of equivolume CM doses and clinical MRI doses. Applying monoenergetic reconstructions and using Gd as contrast agent (Gd MEI 40 keV) doubled Hounsfield-Units (HU) and 90% of the SNR (averaged: 225 HU, SNR3.1) are achievable, as compared to iodinated CM at 120 kV (averaged:110 HU, SNR3.5), at Gd doses of 1.0mmol/kg BW. The accuracies of Gd-VNC (deviation, 6±12 HU) images and Gd quantification (measurement error, 17%) were not significantly different to those of iodine enhanced images (VNC:deviation, 2±11 HU; measurement error,14%). Using monoenergetic extrapolation at 40keV, it is possible to increase Gd-CM attenuation significantly. Thus, equivalent HU and half the SNR in comparison to a standard dose of ICM at 120kV can be expected at a Gd-CM dose of 0.5mmol/kg BW. Post-processing features of iodine based DECT like monoenergetic or VNC images, iodine maps or quantification of CM are feasible with the use of Gd-CM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of the phantom material Virtual WaterTM in high-energy photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M.R.; Niven, D.

    2006-01-01

    The material Virtual Water TM has been characterized in photon and electron beams. Range-scaling factors and fluence correction factors were obtained, the latter with an uncertainty of around 0.2%. This level of uncertainty means that it may be possible to perform dosimetry in a solid phantom with an accuracy approaching that of measurements in water. Two formulations of Virtual Water TM were investigated with nominally the same elemental composition but differing densities. For photon beams neither formulation showed exact water equivalence--the water/Virtual Water TM dose ratio varied with the depth of measurement with a difference of over 1% at 10 cm depth. However, by using a density (range) scaling factor very good agreement ( TM at all depths was obtained. In the case of electron beams a range-scaling factor was also required to match the shapes of the depth dose curves in water and Virtual Wate TM . However, there remained a difference in the measured fluence in the two phantoms after this scaling factor had been applied. For measurements around the peak of the depth-dose curve and the reference depth this difference showed some small energy dependence but was in the range 0.1%-0.4%. Perturbation measurements have indicated that small slabs of material upstream of a detector have a small (<0.1% effect) on the chamber reading but material behind the detector can have a larger effect. This has consequences for the design of experiments and in the comparison of measurements and Monte Carlo-derived values

  2. The potential of dual-energy virtual monochromatic imaging in reducing renal cyst pseudoenhancement. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Sachiko; Ueguchi, Takashi; Ukai, Isao; Nagai, Yumiko; Yamakawa, Masanobu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Shimazu, Takeshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Renal cyst pseudoenhancement, an artifactual increase of computed tomography (CT) attenuation for cysts with increased iodine concentrations in the renal parenchyma, complicates the classification of cysts and may thus lead to the mischaracterization of a benign non-enhancing lesion as an enhancing mass. The purpose of this study was to use a phantom model to assess the ability of dual-energy virtual monochromatic imaging to reduce renal pseudoenhancement. A water-filled cylindrical cyst model suspended in varying concentrations of iodine solution, to simulate varying levels of parenchymal enhancement, was scanned with a dual-energy CT scanner using the following three scanning protocols with different combinations of tube voltage: 80 and 140 kV; 80 and 140 kV with tin filter; and 100 and 140 kV with tin filter. Virtual monochromatic images were then synthesized for each dual-energy scan. Single-energy scan with a tube voltage of 120 kV was also performed to obtain polychromatic images as controls. Mean attenuation values (in Hounsfield units) of cyst proxies were measured on both polychromatic and virtual monochromatic images. Pseudoenhancement was considered to be present when the cyst attenuation level increased by more than 10 HU (Hounsfield Unit) as the background iodine concentration increased from 0.0% to 0.4%, 1.5%, or 2.5%. Our results revealed that pseudoenhancement was not observed on any of the monochromatic images, but appeared on polychromatic images at a background iodine concentration of 2.5%. We thus conclude that dual-energy virtual monochromatic images have a potential to reduce renal pseudoenhancement. (author)

  3. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  4. Scientific Instrument for a Controlled Choice of Optimal Photon Energy Spectrum: A Comparison Between Calculational Methods and Laboratory Irradiations of Comparable Hard Tissue Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.; Sandborg, M.; Eckerdal, O.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    1998-01-01

    Basic performance parameters are defined and analysed in order to optimise physical image quality in relation to the energy imparted to the patient in dental radiology. Air cavities were embedded in well-defined multi material, hard tissue phantoms to represent various objects in dento-maxillo-facial examinations. Basic performance parameters were: object contrast (C), energy imparted (ε) to the patient, signal-to-noise ration (SNR), C 2 /ε (film) and (SNR) / ε (digital imaging system) as functions of HVL (half-value layer), used to describe the photon energy spectrum. For the film receptor, the performance index C 2 /ε is maximum (optimal) at HVL values of 1.5-1.7 mm Al in the simulated Incisive, Premolar and Molar examinations. Other imaging tasks (examinations), not simulated here, may require other optimal HVL. For the digital imaging system (Digora) the performance index (SNR) 2 /ε, theoretically calculated, indicates that a lower value of HVL is optimal than with film as receptor. However, due to the limited number of bits (8 bits) in the analogue to digital converter (ADC) contrast resolution is degraded and calls for use of higher photon energies (HVL). Customised optimisations with proper concern for patient category, type of examination, diagnostic task is the ultimate goal of this work. The conclusions stated above give some general advice on the appropriate choice of photon energy spectrum (HVL). In particular situations, it may be necessary to use more dose demanding kV settings (lower HVL) in order to get sufficient image quality for the diagnostic task. (author)

  5. Crossing the phantom divide with Ricci-like holographic dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepe, S. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Casilla, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, F. [Universidad de La Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Temuco (Chile)

    2010-10-15

    In this work we study the dark energy problem by adopting an holographic model proposed recently in the literature. In this model there has been postulated an energy density {rho}{proportional_to}R, where R is the Ricci scalar curvature. Under this consideration, we have obtained a cosmological scenario which arises from considering two non-interacting fluids along the lines of a reasonable Ansatz for the cosmic coincidence parameter. We have adjusted the involved parameters in the model according to the observational data, showing that the equation of state for the dark energy exhibits a cross through the -1 barrier. Additionally, we have found a disagreement of these parameters in comparison with a scalar field theory approach. (orig.)

  6. Phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual energy computed tomography-based 3-material decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Sedlmair, Martin; Krauss, Bernhard; Wichmann, Julian L.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease usually diagnosed at the manifestation of fragility fractures, which severely endanger the health of especially the elderly. To ensure timely therapeutic countermeasures, noninvasive and widely applicable diagnostic methods are required. Currently the primary quantifiable indicator for bone stability, bone mineral density (BMD), is obtained either by DEXA (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or qCT (quantitative CT). Both have respective advantages and disadvantages, with DEXA being considered as gold standard. For timely diagnosis of osteoporosis, another CT-based method is presented. A Dual Energy CT reconstruction workflow is being developed to evaluate BMD by evaluating lumbar spine (L1-L4) DE-CT images. The workflow is ROI-based and automated for practical use. A dual energy 3-material decomposition algorithm is used to differentiate bone from soft tissue and fat attenuation. The algorithm uses material attenuation coefficients on different beam energy levels. The bone fraction of the three different tissues is used to calculate the amount of hydroxylapatite in the trabecular bone of the corpus vertebrae inside a predefined ROI. Calibrations have been performed to obtain volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) without having to add a calibration phantom or to use special scan protocols or hardware. Accuracy and precision are dependent on image noise and comparable to qCT images. Clinical indications are in accordance with the DEXA gold standard. The decomposition-based workflow shows bone degradation effects normally not visible on standard CT images which would induce errors in normal qCT results.

  7. General solar energy information user study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on general solar energy. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 13 groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: Loan Officers, Real Estate Appraisers, Tax Assessors, Insurers, Lawyers, Utility Representatives, Public Interest Group Representatives, Information and Agricultural Representatives, Public Interest Group Representatives, Information and Agricultural Specialists at State Cooperative Extension Service Offices, and State Energy Office Representatives. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  8. Experimentals on the energy-deposition of fast neutrons in phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, E.

    1978-01-01

    The relative neutron sensitivities of a tissue-equivalent chamber and a carbon chamber with correction factors are given for four neutron energies and a 252 Cf-source. The necessary experimental and technical conditions for an application of the multi-detector mixed-field dosimetry with proportional counters are presented. The corrections accounting for charge recombination or the intensity decrease due to the chamber well are put on a theoretical basis. (DG) [de

  9. Creating a database for evaluating the distribution of energy deposited at prostate using simulation in phantom with the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende Filho, T.A.; Vieira, I.F.; Leal Neto, V.

    2009-01-01

    An exposition computational model (ECM) composed of a water tank phantom, a punctual and mono energetic source, emitter of photons, coupled to a Monte Carlo code to simulation the interaction and deposition of energy emitted by I-125, is a tool that presents many advantages to realize dosimetric evaluations in many areas as planning of a brachytherapy treatments. Using the DOSXYZnrc, was possible to construct a data bank allowing the final user estimates previously the space distribution of the prostate dose, being an important tool at the brachytherapy procedure. The results obtained show the fractional energy deposited into the water phantom evaluated on the energies 0.028 MeV and 0.035 MeV both indicated to this procedure, as well the dose distribution at the range between 0.10334 and 0.53156 μGy. The medium error is less than 2%, limited tolerance value considered at radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  10. Characterisation of urinary stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium using dual-energy CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia; Qu, Mingliang; Duan, Xinhui; Takahashi, Naoki; Kawashima, Akira; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-12-15

    To develop a dual-energy CT (DECT) method for differentiating uric acid (UA) from non-UA stones in the presence of iodinated contrast medium. Thirty UA and 45 non-UA stones were selected after infra-red spectroscopic analysis and independently placed in a 1.5-ml vial, which was filled first with saline and then with increasing concentrations of iodine. For each condition, tubes were put in a 35-cm water phantom and examined using a dual-source CT system at 100 and 140 kV. Virtual unenhanced images created from CT data sets of the stones in iodine-containing solutions provided position and volume information. This map was used to calculate a CT number ratio to differentiate stone type. A region-growing method was developed to improve the ability to differentiate between UA and non-UA stones with iodinated contrast medium. The sensitivity for detecting UA stones was 100 % for unenhanced images but fell to 18 % with 20 mgI/ml iodine solution and 0 % for higher concentrations. With region growing, the sensitivity for detecting UA stones was increased to 100 %, 82 %, 57 %, 50 % and 21 % for iodine solutions of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mgI/ml. The region-growing method improves differentiation of UA from non-UA stones on contrast-enhanced DECT urograms. (orig.)

  11. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  12. Generalized stacking fault energies of alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Lu, Song; Hu, Qing-Miao; Kwon, Se Kyun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2014-07-02

    The generalized stacking fault energy (γ surface) provides fundamental physics for understanding the plastic deformation mechanisms. Using the ab initio exact muffin-tin orbitals method in combination with the coherent potential approximation, we calculate the γ surface for the disordered Cu-Al, Cu-Zn, Cu-Ga, Cu-Ni, Pd-Ag and Pd-Au alloys. Studying the effect of segregation of the solute to the stacking fault planes shows that only the local chemical composition affects the γ surface. The calculated alloying trends are discussed using the electronic band structure of the base and distorted alloys.Based on our γ surface results, we demonstrate that the previous revealed 'universal scaling law' between the intrinsic energy barriers (IEBs) is well obeyed in random solid solutions. This greatly simplifies the calculations of the twinning measure parameters or the critical twinning stress. Adopting two twinnability measure parameters derived from the IEBs, we find that in binary Cu alloys, Al, Zn and Ga increase the twinnability, while Ni decreases it. Aluminum and gallium yield similar effects on the twinnability.

  13. Assessment of uncertainties in the lung activity measurement of low-energy photon emitters using Monte Carlo simulation of ICRP male thorax voxel phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Rao, D D; Kulkarni, M S; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of intake due to long-lived actinides by inhalation pathway is carried out by lung monitoring of the radiation workers inside totally shielded steel room using sensitive detection systems such as Phoswich and an array of HPGe detectors. In this paper, uncertainties in the lung activity estimation due to positional errors, chest wall thickness (CWT) and detector background variation are evaluated. First, calibration factors (CFs) of Phoswich and an array of three HPGe detectors are estimated by incorporating ICRP male thorax voxel phantom and detectors in Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA'. CFs are estimated for the uniform source distribution in lungs of the phantom for various photon energies. The variation in the CFs for positional errors of ±0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm in horizontal and vertical direction along the chest are studied. The positional errors are also evaluated by resizing the voxel phantom. Combined uncertainties are estimated at different energies using the uncertainties due to CWT, detector positioning, detector background variation of an uncontaminated adult person and counting statistics in the form of scattering factors (SFs). SFs are found to decrease with increase in energy. With HPGe array, highest SF of 1.84 is found at 18 keV. It reduces to 1.36 at 238 keV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Energy information systems: a general overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The unprecedented energy crises that engulfed the world in early 1970s brought about a spurt in energy research all over the world, which in turn caused the rapid growth of literature in the field. In order to achieve effective bibliographical control, proper dissemination of information, and rapid access to the desired document, energy information systems of diverse scope came into being. The paper describes the special features of several information systems like (i) International Nuclear Information Systems, which covers world literature on nuclear science and technology (ii) Energy Information Services which takes cares of energy information transfer among the Commonwealth countries of the Asia and Pacific region; (ii) Information Network on New Energy Sources and Technologies for Asia And Pacific. This system is being developed to ensure smooth energy information transfer amongst non-commonwealth countries of Asia and the Pacific. (author)

  15. Dual energy CT of the peripheral arteries. A phantom study to assess the effect of automatic plaque removal on stenosis grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werncke, T.; Wolf, K.J.; Meyer, B.C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik und Hochschulambulanz fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Albrecht, T. [Institut fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Therapie, Vivantes, Neukoelln (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dual energy (DE)-based plaque removal in a vessel phantom. Materials and Methods: Acrylic vessel phantoms of different diameters (3, 5, 8 mm), degrees of stenoses (25 - 100 %) and plaque densities (300 - 750 HU) were filled with contrast-enhanced blood (150 - 450 HU). Dual source CT was used for simultaneous image acquisition at 80 and 140 kV. Beside a DE-based plaque-subtracted dataset (DE-PS), a virtual 120 kV non-plaque subtracted dataset (N-PS) was generated. Agreement between the known and measured luminal diameter in both datasets was determined using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (KLin). Results: A total of 8260 measurements were taken. The correlation of measured diameter in DE-PS images was excellent (KLin = 0.83 - 0.96) for 5 - 8 mm vessel phantoms with high luminal enhancement (300 - 450 HU) and plaque density (500 - 750 HU), moderate (KLin = 0.6 - 0.67) for 5 mm vessels with lower luminal enhancement and plaque density and poor (KLin = 0.10 - 0.64) in the 3 mm vessels. The correlation of N-PS-based stenosis quantification was excellent (KLin = 0.86 - 0.99) for 5 - 8 mm vessel phantoms if the contrast between lumen and plaque was above 100 HU. The correlation decreased in 3 mm vessels (KLin = 0.45 - 0.93), while the lowest correlation was observed for the lowest contrast between plaque and vessel lumen. Conclusion: Automatic DE-based plaque removal is highly effective for heavily calcified plaques and high luminal enhancement in larger diameter vessels {>=} 5 mm. However, accuracy is limited for low density calcified plaque, lower luminal enhancement and smaller caliber vessels mainly due to poor specificity. (orig.)

  16. MO-E-17A-12: Direct Realization of the CT Dose to Phantom: Energy to Heat Conversion in Polyethylene Using Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Mayer, H; Tosh, R [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a primary reference standard for absorbed dose to phantom for medical CT dosimetry. CT dosimetry relies on the implementation of the CTDI standard based on air kerma. We are taking a step toward an absorbed dose to water standard by first investigating the dose in a solid phantom. By directly measuring the heat converted from the incident radiation, the absorbed dose in the phantom at a point can be assessed with primary methods without relying on indirect conversions. Methods: The calorimeter contains two small thermistors embedded in a removable PE “core” inserted into the cylindrical HDPE phantom. A core made with polystyrene (PS) was also tested because of its purportedly negligible heat defect. Measurements were made using the two cores and with a calibrated ionization chamber in a CT beam. The air chamber values were converted to the dose to medium using appropriate stopping-power ratios from the literature, and then compared to the thermal data. Results: The PS core data yielded a dose of 1.3 times (4-run average, 3% std. dev.) higher than the converted chamber value, whereas the PE core data were inexplicably higher. The possible systematic errors include 1) excess heat from the thermistors, 2) in PE the exothermic chemical reactions, 3) uncertainties of the specific heat capacities of the materials, 4) thermal drift, and 5) theoretical conversion of chamber values. Monte Carlo simulations and finite element heat transfer calculations were performed to address some of these issues. The general validity was assessed in a 6 MV photon beam with an entirely different calibration scheme. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility but also revealed the difficulty in developing a new primary reference standard for absorbed dose to material for CT. Additional experimental and theoretical work is planned to achieve our goal.

  17. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in quintom dominated universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we will investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the quintom model of dark energy. Reviewing briefly the quintom scenario of dark energy, we will study the conditions of validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in three cases: quintessence dominated, phantom dominated and transition from quintessence to phantom will be discussed

  18. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  19. General overview of the Mexican energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Jacome, D.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of Mexico's energy sector was presented, with particular focus on the natural gas and electricity sectors. Mexico ranks fifth in oil production, eighth in proven oil reserves, and fourteenth in natural gas reserves. In 1998, the energy sector generated 3.3 per cent of Mexico's gross domestic product (GDP), and oil accounted for 7.5 per cent of total exports. National production of natural gas has been forecasted to grow at a rate of 5.2 per cent annually over the next 10 years. This will be largely due to the increased demand for natural gas to produce electricity. The Mexican government has also taken initiatives to restructure the Mexican energy sector with particular focus on increasing the competitiveness of the electric power industry. Electricity demand is also expected to grow at a rate of 6 per cent annually over the next six years. The objectives of energy reform are to promote more investment from all sectors in order to strengthen the development of the electric power industry and to provide a reliable, high quality service at competitive prices. 9 figs

  20. Covariant generalized holographic dark energy and accelerating universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, S. D.

    2017-08-01

    We propose the generalized holographic dark energy model where the infrared cutoff is identified with the combination of the FRW universe parameters: the Hubble rate, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant, the universe lifetime (if finite) and their derivatives. It is demonstrated that with the corresponding choice of the cutoff one can map such holographic dark energy to modified gravity or gravity with a general fluid. Explicitly, F( R) gravity and the general perfect fluid are worked out in detail and the corresponding infrared cutoff is found. Using this correspondence, we get realistic inflation or viable dark energy or a unified inflationary-dark energy universe in terms of covariant holographic dark energy.

  1. An improved Virtual Torso phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H; Crowley, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The virtual phantom that was previously designed by the Human Monitoring Laboratory had some limitations. It contained no sternum and the ribs extended all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with a mixture of cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). The ribs were located below the chest wall which added to the thickness of the chest wall. The lungs did not touch the inner surface of the chest wall along their length due to the differences in curvature between the ellipsoidal lungs and the ellipsoidal cylinder that defined the torso. As a result there was extra intervening tissue between the lungs and the chest wall. This was shown to have a noticeable effect on the simulation of low energy photons. The virtual phantom has been redesigned and comparison of measured and calculated counting efficiencies shows that it is a good representation of both of LLNL or JAERI at all photon energies measured. The redesigned virtual phantom agrees to within 11% of the torsos' counting efficiency over the energy range 17 - 240 keV. Before modification, the virtual phantom's counting efficiency was a of factor three lower at 17 keV and a factor of two lower at 20 keV; now it is within 5% at 17 keV and within 10% at 20 keV. This phantom can now be reliably used to simulate lung counting. The virtual phantom still contains no sternum and the ribs extend all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). However, the above results indicate that this is not a major flaw in the design of the virtual phantom, as agreement between the Monte Carlo results and experimental data is good. (author)

  2. Quantum vacuum energy in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, Christian [University of Technology at Clausthal, Department of Mathematics, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    The paper deals with the scale discrepancy between the observed vacuum energy in cosmology and the theoretical quantum vacuum energy (cosmological constant problem). Here, we demonstrate that Einstein's equation and an analogy to particle physics leads to the first physical justification of the so-called fine-tuning problem. This fine-tuning could be automatically satisfied with the variable cosmological term Λ(a) = Λ{sub 0} + Λ{sub 1}a{sup -(4-ε)}, 0 < ε << 1, where a is the scale factor. As a side effect of our solution of the cosmological constant problem, the dynamical part of the cosmological term generates an attractive force and solves the missing mass problem of dark matter. (orig.)

  3. f(R in Holographic and Agegraphic Dark Energy Models and the Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a unified approach with the holographic, new agegraphic, and f(R dark energy model to construct the form of f(R which in general is responsible for the curvature driven explanation of the very early inflation along with presently observed late time acceleration. We considered the generalized uncertainty principle in our approach which incorporated the corrections in the entropy-area relation and thereby modified the energy densities for the cosmological dark energy models considered. We found that holographic and new agegraphic f(R gravity models can behave like phantom or quintessence models in the spatially flat FRW universe. We also found a distinct term in the form of f(R which goes as R 3 / 2 due to the consideration of the GUP modified energy densities. Although the presence of this term in the action can be important in explaining the early inflationary scenario, Capozziello et al. recently showed that f(R ~ R 3 / 2 leads to an accelerated expansion, that is, a negative value for the deceleration parameter q which fits well with SNeIa and WMAP data.

  4. Generalized dark energy interactions with multiple fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bruck, Carsten van; Mifsud, Jurgen [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Mimoso, José P.; Nunes, Nelson J., E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: jmifsud1@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: jpmimoso@fc.ul.pt, E-mail: njnunes@fc.ul.pt [Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, PT1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-11-01

    In the search for an explanation for the current acceleration of the Universe, scalar fields are the most simple and useful tools to build models of dark energy. This field, however, must in principle couple with the rest of the world and not necessarily in the same way to different particles or fluids. We provide the most complete dynamical system analysis to date, consisting of a canonical scalar field conformally and disformally coupled to both dust and radiation. We perform a detailed study of the existence and stability conditions of the systems and comment on constraints imposed on the disformal coupling from Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and given current limits on the variation of the fine-structure constant.

  5. Dual-energy CT with tin filter technology for the discrimination of renal lesion proxies containing blood, protein, and contrast-agent. An experimental phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlo, Christoph; Lauber, Arno; Goetti, Robert Paul; Baumueller, Stephan; Stolzmann, Paul; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus; Marincek, Borut; Leschka, Sebastian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    To differentiate proxy renal cystic lesions containing protein, blood, iodine contrast or saline solutions using dual-energy CT (DECT) equipped with a new tin filter technology (TFT). 70 proxies (saline, protein, blood and contrast agent) were placed in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced kidney phantoms. DECT was performed at 80/140 kV with and without tin filtering. Two readers measured the CT attenuation values in all proxies twice. An 80/140 kV ratio was calculated. All intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent (r = 0.93-0.97; p 0.05). The CT attenuation of protein, blood and contrast agent solution differed significantly with tin filtering (p < 0.01-0.05). Significant differences were found between the ratios of protein and blood compared to contrast medium solution (each, p < 0.05) and between the ratios of protein and blood in both phantoms with tin filtering (each, p < 0.05). DECT allows discrimination between a proxy renal lesion containing contrast agent and lesions containing protein and blood through their different attenuation at 80 kV and 140 kV. Further discrimination between protein and blood containing proxies is possible when using a tin filter. (orig.)

  6. A phantom for quality control in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambaccini, M.; Rimondi, O.; Marziani, M.; Toti, A.

    1989-01-01

    A phantom for evaluating image quality in mammography has been designed and will be used in the Italian national programme ''Dose and Quality in Mammography''. The characteristics of the phantom are (a) about the same X-ray transmission as a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast for energies between 15 and 50 keV and (b) optimum energies for imaging of the test objects (included in the phantom) in very close agreement with the optimum energies for imaging of calcifications and tumours in a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast. An experimental comparison between the prototype and some commercial phantoms was carried out. Measurements are in progress to test the phantom's ability to evaluate the performances of mammographic systems quantitatively. (author)

  7. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukhi, J.; Yusob, D.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Vuanghao, L.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging.

  8. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukhi, J; Yusob, D; Vuanghao, L; Zainon, R; Tajuddin, A A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging. (paper)

  9. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  10. Evolution of dosimetric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this oration evolution of the dosimetric phantoms for radiation protection and for medical use is briefly reviewed. Some details of the development of Indian Reference Phantom for internal dose estimation are also presented

  11. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, C; Leuenberger, J [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In view of its mission to contribute towards the development of a globally more sustainable energy supply system, the General Energy Department is focusing on four topical areas: advancing technologies for the use of renewable energies; investigating options for chemical and electrochemical energy storage on various time scales; developing highly efficient converters for the low emission use of fossil and renewable fuels, including both combustion devices and fuel cells; analyzing the consequences of energy use, and advancing scenarios for the development of the energy supply system. Progress in 1998 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1998 is also provided. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  12. Charged black holes in phantom cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Qadir, Asghar; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad [National University of Sciences and Technology, Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2008-11-15

    In the classical relativistic regime, the accretion of phantom-like dark energy onto a stationary black hole reduces the mass of the black hole. We have investigated the accretion of phantom energy onto a stationary charged black hole and have determined the condition under which this accretion is possible. This condition restricts the mass-to-charge ratio in a narrow range. This condition also challenges the validity of the cosmic-censorship conjecture since a naked singularity is eventually produced due to accretion of phantom energy onto black hole. (orig.)

  13. Constraints on stress-energy perturbations in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traschen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Conditions are found for the existence of integral constraints on stress-energy perturbations in general relativity. The integral constraints can be thought of as a general-relativistic generalization of the conservation of energy and momentum of matter perturbations in special relativity. The constraints are stated in terms of a vector field V, and the Robertson-Walker spacetimes are shown to have such constraint vectors. Although in general V is not a Killing vector, in a vacuum spacetime the constraint vectors are precisely the Killing vectors

  14. Effect of a novel intracycle motion correction algorithm on dual-energy spectral coronary CT angiography: A study with pulsating coronary artery phantom at high heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yan; Zhao, Yuan; Pan, Cun Xue; Azati, Gulina; Wang, Yan Wei; Liu, Wen Ya [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Xinjiang (China); Guo, Ning [CT Imaging Research Center, GE Healthcare, Beijing (China)

    2017-11-15

    Using a pulsating coronary artery phantom at high heart rate settings, we investigated the efficacy of a motion correction algorithm (MCA) to improve the image quality in dual-energy spectral coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Coronary flow phantoms were scanned at heart rates of 60–100 beats/min at 10-beats/min increments, using dual-energy spectral CT mode. Virtual monochromatic images were reconstructed from 50 to 90 keV at 10-keV increments. Two blinded observers assessed image quality using a 4-point Likert Scale (1 = non-diagnostic, 4 = excellent) and the fraction of interpretable segments using MCA versus conventional algorithm (CA). Comparison of variables was performed with the Wilcoxon rank sum test and McNemar test. At heart rates of 70, 80, 90, and 100 beats/min, images with MCA were rated as higher image scores compared to those with CA on monochromatic levels of 50, 60, and 70 keV (each p < 0.05). Meanwhile, at a heart rate of 90 beats/min, image interpretability was improved by MCA at a monochromatic level of 60 keV (p < 0.05) and 70 keV (p < 0.05). At a heart rate of 100 beats/min, image interpretability was improved by MCA at monochromatic levels of 50 keV (from 69.4% to 86.1%, p < 0.05), 60 keV (from 55.6% to 83.3%, p < 0.05) and 70 keV (from 33.3% to 69.3%, p < 0.05). Low-keV monochromatic images combined with MCA improves image quality and image interpretability in CCTAs at high heart rates.

  15. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, E.; Leach, M.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for medium-box general merchandise stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  16. Commercial Building Partnership General Merchandise Energy Savings Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  17. Covariant generalized holographic dark energy and accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojiri, Shin' ichi [Nagoya University, Department of Physics, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya (Japan); Odintsov, S.D. [ICREA, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    We propose the generalized holographic dark energy model where the infrared cutoff is identified with the combination of the FRW universe parameters: the Hubble rate, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant, the universe lifetime (if finite) and their derivatives. It is demonstrated that with the corresponding choice of the cutoff one can map such holographic dark energy to modified gravity or gravity with a general fluid. Explicitly, F(R) gravity and the general perfect fluid are worked out in detail and the corresponding infrared cutoff is found. Using this correspondence, we get realistic inflation or viable dark energy or a unified inflationary-dark energy universe in terms of covariant holographic dark energy. (orig.)

  18. Covariant generalized holographic dark energy and accelerating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, S.D.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the generalized holographic dark energy model where the infrared cutoff is identified with the combination of the FRW universe parameters: the Hubble rate, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant, the universe lifetime (if finite) and their derivatives. It is demonstrated that with the corresponding choice of the cutoff one can map such holographic dark energy to modified gravity or gravity with a general fluid. Explicitly, F(R) gravity and the general perfect fluid are worked out in detail and the corresponding infrared cutoff is found. Using this correspondence, we get realistic inflation or viable dark energy or a unified inflationary-dark energy universe in terms of covariant holographic dark energy. (orig.)

  19. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  20. Evaluation of general-purpose collimators against high-resolution collimators with resolution recovery with a view to reducing radiation dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT: A preliminary phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ian S; Saint, Kimberley J; Tonge, Christine M; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing focus on reducing radiation dose to patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging. This preliminary phantom study aims to evaluate the use of general-purpose collimators with resolution recovery (RR) to allow a reduction in patient radiation dose. Images of a cardiac torso phantom with inferior and anterior wall defects were acquired on a GE Infinia and Siemens Symbia T6 using both high-resolution and general-purpose collimators. Imaging time, a surrogate for administered activity, was reduced between 35% and 40% with general-purpose collimators to match the counts acquired with high-resolution collimators. Images were reconstructed with RR with and without attenuation correction. Two pixel sizes were also investigated. Defect contrast was measured. Defect contrast on general-purpose images was superior or comparable to the high-resolution collimators on both systems despite the reduced imaging time. Infinia general-purpose images required a smaller pixel size to be used to maintain defect contrast, while Symbia T6 general-purpose images did not require a change in pixel size to that used for standard myocardial perfusion SPECT. This study suggests that general-purpose collimators with RR offer a potential for substantial dose reductions while providing similar or better image quality to images acquired using high-resolution collimators.

  1. Proposed general amendments to the atomic energy control regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Canada's Atomic Energy Control Act defines the powers and responsibilities of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). Among these is to make regulations to control the development, application and use of atomic energy. In these proposed general amendments to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations substantial changes are proposed in the designation of the authority of AECB staff, exemptions from licensing, international safeguards, duties of licensees and atomic radiation workers, security of information, and provision for hearings. The scope of the control of atomic energy has been redefined as relating to matters of health, safety, security, international safeguards, and the protection of the environment

  2. Generalized formulation of free energy and application to photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hwe Ik; Choi, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    The origin of free energy on the earth is solar radiation. However, the amount of free energy it contains has seldom been investigated, because the free energy concept was believed to be inappropriate for a system of photons. Instead, the origin of free energy has been sought in the process of photosynthesis, imposing a limit of conversion given by the Carnot efficiency. Here we present a general formulation, capable of not only assessing accurately the available amount of free energy in the photon gas but also explaining the primary photosynthetic process more succinctly. In this formulation, the problem of "photosynthetic conversion of the internal energy of photons into the free energy of chlorophyll" is replaced by simple "free energy transduction" between the photons and chlorophyll. An analytic expression for the photosynthetic efficiency is derived and shown to deviate from the Carnot efficiency. Some predictions verifiable possibly by observation are also suggested.

  3. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats - ICREA and Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-23

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time ('phantom energy' without 'Big Rip' singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time ('cosmological constant' with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  4. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R; Shimohigashi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm 3 and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV

  5. Kerr-Taub-NUT General Frame, Energy, and Momentum in Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal G. L. Nashed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new exact solution describing a general stationary and axisymmetric object of the gravitational field in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR is derived. The solution is characterized by three parameters “the gravitational mass M, the rotation a, and the NUT L.” The vierbein field is axially symmetric, and the associated metric gives the Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime. Calculation of the total energy using two different methods, the gravitational energy momentum and the Riemannian connection 1-form Γα̃β, is carried out. It is shown that the two methods give the same results of energy and momentum. The value of energy is shown to depend on the mass M and the NUT parameter L. If L is vanishing, then the total energy reduced to the energy of Kerr black hole.

  6. Energy policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. General review of the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book is a general review on energy policy leaded by Members countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) during the year 1990. This book describes also the trends and the recent events which have affected energy demand, energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy supply and energy source development. This annual review gives the IEA energy forecasting for the next years, till year 2001. A detailed study of energy policy in Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland and Japan is given. The policy of fifteen another Members countries, which have been analyzed the previous years, is recapitulated and briefly brought up to date

  7. Comparison of film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of dose delivered with very high-energy electron beams in a polystyrene phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Liu, Michael; Palma, Bianey; Dunning, Michael; McCormick, Doug; Hemsing, Erik; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Colby, Eric; Koong, Albert C; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W

    2015-04-01

    To measure radiation dose in a water-equivalent medium from very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams and make comparisons to Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results. Dose in a polystyrene phantom delivered by an experimental VHEE beam line was measured with Gafchromic films for three 50 MeV and two 70 MeV Gaussian beams of 4.0-6.9 mm FWHM and compared to corresponding MC-simulated dose distributions. MC dose in the polystyrene phantom was calculated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes based on the experimental setup. Additionally, the effect of 2% beam energy measurement uncertainty and possible non-zero beam angular spread on MC dose distributions was evaluated. MC simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) curves agreed with measurements within 4% for all beam sizes at both 50 and 70 MeV VHEE beams. Central axis PDD at 8 cm depth ranged from 14% to 19% for the 5.4-6.9 mm 50 MeV beams and it ranged from 14% to 18% for the 4.0-4.5 mm 70 MeV beams. MC simulated relative beam profiles of regularly shaped Gaussian beams evaluated at depths of 0.64 to 7.46 cm agreed with measurements to within 5%. A 2% beam energy uncertainty and 0.286° beam angular spread corresponded to a maximum 3.0% and 3.8% difference in depth dose curves of the 50 and 70 MeV electron beams, respectively. Absolute dose differences between MC simulations and film measurements of regularly shaped Gaussian beams were between 10% and 42%. The authors demonstrate that relative dose distributions for VHEE beams of 50-70 MeV can be measured with Gafchromic films and modeled with Monte Carlo simulations to an accuracy of 5%. The reported absolute dose differences likely caused by imperfect beam steering and subsequent charge loss revealed the importance of accurate VHEE beam control and diagnostics.

  8. Comparison of film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of dose delivered with very high-energy electron beams in a polystyrene phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Liu, Michael; Palma, Bianey; Koong, Albert C.; Maxim, Peter G., E-mail: Peter.Maxim@Stanford.edu, E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Loo, Billy W., E-mail: Peter.Maxim@Stanford.edu, E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Dunning, Michael; McCormick, Doug; Hemsing, Erik; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Colby, Eric; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation dose in a water-equivalent medium from very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams and make comparisons to Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results. Methods: Dose in a polystyrene phantom delivered by an experimental VHEE beam line was measured with Gafchromic films for three 50 MeV and two 70 MeV Gaussian beams of 4.0–6.9 mm FWHM and compared to corresponding MC-simulated dose distributions. MC dose in the polystyrene phantom was calculated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes based on the experimental setup. Additionally, the effect of 2% beam energy measurement uncertainty and possible non-zero beam angular spread on MC dose distributions was evaluated. Results: MC simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) curves agreed with measurements within 4% for all beam sizes at both 50 and 70 MeV VHEE beams. Central axis PDD at 8 cm depth ranged from 14% to 19% for the 5.4–6.9 mm 50 MeV beams and it ranged from 14% to 18% for the 4.0–4.5 mm 70 MeV beams. MC simulated relative beam profiles of regularly shaped Gaussian beams evaluated at depths of 0.64 to 7.46 cm agreed with measurements to within 5%. A 2% beam energy uncertainty and 0.286° beam angular spread corresponded to a maximum 3.0% and 3.8% difference in depth dose curves of the 50 and 70 MeV electron beams, respectively. Absolute dose differences between MC simulations and film measurements of regularly shaped Gaussian beams were between 10% and 42%. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that relative dose distributions for VHEE beams of 50–70 MeV can be measured with Gafchromic films and modeled with Monte Carlo simulations to an accuracy of 5%. The reported absolute dose differences likely caused by imperfect beam steering and subsequent charge loss revealed the importance of accurate VHEE beam control and diagnostics.

  9. Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields and energy flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields in stationary spacetime. → Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the electomagnetic field tensor. → Energy-momentum in terms of eigenvectors and Killing vector. → Explicit form of reference frame with vanishing Poynting vector. → Application of formalism to Bessel beams. - Abstract: The algebraic structures of a general electromagnetic field and its energy-momentum tensor in a stationary space-time are analyzed. The explicit form of the reference frame in which the energy of the field appears at rest is obtained in terms of the eigenvectors of the electromagnetic tensor and the existing Killing vector. The case of a stationary electromagnetic field is also studied and a comparison is made with the standard short-wave approximation. The results can be applied to the general case of a structured light beams, in flat or curved spaces. Bessel beams are worked out as example.

  10. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Yurov, Artyom V.

    2012-01-01

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time (“phantom energy” without “Big Rip” singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time (“cosmological constant” with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  11. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob [eds.

    2000-07-01

    Strengthening of international collaborations represented a strategic goal of the General Energy Research Department for 1999. For the Fifth Framework Program of the European Union, we participated in consortia and in the successful preparation of several proposals. National networks with partners from academia and Industry have been formed in two topical areas of central interest in the context of sustainability, i.e. 'Ecoefficient energy use and material cycles' and 'Sustainable transportation' on the other hand. Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy

  12. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    Strengthening of international collaborations represented a strategic goal of the General Energy Research Department for 1999. For the Fifth Framework Program of the European Union, we participated in consortia and in the successful preparation of several proposals. National networks with partners from academia and Industry have been formed in two topical areas of central interest in the context of sustainability, i.e. 'Ecoefficient energy use and material cycles' and 'Sustainable transportation' on the other hand. Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy

  13. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob [eds.

    2000-07-01

    Strengthening of international collaborations represented a strategic goal of the General Energy Research Department for 1999. For the Fifth Framework Program of the European Union, we participated in consortia and in the successful preparation of several proposals. National networks with partners from academia and Industry have been formed in two topical areas of central interest in the context of sustainability, i.e. 'Ecoefficient energy use and material cycles' and 'Sustainable transportation' on the other hand. Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to

  14. Generalized entropy formalism and a new holographic dark energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayahian Jahromi, A.; Moosavi, S. A.; Moradpour, H.; Morais Graça, J. P.; Lobo, I. P.; Salako, I. G.; Jawad, A.

    2018-05-01

    Recently, the Rényi and Tsallis generalized entropies have extensively been used in order to study various cosmological and gravitational setups. Here, using a special type of generalized entropy, a generalization of both the Rényi and Tsallis entropy, together with holographic principle, we build a new model for holographic dark energy. Thereinafter, considering a flat FRW universe, filled by a pressureless component and the new obtained dark energy model, the evolution of cosmos has been investigated showing satisfactory results and behavior. In our model, the Hubble horizon plays the role of IR cutoff, and there is no mutual interaction between the cosmos components. Our results indicate that the generalized entropy formalism may open a new window to become more familiar with the nature of spacetime and its properties.

  15. Some general scaling rules in high energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Idh, J.; Otterlund, I.; Stenlund, E.

    1988-09-01

    We show, using the Fritiof model scenario that the wide variation in the number of participating nucleons tend to drown other dynamical variations in the measurables of high energy ion collisions. We propose a set if general scaling laws for inclusive distributions in which it is the mean multiplicity and the mean transverse energy from each source which are the measurables in the interactions. (authors)

  16. Measurement by film dosimetry and calculation of energy dose distributions for electron and photon irradiation of 42 MeV using the Alderson phantom for planning of pendulum irradiation of the mediastinum in the treatment of peripheral bronchial carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, W.

    1980-01-01

    The energy dose distribution in an Alderson phantom applying a radiation energy of 42 MeV has been determined by film dosimetry and computation; the results have been compared in order to verify both methods and to improve the irradiation of bronchial carcinoma by achieving the best possible protection of healthy tissue and of the spinal cord. The comparative evaluations have shown that there is a good agreement between the calculated results and those measured by film dosimetry. (orig.) [de

  17. General Business Model Patterns for Local Energy Management Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchinetti, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.facchinetti@hslu.ch; Sulzer, Sabine [Lucerne Competence Center for Energy Research, Lucerne University of Applied Science and Arts, Horw (Switzerland)

    2016-03-03

    The transition toward a more sustainable global energy system, significantly relying on renewable energies and decentralized energy systems, requires a deep reorganization of the energy sector. The way how energy services are generated, delivered, and traded is expected to be very different in the coming years. Business model innovation is recognized as a key driver for the successful implementation of the energy turnaround. This work contributes to this topic by introducing a heuristic methodology easing the identification of general business model patterns best suited for Local Energy Management concepts such as Energy Hubs. A conceptual framework characterizing the Local Energy Management business model solution space is developed. Three reference business model patterns providing orientation across the defined solution space are identified, analyzed, and compared. Through a market review, a number of successfully implemented innovative business models have been analyzed and allocated within the defined solution space. The outcomes of this work offer to potential stakeholders a starting point and guidelines for the business model innovation process, as well as insights for policy makers on challenges and opportunities related to Local Energy Management concepts.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2003. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wokaun, A.; Daum, C.

    2004-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided

  19. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2004. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wokaun, A.; Daum, C.

    2005-01-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided

  20. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided

  1. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, Alexander; Daum, Christina [eds.

    2002-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2001 is also provided.

  2. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob [eds.

    2001-07-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  3. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Christina; Leuenberger, Jakob [eds.

    2001-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around (1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; (2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; (3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; (4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; (5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  4. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2002. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, Alexander; Daum, Christina [eds.

    2003-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided.

  5. General Business Model Patterns for Local Energy Management Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchinetti, Emanuele; Sulzer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The transition toward a more sustainable global energy system, significantly relying on renewable energies and decentralized energy systems, requires a deep reorganization of the energy sector. The way how energy services are generated, delivered, and traded is expected to be very different in the coming years. Business model innovation is recognized as a key driver for the successful implementation of the energy turnaround. This work contributes to this topic by introducing a heuristic methodology easing the identification of general business model patterns best suited for Local Energy Management concepts such as Energy Hubs. A conceptual framework characterizing the Local Energy Management business model solution space is developed. Three reference business model patterns providing orientation across the defined solution space are identified, analyzed, and compared. Through a market review, a number of successfully implemented innovative business models have been analyzed and allocated within the defined solution space. The outcomes of this work offer to potential stakeholders a starting point and guidelines for the business model innovation process, as well as insights for policy makers on challenges and opportunities related to Local Energy Management concepts.

  6. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2004. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, Alexander; Daum, Christina (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided.

  7. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2002. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wokaun, A.; Daum, C.

    2003-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided

  8. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2003. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, Alexander; Daum, Christina (eds.)

    2004-03-01

    Research at PSI comprises all aspects of human energy use, with the ultimate goal of promoting development towards a sustainable energy supply system. In the General Energy Research Department, technologies are being advanced for the utilization of renewable energy sources, low-loss energy storage, efficient conversion, and low emission energy use. Experimental and model-based assessment of these emissions forms the basis of a comprehensive assessment of economic, ecological and environmental consequences, for both present and future energy supply systems. The research program of the department is centered around 1) development, use, and characterisation of catalysts for energy technologies in many different fields, like e.g. the partial oxidation of methanol for hydrogen production, the processing of methane by catalytic combustion and reforming; 2) use of concentrated solar radiation to induce chemical conversions, thereby producing energy carriers; 3) development of efficient, less polluting combustion engines and burners by advancing the detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and combustion pathways; 4) research and development of low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells, novel batteries and capacitors, with applications envisaged for electric vehicles, photovoltaics and on-site load leveling; 5) experimental and model based research concerning transportation and chemistry of atmospheric trace gases related to anthropogenic energy transformations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2002 is also provided.

  9. Income- and energy-taxation for redistribution in general equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzRoy, F.R.

    1993-01-01

    In a 3-factor General Equilibrium (GE)-model with a continuum of ability, the employed choose optimal labour supply, and equilibrium unemployment is determined by benefits funded by wage- and energy-taxes. Aggregate labour and the net wage may increase or decrease with taxation (and unemployment), and conditions for a reduction in redistributive wage-taxes to be Pareto-improving are derived. A small energy tax always raises the net wage, providing the wage tax is reduced to maintain constant employment and a balanced budget. High ability households prefer higher energy taxes when externalities are uniformly distributed and non-distorting. (author)

  10. Energy spectra of odd nuclei in the generalized model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Korzh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the generalized nuclear model, energy spectra of the odd nuclei of such elements as 25Mg, 41K, and 65Cu are determined, and the structure of wave functions of these nuclei in the excited and normal states is studied. High quality in determining the energy spectra is possible due to the accurate calculations of all elements of the energy matrix. It is demonstrated that the structure of the wave functions so determined provides the possibility to more accurately select the nuclear model and the method for calculating the nucleon cross-sections of the inelastic scattering of nucleons by odd nuclei.

  11. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Devecchi, Fernando P; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2008-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the 'phantomization' process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes. As an application we analyze the cosmological constant group for a fermionic seed fluid

  12. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the

  13. The notion of general interest in the energy field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauby, P.

    2008-01-01

    The 1980's have been marked by a reversal of the reference paradigm concerning the manner in which energy issues are tackled: whilst during the whole period following the Second World War, primacy was placed on the pursuit of general interest in energy policies like in the industrial forms of organisation, the issues have tended to be tackled first of all in terms of 'markets', particularly in Europe and in developed countries. This article aims to raise once more and redefine energy issues, not using the opposition and exclusion between markets and general interest as a reference, but their relations and interactions as they are constructed, in particular within the framework of European integration processes. After giving a reminder of the essence of 'general interest', it will examine the energy issues in Europe and the construction of their relationship with the europeanization of public services. It will analyse the perspectives of a Community energy policy around three key questions: what internal market? What common policy? What public service obligations? (authors)

  14. EGSNRC Monte Carlo study of the effect of photon energy and field margin in phantoms simulating small lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E.K.; Darko, J.; Mosseri, A.; Jezioranski, J.

    2003-01-01

    The dose distribution in small lung tumors (coin lesions) is affected by the combined effects of reduced attenuation of photons and extended range of electrons in lung. The increased range of electrons in low-density tissues can lead to loss of field flatness and increased penumbra width, especially at high energies. The EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, together with DOSXYZNRC, a three-dimensional voxel dose calculation module has been used to study the characteristics of the penumbra in the region of the target-lung interfaces for various radiation beam energies, lung densities, target-field edge distances, target size, and depth. The Monte Carlo model was validated by film measurements made in acrylic (simulating a tumor) imbedded in cork (simulating the lung). Beam profiles that are deemed to be acceptable are defined as those in which no point within the planning target volume (target volume plus 1 cm margin) received less than 95% of the dose prescribed to the center of the target. For parallel opposed beams and 2 cm cube target size, 6 MV photons produce superior dose distribution with respect to penumbra at the lateral, anterior, and posterior surfaces and midplane of the simulated target, with a target-field edge distance of 2.5 cm. A lesser target-field edge distance of 2.0 cm is required for 4 MV photons to produce acceptable dose distribution. To achieve equivalent dose distribution with 10 and 18 MV photons, a target-field edge distance of 3.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively, is required. For a simulated target size of 4 cm cube, a target-field edge distance of 2, 2.5, and 3 cm is required for 6, 10, and 18 MV photons, respectively, to yield acceptable PTV coverage. The effect, which is predominant in determining the target dose, depends on the beam energy, target-field edge distance, lung density, and the depth and size of the target

  15. Perspective of long term demand and supply of energy and general inspection of energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Since the oil crisis, Japanese energy policy was promoted to get rid of the excess dependence on petroleum and to attain energy security, but energy situation largely changed during the past ten years, and it has become necessary to make general inspection on the long term demand and supply of energy and the energy policy. After the second oil crisis, the worldwide demand of petroleum decreased drastically due to the rapid price rise, and the base price of crude oil was lowered for the first time. It is necessary to positively endeavor to reduce energy cost with new idea. The points of the general inspection are the correspondence of the energy policy to the large structural change of energy, the most desirable system for attaining the optimum structure of energy demand and supply and the utilization of market mechanism as far as possible. This report is the results of discussion held eight times since April, 1983. The change of energy situation in Japan and abroad and the perspective, the new problems in energy countermeasures and the trend of response, the preferential and effective promotion of general energy countermeasures and so on are reported. This report shows the fundamental direction of energy countermeasures hereafter, and the concrete and special examination must be made on many remaining problems. (Kako, I.)

  16. Annual report 2001. General direction of energy and raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the 2001 activity of the French general direction of energy and raw materials (DGEMP) of the ministry of finances and industry: 1 - security of energy supplies: a recurrent problem; 2001, a transition year for nuclear energy worldwide; petroleum refining in font of the 2005 dead-line; the OPEC and the upset of the oil market; the pluri-annual planning of power production investments; renewable energies: a reconfirmed priority; 2 - the opening of markets: the opening of French electricity and gas markets; the international development of Electricite de France (EdF) and of Gaz de France (GdF); electricity and gas industries: first branch agreements; 3 - the present-day topics: 2001, the year of objective contracts; AREVA, the future to be prepared; the new IRSN; the agreements on climate and the energy policy; the mastery of domestic energy consumptions; the safety of hydroelectric dams; Technip-Coflexip: the birth of a para-petroleum industry giant; the cleansing of the mining activity in French Guyana; the future of workmen of Lorraine basin coal mines; 4 - 2001 at a glance: highlights; main legislative and regulatory texts; 5 - DGEMP: November 2001 reorganization and new organization chart; energy and raw materials publications; www.industrie.gouv.fr/energie. (J.S.)

  17. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Hwang, J.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-01-01

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  18. Nonlinear generalization of special relativity at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown, that the introduction of a fundamental length constant into the operator representation of the quantum mechanical commutation relations, as suggested by Bagge, leads to a nonlinear generalization of the Lorentz transformations. The theory requires the introduction of a substratum (ether) and which can be identified as the zero point vacuum energy. At very high energies a non-Lorentz invariant behaviour for the cross sections between elementary particles is predicted. Using the Einstein clock synchronisation definition, the velocity of light is also constant and equal to c in the new theory, but the zero point vacuum energy becomes finite, as are all other quantities which are divergent in Lorentz invariant quantum field theories. In the limiting case where the length constant is set equal to zero, the zero point vacuum energy diverges and special relativity is recovered. (orig.) [de

  19. Phantom black holes and critical phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha [Engineering Faculty, Başkent University, Bağlıca Campus, Ankara (Turkey); Marques, Glauber T. [Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia ICIBE-LASIC, Av. Presidente Tancredo Neves 2501, CEP 66077-901—Belém/PA (Brazil); Rodrigues, Manuel E., E-mail: azreg@baskent.edu.tr, E-mail: gtadaiesky@hotmail.com, E-mail: esialg@gmail.com [Faculdade de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Pará, Campus Universitário de Abaetetuba, CEP 68440-000, Abaetetuba, Pará (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We consider the two classes cosh and sinh of normal and phantom black holes of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. The thermodynamics of these holes is characterized by heat capacities that may have both signs depending on the parameters of the theory. Leaving aside the normal Reissner-Nordström black hole, it is shown that only some phantom black holes of both classes exhibit critical phenomena. The two classes share a nonextremality, but special, critical point where the transition is continuous and the heat capacity, at constant charge, changes sign with an infinite discontinuity. This point yields a classification scheme for critical points. It is concluded that the two unstable and stable phases coexist on one side of the criticality state and disappear on the other side, that is, there is no configuration where only one phase exists. The sinh class has an extremality critical point where the entropy diverges. The transition from extremality to nonextremality with the charge held constant is accompanied by a loss of mass and an increase in the temperature. A special case of this transition is when the hole is isolated (microcanonical ensemble), it will evolve by emission of energy, which results in a decrease of its mass, to the final state of minimum mass and vanishing heat capacity. The Ehrenfest scheme of classification is inaccurate in this case but the generalized one due to Hilfer leads to conclude that the transition is of order less than unity. Fluctuations near criticality are also investigated.

  20. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    -law descriptions of the phantom images were in general agreement with real human images. The Singlet approach offered more realistic contrast as compared to the Doublet approach, but at the expense of air bubbles and air pockets that formed during the filling process. Conclusions: The presented physical breast phantoms and their matching virtual breast phantoms offer realistic breast anatomy, patient variability, and ease of use, making them a potential candidate for performing both system quality control testing and virtual clinical trials

  1. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    -law descriptions of the phantom images were in general agreement with real human images. The Singlet approach offered more realistic contrast as compared to the Doublet approach, but at the expense of air bubbles and air pockets that formed during the filling process. Conclusions: The presented physical breast phantoms and their matching virtual breast phantoms offer realistic breast anatomy, patient variability, and ease of use, making them a potential candidate for performing both system quality control testing and virtual clinical trials.

  2. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Simon, Steven L; Lee, Choonsik; Bouville, Andre; Eckerman, Keith F; Melo, Dunstana

    2011-01-01

    The S values for 11 major target organs for I-131 in the thyroid were compared for three classes of adult computational human phantoms: stylized, voxel and hybrid phantoms. In addition, we compared specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) with the thyroid as a source region over a broader photon energy range than the x- and gamma-rays of I-131. The S and SAF values were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms and the University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms by using the Monte Carlo transport method, while the S and SAF values for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) stylized phantoms were obtained from earlier publications. Phantoms in our calculations were for adults of both genders. The 11 target organs and tissues that were selected for the comparison of S values are brain, breast, stomach wall, small intestine wall, colon wall, heart wall, pancreas, salivary glands, thyroid, lungs and active marrow for I-131 and thyroid as a source region. The comparisons showed, in general, an underestimation of S values reported for the stylized phantoms compared to the values based on the ICRP voxel and UF hybrid phantoms and relatively good agreement between the S values obtained for the ICRP and UF phantoms. Substantial differences were observed for some organs between the three types of phantoms. For example, the small intestine wall of ICRP male phantom and heart wall of ICRP female phantom showed up to eightfold and fourfold greater S values, respectively, compared to the reported values for the ORNL phantoms. UF male and female phantoms also showed significant differences compared to the ORNL phantom, 4.0-fold greater for the small intestine wall and 3.3-fold greater for the heart wall. In our method, we directly calculated the S values without using the SAFs as commonly done. Hence, we sought to confirm the differences observed in our S values by comparing the SAFs among the phantoms with the thyroid as a

  3. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Bouville, Andre; Simon, Steven L.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Melo, Dunstana; Lee, Choonsik

    2011-11-01

    The S values for 11 major target organs for I-131 in the thyroid were compared for three classes of adult computational human phantoms: stylized, voxel and hybrid phantoms. In addition, we compared specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) with the thyroid as a source region over a broader photon energy range than the x- and gamma-rays of I-131. The S and SAF values were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms and the University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms by using the Monte Carlo transport method, while the S and SAF values for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) stylized phantoms were obtained from earlier publications. Phantoms in our calculations were for adults of both genders. The 11 target organs and tissues that were selected for the comparison of S values are brain, breast, stomach wall, small intestine wall, colon wall, heart wall, pancreas, salivary glands, thyroid, lungs and active marrow for I-131 and thyroid as a source region. The comparisons showed, in general, an underestimation of S values reported for the stylized phantoms compared to the values based on the ICRP voxel and UF hybrid phantoms and relatively good agreement between the S values obtained for the ICRP and UF phantoms. Substantial differences were observed for some organs between the three types of phantoms. For example, the small intestine wall of ICRP male phantom and heart wall of ICRP female phantom showed up to eightfold and fourfold greater S values, respectively, compared to the reported values for the ORNL phantoms. UF male and female phantoms also showed significant differences compared to the ORNL phantom, 4.0-fold greater for the small intestine wall and 3.3-fold greater for the heart wall. In our method, we directly calculated the S values without using the SAFs as commonly done. Hence, we sought to confirm the differences observed in our S values by comparing the SAFs among the phantoms with the thyroid as a

  4. Empty calories and phantom fullness: a randomized trial studying the relative effects of energy density and viscosity on gastric emptying determined by MRI and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Guido; Mars, Monica; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul Am

    2016-07-01

    Stomach fullness is a determinant of satiety. Although both the viscosity and energy content have been shown to delay gastric emptying, their relative importance is not well understood. We compared the relative effects of and interactions between the viscosity and energy density on gastric emptying and perceived satiety. A total of 15 healthy men [mean ± SD age: 22.6 ± 2.4 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 22.6 ± 1.8] participated in an experiment with a randomized 2 × 2 crossover design. Participants received dairy-based shakes (500 mL; 50% carbohydrate, 20% protein, and 30% fat) that differed in viscosity (thin and thick) and energy density [100 kcal (corresponding to 0.2 kcal/mL) compared with 500 kcal (corresponding to 1 kcal/mL)]. After ingestion, participants entered an MRI scanner where abdominal scans and oral appetite ratings on a 100-point scale were obtained every 10 min until 90 min after ingestion. From the scans, gastric content volumes were determined. Overall, the gastric emptying half-time (GE t50) was 54.7 ± 3.8 min. The thin 100-kcal shake had the lowest GE t50 of 26.5 ± 3.0 min, followed by the thick 100-kcal shake with a GE t50 of 41 ± 3.9 min and the thin 500-kcal shake with a GE t50 of 69.5 ± 5.9 min, and the thick 500-kcal shake had the highest GE t50 of 81.9 ± 8.3 min. With respect to appetite, the thick 100-kcal shake led to higher fullness (58 points at 40 min) than the thin 500-kcal shake (48 points at 40 min). Our results show that increasing the viscosity is less effective than increasing the energy density in slowing gastric emptying. However, the viscosity is more important to increase the perceived fullness. These results underscore the lack of the satiating efficiency of empty calories in quickly ingested drinks such as sodas. The increase in perceived fullness that is due solely to the increased viscosity, which is a phenomenon that we refer to as phantom fullness, may be useful in lowering energy intake. This trial was

  5. Development of digital phantom for DRR evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuta, Shoichi; Oyama, Masaya; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Generally, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is evaluated by physical phantom. The CT image is camouflaged by the performance of the radiation treatment planning system and contains a variety of error factors. The CT image (as follows the digital phantom), where an arbitrary CT value is arranged in the matrix, is necessary to evaluate the pure performance of the radiation treatment planning system. In this study, the development of a digital phantom is described, and the utility is discussed. CTport and the radiation treatment planning system are evaluated with the use of a digital phantom as follows: geometrical accuracy evaluation of DRR, consisting of the center position, size of irradiation field, distortion, extension of X-ray, and beam axis, and the image quality evaluation of DRR, which consists of the contrast resolution. As for DRR made with CTport and the treatment planning system, the part that shifted geometrically was confirmed. In the image quality evaluation, there was a remarkable difference. Because the making accuracy and the installation accuracy of the phantom do not influence the digital phantom, the geometrical accuracy of the DRR is reliable. Because the CT conditions and the phantom factor have no influence, the peculiar DRR image quality can be evaluated and used to evaluate the best image processing parameters. (author)

  6. Generalized Energy-Dependent Q Values for Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2010-03-31

    We extend Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q value for major and minor actinides on the incident neutron energies in the range 0 {le} E{sub n} {le} 20 MeV. Our parameterization is based on the actinide evaluations recommended for the ENDF/B-VII.1 release. This paper describes the calculation of energydependent fission Q values based on the calculation of the prompt energy release in fission by Madland. This calculation was adopted for use in the LLNL ENDL database and then generalized to obtain the prompt fission energy release for all actinides. Here the calculation is further generalized to the total energy release in fission. There are several stages in a fission event, depending on the time scale. Neutrons and gammas may be emitted at any time during the fission event.While our discussion here is focussed on compound nucleus creation by an incident neutron, similar parameterizations could be obtained for incident gammas or spontaneous fission.

  7. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Positive Energy in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deser, S. [Physics Department, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States)

    1969-07-15

    A review is first given of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; the gravitational field is a self-interacting massless spin-two system within the framework of ordinary Lorentz covariant field theory. The recently solved problem of positive-definiteness of the field energy is then discussed. The latter, a conserved functional of the dynamical variables, is shown to have only one extremum, a local minimum, which is the vacuum state (flat space). This implies positive energy for the field, with the vacuum as ground-state. Similar results hold when minimally coupled matter is present. (author)

  8. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Han Sung; Wang, Zhao Jun; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Beom Sun

    2015-11-21

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens.

  9. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  10. A more general interacting model of holographic dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Fei; Zhang Jingfei; Lu Jianbo; Wang Wei; Gui Yuanxing

    2010-01-01

    So far, there have been no theories or observational data that deny the presence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter. We extend naturally the holographic dark energy (HDE) model, proposed by Granda and Oliveros, in which the dark energy density includes not only the square of the Hubble scale, but also the time derivative of the Hubble scale to the case with interaction and the analytic forms for the cosmic parameters are obtained under the specific boundary conditions. The various behaviors concerning the cosmic expansion depend on the introduced numerical parameters which are also constrained. The more general interacting model inherits the features of the previous ones of HDE, keeping the consistency of the theory.

  11. The Generalized Conversion Factor in Einstein's Mass-Energy Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Sharma

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Einstein's September 1905 paper is origin of light energy-mass inter conversion equation ($L = Delta mc^{2}$ and Einstein speculated $E = Delta mc^{2}$ from it by simply replacing $L$ by $E$. From its critical analysis it follows that $L = Delta mc^{2}$ is only true under special or ideal conditions. Under general cases the result is $L propto Delta mc^{2}$ ($E propto Delta mc^{2}$. Consequently an alternate equation $Delta E = A ub c^{2}Delta M$ has been suggested, which implies that energy emitted on annihilation of mass can be equal, less and more than predicted by $Delta E = Delta mc^{2}$. The total kinetic energy of fission fragments of U-235 or Pu-239 is found experimentally 20-60 MeV less than Q-value predicted by $Delta mc^{2}$. The mass of particle Ds (2317 discovered at SLAC, is more than current estimates. In many reactions including chemical reactions $E = Delta mc^{2}$ is not confirmed yet, but regarded as true. It implies the conversion factor than $c^{2}$ is possible. These phenomena can be explained with help of generalized mass-energy equation $Delta E = A ub c^{2}Delta M$.

  12. Parton self-energies for general momentum-space anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmaei, Babak S.; Strickland, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an efficient general method for calculating the self-energies, collective modes, and dispersion relations of quarks and gluons in a momentum-anisotropic high-temperature quark-gluon plasma. The method introduced is applicable to the most general classes of deformed anisotropic momentum distributions and the resulting self-energies are expressed in terms of a series of hypergeometric basis functions which are valid in the entire complex phase-velocity plane. Comparing to direct numerical integration of the self-energies, the proposed method is orders of magnitude faster and provides results with similar or better accuracy. To extend previous studies and demonstrate the application of the proposed method, we present numerical results for the parton self-energies and dispersion relations of partonic collective excitations for the case of an ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy. Finally, we also present, for the first time, the gluon unstable mode growth rate for the case of an ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy.

  13. Phantom inflation and the 'Big Trip'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Jimenez-Madrid, Jose A.

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inflation is regarded to be driven by a phantom field which is here implemented as a scalar field satisfying an equation of state p=ωρ, with ω-1. Being even aggravated by the weird properties of phantom energy, this will pose a serious problem with the exit from the inflationary phase. We argue, however, in favor of the speculation that a smooth exit from the phantom inflationary phase can still be tentatively recovered by considering a multiverse scenario where the primordial phantom universe would travel in time toward a future universe filled with usual radiation, before reaching the big rip. We call this transition the 'Big Trip' and assume it to take place with the help of some form of anthropic principle which chooses our current universe as being the final destination of the time transition

  14. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds.

  15. Anisotropic Bianchi-I universe with phantom field and cosmological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study an anisotropic Bianchi-I universe in the presence of a phantom field and a cosmological constant. Cosmological solutions are obtained when the kinetic energy of the phantom field is of the order of anisotropy and dominates over the potential energy of the field. The anisotropy of the universe decreases and the ...

  16. Entropy of holographic dark energy and the generalized second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praseetha, P; Mathew, Titus K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we have considered holographic dark energy and studied its cosmology and thermodynamics. We have analyzed the generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics in a flat universe consisting of interacting dark energy and dark matter. We performed the analysis under both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. If the apparent horizon is taken as the boundary of the universe, we have shown that the rate of change of the total entropy of the universe is proportional to (1+q) 2 , which in fact shows that the GSL is valid at the apparent horizon, irrespective of the sign of the deceleration parameter, q. Hence, for any form of dark energy, the apparent horizon can be considered as a perfect thermodynamic boundary of the universe. We confirmed this conclusion by using the holographic dark energy model. When the event horizon is taken as the boundary, we found that the GSL is only partially satisfied. The analysis under nonequilibrium conditions revealed that the GSL is satisfied if the temperature of the dark energy is greater than the temperature of the dark matter. (paper)

  17. Rebound effect of improved energy efficiency for different energy types: A general equilibrium analysis for China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yingying; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Meifang

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the rebound effect of different energy types in China based on a static computable general equilibrium model. A one-off 5% energy efficiency improvement is imposed on five different types of energy, respectively, in all the 135 production sectors in China. The rebound effect is measured both on the production level and on the economy-wide level for each type of energy. The results show that improving energy efficiency of using electricity has the largest positive impact on GDP among the five energy types. Inter-fuel substitutability does not affect the macroeconomic results significantly, but long-run impact is usually greater than the short-run impact. For the exports-oriented sectors, those that are capital-intensive get big negative shock in the short run while those that are labour-intensive get hurt in the long run. There is no “backfire” effect; however, improving efficiency of using electricity can cause negative rebound, which implies that improving the energy efficiency of using electricity might be a good policy choice under China's current energy structure. In general, macro-level rebound is larger than production-level rebound. Primary energy goods show larger rebound effect than secondary energy goods. In addition, the paper points out that the policy makers in China should look at the rebound effect in the long term rather than in the short term. The energy efficiency policy would be a good and effective policy choice for energy conservation in China when it still has small inter-fuel substitution. - Highlights: • Primary energy goods show larger rebound effect than secondary energy goods. • Improving efficiency of using electricity can cause negative rebound. • The energy efficiency policy would be an effective policy choice for China. • Policy-makers should consider the rebound effect in the longer term.

  18. Benchmark calculations with simple phantom for neutron dosimetry (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukio, Sakamoto; Shuichi, Tsuda; Tatsuhiko, Sato; Nobuaki, Yoshizawa; Hideo, Hirayama

    2004-01-01

    Benchmark calculations for high-energy neutron dosimetry were undertaken after SATIF-5. Energy deposition in a cylindrical phantom with 100 cm radius and 30 cm depth was calculated for the irradiation of neutrons from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. Using the ICRU four-element loft tissue phantom and four single-element (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen) phantoms, the depth distributions of deposition energy and those total at the central region of phantoms within l cm radius and at the whole region of phantoms within 100 cm radius were calculated. The calculated results of FLUKA, MCNPX, MARS, HETC-3STEP and NMTC/JAM codes were compared. It was found that FLUKA, MARS and NMTC/JAM showed almost the same results. For the high-energy neutron incident, the MCNP-X results showed the largest ones in the total deposition energy and the HETC-3STEP results show'ed smallest ones. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo study of the influence of energy spectra, mesh size, high Z element on dose and PVDR based on 1-D and 3-D heterogeneous mouse head phantom for Microbeam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Liangfeng; Mao, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of energy spectra, mesh sizes, high Z element on dose and PVDR in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) based on 1-D analogy-mouse-head-model (1-D MHM) and 3-D voxel-mouse-head-phantom (3-D VMHP) by Monte Carlo simulation. A Microbeam-Array-Source-Model was implemented into EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The microbeam size is assumed to be 25μm, 50μm or 75μm in thickness and fixed 1mm in height with 200μmc-t-c. The influence of the energy spectra of ID17@ESRF and BMIT@CLS were investigated. The mesh size was optimized. PVDR in 1-D MHM and 3-D VMHP was compared with the homogeneous water phantom. The arc influence of 3-D VMHP filled with water (3-D VMHWP) was compared with the rectangle phantom. PVDR of the lower BMIT@CLS spectrum is 2.4times that of ID17@ESRF for lower valley dose. The optimized mesh is 5µm for 25µm, and 10µm for 50µm and 75µm microbeams with 200µmc-t-c. A 500μm skull layer could make PVDR difference up to 62.5% for 1-D MHM. However this influence is limited (influence is limited for the more depth (influence of 3-D heterogeneous media. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A generalized window energy rating system for typical office buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Cheng; Chen, Tingyao; Yang, Hongxing; Chung, Tse-ming [Research Center for Building Environmental Engineering, Department of Building Services Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-07-15

    Detailed computer simulation programs require lengthy inputs, and cannot directly provide an insight to relationship between the window energy performance and the key window design parameters. Hence, several window energy rating systems (WERS) for residential houses and small buildings have been developed in different countries. Many studies showed that utilization of daylight through elaborate design and operation of windows leads to significant energy savings in both cooling and lighting in office buildings. However, the current WERSs do not consider daylighting effect, while most of daylighting analyses do not take into account the influence of convective and infiltration heat gains. Therefore, a generalized WERS for typical office buildings has been presented, which takes all primary influence factors into account. The model includes embodied and operation energy uses and savings by a window to fully reflect interactions among the influence parameters. Reference locations selected for artificial lighting and glare control in the current common simulation practice may cause uncompromised conflicts, which could result in over- or under-estimated energy performance. Widely used computer programs, DOE2 and ADELINE, for hourly daylighting and cooling simulations have their own weaknesses, which may result in unrealistic or inaccurate results. An approach is also presented for taking the advantages of the both programs and avoiding their weaknesses. The model and approach have been applied to a typical office building of Hong Kong as an example to demonstrate how a WERS in a particular location can be established and how well the model can work. The energy effect of window properties, window-to-wall ratio (WWR), building orientation and lighting control strategies have been analyzed, and can be indicated by the localized WERS. An application example also demonstrates that the algebraic WERS derived from simulation results can be easily used for the optimal design of

  1. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied...... elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we...... extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site...

  2. General theory for environmental effects on (vertical) electronic excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2016-10-21

    Almost 70 years ago, the first theoretical model for environmental effects on electronic excitation energies has been derived. Since then, several different interpretations and refined models have been proposed for the perichromic shift of a chromophore due to its surrounding medium. Some of these models are contradictory. Here, the contributing terms are derived within the framework of long-range perturbation theory with the least approximations so far. The derivation is based on a state-specific interpretation of the interaction energies and all terms can be identified with individual properties of either the chromophore or the surroundings, respectively. Further, the much debated contribution due to transition moments coupled to the environment can be verified in the form of a non-resonant excitonic coupling to the dynamic polarizabilities in the environment. These general insights should clarify discussions and interpretations of environmental effects on electronic excitations and should foster the development of new models for the computation of these effects.

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency thirty-third general conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A brief account is given of the 33rd session of IAEA General Conference held in Vienna from 25 to 29 September 1989. The Minister for Primary Industry and Energy, Mr John Kerin, led the Australian delegation. His statement to the General Conference highlighted Australia's role as a major uranium exporter, its committment to the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon Treaty and support for the role which the Agency plays in it. The major Australian policy initiatives in environmental areas were also outlined. Australia continues to make a substantial extra-budgetary contribution to the Regional Cooperation Agreement for Asia and Pacific (RCA), and it has recently expanded its committment by agreeing to support a series of new RCA projects. In this context, the role played by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for the provision of technical assistance and cooperation in many areas of the Agency's activities is discussed. ills

  4. Maintaining Department of Energy facilities general design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A General Design Criteria (GDC) Planning Board has been established in the Department of Energy to streamline the improvement and maintenance of the GDC Manual. This Planning Board, composed of a membership from field organizations and Headquarters programmatic offices, started work on 15 enhancements to the GDC Manual. One of those enhancements details natural phenomena hazards criteria. In the past year the Planning Board submitted a major recommendation which has been implemented into what is known as the GDC Improvements project. The result of this project pledges to dramatically increase the GDC Manual's utilization and effectiveness

  5. Cross section recondensation method via generalized energy condensation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglass, Steven; Rahnema, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new method is presented which corrects for core environment error from specular boundaries at the lattice cell level. → Solution obtained with generalized energy condensation provides improved approximation to the core level fine-group flux. → Iterative recondensation of the cross sections and unfolding of the flux provides on-the-fly updating of the core cross sections. → Precomputation of energy integrals and fine-group cross sections allows for easy implementation and efficient solution. → Method has been implemented in 1D and shown to correct the environment error, particularly in strongly heterogeneous cores. - Abstract: The standard multigroup method used in whole-core reactor analysis relies on energy condensed (coarse-group) cross sections generated from single lattice cell calculations, typically with specular reflective boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are an approximation and not representative of the core environment for that lattice, an error is introduced in the core solution (both eigenvalue and flux). As current and next generation reactors trend toward increasing assembly and core heterogeneity, this error becomes more significant. The method presented here corrects for this error by generating updated coarse-group cross sections on-the-fly within whole-core reactor calculations without resorting to additional cell calculations. In this paper, the fine-group core flux is unfolded by making use of the recently published Generalized Condensation Theory and the cross sections are recondensed at the whole-core level. By iteratively performing this recondensation, an improved core solution is found in which the core-environment has been fully taken into account. This recondensation method is both easy to implement and computationally very efficient because it requires precomputation and storage of only the energy integrals and fine-group cross sections. In this work, the theoretical basis and development

  6. Coupled oscillators as models of phantom and scalar field cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    We study a toy model for phantom cosmology recently introduced in the literature and consisting of two oscillators, one of which carries negative kinetic energy. The results are compared with the exact phase space picture obtained for similar dynamical systems describing, respectively, a massive canonical scalar field conformally coupled to the spacetime curvature and a conformally coupled massive phantom. Finally, the dynamical system describing exactly a minimally coupled phantom is studied and compared with the toy model

  7. New mechanism to cross the phantom divide

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Yunshuang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Recently, type Ia supernovae data appear to support a dark energy whose equation of state $w$ crosses -1, which is a much more amazing problem than the acceleration of the universe. We show that it is possible for the equation of state to cross the phantom divide by a scalar field in the gravity with an additional inverse power-law term of Ricci scalar in the Lagrangian. The necessary and sufficient condition for a universe in which the dark energy can cross the phantom divide is obtained. So...

  8. Decaying states as complex energy eigenvectors in generalized quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Chiu, C.B.; Gorini, V.

    1977-04-01

    The problem of particle decay is reexamined within the Hamiltonian formalism. By deforming contours of integration, the survival amplitude is expressed as a sum of purely exponential contributions arising from the simple poles of the resolvent on the second sheet plus a background integral along a complex contour GAMMA running below the location of the poles. One observes that the time dependence of the survival amplitude in the small time region is strongly correlated to the asymptotic behaviour of the energy spectrum of the system; one computes the small time behavior of the survival amplitude for a wide variety of asymptotic behaviors. In the special case of the Lee model, using a formal procedure of analytic continuation, it is shown that a complete set of complex energy eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian can be associated with the poles of the resolvent of the background contour GAMMA. These poles and points along GAMMA correspond to the discrete and the continuum states respectively. In this context, each unstable particle is associated with a well defined object, which is a discrete generalized eigenstate of the Hamiltonian having a complex eigenvalue, with its real and negative imaginary parts being the mass and half width of the particle respectively. Finally, one briefly discusses the analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude within this generalized scheme, and notes the appearance of ''redundant poles'' which do not correspond to discrete solutions of the modified eigenvalue problem

  9. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Malte N; Schabel, Christoph; Krauss, Bernhard; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. • Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. • Dual-energy-CT allows contrast optimization using monoenergetic extrapolations (MEI) and iodine maps (IM). • Noise-optimized-MEI and IM are significantly superior to single-energy-CT in delineation of thrombosis. • Noise-optimized-MEI and IM may facilitate the detection of deep vein thrombosis.

  10. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-15

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established.

  11. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-01

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established

  12. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  13. Phantom crash confirms models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To test computer models of how a nuclear reactor's containment building would fare if an airplane crashed into it, the Muto Institute in Tokyo sponsored a 3.2 million dollar project at Sandia National Laboratory to slam an F-4 Phantom jet into a 500 ton concrete wall. The results showed that the computer calculations were accurate

  14. Generalized hidden symmetry for low-energy hadron phsics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, N.; Meissner, U.G.

    1990-01-01

    We present a detailed study of an effective chiral meson lagrangian involving pseudoscalar, vector and axial-vector mesons. We employ the recently proposed technique to introduce vector and axial-vector mesons as composite gauge bosons of an extended hidden gauge symmetry of the non-linear σ-model. In particular, we write down the most general anomalous action (Wess-Zumino term) in accordance with low-energy theorems and chiral symmetry. The global flavor anomalies of QCD are given by the standard (5-dimensional) Wess-Zumino-Witten action of the pseudoscalar mesons, whereas all the processes violating natural parity for the vectors and axials are chirally (gauge) symmetric and therefore do not contribute to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation. We find fourteen independent terms with a priori unknown (real) coefficients. We are able to fix some of these coefficients from anomalous hadronic and radiative vector/axial-vector meson decays. A comparison to the gauged Wess-Zumino action in the so-called massive Yang-Mills approach shows that both anomalous actions are indeed equivalent for a special choice of the unknown coefficients. We finally propose a realistic two-flavor chiral effective lagrangian incorporating pions, the vector mesons ρ and ω as well as the axial A 1 meson which should be used in skyrmion physics at energy scales up to about 1 GeV. (orig.)

  15. PHANTOM: Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel J.; Wurster, James; Nixon, Chris; Tricco, Terrence S.; Toupin, Stéven; Pettitt, Alex; Chan, Conrad; Laibe, Guillaume; Glover, Simon; Dobbs, Clare; Nealon, Rebecca; Liptai, David; Worpel, Hauke; Bonnerot, Clément; Dipierro, Giovanni; Ragusa, Enrico; Federrath, Christoph; Iaconi, Roberto; Reichardt, Thomas; Forgan, Duncan; Hutchison, Mark; Constantino, Thomas; Ayliffe, Ben; Mentiplay, Daniel; Hirsh, Kieran; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Phantom is a smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code focused on stellar, galactic, planetary, and high energy astrophysics. It is modular, and handles sink particles, self-gravity, two fluid and one fluid dust, ISM chemistry and cooling, physical viscosity, non-ideal MHD, and more. Its modular structure makes it easy to add new physics to the code.

  16. Construction of Korean adult voxel phantoms for radiation dosimetry and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik

    2002-08-15

    stomach, thyroid, tests depending on the photon energy and the irradiation direction. These are caused by difference in trunk thickness between MIRD-type phantom and Korean voxel phantom, and differences of organ positions in the body. In the second example, dose to a brain tumor for a patient undergoing boronneutron- capture therapy(BNCT) was examined using head part of the KRMAN to demonstrate utility of voxel phantoms precisely describing an individual patient. In conclusion, although the MIRD-type phantoms are considered satisfactory for general purposes of external radiation protection dosimetry, partial modifications are needed for location and shape of some specific organs to improve accuracy of organ equivalent doses. Voxel phantoms can be used as tools providing references dosimetric values in this process. Since organ equivalent doses in internal exposure mode are sensitive to organ size and relative location, use of voxel phantoms is vital to enhance accuracy of patient dose assessment in therapy level of nuclear medicine. Refinement of KRMAN and KRWOMAN using additional image data is prerequisite of further applications. Development of methodology for accelerating voxel Monte Carlo calculations are also essential.

  17. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of measurements of dosimetric properties of simple extremity phantoms suitable for use in extremity dosimeter performance testing. Two sizes of phantoms were used in this study. One size represented the forearm or lower leg and the other size represented the finger or toe. For both phantom sizes, measurements were performed on solid plastic phantoms and on phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the bone on the surface dose. Exposure-to-dose conversion factors (C/sub x/ factors) were determined for photon energies ranging from 16 to 1250 keV (average for 60 Co). The effect of the presence of a phantom was also measured for a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source. Significant differences in the measured C/sub x/ factors were found among the phantoms investigated. The factors for the finger-sized phantoms were uniformly less than for the arm-sized phantoms

  18. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Krauss, Bernhard [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.005;CNR:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.004). At low iodine concentrations, MEI190keV and VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. circle Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. (orig.)

  19. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph; Krauss, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.005;CNR:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.004). At low iodine concentrations, MEI190keV and VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. circle Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. (orig.)

  20. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  1. A generalized model for estimating the energy density of invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daniel A.; Csargo, Isak J.; Von Eschen, Aaron; Thul, Megan D.; Baker, James M.; Hayer, Cari-Ann; Howell, Jessica; Krause, Jacob; Letvin, Alex; Chipps, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Invertebrate energy density (ED) values are traditionally measured using bomb calorimetry. However, many researchers rely on a few published literature sources to obtain ED values because of time and sampling constraints on measuring ED with bomb calorimetry. Literature values often do not account for spatial or temporal variability associated with invertebrate ED. Thus, these values can be unreliable for use in models and other ecological applications. We evaluated the generality of the relationship between invertebrate ED and proportion of dry-to-wet mass (pDM). We then developed and tested a regression model to predict ED from pDM based on a taxonomically, spatially, and temporally diverse sample of invertebrates representing 28 orders in aquatic (freshwater, estuarine, and marine) and terrestrial (temperate and arid) habitats from 4 continents and 2 oceans. Samples included invertebrates collected in all seasons over the last 19 y. Evaluation of these data revealed a significant relationship between ED and pDM (r2  =  0.96, p cost savings compared to traditional bomb calorimetry approaches. This model should prove useful for a wide range of ecological studies because it is unaffected by taxonomic, seasonal, or spatial variability.

  2. Anthropomorphic phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.; Constantinou, C.

    1982-01-01

    The need, terminology and history of tissue substitutes are outlined. Radiation properties of real tissues are described and simulation procedures are outlined. Recent tissue substitutes are described and charted, as are calculated radiation classifications. Manufacturing procedures and quality control are presented. Recent phantom studies are reviewed and a discussion recorded. Elemental compositions of the recommended tissue substitutes are charted with elemental composition given for each tissue substitute

  3. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  4. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head and brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshvari, J; Kivento, M; Christ, A; Bit-Babik, G

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases. (paper)

  5. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.; Christ, A.; Bit-Babik, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  6. The relation between energy efficiency and general objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, John; Naessen, Jonas; Sprei, Frances

    2006-09-01

    Three overall objectives for energy efficiency programs are discussed: Reduction of negative externalities, esp. climatic change; Phase-out of nuclear power while limiting electricity imports; and creating welfare gains by correcting market failures of energy efficiency programs (rebound effects)

  7. Annual report 2005 General Direction of the Energy and raw materials; Rapport annuel 2005 Direction Generale de L'Energie et des Matieres Premieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This 2005 annual report of the DGEMP (General Direction of the Energy and the raw Materials), takes stock on the energy bill and accounting of the France. The first part presents the electric power, natural gas and raw materials market in France. The second part is devoted to the diversification of the energy resources with a special attention to the renewable energies and the nuclear energy. The third part discusses the energy and raw materials prices and the last part presents the international cooperation in the energy domain. (A.L.B.)

  8. Validation of PIMAL 3.0-phantom with moving arms and legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Keith T.; Bellamy, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    When it comes to determining radiation protection measurements, complex geometries often require the use of computational modeling to solve the problems; the human body is no exception. However, both old and new phantom models have almost always been rigidly created in the vertical upright position. Oak Ridge National Laboratory solved this issue in 2007 by developing a piece of software named 'Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL)', which creates a flexible phantom model for computer simulations. Though the initial hermaphrodite phantom is validated, new gender-specific models need validation against generally accepted values. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the dose coefficients from PIMAL against known values in Federal Guidance Report 12 for water submersion. Of 21 organ-tissue doses, all but 2 matched to within 15% for photon energies above 1 MeV. For plots with notable discrepancies at multiple energies, including bone surface and effective dose, explanations are given to justify differences. (authors)

  9. Proceedings of the General Committee for solar thermal energy 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, Francois; Loyen, Richard; Khebchache, Bouzid; Cholin, Xavier; Leicher, David; Mozas, Kevin; Leclercq, Martine; Laugier, Patrick; Dias, Pedro; Kuczer, Eric; Benabdelkarim, Mohamed; Brottier, Laetitia; Soussana, Max; Cheze, David; Mugnier, Daniel; Laplagne, Valerie; Mykieta, Frederic; Ducloux, Antoine; Egret, Dominique; Noisette, Nadege; Peneau, Yvan; Seguis, Anne-Sophie; Gerard, Roland

    2017-10-01

    After an introducing contribution which discussed the difficult evolution of the solar thermal energy sector in 2015, contributions addressed development plans for SOCOL (a plan for collective solar thermal and solar heat) which aims at reviving the market and at opening new markets. A next set of contributions discussed how solar thermal energy can be at the service of energy transition. Following sessions addressed issues like innovation at the service of solar thermal energy, energetic display of solar systems and application of the Ecodesign and Labelling directives, and the reduction of carbon footprint and the energy dependence of territories

  10. Neutron production in a spherical phantom aboard ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasbaz, A.; Machrafi, R.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program on radiation monitoring on International Space Station (ISS) that was established to analyze the radiation exposure levels onboard the ISS using different radiation instruments and a spherical phantom to simulate human body. Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the interaction of high energy protons and neutrons with the spherical phantom currently onboard ISS. The phantom has been exposed to individual proton energies and to a spectrum of neutrons. The internal to external neutron flux ratio was calculated and compared to the experimental data, recently, measured on the ISS. (author)

  11. Simulation analysis of radiation fields inside phantoms for neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Y.; Miyahara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation fields inside phantoms have been calculated for neutron irradiation. Particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS was employed for the calculation. Energy and size dependences of neutron dose were analyzed using tissue equivalent spheres of different size. A voxel phantom of mouse was developed based on CT images of an 8-week-old male C3H/HeNs mouse. Deposition energy inside the mouse was calculated for 2- and 10-MeV neutron irradiation. (author)

  12. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  13. Calculation of normalised organ and effective doses to adult reference computational phantoms from contemporary computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jan T.M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX has been used to simulate photon transport and energy deposition in anthropomorphic phantoms due to the x-ray exposure from the Philips iCT 256 and Siemens Definition CT scanners, together with the previously studied General Electric 9800. The MCNPX code was compiled with the Intel FORTRAN compiler and run on a Linux PC cluster. A patch has been successfully applied to reduce computing times by about 4%. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently published the Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference computational voxel phantoms as successors to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) stylised hermaphrodite mathematical phantoms that form the basis for the widely-used ImPACT CT dosimetry tool. Comparisons of normalised organ and effective doses calculated for a range of scanner operating conditions have demonstrated significant differences in results (in excess of 30%) between the voxel and mathematical phantoms as a result of variations in anatomy. These analyses illustrate the significant influence of choice of phantom on normalised organ doses and the need for standardisation to facilitate comparisons of dose. Further such dose simulations are needed in order to update the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry spreadsheet for contemporary CT practice. (author)

  14. Ingerop - Energy activities and industry - General brochure 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Ingerop is a leading player in France and a major player internationally in engineering and consulting in sustainable mobility, energy transition and living environment and in major issues of today and tomorrow. The industrial engineering provided by Ingerop in France and for export, provides a response to customer expectations, integrating more and more the theme of sustainable development. Faced with a growing demand for electricity both in the world and in Europe Ingerop made the energy sector its priority development. The controlled use of energy (energy efficiency, renewable energy) is an ongoing challenge for Ingerop. The group continues its development in nuclear energy by extending its remit from the upstream phases for new construction projects abroad until the decommissioning phases in France and abroad. Ingerop continues its development in nuclear energy by extending its remit from the upstream phases for new construction projects abroad to decommissioning in France and abroad. Ingerop strengthens its expertise in new energy with new projects in biomass boilers and heat networks. The group has profound geothermal skills in heating networks or fatal energy recovery, permitting them to intervene with local authorities such as farmers, from feasibility studies to commissioning and assisting project management with technical studies. The expertise acquired by the group Ingerop in the 1990's, through the construction of fifty data centers on behalf of SFR, enables a significant experience going back twenty years. Furthermore, development continued on the design of more energy-efficient projects and ensuring increasingly high reliability. This brochure presents Ingerop's skills and main references in its four domains of intervention: energy industry (operation in nuclear environment, conventional power plants, new energy technologies, data centers), other industries, infrastructures, and building industry

  15. 3-Form Cosmology: Phantom Behaviour, Singularities and Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Morais

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The latest cosmological observations by the Planck collaboration (and combined with others are compatible with a phantom-like behaviour ( w < − 1 for the dark energy equation of state that drives the current acceleration of the Universe. With this mindset, we look into models where dark energy is described by a 3-form field minimally coupled to gravity. When compared to a scalar field, these models have the advantage of more naturally accommodating a cosmological-constant and phantom-like behaviours. We show how the latter happens for a fairly general class of positive-valued potentials, and through a dynamical system approach, we find that in such cases the 3-form field leads the Universe into a Little Sibling of the Big Rip singular event into the future. In this work, we explore the possibility of avoiding such singularity via an interaction in the dark sector between cold dark matter and the 3-form field. For the kind of interactions considered, we deduce a condition for replacing the LSBR by a late time de Sitter phase. For specific examples of interactions that meet this condition, we look for distinctive imprints in the statefinder hierarchy { S 3 ( 1 ; S 4 ( 1 } , { S 3 ( 1 ; S 5 ( 1 } , and in the growth rate of matter, ϵ ( z , through the composite null diagnostic (CND.

  16. Influence of different types of phantoms on the calibration of dosemeters for eye lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, H.; Kowatari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Both a cylinder and a slab phantom have been recommended to be used as calibration phantoms for eye lens dosimetry in the International Atomic Energy Agency TECDOC. This study describes investigations on the influence of the type of phantom on the calibration of dosemeters. In order to fulfil the purpose, backscatter radiation from practically used water-filled phantoms was evaluated by calculations and experiments. For photons, the calculations showed that the cylinder phantom had 10 % lower backscattered effect at maximum than a slab phantom, and simulated well the backscattered effect of the human head or neck to within ±10 %. The irradiation results of non-filtered optically stimulated luminescence and radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeters indicated that the differences of the calibration factors between the two types of phantoms were up to 20 and 10 %, respectively, reflecting the response to backscattered photons. For electrons, no difference was found between the two types of phantoms. (authors)

  17. Nuclear Energy: General aspects of risk assessment and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischerhof, Hans.

    1977-01-01

    While the peaceful uses of nuclear energy have progressed greatly in many countries and nuclear energy for electricity generation is greatly in demand also in developing countries, progress in this field is being threatened by minorities in those very countries which were originally responsible for this development. The paper analyses the various reasons behind this public opposition. The fear of nuclear war cannot be dispelled despite Government declarations promoting prohibition of the use of nuclear energy for military purposes and the numerous parties to the non-proliferation treaty. However, there is no cogent reason for transferring this mistrust to the peaceful uses of this source of energy. Also, hostility to technology is gaining ground in many countries and large groups of people are not prepared to accept the minimalised risks of nuclear energy. It is recommended that industry and politicians should pay more attention than in the past to the psychological question of acceptance of nuclear energy and lawyers have an important role to play in this context. They should co-operate more in gaining acceptance for the undeniable even if improbable remaining risks and integrate nuclear energy even closer into established law. (NEA) [fr

  18. Attenuation properties and percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms using computed tomography (CT) and treatment planning system (TPS) at high energy x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Abdullah, R. [School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Tajuddin, A. A. [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200 Kepala Batas, Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, R. [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, S. [Physics Section, School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    A set of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms with dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}. The mass attenuation coefficient of the phantom was measured using {sup 60}Co gamma source. The phantoms were scanned using Computed Tomography (CT) scanner and the percentage depth dose (PDD) of the phantom was calculated using treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray and compared to that in solid water phantoms. The result showed that the mass attenuation coefficient of tannin-based Rhizohora spp. phantoms was near to the value of water with χ{sup 2} value of 1.2. The measured PDD also showed good agreement with solid water phantom at both 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray with percentage deviation below 8% at depth beyond the maximum dose, Z{sub max}.

  19. Vacuum polarization energy for general backgrounds in one space dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weigel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For field theories in one time and one space dimensions we propose an efficient method to compute the vacuum polarization energy of static field configurations that do not allow a decomposition into symmetric and anti-symmetric channels. The method also applies to scenarios in which the masses of the quantum fluctuations at positive and negative spatial infinity are different. As an example we compute the vacuum polarization energy of the kink soliton in the ϕ6 model. We link the dependence of this energy on the position of the soliton to the different masses.

  20. General aspects concerning the nuclear energy and the public opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodeanu, F.; Bilegan, I.; Chirica, T.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear power successfully competes, from technical and economic point of view all the other energy sources, having a much less environmental impact. Its expansion is limited in our days by the acceptance of local communities. Thus, for the success of a nuclear power project, the public information becomes a strategic option of the company management, and the Romanian Energy Authority - RENEL is now implementing the first steps of its programme aiming at this objective. (author). 23 refs

  1. Herbaceous energy crops: a general survey and a microeconomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caserta, G.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid fuels (bioethanol and biooil) derived from herbaceous crops are considered beneficial for the environment and human health especially if they are used as fuels for motor vehicles. The choice of the most suited crop to be cultivated for liquid biofuel production depends on many factors; the most important being the economic convenience for farmers to cultivate the new energy crop in place of the traditional ones. In order to analyse the conditions which favour the cultivation and selling of specific energy crops, a simple methodology is proposed, based on the calculation of the ''threshold price'' of the energy crop products. The ''threshold price'' is the minimum price at which the primary products of the energy crop, i.e., roots, tubers, seeds, etc., must be sold in order to obtain a gross margin equal to that usually obtained from the traditional crop which is replaced by the energy crop. As a case-study, this methodology has been applied to twelve Italian provinces where the cultivation of six energy crops, both in productive lands and set-aside lands, is examined. The crops considered are sugar beet, sweet sorghum and topinambour, useful for bioethanol production; and rapeseed, sunflower and soya, which are usually employed for the production of biooil. (Author)

  2. New mechanism to cross the phantom divide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yunshuang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Recently, type Ia supernova data appear to support a dark energy whose equation of state w crosses -1, which is a much more amazing problem than the acceleration of the universe. We show that it is possible for the equation of state to cross the phantom divide by a scalar field in gravity with an additional inverse power-law term of the Ricci scalar in the Lagrangian. The necessary and sufficient condition for a universe in which the dark energy can cross the phantom divide is obtained. Some analytical solutions with w -1 are obtained. A minimally coupled scalar with different potentials, including quadratic, cubic, quantic, exponential and logarithmic potentials are investigated via numerical methods, respectively. All these potentials lead to the crossing behavior. We show that it is a robust result which is hardly dependent on the concrete form of the potential of the scalar. (orig.)

  3. Energy transition. To put an end to generally accepted ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    In a set of brief texts, this publication shows that many commonly heard statements regarding energy are wrong. These wrong statements are: Germany has replaced its nuclear by coal which is even more polluting and harmful for the climate; Renewable energies will never cover all our electricity needs, and we'll still need nuclear or gas when wind turbines and solar arrays do not produce; French people are largely opposed to renewable energies, notably those located at the proximity of wind energy projects; Doing without nuclear is depriving of an electricity which is lastingly cheaper than that of our neighbours; Closing nuclear and coal plants will automatically increase unemployment, that which is unacceptable in these times of crisis; Renewable energies will have negative impacts on landscapes as territories will be covered with wind turbines and solar arrays; Renewable energies are harmful for the environment (wind turbine kill huge amounts of birds, and solar arrays use rare earth materials); Ecologists always want to create more additional taxes; Car is necessary, notably in rural areas where there is no public transports; Pollution peaks are mainly caused by pollution coming from Germany and by chimneys and farmers, and cars are not responsible for that; Eating organic food is much more expensive; Helping countries of the South to struggle against climate change is an expense France cannot afford; France almost does not emit greenhouse gases in comparison with China and the USA, and thus, why should we make efforts when other countries do not make them?; Thanks to nuclear, France is more energetically independent; Nuclear does not emit greenhouse gases, it's a clean energy

  4. Integrating renewable energy into general practice : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-01

    This feasibility study was conducted to determine the viability of integrating solar thermal residential domestic hot water systems and community ground source heating and air conditioning within low-income housing projects in Toronto. The study examined the organizational changes needed to incorporate renewable energy systems for small-scale district and individual homes. The study was conducted on behalf of Habitat for Humanity (HFHT). Results of the study showed that the most significant benefits of integrating renewable energy systems will be the elimination of fossil fuel usage; reductions in home operating costs for partner families; and the potential for leveraging increased sponsorship funds. A geoexchange heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system was recommended for the new HFHT headquarters as well as for future housing projects. It was concluded that HFHT should prepare for increased integration of renewable energy technologies as capital costs decrease and greater financial incentives become available. 15 tabs., 3 figs.

  5. General engineering ethics and multiple stress of atomic energy engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kunihiko

    1999-01-01

    The factors, by which the modern engineering ethics has been profoundly affected, were classified to three categories, namely mental blow, the destruction of human function and environment damage. The role of atomic energy engineering in the ethic field has been shown in the first place. It is pointed out that it has brought about the mental blow by the elucidation of universal truth and discipline and the functional disorder by the power supply. However, the direct effect of radiation to the human kinds is only a part of the stresses comparing to the accumulation of the social stress which should be taken into account of by the possibility of disaster and the suspicion of the atomic energy politics. An increase in the multiple stresses as well as the restriction of criticism will place obstacles on the promotion of atomic energy. (author)

  6. General engineering ethics and multiple stress of atomic energy engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kunihiko [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The factors, by which the modern engineering ethics has been profoundly affected, were classified to three categories, namely mental blow, the destruction of human function and environment damage. The role of atomic energy engineering in the ethic field has been shown in the first place. It is pointed out that it has brought about the mental blow by the elucidation of universal truth and discipline and the functional disorder by the power supply. However, the direct effect of radiation to the human kinds is only a part of the stresses comparing to the accumulation of the social stress which should be taken into account of by the possibility of disaster and the suspicion of the atomic energy politics. An increase in the multiple stresses as well as the restriction of criticism will place obstacles on the promotion of atomic energy. (author)

  7. DGP cosmological model with generalized Ricci dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, Yeremy [Universidad de Santiago, Departamento de Matematicas y Ciencia de la Computacion, Santiago (Chile); Avelino, Arturo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Facultad de Ciencias, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Universidad de La Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Temuco (Chile)

    2014-11-15

    The brane-world model proposed by Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) leads to an accelerated universe without cosmological constant or other form of dark energy for the positive branch (element of = +1). For the negative branch (element of = -1) we have investigated the behavior of a model with an holographic Ricci-like dark energy and dark matter, where the IR cutoff takes the form αH{sup 2} + βH, H being the Hubble parameter and α, β positive constants of the model. We perform an analytical study of the model in the late-time dark energy dominated epoch, where we obtain a solution for r{sub c}H(z), where r{sub c} is the leakage scale of gravity into the bulk, and conditions for the negative branch on the holographic parameters α and β, in order to hold the conditions of weak energy and accelerated universe. On the other hand, we compare the model versus the late-time cosmological data using the latest type Ia supernova sample of the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA), in order to constrain the holographic parameters in the negative branch, as well as r{sub c}H{sub 0} in the positive branch, where H{sub 0} is the Hubble constant. We find that the model has a good fit to the data and that the most likely values for (r{sub c}H{sub 0}, α, β) lie in the permitted region found from an analytical solution in a dark energy dominated universe. We give a justification to use a holographic cutoff in 4D for the dark energy in the 5-dimensional DGP model. Finally, using the Bayesian Information Criterion we find that this model is disfavored compared with the flat ΛCDM model. (orig.)

  8. Energy taxes and wages in a general equilibrium model of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Energy taxes are responsible for a good deal of observed differences in energy prices across states and countries. They alter patterns of production and income distribution. The present paper examines the potential of energy taxes to lower wages in a general equilibrium model of production with capital, labour and energy inputs. (Author)

  9. A study of the linear free energy model for DNA structures using the generalized Hamiltonian formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, M., E-mail: yavari@iaukashan.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Kashan Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We generalize the results of Nesterenko [13, 14] and Gogilidze and Surovtsev [15] for DNA structures. Using the generalized Hamiltonian formalism, we investigate solutions of the equilibrium shape equations for the linear free energy model.

  10. Construction of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the adult reference voxel phantoms based on the physiological and anatomical reference data of Caucasian on October, 2007. The organs and tissues of these phantoms were segmented on the basis of ICRP Publication 103. In future, the dose coefficients for internal dose and dose conversion coefficients for external dose calculated using the adult reference voxel phantoms will be widely used for the radiation protection fields. On the other hand, the body sizes and organ masses of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian. In addition, there are some cases that the anatomical characteristics such as body sizes, organ masses and postures of subjects influence the organ doses in dose assessment for medical treatments and radiation accident. Therefore, it was needed to use human phantoms with average anatomical characteristics of Japanese. The authors constructed the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms by modifying the previously developed high-resolution adult male (JM) and female (JF) voxel phantoms. It has been modified in the following three aspects: (1) The heights and weights were agreed with the Japanese averages; (2) The masses of organs and tissues were adjusted to the Japanese averages within 10%; (3) The organs and tissues, which were newly added for evaluation of the effective dose in ICRP Publication 103, were modeled. In this study, the organ masses, distances between organs, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose conversion coefficients of these phantoms were compared with those evaluated using the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms. This report provides valuable information on the anatomical and dosimetric characteristics of the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms developed as reference phantoms of adult Japanese. (author)

  11. Global energy-momentum conservation in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissani, N.; Leibowitz, E.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that there exists a family of coordinate systems in which the energy-momentum tensor is globally conserved. Furthermore, this preferred class of frames includes geodesic systems with respect to any arbitrary point or timelike geodesic line. This implies a physically satisfactory conservation law with no need to introduce an extraneous pseudotensor

  12. Energy-momentum distribution: A crucial problem in general relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharif, M.; Fatima, T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is aimed to elaborate the problem of energy–momentum in general relativity. In this connection, we use the prescriptions of Einstein, Landau–Lifshitz, Papapetrou and Möller to compute the energy–momentum densities for two exact solutions of Einstein field equations. The space–times under

  13. Surface energy and radiation balance systems - General description and improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschen, Leo J.; Simpson, James R.

    1989-01-01

    Surface evaluation of sensible and latent heat flux densities and the components of the radiation balance were desired for various vegetative surfaces during the ASCOT84 experiment to compare with modeled results and to relate these values to drainage winds. Five battery operated data systems equipped with sensors to determine the above values were operated for 105 station days during the ASCOT84 experiment. The Bowen ratio energy balance technique was used to partition the available energy into the sensible and latent heat flux densities. A description of the sensors and battery operated equipment used to collect and process the data is presented. In addition, improvements and modifications made since the 1984 experiment are given. Details of calculations of soil heat flow at the surface and an alternate method to calculate sensible and latent heat flux densities are provided.

  14. DNA – A General Energy System Simulation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Houbak, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews the development of the energy system simulation tool DNA (Dynamic Network Analysis). DNA has been developed since 1989 to be able to handle models of any kind of energy system based on the control volume approach, usually systems of lumped parameter components. DNA has proven...... to be a useful tool in the analysis and optimization of several types of thermal systems: Steam turbines, gas turbines, fuels cells, gasification, refrigeration and heat pumps for both conventional fossil fuels and different types of biomass. DNA is applicable for models of both steady state and dynamic...... operation. The program decides at runtime to apply the DAE solver if the system contains differential equations. This makes it easy to extend an existing steady state model to simulate dynamic operation of the plant. The use of the program is illustrated by examples of gas turbine models. The paper also...

  15. Proceedings of the General Committee for solar thermal energy 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyen, Richard; Gibert, Francois; Porcheyre, Edwige; Laplagne, Valerie; Lambertucci, Stefano; Hauser, Eva; Delmas, Pierre; Mozas, Kevin; Servier, Gerard; Girard, Jean-Paul; Haim, Philippe; Gendron, Marc; Haas, Benjamin; Leclech, Rodrigue; Eberhardt, Mathieu; Bettwy, Fabrice; Berthomieu, Nadine; Barais, Claire; Mingant, Sylvie; Daniel, Charles; GODIN, Olivier; PELe, Charles; Benabdelkarim, Mohamed; Brottier, Laetitia; Cholin, Xavier; Mugnier, Daniel; Marchal, David; Khebchache, Bouzid

    2017-10-01

    The contributions of this conference first proposed an overview of the status and perspectives of the solar thermal energy sector with a presentation of the present situation and perspectives for the French market, and an overview of situations and initiatives in neighbouring European countries. A second session addressed the possible new economical and marketing models able to face challenges of solar thermal energy in 2018 with focuses on heat kWh purchase, on supply portage through a global operator contract (design-realisation-exploitation-maintenance contracts or CREM contracts, energy performance contracts or CPE), and on issues related to building renovation (solar-gas synergy) and to new buildings (regulatory evolution, E+C label). The third session proposed examples of local good practices: development of solar thermal networks in Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes with the development of these networks and a support to commissioners, ADEME's support with patrimony-rehabilitation contracts, and the solar policy implemented by the Brest metropole. A technological focus was then proposed. It addressed communications about the SOCOL approach, concentration-based solar technology (technology, applications, realisations), and solar heating (assets in new and renovated buildings). Before a synthesis, two interventions addressed the production of solar electron and calories, and works performed on the increase of the solar coverage rate

  16. Evaluation of the 1Shot Phantom dedicated to the mammography system using FCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Chieko; Uchiyama, Nachiko; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Nagata, Mio; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sankoda, Katsuhiro; Saotome, Shigeru; Tagi, Masahiro; Kusunoki, Tetsurou

    2009-01-01

    Currently daily quality control (QC) tests for mammography systems are generally evaluated by using visual analysis phantoms, which of course means subjective measurement. In our study, however, we evaluated a novel digital phantom, the 1Shot Phantom M plus (1Shot Phantom), together with automatic analysis software dedicated for mammography systems using Fuji computed radiography (FCR). The digital phantom enables objective evaluation by providing for actual physical measurement rather than subjective visual assessment. We measured contrast to noise ratio (CNR), image receptor homogeneity, missed tissue at chest wall side, modulation transfer function (MTF), and geometric distortion utilizing the 1Shot Phantom. We then compared the values obtained using the 1Shot Phantom with values obtained from the European guidelines and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. In addition, we evaluated the convenience of using the digital phantom. The values utilizing the 1Shot Phantom and those from the European guidelines and IEC standards were consistent, but the QC tests for the European guidelines and IEC standards methods took about six hours while the same QC tests using the 1Shot Phantom took 10 minutes or less including exposure of the phantom image, measurement, and analysis. In conclusion, the digital phantom and dedicated software proved very useful and produced improved analysis for mammography systems using FCR in clinical daily QC testing because of their objectivity and substantial time-saving convenience. (author)

  17. General Astrophysics with TPF: Not Just Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Besides searching for Earth-LIke Planets, TPF can study Jupiters, Neptunes, and all sorts of exotic planets. It can image debris-disks, YSO disks, AGN disks, maybe even AGB disks. And you are probably aware that a large optical space telescope like TPF-C or TPF-O can be a fantastic tool for studying the equation of state of the Dark Energy. I will review some of the future science of TPF-C, TPF-I and TPF-O, focusing on the applications of TPF to the study of objects in our Galaxy: especially circumstellar disks and planets other than exo-Earths.

  18. A Generalization of Electromagnetic Fluctuation-Induced Casimir Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular forces responsible for adhesion and cohesion can be classified according to their origins; interactions between charges, ions, random dipole—random dipole (Keesom, random dipole—induced dipole (Debye are due to electrostatic effects; covalent bonding, London dispersion forces between fluctuating dipoles, and Lewis acid-base interactions are due to quantum mechanical effects; pressure and osmotic forces are of entropic origin. Of all these interactions, the London dispersion interaction is universal and exists between all types of atoms as well as macroscopic objects. The dispersion force between macroscopic objects is called Casimir/van der Waals force. It results from alteration of the quantum and thermal fluctuations of the electrodynamic field due to the presence of interfaces and plays a significant role in the interaction between macroscopic objects at micrometer and nanometer length scales. This paper discusses how fluctuational electrodynamics can be used to determine the Casimir energy/pressure between planar multilayer objects. Though it is confirmation of the famous work of Dzyaloshinskii, Lifshitz, and Pitaevskii (DLP, we have solved the problem without having to use methods from quantum field theory that DLP resorted to. Because of this new approach, we have been able to clarify the contributions of propagating and evanescent waves to Casimir energy/pressure in dissipative media.

  19. Studies on Phantom Vibration and Ringing Syndrome among Postgraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar Goyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phantom vibrations and ringing of mobile phones are prevalent hallucinations in the general population. They might be considered as a normal brain mechanism. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of Phantom vibrations and ringing syndrome among students and to assess factors associated it. The survey of 300 postgraduate students belonging to different field of specialization was conducted at Kurukshetra University. 74% of students were found to have both Phantom vibrations and ringing syndrome. Whereas 17% of students felt Phantom vibration exclusively and 4% students face only Phantom ringing syndrome. Both the syndrome occurs more fervent in students who kept their mobile phone in shirt or jean pocket than to who kept mobile in handbag. 75% of students felt vibration or ringing even when the phone is switched off or phone was not in their pocket. Also the frequency of both the syndrome is directly proportional to the duration of mobile phone use and person emotional behavior. Although most of students agree that the Phantom syndrome did not bother them but some students deals with anxiety when they feel symptoms associated with Phantom syndrome. By using mobile phones in proper way, one can avoid these syndromes, or at least can ameliorate the symptoms.

  20. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume V: General Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wokaun, A.; Daum, C.

    2002-03-01

    Major advances in 'Energy and Materials Cycles' have been achieved in the removal of heavy metals from the solid residues of municipal waste incineration. It has been conclusively shown that the oxidation/reduction conditions established during the thermal treatment of filter ash have a decisive influence on the evaporation of groups of heavy metals. With respect to biomass gasification, studies have been carried out with respect to the best way of extracting pure hydrogen from the low calorific value gas that is typically obtained from a biomass gasifier. The overarching goal of the laboratory 'High Temperature Solar Technology' is the use of solar energy for the production of solar fuels, or for the reduction of CO 2 emissions in large scale industrial processes that are conventionally carried out with the use of fossil fuels. In a short-term project targeted at the solar production of lime, highly encouraging results (98% degree of calcination, adjustable reactivity of the lime) have been obtained in a 10 kW prototype reactor. Hybrid processes, in which the calorific value of fossil fuels is upgraded by solar energy, represent the medium-term strategy. In this context, the successful operation of the SYNMET reactor, in which zinc oxide is reacted with methane to produce zinc and synthesis gas, represents an important milestone. The physical sciences group has come up with a novel scheme in which sulfides, rather than oxides, are used as starting materials. Copper sulfide Cu 2 S has been identified as a promising raw material, from which metallic copper would be produced in a solar reduction step. For the use of a catalytic combustor upstream of the main burning chamber of the gas turbine, it is crucial to know the stream wise distance over the catalyst where homogeneous ignition is initiated. The combustion-group working at this concept has made great advances in matching the observed ignition distances with theory. In addition, the influence of turbulence was

  1. Skyrmion vibrational energies together with a generalized mass term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Merlin C.; Marleau, Luc

    2009-01-01

    We study various properties of a one-parameter mass term for the Skyrme model, originating from the works of Kopeliovich, Piette and Zakrzewski [V. B. Kopeliovich, B. Piette, and W. J. Zakrzewski, Phys. Rev. D 73, 014006 (2006).], through the use of axially symmetric solutions obtained numerically by simulated-annealing. These solutions allow us to observe asymptotic behaviors of the B=2 binding energies that differ to those previously obtained [B. Piette and W. J. Zakrzewski, Phys. Rev. D 77, 074009 (2008).]. We also decipher the characteristics of three distinct vibrational modes that appear as eigenstates of the vibrational Hamiltonian. This analysis further examine the assertion that the one-parameter mass term offers a better account of baryonic matter than the traditional mass term.

  2. Empty calories and phantom fullness : A randomized trial studying the relative effects of energy density and viscosity on gastric emptying determined by MRI and satiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camps, Guido; Mars, Monica; De Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stomach fullness is a determinant of satiety. Although both the viscosity and energy content have been shown to delay gastric emptying, their relative importance is not well understood. Objective: We compared the relative effects of and interactions between the viscosity and energy

  3. Correspondence between the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran and the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    The document includes 5 attachments: the letter of 9 April 1984 from the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran to the Director General, the letter of 11 May 1984 from the Director General to the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, the text of the telex of 27 May 1984 from the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran to the Director General, the text of the telex of 28 May 1984 from the Director General to the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran and the text of the telex from 30 May 1984 from the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran to the Director General refering to ''Military attack on Iran's Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant''

  4. Porous silicon phantoms for high-resolution scintillation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Francia, G. [Portici Research Centre, ENEA, Via Vecchio Macello, 80055 Portici, Naples (Italy); Scafe, R. [Casaccia Research Centre, ENEA, 00060 S.Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: scafe@casaccia.enea.it; De Vincentis, G. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , V.le Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); La Ferrara, V. [Portici Research Centre, ENEA, Via Vecchio Macello, 80055 Portici, Naples (Italy); Iurlaro, G. [Casaccia Research Centre, ENEA, 00060 S.Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Nasti, I. [Portici Research Centre, ENEA, Via Vecchio Macello, 80055 Portici, Naples (Italy); Montani, L. [Casaccia Research Centre, ENEA, 00060 S.Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Pellegrini, R. [Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , V.le Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Betti, M. [Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , V.le Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Martucciello, N. [Portici Research Centre, ENEA, Via Vecchio Macello, 80055 Portici, Naples (Italy); Pani, R. [Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , V.le Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    High resolution radionuclide imaging requires phantoms with precise geometries and known activities using either Anger cameras equipped with pinhole collimators or dedicated small animal devices. Porous silicon samples, having areas of different shape and size, can be made and loaded with a radioactive material, obtaining: (a) precise radio-emitting figures corresponding to the porous areas geometry (b) a radioactivity of each figure depending on the pore's specifications, and (c) the same emission energy to be used in true exams. To this aim a sample with porous circular areas has been made and loaded with a {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} {sup -} solution. Imaging has been obtained using both general purpose and pinhole collimators. This first sample shows some defects that are analyzed and discussed.

  5. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, A; Daum, C [eds.

    2002-03-01

    Major advances in 'Energy and Materials Cycles' have been achieved in the removal of heavy metals from the solid residues of municipal waste incineration. It has been conclusively shown that the oxidation/reduction conditions established during the thermal treatment of filter ash have a decisive influence on the evaporation of groups of heavy metals. With respect to biomass gasification, studies have been carried out with respect to the best way of extracting pure hydrogen from the low calorific value gas that is typically obtained from a biomass gasifier. The overarching goal of the laboratory 'High Temperature Solar Technology' is the use of solar energy for the production of solar fuels, or for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in large scale industrial processes that are conventionally carried out with the use of fossil fuels. In a short-term project targeted at the solar production of lime, highly encouraging results (98% degree of calcination, adjustable reactivity of the lime) have been obtained in a 10 kW prototype reactor. Hybrid processes, in which the calorific value of fossil fuels is upgraded by solar energy, represent the medium-term strategy. In this context, the successful operation of the SYNMET reactor, in which zinc oxide is reacted with methane to produce zinc and synthesis gas, represents an important milestone. The physical sciences group has come up with a novel scheme in which sulfides, rather than oxides, are used as starting materials. Copper sulfide Cu{sub 2}S has been identified as a promising raw material, from which metallic copper would be produced in a solar reduction step. For the use of a catalytic combustor upstream of the main burning chamber of the gas turbine, it is crucial to know the stream wise distance over the catalyst where homogeneous ignition is initiated. The combustion-group working at this concept has made great advances in matching the observed ignition distances with theory. In addition, the influence of

  6. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume V: General Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wokaun, A.; Daum, C. (eds.)

    2002-03-01

    Major advances in 'Energy and Materials Cycles' have been achieved in the removal of heavy metals from the solid residues of municipal waste incineration. It has been conclusively shown that the oxidation/reduction conditions established during the thermal treatment of filter ash have a decisive influence on the evaporation of groups of heavy metals. With respect to biomass gasification, studies have been carried out with respect to the best way of extracting pure hydrogen from the low calorific value gas that is typically obtained from a biomass gasifier. The overarching goal of the laboratory 'High Temperature Solar Technology' is the use of solar energy for the production of solar fuels, or for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in large scale industrial processes that are conventionally carried out with the use of fossil fuels. In a short-term project targeted at the solar production of lime, highly encouraging results (98% degree of calcination, adjustable reactivity of the lime) have been obtained in a 10 kW prototype reactor. Hybrid processes, in which the calorific value of fossil fuels is upgraded by solar energy, represent the medium-term strategy. In this context, the successful operation of the SYNMET reactor, in which zinc oxide is reacted with methane to produce zinc and synthesis gas, represents an important milestone. The physical sciences group has come up with a novel scheme in which sulfides, rather than oxides, are used as starting materials. Copper sulfide Cu{sub 2}S has been identified as a promising raw material, from which metallic copper would be produced in a solar reduction step. For the use of a catalytic combustor upstream of the main burning chamber of the gas turbine, it is crucial to know the stream wise distance over the catalyst where homogeneous ignition is initiated. The combustion-group working at this concept has made great advances in matching the observed ignition distances with theory. In addition, the

  7. Annual report 2005 General Direction of the Energy and raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 annual report of the DGEMP (General Direction of the Energy and the raw Materials), takes stock on the energy bill and accounting of the France. The first part presents the electric power, natural gas and raw materials market in France. The second part is devoted to the diversification of the energy resources with a special attention to the renewable energies and the nuclear energy. The third part discusses the energy and raw materials prices and the last part presents the international cooperation in the energy domain. (A.L.B.)

  8. Assessment of specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons using average adult Japanese female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Kentaro; Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2016-12-01

    In the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the procedure for calculating effective doses was modified as follows. Equivalent doses are evaluated using the male and female voxel phantoms on the basis of reference anatomical data of Caucasians, and effective doses are calculated using sex-averaged equivalent doses in applying tissue weighting factors. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs), which are essential data for calculating internal doses, depend on the body weights, organ masses, and positional relations of organs of the phantoms. Then, the dose coefficients, which are committed effective doses per unit intake of radionuclides, developed by ICRP on the basis of the 2007 Recommendations reflect the physical characteristics of Caucasians and are averaged over the sexes. Meanwhile, the physiques of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasians, and organ masses are also different from each other. Therefore, dose coefficients reflecting Japanese physical characteristics are different from those of ICRP. Knowledge of the influence of race differences on dose coefficients is important to apply the sex averaged dose coefficients of ICRP to the Japanese system of radiation protection. SAF data based on phantoms which have Japanese physical characteristics is essential for assessment of the dose coefficients reflecting Japanese physical characteristics. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency constructed average adult Japanese phantoms, JM-103 (male) and JF-103 (female), and is developing a dose estimation method for internal exposure using these phantoms. This report provides photon and electron SAFs of JF-103. The data of this report and the previously published data of JM-103 are applicable to evaluate sex-specific and sex-averaged dose coefficients reflecting the physical characteristics of the average adult Japanese for intakes of radionuclides emitting photons and electrons. Appendix as CD-ROM. (J.P.N.)

  9. Voxel anthropomorphic phantoms: review of models used for ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemosquet, A.; Carlan, L. de; Clairand, I.

    2003-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have been used since the 1970's for dosimetric calculations. Realistic geometries are required for this operation, resulting in the development of ever more accurate phantoms. Voxel phantoms, consisting of a set of small-volume elements, appeared towards the end of the 1980's, and significantly improved on the original mathematical models. Voxel phantoms are models of the human body, obtained using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). These phantoms are an extremely accurate representation of the human anatomy. This article provides a review of the literature available on the development of these phantoms and their applications in ionising radiation dosimetry. The bibliographical study has shown that there is a wide range of phantoms, covering various characteristics of the general population in terms of sex, age or morphology, and that they are used in applications relating to all aspects of ionising radiation. (author)

  10. Phantom inflation and the 'Big Trip'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es; Jimenez-Madrid, Jose A. [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-08-19

    Primordial inflation is regarded to be driven by a phantom field which is here implemented as a scalar field satisfying an equation of state p={omega}{rho}, with {omega}-1. Being even aggravated by the weird properties of phantom energy, this will pose a serious problem with the exit from the inflationary phase. We argue, however, in favor of the speculation that a smooth exit from the phantom inflationary phase can still be tentatively recovered by considering a multiverse scenario where the primordial phantom universe would travel in time toward a future universe filled with usual radiation, before reaching the big rip. We call this transition the 'Big Trip' and assume it to take place with the help of some form of anthropic principle which chooses our current universe as being the final destination of the time transition.

  11. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  12. Measurement of TLD Albedo response on various calibration phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, T.; Tsujimura, N.; Shinohara, K.; Ishiguro, H.; Nakamura, T.

    1996-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) has recommended that individual dosemeter should be calibrated on a suitable phantom and has pointed out that the calibration factor of a neutron dosemeter is strongly influenced by the the exact size and shape of the body and the phantom to which the dosemeter is attached. As the principle of an albedo type thermoluminescent personal dosemeter (albedo TLD) is essentially based on a detection of scattered and moderated neutron from a human body, the sensitivity of albedo TLD is strongly influenced by the incident neutron energy and the calibration phantom. (1) Therefore for albedo type thermoluminescent personal dosemeter (albedo TLD), the information of neutron albedo response on the calibration phantom is important for appropriate dose estimation. In order to investigate the effect of phantom type on the reading of the albedo TLD, measurement of the TLD energy response and angular response on some typical calibration phantoms was performed using dynamitron accelerator and 252 Cf neutron source. (author)

  13. A General Mathematical Framework for Calculating Systems-Scale Efficiency of Energy Extraction and Conversion: Energy Return on Investment (EROI) and Other Energy Return Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Adam R. Brandt; Michael Dale

    2011-01-01

    The efficiencies of energy extraction and conversion systems are typically expressed using energy return ratios (ERRs) such as the net energy ratio (NER) or energy return on investment (EROI). A lack of a general mathematical framework prevents inter-comparison of NER/EROI estimates between authors: methods used are not standardized, nor is there a framework for succinctly reporting results in a consistent fashion. In this paper we derive normalized mathematical forms of four ERRs for energy ...

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of dose distribution in water phantom for monoenergetic photon sources in the energy range of 20 keV and 2 MeV using a customized GEANT4 distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia, Eduardo; Rodrigues Jr, Orlando; Campos, Leticia Lucente

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Monte Carlo simulation methods are important tools in the areas of radiation transport and dosimetry, assisting in the radiation therapy treatment planning, study of energy deposition in complex systems and aid in the agreement the experimental results in the research of new materials. However, two aspects can affect the use of these tools: complexity in real world problems transposition to the simulation environment and difficulty in computational codes utilization. The objective of this work is to present a free software distribution based in the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. The distribution was customized with the addition of tools for the development, visualization and data analysis in a software package with simplified installation and attended configuration. A wizard tool was developed and incorporated to the software package aiming to assist the user in the simulation skeleton creation and the election of the compilation and link flags for new models of simulation in the area of the radiation dosimetry. This software distribution is part of a wider project for the development of an infrastructure based in the GEANT4 for the radiation transport simulation under the perspective of a non centered computational architecture in dosimetry. The absorbed dose distribution in water phantom was simulated for monoenergetic photon sources with energies between 20 keV and 2 MeV. All results and analyses were generated with the tools incorporated in the software package. (author)

  15. A suitability study of the fission product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption phantom for calibration of in vivo bioassay equipment for the DOELAP accreditation testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, P.C.; Lynch, T.P.

    1991-08-01

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) conducted an intercomparison study of the Fission Product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption (BOMAB) phantom for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the consistency of calibration response of the two phantoms and their suitability for certification and use under a planned bioassay laboratory accreditation program. The study was initiated to determine calibration factors for both types of phantoms and to evaluate the suitability of their use in DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) round-robin testing. The BOMAB was found to be more appropriate for the DOELAP testing program. 9 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  16. 76 FR 11437 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Societe Generale Energy Corp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... reliability of the U.S. electric power supply system. Copies of this application will be made available, upon... surplus energy purchased from electric utilities, Federal power marketing agencies and other entities... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. EA-376] Application To Export Electric Energy; Societe...

  17. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging for simultaneous detection, characterization, and volume measurement of urinary stones with excretory-phase CT urography alone. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Niikawa, Hidekazu; Shikata, Atsushi; Murakami, Emi; Tsunoda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshihide; Tsujihata, Masao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if two-pass dual-energy CT imaging - id est (i.e.), simultaneous three-material and two-material decomposition analysis - can depict and characterize urinary stones in various concentrations of iodine solution in vitro. Twelve urinary stones were scanned with a dual-source CT scanner. First, each stone (in a saline-filled tube) underwent single- and dual-energy mode CT scans in order to measure the volume of the stone. Each stone was then placed in various concentrations of contrast medium and scanned in dual-energy mode to calculate its volume via three-material decomposition analysis. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging analysis software for the Matlab environment, which was developed specifically to process simultaneous three-material and two-material decomposition, was applied to characterize and calculate the volume of each stone. Although the virtual non-contrast images from three-material decomposition analysis clearly visualized all of the stones in contrast medium with up to 80 mgI/mL, the volumes of the uric acid stones were overestimated. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging was able to depict and characterize non-uric-acid stones in diluted contrast medium with up to 80 mgI/mL, whereas uric acid stones were correctly evaluated in diluted contrast medium with 40 mgI/mL or less. Two-pass dual-energy CT imaging is able to depict and characterize urinary stones in contrast medium. (author)

  18. A Monte Carlo-based method to estimate radiation dose from spiral CT: from phantom testing to patient-specific models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarry, G; De Marco, J J; Beifuss, U; Cagnon, C H; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and test a method to estimate the relative and absolute absorbed radiation dose from axial and spiral CT scans using a Monte Carlo approach. Initial testing was done in phantoms and preliminary results were obtained from a standard mathematical anthropomorphic model (MIRD V) and voxelized patient data. To accomplish this we have modified a general purpose Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP4B) to simulate the CT x-ray source and movement, and then to calculate absorbed radiation dose in desired objects. The movement of the source in either axial or spiral modes was modelled explicitly while the CT system components were modelled using published information about x-ray spectra as well as information provided by the manufacturer. Simulations were performed for single axial scans using the head and body computed tomography dose index (CTDI) polymethylmethacrylate phantoms at both central and peripheral positions for all available beam energies and slice thicknesses. For comparison, corresponding physical measurements of CTDI in phantom were made with an ion chamber. To obtain absolute dose values, simulations and measurements were performed in air at the scanner isocentre for each beam energy. To extend the verification, the CT scanner model was applied to the MIRD V model and compared with published results using similar technical factors. After verification of the model, the generalized source was simulated and applied to voxelized models of patient anatomy. The simulated and measured absolute dose data in phantom agreed to within 2% for the head phantom and within 4% for the body phantom at 120 and 140 kVp; this extends to 8% for the head and 9% for the body phantom across all available beam energies and positions. For the head phantom, the simulated and measured absolute dose data agree to within 2% across all slice thicknesses at 120 kVp. Our results in the MIRD phantom agree within 11% of all the different organ dose values

  19. Annual report 2001. General direction of energy and raw materials; Rapport annuel 2001. Direction generale de l'energie et des matieres premieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report summarizes the 2001 activity of the French general direction of energy and raw materials (DGEMP) of the ministry of finances and industry: 1 - security of energy supplies: a recurrent problem; 2001, a transition year for nuclear energy worldwide; petroleum refining in font of the 2005 dead-line; the OPEC and the upset of the oil market; the pluri-annual planning of power production investments; renewable energies: a reconfirmed priority; 2 - the opening of markets: the opening of French electricity and gas markets; the international development of Electricite de France (EdF) and of Gaz de France (GdF); electricity and gas industries: first branch agreements; 3 - the present-day topics: 2001, the year of objective contracts; AREVA, the future to be prepared; the new IRSN; the agreements on climate and the energy policy; the mastery of domestic energy consumptions; the safety of hydroelectric dams; Technip-Coflexip: the birth of a para-petroleum industry giant; the cleansing of the mining activity in French Guyana; the future of workmen of Lorraine basin coal mines; 4 - 2001 at a glance: highlights; main legislative and regulatory texts; 5 - DGEMP: November 2001 reorganization and new organization chart; energy and raw materials publications; www.industrie.gouv.fr/energie. (J.S.)

  20. Annual report 2001. General direction of energy and raw materials; Rapport annuel 2001. Direction generale de l'energie et des matieres premieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report summarizes the 2001 activity of the French general direction of energy and raw materials (DGEMP) of the ministry of finances and industry: 1 - security of energy supplies: a recurrent problem; 2001, a transition year for nuclear energy worldwide; petroleum refining in font of the 2005 dead-line; the OPEC and the upset of the oil market; the pluri-annual planning of power production investments; renewable energies: a reconfirmed priority; 2 - the opening of markets: the opening of French electricity and gas markets; the international development of Electricite de France (EdF) and of Gaz de France (GdF); electricity and gas industries: first branch agreements; 3 - the present-day topics: 2001, the year of objective contracts; AREVA, the future to be prepared; the new IRSN; the agreements on climate and the energy policy; the mastery of domestic energy consumptions; the safety of hydroelectric dams; Technip-Coflexip: the birth of a para-petroleum industry giant; the cleansing of the mining activity in French Guyana; the future of workmen of Lorraine basin coal mines; 4 - 2001 at a glance: highlights; main legislative and regulatory texts; 5 - DGEMP: November 2001 reorganization and new organization chart; energy and raw materials publications; www.industrie.gouv.fr/energie. (J.S.)

  1. Proceedings of the 4. General Congress on Nuclear Energy. v. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The first volume of the 4. General Congress on Nuclear Energy presents works about transient and accident analysis; thermohydraulics; radioisotopes uses; fuel cycle; shield; material technology; nuclear installation construction and reactor and nuclear physics. (C.G.C.)

  2. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  3. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil); Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do, E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  4. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256×256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  5. Prevalent hallucinations during medical internships: phantom vibration and ringing syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phantom vibration syndrome is a type of hallucination reported among mobile phone users in the general population. Another similar perception, phantom ringing syndrome, has not been previously described in the medical literature. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns (46 males, 28 females; mean age, 24.8±1.2 years was conducted using repeated investigations of the prevalence and associated factors of phantom vibration and ringing. The accompanying symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories before the internship began, and again at the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, and two weeks after the internship ended. RESULTS: The baseline prevalence of phantom vibration was 78.1%, which increased to 95.9% and 93.2% in the third and sixth internship months. The prevalence returned to 80.8% at the twelfth month and decreased to 50.0% 2 weeks after the internship ended. The baseline prevalence of phantom ringing was 27.4%, which increased to 84.9%, 87.7%, and 86.3% in the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, respectively. This returned to 54.2% two weeks after the internship ended. The anxiety and depression scores also increased during the internship, and returned to baseline two weeks after the internship. There was no significant correlation between phantom vibration/ringing and symptoms of anxiety or depression. The incidence of both phantom vibration and ringing syndromes significantly increased during the internship, and subsequent recovery. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that phantom vibration and ringing might be entities that are independent of anxiety or depression during evaluation of stress-associated experiences during medical internships.

  6. Phantom models for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storr, G.J.

    1990-08-01

    The development of a two-dimensional phantom model using the neutron and photon transport code DOT-IV is detailed. The effects of varying basic parameters such as aperture width, neutron source energy and tissue composition have been studied. One important conclusion from the study is that narrow beam apertures will give little or no advantage for tumour dose over tissue dose even in the 'ideal beam' range of 2-7 keV. The model may be used for future filter and beam studies with confidence. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 13 figs

  7. Dynamics of coupled phantom and tachyon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahalam, M. [Zhejiang University of Technology, Institute for Advanced Physics and Mathematics, Hangzhou (China); Pathak, S.D.; Li, Shiyuan [Shandong University, School of Physics, Jinan (China); Myrzakulov, R. [Eurasian National University, Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Wang, Anzhong [Zhejiang University of Technology, Institute for Advanced Physics and Mathematics, Hangzhou (China); Baylor University, Department of Physics, GCAP-CASPER, Waco, TX (United States)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper, we apply the dynamical analysis to a coupled phantom field with scaling potential taking particular forms of the coupling (linear and combination of linear), and present phase space analysis. We investigate if there exists a late time accelerated scaling attractor that has the ratio of dark energy and dark matter densities of the order one. We observe that the scrutinized couplings cannot alleviate the coincidence problem, however, they acquire stable late time accelerated solutions. We also discuss a coupled tachyon field with inverse square potential assuming linear coupling. (orig.)

  8. Dynamics of coupled phantom and tachyon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahalam, M.; Pathak, S.D.; Li, Shiyuan; Myrzakulov, R.; Wang, Anzhong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the dynamical analysis to a coupled phantom field with scaling potential taking particular forms of the coupling (linear and combination of linear), and present phase space analysis. We investigate if there exists a late time accelerated scaling attractor that has the ratio of dark energy and dark matter densities of the order one. We observe that the scrutinized couplings cannot alleviate the coincidence problem, however, they acquire stable late time accelerated solutions. We also discuss a coupled tachyon field with inverse square potential assuming linear coupling. (orig.)

  9. Proceedings of the 1. General Congress of Nuclear Energy. v. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of I General Congress of Nuclear Energy are presented. All fields related to nuclear energy are enclosed. In the second part the following fields are shown: reactor instrumentation and control, nuclear medicine, radioisotopes uses, fuel cycle and radiation protection. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Proceedings of the 1. General Congress of Nuclear Energy. v. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of 1 General Congress of Nuclear Energy are presented. All fields related to nuclear energy are enclosed. In the first part the following fields are shown: safety analysis, science and technology of materials, nuclear materials, nuclear laws, education and trainning, reactor physics, nuclear physics, quality assurance, mathematical models, reactor operation, safeguards, advanced technologies, thermohydraulic and reactor licensing. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Low energy neutron scattering for energy dependent cross sections. General considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenstein, W; Dagan, R [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    We consider in this paper some aspects related to neutron scattering at low energies by nuclei which are subject to thermal agitation. The scattering is determined by a temperature dependent joint scattering kernel, or the corresponding joint probability density, which is a function of two variables, the neutron energy after scattering, and the cosine of the angle of scattering, for a specified energy and direction of motion of the neutron, before the interaction takes place. This joint probability density is easy to calculate, when the nucleus which causes the scattering of the neutron is at rest. It can be expressed by a delta function, since there is a one to one correspondence between the neutron energy change, and the cosine of the scattering angle. If the thermal motion of the target nucleus is taken into account, the calculation is rather more complicated. The delta function relation between the cosine of the angle of scattering and the neutron energy change is now averaged over the spectrum of velocities of the target nucleus, and becomes a joint kernel depending on both these variables. This function has a simple form, if the target nucleus behaves as an ideal gas, which has a scattering cross section independent of energy. An energy dependent scattering cross section complicates the treatment further. An analytic expression is no longer obtained for the ideal gas temperature dependent joint scattering kernel as a function of the neutron energy after the interaction and the cosine of the scattering angle. Instead the kernel is expressed by an inverse Fourier Transform of a complex integrand, which is averaged over the velocity spectrum of the target nucleus. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-08-29

    With declining production costs and increasing technical capabilities, LED adoption has recently gained momentum in general illumination applications. This is a positive development for our energy infrastructure, as LEDs use significantly less electricity per lumen produced than many traditional lighting technologies. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications examines the expected market penetration and resulting energy savings of light-emitting diode, or LED, lamps and luminaires from today through 2030.

  13. Solar thermal energy utilization. German studies on technology and application. Vol. 1. General investigations on energy availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M. (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR), Koeln (Germany, F.R.). Hauptabteilung Energietechnik) (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of a three-volume series titled 'Solar thermal energy utilization' comprises three papers dealing with general investigations into energy availability. Their titles are: Yearly yield of solar CRS-process heat and temperature of reaction; - literature survey in the field of primary and secondary concentrating solar energy systems concerning the choice and manufacturing process of suitable materials; - considerations and proposals for future research and development of high temperature solar processes. Each of the three chapters was abstracted for entry into the database. (HWJ).

  14. Standardization of calibration method of whole-body counter. 1. Calibration by using anthropometric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Masaki; Uchiyama, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi; Mizushita, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    To standardize the calibration methods of whole-body counters, three anthropometric phantoms were manufactured based on dozens of Japanese average value of body size data. Using these phantoms, the calibrations of some whole-body counters were carried out and the comparison of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantoms and block phantoms, which used to be used for the calibration of whole-body counters generally, was implemented. Five whole-body counters, one scanning system, two stationary systems and two chair systems, were used for this study. The following results were derived: As an example, in NIRS scanning system, the counting efficiency of anthropometric phantom of 162cm height was 12.7% greater than that of block phantom of the same height. This means 137 Cs body burdens in adult men used to be estimated with the excess of about 10%. Body burdens tended to be estimated excessively in adult because the difference of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantom and block phantom increases with increase of height. To standardize body burden data measured with various whole-body counters, the calibration of each whole-body counter should be conducted using anthropometric phantoms and phantoms which used to be used for the calibration of that whole-body counter. (author)

  15. Construction of Chinese reference female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Yinxiangzi; Liu Lixing; Xia Xiaobin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Voxel-based Chinese Reference female Phantom (VCRP-woman) is developed from an individual female phantom which was based on high resolution cross-sectional color photographs. An in-house C ++ program was developed to adjust the phantom. Finally, a reference female phantom with have the same height, weighte and similar organs masses with the Chinese reference adult female data. The adjusted phantom is then imported to MCNPX to calculate the organs absorbed dose and effective dose conversion coefficients. Results are compared between VCRP-woman and the ICRP adult reference female phantom. (authors)

  16. A methodology for developing anisotropic AAA phantoms via additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Galarreta, Sergio; Antón, Raúl; Cazón, Aitor; Finol, Ender A

    2017-05-24

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The criterion of maximum diameter is still used in clinical practice, although numerical studies have demonstrated the importance of biomechanical factors for rupture risk assessment. AAA phantoms could be used for experimental validation of the numerical studies and for pre-intervention testing of endovascular grafts. We have applied multi-material 3D printing technology to manufacture idealized AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Different composites were fabricated and the phantom specimens were characterized by biaxial tensile tests while using a constitutive model to fit the experimental data. One composite was chosen to manufacture the phantom based on having the same mechanical properties as those reported in the literature for human AAA tissue; the strain energy and anisotropic index were compared to make this choice. The materials for the matrix and fibers of the selected composite are, respectively, the digital materials FLX9940 and FLX9960 developed by Stratasys. The fiber proportion for the composite is equal to 0.15. The differences between the composite behavior and the AAA tissue are small, with a small difference in the strain energy (0.4%) and a maximum difference of 12.4% in the peak Green strain ratio. This work represents a step forward in the application of 3D printing technology for the manufacturing of AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of mathematical pediatric phantoms for internal dose calculations: designs, limitations, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms of the human body at various ages are employed with Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for calculation of photon specific absorbed fractions. The author has developed a pediatric phantom series based on the design of the adult phantom, but with explicit equations for each organ so that organ sizes and marrow distributions could be assigned properly. Since the phantoms comprise simple geometric shapes, predictive dose capability is limited when geometry is critical to the calculation. Hence, there is a demand for better phantom design in situations where geometry is critical, such as for external irradiation or for internal emitters with low energy photons. Recent advances in computerized axial tomography (CAT) present the potential for derivation of anatomical information, which is so critical to development of phantoms, and ongoing developmental work on compuer architecture to handle large arrays for Monte Carlo calculations should make complex-geometry dose calculations economically feasible within this decade

  18. Intercomparison of JAERI Torso Phantom lung sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H.; Hauck, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    activity homogeneously distributed throughout the tissue substitute material. Many different sources can be used with a single lung set. The coefficients of variation for selected (i.e., those that had three or more values) counting efficiency data at different photon energies show that agreement between lung sets depends on the photon energy. In general, the lower the photon energy the worse the agreement. The 17.7 and 26.4 keV photopeaks show the highest coefficients of variation. This could be due to several factors: the distribution of the radionuclide in the lung insert, the positioning of the detector, the analysis of the photo peak. Once the photon energy rises above 60 keV the coefficient of variation is always less than 6%. This means that 95% of the time one can expect counting efficiencies derived from lung sets that have the activity homogeneously distributed through the tissue substitute material to be within 12% of each other. However, at lower photon energies the agreement is only to within 30%, and this may present a problem for lung intercomparison programs that use low energy emitting photons. (author)

  19. Generalized Scaling of Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Applications for Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-W. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous work from this laboratory, it has been found that the urban heat island intensity (UHI can be scaled with the urban length scale and the wind speed, through the time-dependent energy balance. The heating of the urban surfaces during the daytime sets the initial temperature, and this overheating is dissipated during the night-time through mean convection motion over the urban surface. This may appear to be in contrast to the classical work by Oke (1973. However, in this work, we show that if the population density is used in converting the population data into urbanized area, then a good agreement with the current theory is found. An additional parameter is the “urban flow parameter,” which depends on the urban building characteristics and affects the horizontal convection of heat due to wind. This scaling can be used to estimate the UHI intensity in any cities and therefore predict the required energy consumption during summer months. In addition, all urbanized surfaces are expected to exhibit this scaling, so that increase in the surface temperature in large energy-consumption or energy-producing facilities (e.g., solar electric or thermal power plants can be estimated.

  20. A Novel Simple Phantom for Verifying the Dose of Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A standard protocol of dosimetric measurements is used by the organizations responsible for verifying that the doses delivered in radiation-therapy institutions are within authorized limits. This study evaluated a self-designed simple auditing phantom for use in verifying the dose of radiation therapy; the phantom design, dose audit system, and clinical tests are described. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs were used as postal dosimeters, and mailable phantoms were produced for use in postal audits. Correction factors are important for converting TLD readout values from phantoms into the absorbed dose in water. The phantom scatter correction factor was used to quantify the difference in the scattered dose between a solid water phantom and homemade phantoms; its value ranged from 1.084 to 1.031. The energy-dependence correction factor was used to compare the TLD readout of the unit dose irradiated by audit beam energies with 60Co in the solid water phantom; its value was 0.99 to 1.01. The setup-condition factor was used to correct for differences in dose-output calibration conditions. Clinical tests of the device calibrating the dose output revealed that the dose deviation was within 3%. Therefore, our homemade phantoms and dosimetric system can be applied for accurately verifying the doses applied in radiation-therapy institutions.

  1. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  2. The energy efficiency partnership - Kraft General Foods and Boston Edison Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.C.; Donoghue, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    During the past twenty years, inordinate shifts in the supply and demand of energy have forced both electric utility companies and their customers to investigate new and innovative ways to satisfy the ever increasing demand for electricity. The Energy Efficiency Partnership, developed between Kraft General Foods and Boston Edison Company, presents an exemplary study of how two corporate giants creatively solved the problem of uncontrolled energy costs and its positive effect on the overall operations of Kraft General Foods, Framingham. But the Energy Efficiency Partnership did more than reduce energy costs, it provided benefits to all parties on the playing field. To understand its significance, a review of the partnership's history is paramount. The first official announcement of the Energy Efficiency Partnership was made on April 9, 1990. Framingham, MA, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Kraft General Foods Framingham, and Boston Edison Company have joined forces in a $3.6 million dollar energy partnership that will help keep 250 industrial jobs in Massachusetts and could lead to the future expansion of the international food company's Framingham facility

  3. A comparative study on patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the results of patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom. Methods: Fifteen intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans already planned on treatment planning system (TPS for head-and-neck cancer patients were exported on all three kinds of phantoms viz. slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom, and dose was calculated using anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA. All the gantry angles were set to zero in case of slab phantom while set to as it is in actual plan in case of other two phantoms. All the plans were delivered by linear accelerator (LA and dose for each plan was measured by 0.13 cc ion chamber. The percentage (% variations between planned and measured doses were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean % variations between planned and measured doses of all IMRT quality assurance (QA plans were as 0.65 (Standard deviation (SD: 0.38 with confidence limit (CL 1.39, 1.16 (SD: 0.61 with CL 2.36 and 2.40 (SD: 0.86 with CL 4.09 for slab phantom, acrylic head phantom and goat head phantom respectively. Conclusion: Higher dose variations found in case of real tissue phantom compare to results in case of slab and acrylic body phantoms. The algorithm AAA does not calculate doses in heterogeneous medium as accurate as it calculates in homogeneous medium. Therefore the patient specific absolute dosimetry should be done using heterogeneous phantom mimicking density wise as well as design wise to the actual human body.  

  4. Effects of Low Anisotropy on Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in Galileon Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossienkhani, H.; Fayaz, V.; Jafari, A.; Yousefi, H.

    2018-04-01

    The definition of the Galileon gravity form is extended to the Brans-Dicke theory. Given, the framework of the Galileon theory, the generalized ghost dark energy model in an anisotropic universe is investigated. We study the cosmological implications of this model. In particular, we obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of this dark energy in Bianchi type I model. We also probe observational constraints by using the latest observational data on the generalized ghost dark energy models as the unification of dark matter and dark energy. In order to do so, we focus on observational determinations of the Hubble expansion rate (namely, the expansion history) H(z). As a result, we show the influence of the anisotropy (although low) on the evolution of the universe in the statefinder diagrams for Galileon gravity.

  5. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time t = 0 across the barrier w = −1 into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  6. Generalized Energy Flow Analysis Considering Electricity Gas and Heat Subsystems in Local-Area Energy Systems Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Shi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate environmental pollution and improve the efficient use of energy, energy systems integration (ESI—covering electric power systems, heat systems and natural gas systems—has become an important trend in energy utilization. The traditional power flow calculation method, with the object as the power system, will prove difficult in meeting the requirements of the coupled energy flow analysis. This paper proposes a generalized energy flow (GEF analysis method which is suitable for an ESI containing electricity, heat and gas subsystems. First, the models of electricity, heat, and natural gas networks in the ESI are established. In view of the complexity of the conventional method to solve the gas network including the compressor, an improved practical equivalent method was adopted based on different control modes. On this basis, a hybrid method combining homotopy and the Newton-Raphson algorithm was executed to compute the nonlinear equations of GEF, and the Jacobi matrix reflecting the coupling relationship of multi-energy was derived considering the grid connected mode and island modes of the power system in the ESI. Finally, the validity of the proposed method in multi-energy flow calculation and the analysis of interacting characteristics was verified using practical cases.

  7. Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penning, Julie [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Stober, Kelsey [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Victor [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Yamada, Mary [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The DOE report, Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications, is a biannual report which models the adoption of LEDs in the U.S. general-lighting market, along with associated energy savings, based on the full potential DOE has determined to be technically feasible over time. This version of the report uses an updated 2016 U.S. lighting-market model that is more finely calibrated and granular than previous models, and extends the forecast period to 2035 from the 2030 limit that was used in previous editions.

  8. Oil Subsidies and Renewable Energy in Saudi Arabia: A General Equilibrium Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Blazquez, J; Hunt, Lester; Manzano, B

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) announced its Vision 2030 strategic plan incorporating major changes to the economic structure of the country, including an intention to deploy 9.5 GW of renewable energy in an effort to reduce the penetration of oil in the electricity generation system. This paper assesses the macroeconomic impact of such changes in the KSA, coupled with reductions in implicit energy subsidies. Based on a dynamic general equilibrium model, our analysis suggests that...

  9. General Navier–Stokes-like momentum and mass-energy equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monreal, Jorge, E-mail: jmonreal@mail.usf.edu

    2015-03-15

    A new system of general Navier–Stokes-like equations is proposed to model electromagnetic flow utilizing analogues of hydrodynamic conservation equations. Such equations are intended to provide a different perspective and, potentially, a better understanding of electromagnetic mass, energy and momentum behaviour. Under such a new framework additional insights into electromagnetism could be gained. To that end, we propose a system of momentum and mass-energy conservation equations coupled through both momentum density and velocity vectors.

  10. Telex message to the Director General from the President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The document reproduces the text of a telex message dated 19 July 1988 from the Deputy Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran and President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran to the Director General of the IAEA and the Director General's reply dated 29 July 1988, in connection with an Iraqi military attack of the Busher Nuclear Power Plant on 18 July 1988

  11. An energy recondensation method using the discrete generalized multigroup energy expansion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Lei; Forget, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Discrete-generalized multigroup method was implemented as a recondensation scheme. → Coarse group cross-sections were recondensed from core-level solution. → Neighboring effect of reflector and MOX bundle was improved. → Methodology was shown to be fully consistent when a flat angular flux approximation is used. - Abstract: In this paper, the discrete generalized multigroup (DGM) method was used to recondense the coarse group cross-sections using the core level solution, thus providing a correction for neighboring effect found at the core level. This approach was tested using a discrete ordinates implementation in both 1-D and 2-D. Results indicate that 2 or 3 iterations can substantially improve the flux and fission density errors associated with strong interfacial spectral changes as found in the presence of strong absorbers, reflector of mixed-oxide fuel. The methodology is also proven to be fully consistent with the multigroup methodology as long as a flat-flux approximation is used spatially.

  12. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minev, L.; Boshkova, T.; Uzunov, P.

    1995-01-01

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as 'zero' -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minev, L; Boshkova, T; Uzunov, P [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as `zero` -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A feasiblity study of an ultrasonic test phantom arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip

    This thesis is a feasibility study for the creation of a test phantom that replicates the physiological features, from an acoustic and mechanical standpoint, of that of a human arm. Physiological feature set includes; Heart, Arteries, Veins, Bone, Muscle, Fat, Skin, and Dermotographic Features (finger prints). Mechanical Aspects include, vascular compression and distention, elasticity of tissue layers, mechanics of human heart. The end goal of which to have a working understanding of each component in order to create a controllable, real time, physiologically accurate, test phantom for a wide range of ultrasonic based applications. These applications can range from devices like wearable technologies to medical training, to biometric "Liveness" detection methods. The proposed phantom would allow for a number of natural bodily functions to be measured including but not limited to vascular mapping, blood pressure, heart rate, subdermal imaging, and general ultrasonic imaging.

  15. Marginal abatement cost curves in general equilibrium: The influence of world energy prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, Gernot; Peterson, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs) are a favorite instrument to analyze international emissions trading. This paper focuses on the question of how to define MACCs in a general equilibrium context where the global abatement level influences energy prices and in turn national MACCs. We discuss the mechanisms theoretically and then use the CGE model DART for quantitative simulations. The result is, that changes in energy prices resulting from different global abatement levels do indeed affect national MACCs. Also, we compare different possibilities of defining MACCs-of which some are robust against changes in energy prices while others vary considerably. (author)

  16. An energy-stable generalized- α method for the Swift–Hohenberg equation

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmiento, Adel; Espath, L.F.R.; Vignal, P.; Dalcin, Lisandro; Parsani, Matteo; Calo, V.M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a second-order accurate energy-stable time-integration method that controls the evolution of numerical instabilities introducing numerical dissipation in the highest-resolved frequencies. Our algorithm further extends the generalized-α method and provides control over dissipation via the spectral radius. We derive the first and second laws of thermodynamics for the Swift–Hohenberg equation and provide a detailed proof of the unconditional energy stability of our algorithm. Finally, we present numerical results to verify the energy stability and its second-order accuracy in time.

  17. An energy-stable generalized- α method for the Swift–Hohenberg equation

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmiento, Adel

    2017-11-16

    We propose a second-order accurate energy-stable time-integration method that controls the evolution of numerical instabilities introducing numerical dissipation in the highest-resolved frequencies. Our algorithm further extends the generalized-α method and provides control over dissipation via the spectral radius. We derive the first and second laws of thermodynamics for the Swift–Hohenberg equation and provide a detailed proof of the unconditional energy stability of our algorithm. Finally, we present numerical results to verify the energy stability and its second-order accuracy in time.

  18. Avoidance of singularity and global non-conservation of energy in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, M.M.

    2009-06-01

    We show that the singularity in the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) is the expression of a non-Machian feature. It can be avoided with a scale-invariant dynamical theory, a property lacking in GTR. It is further argued that the global non-conservation of energy in GTR also results from the lack of scale-invariance, and the field formulation presented by several authors can only partly resolve the problem. Assuming the global energy conservation, we propose a negative energy density component with a positive equation of state that can drive the late-time acceleration in the universe, while the positive component confines to smaller scales. (author)

  19. On the report of the Nuclear Energy Section Meeting, General Survey Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Shigehiro

    1979-01-01

    The demand and supply of petroleum have relaxed temporarily, but in the long run, the difficulty of energy problem does not change. More powerful promotion of general energy policy with conformity and effectiveness is a worldwide problem. In order to cope with such situation, General Energy Survey Committee has examined the concrete measures, and drawn up the interim report in August, 1977. The present report does not change from the interim report in its basic framework, but the background on which this framework is based is clarified, and the contents of the concrete measures are examined in more detail. The Nuclear Energy Sectional Meeting has obtained the conclusions about the basic matters in the development and utilization of nuclear energy and the concrete measures required to be taken urgently. The domestic and foreign situations about the development and utilization of nuclear energy are explained, and the location of nuclear power stations is the most serious bottleneck, therefore the measures to obtain national consensus are the most important problem in every country. The nuclear power generation in Japan is expected to reach 33 million kW by 1985 and 60 million kW by 1990. As the concrete measures, improvement of safety and reliability, establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, development and adoption of new type nuclear reactors, strengthening of the base of nuclear energy industries, promotion of research and development, and contribution to international activities are briefly discussed. (Kako, I.)

  20. How to be smart and energy efficient: A general discussion on thermochromic windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2014-01-01

    A window is a unique element in a building because of its simultaneous properties of being “opaque” to inclement weather yet transparent to the observer. However, these unique features make the window an element that can reduce the energy efficiency of buildings. A thermochromic window is a type of smart window whose solar radiation properties vary with temperature. It is thought that the solar radiation gain of a room can be intelligently regulated through the use of thermochromic windows, resulting in lower energy consumption than with standard windows. Materials scientists have made many efforts to improve the performance of thermochromic materials. Despite these efforts, fundamental problems continue to confront us. How should a “smart” window behave? Is a “smart” window really the best candidate for energy-efficient applications? What is the relationship between smartness and energy performance? To answer these questions, a general discussion of smartness and energy performance is provided. PMID:25233891

  1. Analysis of Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in LQC and Galileon Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Mahasweta; Debnath, Ujjal

    2016-01-01

    A so-called ghost dark energy was recently proposed to explain the present acceleration of the universe. The energy density of ghost dark energy, which originates from Veneziano ghost of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), in a time dependent background, can be written in the form, ρ_D = (αH + βH"2) where H is the Hubble parameter. We investigate the generalized ghost dark energy (GGDE) model in the setup of loop quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Galileon Cosmology. We study the cosmological implications of the models. We also obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and differential equations governing the evolution of this dark energy model for LQC and Galileon Cosmology. (paper)

  2. Boundary conditions, energies and gravitational heat in general relativity (a classical analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francaviglia, M; Raiteri, M

    2004-01-01

    The variation of the energy for a gravitational system is directly defined from the Hamiltonian field equations of general relativity. When the variation of the energy is written in a covariant form, it splits into two (covariant) contributions: one of them is the Komar energy, while the other is the so-called covariant ADM correction term. When specific boundary conditions are analysed one sees that the Komar energy is related to the gravitational heat while the ADM correction term plays the role of the Helmholtz free energy. These properties allow one to establish, inside a classical geometric framework, a formal analogy between gravitation and the laws governing the evolution of a thermodynamical system. The analogy applies to stationary spacetimes admitting multiple causal horizons as well as to AdS Taub-bolt solutions

  3. Efficient simulation of voxelized phantom in GATE with embedded SimSET multiple photon history generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Lin, Yi-Hsing; Ni, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jay; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2014-10-01

    GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is a powerful Monte Carlo simulator that combines the advantages of the general-purpose GEANT4 simulation code and the specific software tool implementations dedicated to emission tomography. However, the detailed physical modelling of GEANT4 is highly computationally demanding, especially when tracking particles through voxelized phantoms. To circumvent the relatively slow simulation of voxelized phantoms in GATE, another efficient Monte Carlo code can be used to simulate photon interactions and transport inside a voxelized phantom. The simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET), a dedicated Monte Carlo code for PET/SPECT systems, is well-known for its efficiency in simulation of voxel-based objects. An efficient Monte Carlo workflow integrating GATE and SimSET for simulating pinhole SPECT has been proposed to improve voxelized phantom simulation. Although the workflow achieves a desirable increase in speed, it sacrifices the ability to simulate decaying radioactive sources such as non-pure positron emitters or multiple emission isotopes with complex decay schemes and lacks the modelling of time-dependent processes due to the inherent limitations of the SimSET photon history generator (PHG). Moreover, a large volume of disk storage is needed to store the huge temporal photon history file produced by SimSET that must be transported to GATE. In this work, we developed a multiple photon emission history generator (MPHG) based on SimSET/PHG to support a majority of the medically important positron emitters. We incorporated the new generator codes inside GATE to improve the simulation efficiency of voxelized phantoms in GATE, while eliminating the need for the temporal photon history file. The validation of this new code based on a MicroPET R4 system was conducted for 124I and 18F with mouse-like and rat-like phantoms. Comparison of GATE/MPHG with GATE/GEANT4 indicated there is a slight difference in energy

  4. Development of a global computable general equilibrium model coupled with detailed energy end-use technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed energy end-use technology information is considered within a CGE model. • Aggregated macro results of the detailed model are similar to traditional model. • The detailed model shows unique characteristics in the household sector. - Abstract: A global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model integrating detailed energy end-use technologies is developed in this paper. The paper (1) presents how energy end-use technologies are treated within the model and (2) analyzes the characteristics of the model’s behavior. Energy service demand and end-use technologies are explicitly considered, and the share of technologies is determined by a discrete probabilistic function, namely a Logit function, to meet the energy service demand. Coupling with detailed technology information enables the CGE model to have more realistic representation in the energy consumption. The proposed model in this paper is compared with the aggregated traditional model under the same assumptions in scenarios with and without mitigation roughly consistent with the two degree climate mitigation target. Although the results of aggregated energy supply and greenhouse gas emissions are similar, there are three main differences between the aggregated and the detailed technologies models. First, GDP losses in mitigation scenarios are lower in the detailed technology model (2.8% in 2050) as compared with the aggregated model (3.2%). Second, price elasticity and autonomous energy efficiency improvement are heterogeneous across regions and sectors in the detailed technology model, whereas the traditional aggregated model generally utilizes a single value for each of these variables. Third, the magnitude of emissions reduction and factors (energy intensity and carbon factor reduction) related to climate mitigation also varies among sectors in the detailed technology model. The household sector in the detailed technology model has a relatively higher reduction for both energy

  5. The heterogeneous gas with singular interaction: generalized circular law and heterogeneous renormalized energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molino, Luis Carlos García del; Pakdaman, Khashayar; Touboul, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and analyze d-dimensional Coulomb gases with random charge distribution and general external confining potential. We show that these gases satisfy a large-deviation principle. The analysis of the minima of the rate function (which is the leading term of the energy) reveals that, at equilibrium, the particle distribution is a generalized circular law (i.e. with spherical support but not necessarily uniform distribution). In the classical electrostatic external potential, there are infinitely many minimizers of the rate function. The most likely macroscopic configuration is a disordered distribution in which particles are uniformly distributed (for d = 2, the circular law), and charges are independent of the positions of the particles. General charge-dependent confining potentials unfold this degenerate situation: in contrast, the particle density is not uniform, and particles spontaneously organize according to their charge. In this picture the classical electrostatic potential appears as a transition at which order is lost. Sub-leading terms of the energy are derived: we show that these are related to an operator, generalizing the Coulomb renormalized energy, which incorporates the heterogeneous nature of the charges. This heterogeneous renormalized energy informs us about the microscopic arrangements of the particles, which are non-standard, strongly dependent on the charges, and include progressive and irregular lattices. (paper)

  6. Student Conceptions about Energy Transformations: Progression from General Chemistry to Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Adele J.; Rowland, Susan L.; Lawrie, Gwendolyn A.; Wright, Anthony H.

    2014-01-01

    Students commencing studies in biochemistry must transfer and build on concepts they learned in chemistry and biology classes. It is well established, however, that students have difficulties in transferring critical concepts from general chemistry courses; one key concept is "energy." Most previous work on students' conception of energy…

  7. Non-existence of global solutions to generalized dissipative Klein-Gordon equations with positive energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Olegovich Korpusov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article the initial-boundary-value problem for generalized dissipative high-order equation of Klein-Gordon type is considered. We continue our study of nonlinear hyperbolic equations and systems with arbitrary positive energy. The modified concavity method by Levine is used for proving blow-up of solutions.

  8. Generalized Riemann zeta-function regularization and Casimir energy for a piecewise uniform string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinzhou; Shi Xin; Zhang Jianzu.

    1990-12-01

    The generalized zeta-function techniques will be utilized to investigate the Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We find that zeta-function regularization method can lead straightforwardly to a correct result. (author). 6 refs

  9. The general form of the relaxation of a purely interfacial energy for structured deformations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2017), s. 191-215 ISSN 2326-7186 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : structured deformations * relaxation * subadditive envelope * interfacial energy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics http://msp.org/memocs/2017/5-2/p04.xhtml

  10. A general purpose program system for high energy physics experiment data acquisition and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuren; Xing Yuguo; Jin Bingnian

    1985-01-01

    This paper introduced the functions, structure and system generation of a general purpose program system (Fermilab MULTI) for high energy physics experiment data acquisition and analysis. Works concerning the reconstruction of MULTI system level 0.5 which can be run on the computer PDP-11/23 are also introduced briefly

  11. The Generalized Multipole Technique for the Simulation of Low-Loss Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiewidt, Lars; Karamehmedovic, Mirza

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a Generalized Multipole Technique (GMT) to simulate low-loss Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) spectra of isolated spheriodal nanoparticles. The GMT provides certain properties, such as semi-analytical description of the electromagnetic fields...

  12. The energy and the linear momentum of space-times in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, R.; Yau, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    We extend our previous proof of the positive mass conjecture to allow a more general asymptotic condition proposed by York. Hence we are able to prove that for an isolated physical system, the energy momentum four vector is a future timelike vector unless the system is trivial. Furthermore, we allow singularities of the type of black holes. (orig.)

  13. NMR-CT image and symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Syozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures. One is described as a mathematical expression. Another is 'symbol phantoms' in 3 dimensional picture-elements, each of which symbolize an organ name. The concept and the algorithm of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for a individual in terms of all his transversal section images. We got 85 transversal section images of head and trunk parts, and those of 40 legs parts by using NMR-CT. We have made the individual phantom for computation of organ doses. The transversal section images were not so clear to identify all organs needed to dose estimation that we had to do hand-editing the shapes of organs with viewing a typical section images: we could not yet make symbol phantom in a automatic editing. Symbols were coded to be visual cords as ASCII characters. After we got the symbol phantom of the first stage, we can edit it easily using a word-processor. Symbol phantom could describe more freely the shape of organs than mathematical phantom. Symbol phantom has several advantages to be an individual phantom, but the only difficult point is how to determine its end-point as a reference man when we apply the method to build the reference man. (author)

  14. 3D Printing Openable Imaging Phantom Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Keun; Won, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Seung Wook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design an openable phantom that can replace the internal measurement bar used for contrast comparison in order to increase the efficiency of manufacturing imaging phantom used in the medical industry and to improve convenience using 3D printer. Phantom concept design, 3D printing, and Image reconstruction were defined as the scope of the thesis. Also, we study metal artifact reduction with openable phantom. We have designed a Openable phantom using 3D printing, and have investigated metal artifact reduction after inserting a metallic material inside the phantom. The openable phantom can be adjusted at any time to suit the user's experiment and can be easily replaced and useful.

  15. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - mu emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-mu polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10 sup - sup 3 tracks/neutron to within +- 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm sup 2 thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the high

  16. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-01

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - {mu} emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-{mu} polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10{sup -3} tracks/neutron to within {+-} 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the

  17. A General Mathematical Framework for Calculating Systems-Scale Efficiency of Energy Extraction and Conversion: Energy Return on Investment (EROI and Other Energy Return Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Brandt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The efficiencies of energy extraction and conversion systems are typically expressed using energy return ratios (ERRs such as the net energy ratio (NER or energy return on investment (EROI. A lack of a general mathematical framework prevents inter-comparison of NER/EROI estimates between authors: methods used are not standardized, nor is there a framework for succinctly reporting results in a consistent fashion. In this paper we derive normalized mathematical forms of four ERRs for energy extraction and conversion pathways. A bottom-up (process model formulation is developed for an n-stage energy harvesting and conversion pathway with various system boundaries. Formations with the broadest system boundaries use insights from life cycle analysis to suggest a hybrid process model/economic input output based framework. These models include indirect energy consumption due to external energy inputs and embodied energy in materials. Illustrative example results are given for simple energy extraction and conversion pathways. Lastly, we discuss the limitations of this approach and the intersection of this methodology with “top-down” economic approaches.

  18. Environment taxation and greenhouse gases (general tax on energy polluting activities and emissions trading)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parayre, P.; Bruhnes, P.; Huglo, Ch.

    2000-12-01

    This document brings together 11 expert testimonies about the French general tax on polluting activities (GTPA). Content: 1 - the GTPA today and in 2001: the first year GTPA, the GTPA 2001 in the water sector, the everyday formal procedures linked with GTPA, the contentious aspects of GTPA; 2 - the eco-tax or energy-GTPA: European framework of energy products taxing, enforcement and implementation of the energy-GTPA in France; 3 - the negotiable emission permits: negotiable permits for companies with a strong energy intensity, functioning of emission permits in a global strategy, the position of the European Commission about negotiable permits and the perspectives in this domain at the community level; 4 - towards a reduction of greenhouse gases: the Goeteborg protocol, the consequences of La Haye's COP6, the position of a type-sector, an efficient system for the abatement of greenhouse gases by the producing sector. (J.S.)

  19. Phantom-like behavior of a DGP-inspired Scalar-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Azizi, Tahereh; Setare, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We study the phantom-like behavior of a DGP-inspired braneworld scenario where curvature correction on the brane is taken into account. We include a possible modification of the induced gravity on the brane by incorporating higher order curvature terms of Gauss-Bonnet type. We investigate the cosmological implications of the model and we show that the normal branch of the scenario self-accelerates in this modified scenario without introducing any dark energy component. Also, a phantom-like behavior can be realized in this model without introducing any phantom field that suffers from serious difficulties such as violation of the null energy condition

  20. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (original ICRP reference phantoms, it is believed that the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms properly developed will not only provide the same or similar dose values (say, difference <5 or 10%) for highly penetrating radiations, but also provide correct dose values for the weakly penetrating

  1. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  2. Energy, economy and equity interactions in a CGE [Computable General Equilibrium] model for Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Farzana

    1997-01-01

    In the last three decades, Computable General Equilibrium modelling has emerged as an established field of applied economics. This book presents a CGE model developed for Pakistan with the hope that it will lay down a foundation for application of general equilibrium modelling for policy formation in Pakistan. As the country is being driven swiftly to become an open market economy, it becomes vital to found out the policy measures that can foster the objectives of economic planning, such as social equity, with the minimum loss of the efficiency gains from the open market resource allocations. It is not possible to build a model for practical use that can do justice to all sectors of the economy in modelling of their peculiar features. The CGE model developed in this book focuses on the energy sector. Energy is considered as one of the basic needs and an essential input to economic growth. Hence, energy policy has multiple criteria to meet. In this book, a case study has been carried out to analyse energy pricing policy in Pakistan using this CGE model of energy, economy and equity interactions. Hence, the book also demonstrates how researchers can model the fine details of one sector given the core structure of a CGE model. (UK)

  3. Impact of patient weight on tumor visibility based on human-shaped phantom simulation study in PET imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarudin, M.; Saripan, M. I.; Mashohor, S.; Saad, W. H. M.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-10-01

    Energy window technique has been implemented in all positron emission tomography (PET) imaging protocol, with the aim to remove the unwanted low energy photons. Current practices in our institution however are performed by using default energy threshold level regardless of the weight of the patient. Phantom size, which represents the size of the patient's body, is the factor that determined the level of scatter fraction during PET imaging. Thus, the motivation of this study is to determine the optimum energy threshold level for different sizes of human-shaped phantom, to represent underweight, normal, overweight and obese patients. In this study, the scanner was modeled by using Monte Carlo code, version MCNP5. Five different sizes of elliptical-cylinder shaped of human-sized phantoms with diameter ranged from 15 to 30 cm were modeled. The tumor was modeled by a cylindrical line source filled with 1.02 MeV positron emitters at the center of the phantom. Various energy window widths, in the ranged of 10-50% were implemented to the data. In conclusion, the phantom mass volume did influence the scatter fraction within the volume. Bigger phantom caused more scattering events and thus led to coincidence counts lost. We evaluated the impact of phantom sizes on the sensitivity and visibility of the simulated models. Implementation of wider energy window improved the sensitivity of the system and retained the coincidence photons lost. Visibility of the tumor improved as an appropriate energy window implemented for the different sizes of phantom.

  4. Thermostatistic properties of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas with a general energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shukuan; Su, Guozhen; Chen, Jincan

    2007-01-01

    The thermostatistic problems of a q-deformed ideal Fermi gas in any dimensional space and with a general energy spectrum are studied, based on the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution. The effects of the deformation parameter q on the properties of the system are revealed. It is shown that q-deformation results in some novel characteristics different from those of an ordinary system. Besides, it is found that the effects of the q-deformation on the properties of the Fermi systems are very different for different dimensional spaces and different energy spectrums

  5. Generalized planar fault energies and twinning in Cu-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibey, S.; Liu, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report ab initio density functional theory calculations of generalized planar fault energies of fcc Cu -xAl (x =0, 5.0, and 8.3at.%) alloys. We investigate the effects of substitutional solute Al on the unstable intrinsic γus and twin γut stacking fault energies (SFEs). Our results reveal an increased tendency of Cu-Al to deform preferentially by twinning with increasing Al content, consistent with experiment. We attribute this mechanical behavior to appreciable lowering of the twinning barrier γut, along with the stable intrinsic and twin SFEs.

  6. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex V: PSI general energy technology newsletter 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, C; Leuenberger, J [eds.

    1997-06-01

    Surveying the results of General Energy Research in 1996, three major trends can be identified. First, in areas where research results have reached an advanced stage, decisive steps have been taken to promote a transfer towards industrial realization; examples include biomass gasification, advanced battery concepts, and combustion research. Second, in projects with longer term orientation, several options are being evaluated by exploratory studies, e.g. in solar chemistry and reaction analysis. Third, in line with the strategic planning of our institute, the development and characterization of materials for energy research has received increased attention. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  7. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-01-01

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. D 79, 103517 (2009).] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. D 69, 123517 (2004). We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  8. US Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of program administration by the Office of Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-02

    The objective of the audit was to determine whether Energy Research had established performance expectations, including performance criteria and metrics, and used these expectations to monitor progress for basic and applied research performed at the Department`s national laboratories. Congressional and Departmental initiatives envision improved contract and program performance by requiring program managers to set measurable performance expectations. Even though research outcomes are inherently unpredictable, performance expectations can and should be established for scopes of work, milestones, resource limits and deliverables. However, Energy Research generally did not clearly specify--at either an aggregated program or individual task level--such expectations for research at the Department`s national laboratories. While information was available in the contractor`s research proposals, Energy Research essentially relied on the contractors to initiate and execute the research without agreement on expectations. This practice provided the Department with little basis to measure and evaluate contractor performance. Energy Research agreed in part with the finding and will take action on the recommendations in the report.

  9. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  10. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  11. Generalized Lorenz models and their routes to chaos. II. Energy-conserving horizontal mode truncations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Musielak, Z.E.

    2007-01-01

    All attempts to generalize the three-dimensional Lorenz model by selecting higher-order Fourier modes can be divided into three categories, namely: vertical, horizontal and vertical-horizontal mode truncations. The previous study showed that the first method allowed only construction of a nine-dimensional system when the selected modes were energy-conserving. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that a five-dimensional model is the lowest-order generalized Lorenz model that can be constructed by the second method and that its route to chaos is the same as that observed in the original Lorenz model. It is shown that the onset of chaos in both systems is determined by a number of modes that describe the vertical temperature difference in a convection roll. In addition, a simple rule that allows selecting modes that conserve energy for each method is derived

  12. Energy eigenvalues and squeezing properties of general systems of coupled quantum anharmonic oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, N. N.; Chew, L. Y.

    2007-01-01

    We have generalized the two-step approach to the solution of systems of N coupled quantum anharmonic oscillators. By using the squeezed vacuum state of each individual oscillator, we construct the tensor product state, and obtain the optimal squeezed vacuum product state through energy minimization. We then employ this optimal state and its associated bosonic operators to define a basis set to construct the Heisenberg matrix. The diagonalization of the matrix enables us to obtain the energy eigenvalues of the coupled oscillators. In particular, we have applied our formalism to determine the eigenenergies of systems of two coupled quantum anharmonic oscillators perturbed by a general polynomial potential, as well as three and four coupled systems. Furthermore, by performing a first-order perturbation analysis about the optimal squeezed vacuum product state, we have also examined into the squeezing properties of two coupled oscillator systems

  13. Palatini wormholes and energy conditions from the prism of general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Cecilia [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC. Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Rubiera-Garcia, Diego [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Astrofisica e Ciencias do Espaco, Lisbon (Portugal); Olmo, Gonzalo J. [Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC. Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Wormholes are hypothetical shortcuts in spacetime that in general relativity unavoidably violate all of the pointwise energy conditions. In this paper, we consider several wormhole spacetimes that, as opposed to the standard designer procedure frequently employed in the literature, arise directly from gravitational actions including additional terms resulting from contractions of the Ricci tensor with the metric, and which are formulated assuming independence between metric and connection (Palatini approach). We reinterpret such wormhole solutions under the prism of General Relativity and study the matter sources that thread them. We discuss the size of violation of the energy conditions in different cases and how this is related to the same spacetimes when viewed from the modified gravity side. (orig.)

  14. Palatini wormholes and energy conditions from the prism of general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Cecilia; Lobo, Francisco S N; Olmo, Gonzalo J; Rubiera-Garcia, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Wormholes are hypothetical shortcuts in spacetime that in general relativity unavoidably violate all of the pointwise energy conditions. In this paper, we consider several wormhole spacetimes that, as opposed to the standard designer procedure frequently employed in the literature, arise directly from gravitational actions including additional terms resulting from contractions of the Ricci tensor with the metric, and which are formulated assuming independence between metric and connection (Palatini approach). We reinterpret such wormhole solutions under the prism of General Relativity and study the matter sources that thread them. We discuss the size of violation of the energy conditions in different cases and how this is related to the same spacetimes when viewed from the modified gravity side.

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of water equivalent for two solid water phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhua; Wang Xun; Ren Jiangping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the water equivalent of two solid water phantoms. Methods: The X-ray and electron beam depth-ion curves were measured in water and two solid water phantoms, RW3 and Virtual Water. The water-equivalency correction factors for the two solid water phantoms were compared. We measured and calculated the range sealing factors and the fluence correction factors for the two solid water phantoms in the case of electron beams. Results: The average difference between the measured ionization in solid water phantoms and water was 0.42% and 0.16% on 6 MV X-ray (t=-6.15, P=0.001 and t=-1.65, P=0.419) and 0.21% and 0.31% on 10 MV X-ray (t=1.728, P=0.135 and t=-2.296, P=0.061), with 17.4% and 14.5% on 6 MeV electron beams (t=-1.37, P=0.208 and t=-1.47, P=0.179) and 7.0% and 6.0% on 15 MeV electron beams (t=-0.58, P=0.581 and t=-0.90, P=0.395). The water-equivalency correction factors for the two solid water phantoms varied slightly largely, F=58.54, P=0.000 on 6 MV X-ray, F=0.211, P=0.662 on 10 MV X-ray, F=0.97, P=0.353 on 6 MeV electron beams, F=0.14, P=0.717 on 15 MeV electron beams. However, they were almost equal to 1 near the reference depths. The two solid water phantoms showed a similar tread of C pl increasing (F=26.40, P=0.014) and h pl decreasing (F=7.45, P=0.072) with increasing energy. Conclusion: The solid water phantom should undergo a quality control test before being clinical use. (authors)

  16. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazos, D; Kolitsi, Z; Badea, C; Pallikarakis, N [Medical Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Univercity of Patras (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  17. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos, D.; Kolitsi, Z.; Badea, C.; Pallikarakis, N.

    1998-01-01

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author)

  18. Deformed potential energy of $^{263}Db$ in a generalized liquid drop model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Bao Qiu; Zhao Yao Lin; 10.1088/0256-307X/20/11/009

    2003-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energy for super-heavy nuclei /sup 263/Db, which governs the entrance and alpha decay channels, is determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi- molecular shape is assumed in the GLDM, which includes volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, proximity effects, mass asymmetry, and an accurate nuclear radius. The microscopic single particle energies derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods- Saxon potential with a quasi-molecular shape. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method. The total deformed potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the deformed potential energy of the experiment /sup 22/Ne+/sup 241/Am to /sup 263/Db* to /sup 259/Db+4 n, which was performed on the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for t...

  19. Assessment of specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons using average adult Japanese male phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Kentaro; Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2014-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is revising dose coefficients, which are effective and equivalent doses per unit intake of radionuclides, based on the 2007 Recommendations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of voxel phantoms having standard physiques and organ masses (physical characteristics) of Caucasian are used for calculation of the new dose coefficients. SAFs depend on physical characteristics of a phantom used for assessment of the SAFs. Therefore, the SAFs and the dose coefficients developed by ICRP reflect physical characteristics of Caucasian. On the other hand, physiques of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian, and organ masses are also different from each other. Consequently, it is expected that SAFs and dose coefficients with physical characteristics of adult Japanese are different from those of ICRP. It is important to understand the influence of the differences in physical characteristics between both races on SAFs and dose coefficients when using the SAFs and dose coefficients of ICRP for radiation protection for Japanese. In order to evaluate internal doses considering the physical characteristics of adult Japanese, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency plans to develop a comprehensive data set of SAFs for photons, electrons, alpha particles and neutrons using average adult Japanese male and female phantoms (male: JM-103, female: JF-103). This report presents a data set of photon and electron SAFs for JM-103. JM-103 was incorporated into the general purpose radiation transport code, MCNPX 2.6.0, and the SAFs were calculated by the MCNPX 2.6.0 for 25 energies from 10 keV to 10 MeV and for combinations of 67 source regions and 41 target organs. Influences of differences in physical characteristics between adult Japanese and Caucasian on SAFs was also examined by comparison between the calculated SAFs in this study and the SAFs of the reference adult male phantom of ICRP. The photon and electron

  20. Optimization of phantom backscatter thickness and lateral scatter volume for radiographic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.P.; De Wagter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the optimal backscatter thickness and lateral phantom dimension beyond the irradiated volume for the dosimetric verification with radiographic film when applying large field sizes. Polystyrene and Virtual Water™ phantoms were used to study the influence of the phantom backscatter thickness. EDR2 and XV films were used in 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The results show 11.4% and 6.4% over-response of the XV2 film when compared to the ion chamber for 6 MV 30×30 and 10×10 cm 2 field sizes, respectively, when the phantom backscatter thickness is 5 cm. For the same setup, measurements with EDR2 films indicate 8.5% and 1.7% over-response. The XV2 film response in the polystyrene phantom is about 2.0% higher than in the Virtual Water™ phantom for the 6 MV beam and 20 cm backscatter thickness. Similar results were obtained for EDR2 film. In the lateral scatter study, film response was nearly constant within 5 cm of lateral thickness and it increases when lateral thickness increases due to more multiple scatter of low energy photons. The backscatter thickness of the phantom should be kept below 7 cm for the accuracy of the film dosimetry. The lateral extension of the phantom should not be more than 5 cm from the field boundary in case of large irradiated volumes.

  1. An efficient and accurate method to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for general potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, T; Heller, E J; Parrott, R E

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent quantum mechanics provides an intuitive picture of particle propagation in external fields. Semiclassical methods link the classical trajectories of particles with their quantum mechanical propagation. Many analytical results and a variety of numerical methods have been developed to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The time-dependent methods work for nearly arbitrarily shaped potentials, including sources and sinks via complex-valued potentials. Many quantities are measured at fixed energy, which is seemingly not well suited for a time-dependent formulation. Very few methods exist to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for complicated potentials without resorting to ensemble averages or using certain lead-in arrangements. Here, we demonstrate in detail a time-dependent approach, which can accurately and effectively construct the energy-dependent Green function for very general potentials. The applications of the method are numerous, including chemical, mesoscopic, and atomic physics

  2. A generalized scaling law for the ignition energy of inertial confinement fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The minimum energy needed to ignite an inertial confinement fusion capsule is of considerable interest in the optimization of an inertial fusion driver. Recent computational work investigating this minimum energy has found that it depends on the capsule implosion history, in particular, on the capsule drive pressure. This dependence is examined using a series of LASNEX simulations to find ignited capsules which have different values of the implosion velocity, fuel adiabat and drive pressure. It is found that the main effect of varying the drive pressure is to alter the stagnation of the capsule, changing its stagnation adiabat, which, in turn, affects the energy required for ignition. To account for this effect a generalized scaling law has been devised for the ignition energy, E ign ∝α if 1.88±0.05 υ -5.89±0.12 P -0.77±0.03 . This generalized scaling law agrees with the results of previous work in the appropriate limits. (author)

  3. A phantom for assessing the personal dose equivalent, HP(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, C.; Filho, J.A

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of a phantom designed to evaluate the personal dose equivalent, H P (10), and appropriate for photographic dosimetry are presented. It is called HP(10) phantom due to cavities constructed to insert dosimetric films at a depth of 10 mm. The H P (10) phantom is irradiated with ionizing radiation energy, E, from 45 to 1250 keV, with doses ranging from 0.2 to 50 mSv. It is positioned in the direction α = 0 °, and the radiation field focusing perpendicular to its front surface. So, are established calibration curves of dosimeters in the position conventionally true and quantities H P (10). It made a comparison between the responses obtained with the H P (10) phantom and responses obtained when using the calibration procedure recommended by ISO dosimeters. The ISO recommends getting the air kerma, Ka, for photons at test point of the radiation field by an ionization chamber. And through conversion coefficients, h pK (10; E, α), becomes the air kerma for H P (10). The ISO 4037-3 recommendation has been studied by researchers to ensure that the low energy spectral differences occur in radiation fields which are generated by various X-ray equipment, and induce changes in the percentages of conversion coefficients on the order of 10% to 90% . On the basis of the recommendations ISO, this article develops phantom able to assess the dose to the influence of scattering and absorption of radiation, its implications with respect to dosimetry, providing improvement in the assessment of doses. (author)

  4. Transorbital therapy delivery: phantom testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Martha-Conley; Atuegwu, Nkiruka; Mawn, Louise; Galloway, Robert L.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a combined image-guided and minimally invasive system for the delivery of therapy to the back of the eye. It is composed of a short 4.5 mm diameter endoscope with a magnetic tracker embedded in the tip. In previous work we have defined an optimized fiducial placement for accurate guidance to the back of the eye and are now moving to system testing. The fundamental difficulty in testing performance is establishing a target in a manner which closely mimics the physiological task. We have to have a penetrable material which obscures line of sight, similar to the orbital fat. In addition we need to have some independent measure of knowing when a target has been reached to compare to the ideal performance. Lastly, the target cannot be rigidly attached to the skull phantom since the optic nerve lies buried in the orbital fat. We have developed a skull phantom with white cloth stellate balls supporting a correctly sized globe. Placed in the white balls are red, blue, orange and yellow balls. One of the colored balls has been soaked in barium to make it bright on CT. The user guides the tracked endoscope to the target as defined by the images and tells us its color. We record task accuracy and time to target. We have tested this with 28 residents, fellows and attending physicians. Each physician performs the task twice guided and twice unguided. Results will be presented.

  5. Determination of new European biometric equations for the calibration of in vivo lung counting systems using Livermore phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrat, N.; Prulhiere, G.; Carlan de, L.; Franck, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In vivo lung measurement is a widely used method for nuclear workers monitoring. This technique consists of assessing retained activity in lungs after an inhalation, by means of an external direct measurement of x- or gamma rays emitted during disintegration of incorporated nuclides. This estimation is always done by comparing the measurement of the subject to the measurement obtained using a physical calibration phantom. However, due to emissions by actinides of x and γ-rays with energies below 200 keV and low emission ratio, calibration of in vivo measurement systems is very delicate, leading to important systematic errors despite the improvements realized in the design of sophisticated phantoms. Moreover, in France, calibration factors for a given subject are generally corrected thanks to biometric equations determining chest wall thickness according to weight/height ratio of the measured person. Nevertheless these equations were determined for a 2, 3 or 6 detectors system in chair geometry and for American subjects, that doesn't represent the geometry encountered in French laboratories. The work presented here is dedicated to the determination of new biometric equations more adapted to the French measurement systems using 4 germanium detectors in bed geometry with a Livermore calibration phantom. These equations were determined on the basis of computed tomography (CT) images of 33 adult males and for energies of 17 and 60 keV (respectively full absorption peaks of 239 Pu and 241 Am). These biometric equations which can be directly converted into Livermore chest thicknesses, were calculated for all kinds of Livermore phantoms: 16 mm and 19 mm torso plate (100 % muscle equivalent) and for all composition of overlay plates (100 % muscle; 50 % muscle-50 % adipose; 13 % muscle-87 % adipose). The obtained results could directly be used in the different European radiobioassay laboratories to improve the calibration of in vivo lung counting systems. (author)

  6. Electron beam dosimetry in heterogeneous phantoms using a MAGIC normoxic polymer gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghahraman Asl, R.; Nedaie, H.; Bolouri, B.; Arbabi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays radiosensitive polymer gels are used as a reliable dosimetry tool for verification of 3D dose distributions. Special characteristics of these dosimeters have made them useful for verification of complex dose distributions in clinical situations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of a normoxic polymer gel to determine electron dose distributions in different slab phantoms in presence of small heterogeneities. Materials and Methods: Different cylindrical phantoms consisting gel were used under slab phantoms during each irradiation. MR images of irradiated gel phantoms were obtained to determine their R2 relaxation maps. 1D and 2D lateral dose profiles were acquired at depths of 1 cm for an 8 MeV beam and 1 and 4 cm for the 15 MeV energy, and then compared with the lateral dose profiles measured using a diode detector. In addition, 3D dose distributions around these heterogeneities for the same energies and depths were measured using a gel dosimeter. Results: Dose resolution for MR gel images at the range of 0-10 Gy was less than 1.55 Gy. Mean dose difference and distance to agreement for dose profiles were 2.6% and 2.2 mm, respectively. The results of the MAGIC-type polymer gel for bone heterogeneity at 8 MeV showed a reduction in dose of approximately 50%, and 30% and 10% at depths 1 and 4 cm at 15 MeV. However, for air heterogeneity increases in dose of approximately 50% at depth 1 cm under the heterogeneity at 8 MeV and 20% and 45% respectively at 15 MeV were observed. Discussion and Conclusion: Generally, electron beam distributions are significantly altered in the presence of tissue inhomogeneities such as bone and air cavities, this being related to mass stopping and mass scattering powers of heterogeneous materials. At the same time, hot and cold scatter lobes under heterogeneity regions due to scatter edge effects were also seen. However, these effects (increased dose, reduced dose, hot and cold spots) at deeper depths, are

  7. Quality assessment of brain images by Hoffman phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.R.; Saddad, F.; Mosalla, B.; Moradkhani, S.; Degbankhan, R.; Pouladi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is using Hoffman brain phantom for quality assessment of brian images in SPECT system. There are the following standards for quality control in nuclear medicine: American Association of Physicists in Medicine, National Electrical Manufacturers Association, International Electromechanical Commission, International Atomic Energy Agency. Each of the above standards has the following important orders: Physical inspection, Acceptance and Reference Testing, Periodic Q C tests (Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Quarterly, Annually). The above tests are simple physics measures. To more meaningful ones based on performance of some tasks related to clinical application it is better to use from organs' phantoms, such as: brain, cardiac, etc. In this research we made a comparison between normal and abnormal states of Hoffman brain phantom. Methods of Hoffman brain phantom was filled with a solution of Tc- 99 m (5 mCi) and water (1300 cc). this results: The investigation of small abnormalities strongly related to the operating conditions and deviation from best tuning state of the system

  8. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F-T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where temperature distributions during F-T are relatively homogeneous. In this work, in breast-sized samples we observed substantial temperature differences between the shallow regions and the interior during the F-T procedure. We investigated whether spatial variations were also present in the acoustic and optical properties. The speed of sound, acoustic attenuation, and optical reduced scattering coefficients were measured on specimens sampled at various locations in a large phantom. In general, the properties matched values quoted for breast tissue. But while acoustic properties were relatively homogeneous, the reduced scattering was substantially different at the surface compared with the interior. We correlated these variations with gel microstructure inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the phantom's reduced scattering spatial distribution matches the optical properties of the standard two-layer breast model used in x ray dosimetry. We conclude that large PVA samples prepared using the standard recipe make excellent breast tissue phantoms.

  9. Policy options for sustainable energy use in a general model of the UK economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, T.; Ekins, P.; Johnstone, N.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative general economic model has been developed for options available in greenhouse gas abatement policy concerning energy use. It has been applied in three exercises to explore the effects of energy taxes on the United Kingdom economy. One of these examined the effect of the proposed European Commission carbon/energy tax; the second attempts to set out a policy framework which would enable the UK to reach the IPCC target of 60% reduction in CO 2 emissions by 2040 and explores the economic implications; the third compares the proposal of the UK government to levy VAT on domestic fuel with the EC carbon/energy tax. Additionally, estimates have been made of the secondary benefits of reducing CO 2 emissions. The results present a striking contrast to much of the literature. They include the conclusions that: the EC carbon/energy tax would have negligible macroeconomic effects on the UK economy providing revenues were recycled in such a way as to neutralise inflation; reduction of UK CO 2 emissions by 60% would not necessarily cause great economic disruption; the secondary benefits of reducing CO 2 emissions are of sufficient size to alter radically the benefit cost profile of carbon abatement; equity and efficiency should be regarded as complementary, not competing, objectives in the abatement of CO 2 emissions from the domestic sector. (UK)

  10. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time

  11. Observational constraints on phantom power-law cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeonikhom, Chakkrit; Gumjudpai, Burin; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate phantom cosmology in which the scale factor is a power law, and we use cosmological observations from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and observational Hubble data, in order to impose complete constraints on the model parameters. We find that the power-law exponent is β∼-6.51 -0.25 +0.24 , while the Big Rip is realized at t s ∼104.5 -2.0 +1.9 Gyr, in 1σ confidence level. Providing late-time asymptotic expressions, we find that the dark-energy equation-of-state parameter at the Big Rip remains finite and equal to w DE ∼-1.153, with the dark-energy density and pressure diverging. Finally, we reconstruct the phantom potential.

  12. Material-specific Conversion Factors for Different Solid Phantoms Used in the Dosimetry of Different Brachytherapy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Based on Task Group No. 43 (TG-43U1 recommendations, water phantom is proposed as a reference phantom for the dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. The experimental determination of TG-43 parameters is usually performed in water-equivalent solid phantoms. The purpose of this study was to determine the conversion factors for equalizing solid phantoms to water. Materials and Methods TG-43 parameters of low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources (i.e., Pd-103, I-125 and Cs-137 were obtained in different phantoms, using Monte Carlo simulations. The brachytherapy sources were simulated at the center of different phantoms including water, solid water, poly(methyl methacrylate, polystyrene and polyethylene. Dosimetric parameters such as dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function of each source were compared in different phantoms. Then, conversion factors were obtained to make phantom parameters equivalent to those of water. Results Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water. Conclusion Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water.

  13. Impact of the EISA 2007 Energy Efficiency Standard on General Service Lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantner, Colleen L.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Alstone, Andrea L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ganeshalingam, Mohan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerke, Brian F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hosbach, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-20

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), requires that, effective beginning January 1, 2020, the Secretary of Energy shall prohibit the sale of any general service lamp (GSL) that does not meet a minimum efficacy standard of 45 lumens per watt. This is referred to as the EISA 2007 backstop. The U.S. Department of Energy recently revised the definition of the term GSL to include certain lamps that were either previously excluded or not explicitly mentioned in the EISA 2007 definition. For this subset of GSLs, we assess the impacts of the EISA 2007 backstop on national energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, and consumer expenditures. To estimate these impacts, we projected the energy use, purchase price, and operating cost of representative lamps purchased during a 30-year analysis period, 2020-2049, for cases in which the EISA 2007 backstop does and does not take effect; the impacts of the backstop are then given by the difference between the two cases. In developing the projection model, we also performed the most comprehensive assessment to date of usage patterns and lifetime distributions for the analyzed lamp types in the United States. There is substantial uncertainty in the estimated impacts, which arises from uncertainty in the speed and extent of the market conversion to solid state lighting technology that would occur in the absence of the EISA 2007 backstop. In our central estimate we find that the EISA 2007 backstop results in significant energy savings of 27 quads and consumer net present value of $120 billion (at a seven percent discount rate) for lamps shipped between 2020 and 2049, and carbon dioxide emissions reduction of 540 million metric tons by 2030 for those GSLs not explicitly included in the EISA 2007 definition of a GSL.

  14. Impacts of the EISA 2007 Energy Efficiency Standard on General Service Lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantner, Colleen L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Alstone, Andrea L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ganeshalingam, Mohan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerke, Brian F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hosbach, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-01-20

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), requires that, effective beginning January 1, 2020, the Secretary of Energy shall prohibit the sale of any general service lamp (GSL) that does not meet a minimum efficacy standard of 45 lumens per watt. This is referred to as the EISA 2007 backstop. The U.S. Department of Energy recently revised the definition of the term GSL to include certain lamps that were either previously excluded or not explicitly mentioned in the EISA 2007 definition. For this subset of GSLs, we assess the impacts of the EISA 2007 backstop on national energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, and consumer expenditures. To estimate these impacts, we projected the energy use, purchase price, and operating cost of representative lamps purchased during a 30-year analysis period, 2020-2049, for cases in which the EISA 2007 backstop does and does not take effect; the impacts of the backstop are then given by the difference between the two cases. In developing the projection model, we also performed the most comprehensive assessment to date of usage patterns and lifetime distributions for the analyzed lamp types in the United States. There is substantial uncertainty in the estimated impacts, which arises from uncertainty in the speed and extent of the market conversion to solid state lighting technology that would occur in the absence of the EISA 2007 backstop. In our central estimate we find that the EISA 2007 backstop results in significant energy savings of 27 quads and consumer net present value of $120 billion (at a seven percent discount rate) for lamps shipped between 2020 and 2049, and carbon dioxide emissions reduction of 540 million metric tons by 2030 for those GSLs not explicitly included in the EISA 2007 definition of a GSL.

  15. Three-dimensional printer-generated patient-specific phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Nakaya, Takayoshi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Aoyama, Takahiro; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Komori, Masataka; Kawamura, Mariko; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance is performed using simple rectangular or cylindrical phantoms; thus, the dosimetric errors caused by complex patient-specific anatomy are absent in the evaluation objects. In this study, we construct a system for generating patient-specific three-dimensional (3D)-printed phantoms for radiotherapy dosimetry. An anthropomorphic head phantom containing the bone and hollow of the paranasal sinus is scanned by computed tomography (CT). Based on surface rendering data, a patient-specific phantom is formed using a fused-deposition-modeling-based 3D printer, with a polylactic acid filament as the printing material. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters can be inserted in the 3D-printed phantom. The phantom shape, CT value, and absorbed doses are compared between the actual and 3D-printed phantoms. The shape difference between the actual and printed phantoms is less than 1 mm except in the bottom surface region. The average CT value of the infill region in the 3D-printed phantom is -6 ± 18 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the vertical shell region is 126 ± 18 HU. When the same plans were irradiated, the dose differences were generally less than 2%. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the 3D-printed phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Active motions of Brownian particles in a generalized energy-depot model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Koo Kim, Chul; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock

    2008-01-01

    We present a generalized energy-depot model in which the rate of conversion of the internal energy into motion can be dependent on the position and velocity of a particle. When the conversion rate is a general function of the velocity, the active particle exhibits diverse patterns of motion, including a braking mechanism and a stepping motion. The phase trajectories of the motion are investigated in a systematic way. With a particular form of the conversion rate dependent on the position and velocity, the particle shows a spontaneous oscillation characterizing a negative stiffness. These types of active behaviors are compared with similar phenomena observed in biology, such as the stepping motion of molecular motors and amplification in the hearing mechanism. Hence, our model can provide a generic understanding of the active motion related to the energy conversion and also a new control mechanism for nano-robots. We also investigate the effect of noise, especially on the stepping motion, and observe random walk-like behavior as expected.

  17. Hierarchy in fermion masses and the phantom axion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanopoulos, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    An SU(5) model is presented with hierarchical fermion masses without strong CP violation and with an almost unobservable axion. The key point is to ''tie'' the highly desirable U(1)sub(P-Q) symmetry to the symmetry needed for the fermion mass hierarchy. Since the symmetry is broken at super-high energies (10 15 GeV), the axion becomes super-difficult to detect. This is the Phantom Axion. (author)

  18. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S K; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Frey, Eric; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48–184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as

  19. The Japanese adult, child and infant phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, Mark; Egbert, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical phantom for adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors is a modification of the 57-kg ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) phantom for Western 15-year-old males and adult females. For younger Japanese survivors mathematical phantoms were similarly modified from the 18 and 9 kg ORNL phantoms for Western 5- and 1-year-olds, respectively. To make the phantom correspond more closely with dimensions and organ sizes recommended for Japanese adults by Maruyama and coworkers (cf E184), changes were made in the size of the lungs, the pancreas, the thyroid, and the testes and in the length of the legs. Also, the head-and-neck region was modified to improve the dose estimates for the thyroid from external radiation, after the ideas of Nagarajan et al. The arms were separated from the trunk to represent more accurately the shielding by the phantom in external exposures. Furthermore, provisions were made to provide a phantom in a kneeling posture. The elemental composition of the tissues was changed to that given by Kerr. The resulting phantom is slightly smaller in mass (55 kg). Details of these changes are given

  20. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Gupta, Rajiv, E-mail: songxiang.gu@fda.hhs.gov, E-mail: rgupta1@partners.org, E-mail: iacovos.kyprianou@fda.hhs.gov [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  1. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Gupta, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  2. Enceladus' 101 Geysers: Phantoms? Hardly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C.; Nimmo, F.; DiNino, D.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery by the Cassini mission of present-day geysering activity capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus (eg, Porco, C. C. et al. Science 311, 1393, 2006) and sourced within a subsurface body of liquid water (eg, Postberg, F. et al. Nature 459, 1098, 2009; Porco, C.C. et al. AJ 148, 45, 2014, hereafter PEA], laced with organic compounds (eg, Waite, J.H. et al. Science 311, 1419, 2006), has been a significant one, with far-reaching astrobiological implications. In an extensive Cassini imaging survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT), PEA identified 101 distinct, narrow jets of small icy particles erupting, with varying strengths, from the four major fractures crossing the SPT. A sufficient spread in stereo angles of the 107 images used in that work allowed (in some cases, many) pair-wise triangulations to be computed; precise surface locations were derived for 98 jets. Recently, it has been claimed (Spitale, J.N. et al. Nature 521, 57, 2015) that the majority of the geysers are not true discrete jets, but are "phantoms" that appear in shallow-angle views of a dense continuous curtain of material with acute bends in it. These authors also concluded that the majority of the eruptive material is not in the form of jets but in the form of fissure-style 'curtain' eruptions. We argue below the contrary, that because almost all the moon's geysers were identified by PEA using multiple images with favorable viewing geometries, the vast majority of them, and likely all, are discrete jets. Specifically, out of 98 jets, no fewer than 90 to 95 were identified with viewing geometries that preclude the appearance of phantoms. How the erupting solids (i.e., icy particles) that are seen in Cassini images are partitioned between jets and inter-jet curtains is still an open question.

  3. A survey of images of a phantom produced by radioisotope scanners and cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A working party of the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) concerned with the assessment of performance of radioisotope-imaging equipment designed a test pattern called the Williams Phantom. The criteria and design are discussed. It consists of four 'cold' and four 'hot' areas. One Williams Phantom was sent to each radioisotope-imaging centre in Great Britain: the images produced were sent to the DHSS. The variation in image quality was large. A comprehensive sample of the images of the phantom produced on a variety of radioisotope scanners and γ cameras is presented to illustrate a number of general observations made by the working party. (U.K.)

  4. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  5. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  6. On the generalized eigenvalue method for energies and matrix elements in lattice field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossier, Benoit [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)]|[Paris-XI Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique; Morte, Michele della [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Hippel, Georg von; Sommer, Rainer [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Mendes, Tereza [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)]|[Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). IFSC

    2009-02-15

    We discuss the generalized eigenvalue problem for computing energies and matrix elements in lattice gauge theory, including effective theories such as HQET. It is analyzed how the extracted effective energies and matrix elements converge when the time separations are made large. This suggests a particularly efficient application of the method for which we can prove that corrections vanish asymptotically as exp(-(E{sub N+1}-E{sub n}) t). The gap E{sub N+1}-E{sub n} can be made large by increasing the number N of interpolating fields in the correlation matrix. We also show how excited state matrix elements can be extracted such that contaminations from all other states disappear exponentially in time. As a demonstration we present numerical results for the extraction of ground state and excited B-meson masses and decay constants in static approximation and to order 1/m{sub b} in HQET. (orig.)

  7. Edge corrections to electromagnetic Casimir energies from general-purpose Mathieu-function routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blose, Elizabeth Noelle; Ghimire, Biswash; Graham, Noah; Stratton-Smith, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Scattering theory methods make it possible to calculate the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder opposite a perfectly conducting plane in terms of Mathieu functions. In the limit of zero radius, the elliptic cylinder becomes a finite-width strip, which allows for the study of edge effects. However, existing packages for computing Mathieu functions are insufficient for this calculation because none can compute Mathieu functions of both the first and second kind for complex arguments. To address this shortcoming, we have written a general-purpose Mathieu-function package, based on algorithms developed by Alhargan. We use these routines to find edge corrections to the proximity force approximation for the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting strip opposite a perfectly conducting plane.

  8. CSR Interaction for a 2D Energy-Chirped Bunch on a General Orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Rui

    2009-01-01

    When an electron bunch with initial linear energy chirp traverses a bunch compression chicane, the bunch interacts with itself via coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space charge force. The effective longitudinal CSR force for such kind of 2D bunch on a circular orbit has been analyzed earlier (1). In this paper, we present the analytical results of the effective longitudinal CSR force for a 2D energy-chirped bunch going through a general orbit, which includes the entrance and exit of a circular orbit. In particular, we will show the behavior of the force in the last bend of a chicane when the bunch is under extreme compression. This is the condition when bifurcation of bunch phase space occurs in many CSR measurements. (1) R. Li, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 024401 (2008)

  9. On the generalized eigenvalue method for energies and matrix elements in lattice field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blossier, Benoit; Mendes, Tereza; Sao Paulo Univ.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss the generalized eigenvalue problem for computing energies and matrix elements in lattice gauge theory, including effective theories such as HQET. It is analyzed how the extracted effective energies and matrix elements converge when the time separations are made large. This suggests a particularly efficient application of the method for which we can prove that corrections vanish asymptotically as exp(-(E N+1 -E n ) t). The gap E N+1 -E n can be made large by increasing the number N of interpolating fields in the correlation matrix. We also show how excited state matrix elements can be extracted such that contaminations from all other states disappear exponentially in time. As a demonstration we present numerical results for the extraction of ground state and excited B-meson masses and decay constants in static approximation and to order 1/m b in HQET. (orig.)

  10. Energy from sugarcane bagasse under electricity rationing in Brazil: a computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaramucci, Jose A.; Perin, Clovis; Pulino, Petronio; Bordoni, Orlando F.J.G.; Cunha, Marcelo P. da; Cortez, Luis A.B.

    2006-01-01

    In the midst of the institutional reforms of the Brazilian electric sectors initiated in the 1990s, a serious electricity shortage crisis developed in 2001. As an alternative to blackout, the government instituted an emergency plan aimed at reducing electricity consumption. From June 2001 to February 2002, Brazilians were compelled to curtail electricity use by 20%. Since the late 1990s, but especially after the electricity crisis, energy policy in Brazil has been directed towards increasing thermoelectricity supply and promoting further gains in energy conservation. Two main issues are addressed here. Firstly, we estimate the economic impacts of constraining the supply of electric energy in Brazil. Secondly, we investigate the possible penetration of electricity generated from sugarcane bagasse. A computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is used. The traditional sector of electricity and the remainder of the economy are characterized by a stylized top-down representation as nested CES (constant elasticity of substitution) production functions. The electricity production from sugarcane bagasse is described through a bottom-up activity analysis, with a detailed representation of the required inputs based on engineering studies. The model constructed is used to study the effects of the electricity shortage in the preexisting sector through prices, production and income changes. It is shown that installing capacity to generate electricity surpluses by the sugarcane agroindustrial system could ease the economic impacts of an electric energy shortage crisis on the gross domestic product (GDP)

  11. A multi-harmonic generalized energy balance method for studying autonomous oscillations of nonlinear conservative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Nidish Narayanaa; Krishna, I. R. Praveen; Padmanabhan, C.

    2018-05-01

    The Harmonic Balance Method (HBM) is a frequency-domain based approximation approach used for obtaining the steady state periodic behavior of forced dynamical systems. Intrinsically these systems are non-autonomous and the method offers many computational advantages over time-domain methods when the fundamental period of oscillation is known (generally fixed as the forcing period itself or a corresponding sub-harmonic if such behavior is expected). In the current study, a modified approach, based on He's Energy Balance Method (EBM), is applied to obtain the periodic solutions of conservative systems. It is shown that by this approach, periodic solutions of conservative systems on iso-energy manifolds in the phase space can be obtained very efficiently. The energy level provides the additional constraint on the HBM formulation, which enables the determination of the period of the solutions. The method is applied to the linear harmonic oscillator, a couple of nonlinear oscillators, the elastic pendulum and the Henon-Heiles system. The approach is used to trace the bifurcations of the periodic solutions of the last two, being 2 degree-of-freedom systems demonstrating very rich dynamical behavior. In the process, the advantages offered by the current formulation of the energy balance is brought out. A harmonic perturbation approach is used to evaluate the stability of the solutions for the bifurcation diagram.

  12. Subjective discount rates in the general population and their predictive power for energy saving behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruderer Enzler, Heidi; Diekmann, Andreas; Meyer, Reto

    2014-01-01

    Why do people sometimes refrain from saving energy even if it would pay off in monetary terms? Subjective discount rates present one possible explanation for this lack of foresight, but little is known about their level and reliability in the general population. With regard to behavior, persons with lower discount rates are expected to accept additional costs upfront more readily than those with higher discount rates. Based on a representative nation-wide study, the Swiss Environmental Survey 2007, and a follow-up survey, our analyses reveal that on average subjective discount rates are well above market interest rates and moderately stable over a time interval of four years. Income and education are negatively correlated with discount rates. Contrary to expectations, we did not find convincing support for an impact of discount rates on energy saving behavior. - Highlights: • Results of a large panel study in Switzerland. • Mean subjective discount rates in population are well above market interest rates. • Subjective discount rates are moderately stable over four years. • Theory suggests impact of subjective discount rates on energy saving behavior. • However, subjective discount rates do not contribute to explanation of energy saving behavior

  13. Possible association between phantom vibration syndrome and occupational burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chao-Pen Chen,1 Chi-Cheng Wu,2 Li-Ren Chang,3 Yu-Hsuan Lin4 1Department of Education, National Taiwan University Hospital, 2Department of Family Medicine, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan City, 3Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University, College of Medicine, 4Institute of Brain Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Phantom vibration syndrome (PVS and phantom ringing syndrome (PRS occur in many cell phone users. Previous studies have indicated an association between PVS/PRS and job stress. The aim of this study was to determine if PVS/PRS were also associated with occupational burnout.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 384 employees of a high-tech company in northern Taiwan. They all completed a phantom vibration and ringing questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Chinese version of the Occupational Burnout Inventory.Results: Significantly more women and people with at least a college education were in the population with PRS and PVS, respectively. Anxiety and depression had no associations with PVS/PRS. Higher scores for personal fatigue, job fatigue, and service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PVS, but only a higher score for service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PRS.Conclusion: The independent association between work-related burnout and PVS/PRS suggests that PVS/PRS may be a harbinger of mental stress or a component of the clinical burnout syndrome, and may even be a more convenient and accurate predictor of occupational burnout. Keywords: phantom vibration syndrome, phantom ringing syndrome, occupational burnout

  14. Low-energy coupling of individual and collective degrees of freedom: a general microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, P.; Meyer, M.

    1988-01-01

    A general microscopic approach of low energy coupling of individual and collective degrees of freedom is presented. The ingredients of a Bohr-Mottelson unified model description are determined consistently from the Skyrme SIII effective interaction, through the adiabatic limit of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation. Three specific aspects will be mostly developed: i) the effect of pairing correlations on adiabatic mass parameters and collective dynamics; ii) a consistent coupling of collective and individual degrees of freedom to describe odd nuclei; iii) a study of spectroscopic data in odd-odd nuclei as a test of effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. (author)

  15. The General Evolving Model for Energy Supply-Demand Network with Local-World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Fang, Cuicui

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, two general bipartite network evolving models for energy supply-demand network with local-world are proposed. The node weight distribution, the "shifting coefficient" and the scaling exponent of two different kinds of nodes are presented by the mean-field theory. The numerical results of the node weight distribution and the edge weight distribution are also investigated. The production's shifted power law (SPL) distribution of coal enterprises and the installed capacity's distribution of power plants in the US are obtained from the empirical analysis. Numerical simulations and empirical results are given to verify the theoretical results.

  16. Proceedings of the 3. General Congress on Nuclear Energy. v. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 3. General Congress on Nuclear Energy (CGEN), present about 200 contributed papers. The topics covered by the meeting are: reactor physics and operation; risk analysis, safety analysis, nuclear power plants construction; thermohydraulics; nuclear power plants control and instrumentation; equipment and system design, radioactive management; fuel cycle; design and fabrication of fuel elements, science and technology materials; instrumentation for radiation detection and dosimetry; shielding, radiation protection, licensing, safeguards, social and environmental impacts; radioisotopes production and application; radiochemistry, radioecology; nuclear medicine and radiobiology. In this volume the contributed papers emphasize the topics shielding, radiation protection, licensing, safeguards and social and environmental impacts. (M.I.A.)

  17. Impact of patient weight on tumor visibility based on human-shaped phantom simulation study in PET imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musarudin, M.; Saripan, M.I.; Mashohor, S.; Saad, W.H.M.; Nordin, A.J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy window technique has been implemented in all positron emission tomography (PET) imaging protocol, with the aim to remove the unwanted low energy photons. Current practices in our institution however are performed by using default energy threshold level regardless of the weight of the patient. Phantom size, which represents the size of the patient's body, is the factor that determined the level of scatter fraction during PET imaging. Thus, the motivation of this study is to determine the optimum energy threshold level for different sizes of human-shaped phantom, to represent underweight, normal, overweight and obese patients. In this study, the scanner was modeled by using Monte Carlo code, version MCNP5. Five different sizes of elliptical-cylinder shaped of human-sized phantoms with diameter ranged from 15 to 30 cm were modeled. The tumor was modeled by a cylindrical line source filled with 1.02 MeV positron emitters at the center of the phantom. Various energy window widths, in the ranged of 10–50% were implemented to the data. In conclusion, the phantom mass volume did influence the scatter fraction within the volume. Bigger phantom caused more scattering events and thus led to coincidence counts lost. We evaluated the impact of phantom sizes on the sensitivity and visibility of the simulated models. Implementation of wider energy window improved the sensitivity of the system and retained the coincidence photons lost. Visibility of the tumor improved as an appropriate energy window implemented for the different sizes of phantom. - Highlights: • Optimizing the energy window improved the sensitivity of the PET system. • Improving the visibility of the tumors using the optimized energy window. • Recommendations on the optimized energy windows for different body sizes. • Using simulated phantom using MCNP to determine various body sizes

  18. Generalized Least Energy of Separation for Desalination and Other Chemical Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan H. Mistry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies driven by different combinations of heat, work, and chemical energy. This paper develops a consistent basis for comparing the energy consumption of such technologies using Second Law efficiency. The Second Law efficiency for a chemical separation process is defined in terms of the useful exergy output, which is the minimum least work of separation required to extract a unit of product from a feed stream of a given composition. For a desalination process, this is the minimum least work of separation for producing one kilogram of product water from feed of a given salinity. While definitions in terms of work and heat input have been proposed before, this work generalizes the Second Law efficiency to allow for systems that operate on a combination of energy inputs, including fuel. The generalized equation is then evaluated through a parametric study considering work input, heat inputs at various temperatures, and various chemical fuel inputs. Further, since most modern, large-scale desalination plants operate in cogeneration schemes, a methodology for correctly evaluating Second Law efficiency for the desalination plant based on primary energy inputs is demonstrated. It is shown that, from a strictly energetic point of view and based on currently available technology, cogeneration using electricity to power a reverse osmosis system is energetically superior to thermal systems such as multiple effect distillation and multistage flash distillation, despite the very low grade heat input normally applied in those systems.

  19. Calculation of local skin doses with ICRP adult mesh-type reference computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Haegin; Choi, Chansoo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Lee, Hanjin; Shin, Bangho; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Recently, Task Group 103 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed new mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) for adult males and females in order to address the limitations of the current voxel-type reference phantoms described in ICRP Publication 110 due to their limited voxel resolutions and the nature of the voxel geometry. One of the substantial advantages of the MRCPs over the ICRP-110 reference phantoms is the inclusion of a 50-μm-thick radiosensitive skin basal-cell layer; however, a methodology for calculating the local skin dose (LSD), i.e., the maximum dose to the basal layer averaged over a 1-cm2 area, has yet to be developed. In the present study, a dedicated program for the LSD calculation with the MRCPs was developed based on the mean shift algorithm and the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The developed program was used to calculate local skin dose coefficients (LSDCs) for electrons and alpha particles, which were then compared with the values given in ICRP Publication 116 that were produced with a simple tissue-equivalent cube model. The results of the present study show that the LSDCs of the MRCPs are generally in good agreement with the ICRP-116 values for alpha particles, but for electrons, significant differences are found at energies higher than 0.15 MeV. The LSDCs of the MRCPs are greater than the ICRP-116 values by as much as 2.7 times at 10 MeV, which is due mainly to the different curvature between realistic MRCPs ( i.e., curved) and the simple cube model ( i.e., flat).

  20. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Saito, K.

    2002-01-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated

  1. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ., of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita-Ken (Japan); Saito, K. [JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated.

  2. Inflation is the generic feature of phantom field-not the big-rip

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, Abhik Kumar

    2006-01-01

    A class of solutions for phantom field corresponding to a generalized k-essence lagrangian has been presented, employing a simple method which provides the scope to explore many such. All the solutions having dynamical state parameter are found to touch the magic line w = -1, asymptotically. The solutions with constant equation of state can represent phantom, quitessence or an ordinary scalar field cosmologies depending on the choice of a couple of parameters of the theory. For w approximatel...

  3. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm) 3 voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise (β = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 × 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm) 3 voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent β from 25.6 × 25.6 mm 2 regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for β (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions and patterns. β values for this new phantom are comparable

  4. Positive energy theorem in generalized Kaluza-Klein theories of higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreschi, O.M.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of using spinors in the proof of positive energy theorems in 4 dimensions is extended to the case of Kaluza-Klein theories in spaces of 4 + n dimensions. First a useful presentation of generalized Kaluza-Klein theories is introduced, in which just from the observation of conformal symmetries it is possible to detect a nice splitting of the Ricci tensor into a 4-dimensional Ricci part and a Yang-Mills part, among others. Consideration of linear dependence among the symmetries is not excluded in this treatment. Relevant to the introduction of spinors, a discussion of Clifford Algebras is presented. In particular a real representation of these algebras is introduced for spaces of higher dimensions and its structure is analyzed. The Lie derivative of spinors is presented probably more clearly than in former treatments. After the introduction of these preliminary themes, a brief review of the relevant aspects of positive energy theorems in 4 dimensions is presented, followed by the extension of these ideas to the case of 5 dimensions. Here an earlier result involving gravitational mass and electromagnetic charges is improved. Finally the results are generalized to spaces of 4 + n dimensions, and a more complicated condition to be satisfied by the usual matter tensor is discovered. This procedure leads to a natural definition of invariant Yang-Mills charges, which is compared with former studies

  5. General theory of excitation energy transfer in donor-mediator-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihiro

    2009-04-21

    General theory of the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the case of donor-mediator-acceptor system was constructed by using generalized master equation (GME). In this theory, we consider the direct and indirect transitions in the EET consistently. Hence, our theory includes the quantum mechanical interference between the direct and indirect transitions automatically. Memory functions in the GME were expressed by the overlap integrals among the time-dependent emission spectrum of the donor, the absorption spectrum of the mediator, the time-dependent emission spectrum of the mediator, and the absorption spectrum of the acceptor. In the Markov limit of the memory functions, we obtained the rate of EET which consists of three terms due to the direct transition, the indirect transition, and the interference between them. We found that the interference works effectively in the limit of slow thermalization at the intermediate state. The formula of EET rate in this limit was expressed by the convolution of the EET interaction and optical spectra. The interference effect strongly depends on the width of the absorption spectrum of mediator molecule and the energy gap between the donor and the mediator molecules.

  6. Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zborovsky, I.; Tokarev, M.

    2006-01-01

    New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is a fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying subprocess expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x 1 and x 2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x 1 and x 2 are functions of the momentum fractions y a and y b of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function ψ(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the ψ(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons, and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at the proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC

  7. Construction of boundary-surface-based Chinese female astronaut computational phantom and proton dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjuan; Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Jia Xianghong; Xu Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of China's space industry, the importance of radiation protection is increasingly prominent. To provide relevant dose data, we first developed the Visible Chinese Human adult Female (VCH-F) phantom, and performed further modifications to generate the VCH-F Astronaut (VCH-FA) phantom, incorporating statistical body characteristics data from the first batch of Chinese female astronauts as well as reference organ mass data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP; both within 1% relative error). Based on cryosection images, the original phantom was constructed via Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) boundary surfaces to strengthen the deformability for fitting the body parameters of Chinese female astronauts. The VCH-FA phantom was voxelized at a resolution of 2 x 2 x 4 mm 3 for radioactive particle transport simulations from isotropic protons with energies of 5000 - 10 000 MeV in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. To investigate discrepancies caused by anatomical variations and other factors, the obtained doses were compared with corresponding values from other phantoms and sex-averaged doses. Dose differences were observed among phantom calculation results, especially for effective dose with low-energy protons. Local skin thickness shifts the breast dose curve toward high energy, but has little impact on inner organs. Under a shielding layer, organ dose reduction is greater for skin than for other organs. The calculated skin dose per day closely approximates measurement data obtained in low-Earth orbit (LEO). (author)

  8. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using a series of adult Japanese voxel phantoms against external photon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a complete set of conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses calculated for external photon exposure using five Japanese adult voxel phantoms developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). At the JAEA, high-resolution Japanese voxel phantoms have been developed to clarify the variation of organ doses due to the anatomical characteristics of Japanese, and three male phantoms (JM, JM2 and Otoko) and two female phantoms (JF and Onago) have been constructed up to now. The conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses for the five voxel phantoms have been calculated for six kinds of idealized irradiation geometries from monoenergetic photons ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV using EGS4, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport. The dose conversion coefficients are given as absorbed dose and effective dose per unit air-kerma free-in-air, and are presented in tables and figures. The calculated dose conversion coefficients are compared with those of voxel phantoms based on the Caucasian and the recommended values in ICRP74 in order to discuss (1) variation of organ dose due to the body size and individual anatomy, such as position and shape of organs, and (2) effect of posture on organ doses. The present report provides valuable data to study the influence of the body characteristics of Japanese upon the organ doses and to discuss developing reference Japanese and Asian phantoms. (author)

  9. A general-purpose process modelling framework for marine energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, George G.; Georgopoulou, Chariklia A.; Stefanatos, Iason C.; Zymaris, Alexandros S.; Kakalis, Nikolaos M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Process modelling techniques applied in marine engineering. • Systems engineering approaches to manage the complexity of modern ship machinery. • General purpose modelling framework called COSSMOS. • Mathematical modelling of conservation equations and related chemical – transport phenomena. • Generic library of ship machinery component models. - Abstract: High fuel prices, environmental regulations and current shipping market conditions impose ships to operate in a more efficient and greener way. These drivers lead to the introduction of new technologies, fuels, and operations, increasing the complexity of modern ship energy systems. As a means to manage this complexity, in this paper we present the introduction of systems engineering methodologies in marine engineering via the development of a general-purpose process modelling framework for ships named as DNV COSSMOS. Shifting the focus from components – the standard approach in shipping- to systems, widens the space for optimal design and operation solutions. The associated computer implementation of COSSMOS is a platform that models, simulates and optimises integrated marine energy systems with respect to energy efficiency, emissions, safety/reliability and costs, under both steady-state and dynamic conditions. DNV COSSMOS can be used in assessment and optimisation of design and operation problems in existing vessels, new builds as well as new technologies. The main features and our modelling approach are presented and key capabilities are illustrated via two studies on the thermo-economic design and operation optimisation of a combined cycle system for large bulk carriers, and the transient operation simulation of an electric marine propulsion system

  10. A modified generalized Chaplygin gas as the unified dark matter-dark energy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xue-Mei, E-mail: xmd@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China)

    2011-12-15

    A modified generalized Chaplygin gas (MGCG) is considered as the unified dark matter-dark energy revisited. The character of MGCG is endued with the dual role, which behaves as matter at early times and as a quiescence dark energy at late times. The equation of state for MGCG is p = -{alpha}{rho}/(1 + {alpha}) - {upsilon}(z){rho}{sup -{alpha}/(1 + {alpha})}, where {upsilon}(z) = -[{rho}0{sub c}(1 + z){sup 3}] {sup (1+{alpha})} (1 - {Omega}{sub 0B}){sup {alpha} {l_brace}{alpha}{Omega}0{sub DM} + {Omega}{sub 0DE} [{omega}{sub DE} + {alpha}(1 +{omega}{sub DE})](1 + z){sup 3}{omega}DE(1+{alpha}){r_brace}}. Some cosmological quantities, such as the densities of different components of the universe {Omega}{sub i} (i, respectively, denotes baryons, dark matter, and dark energy) and the deceleration parameter q, are obtained. The present deceleration parameter q{sub 0}, the transition redshift z{sub T}, and the redshift z{sub eq}, which describes the epoch when the densities in dark matter and dark energy are equal, are also calculated. To distinguish MGCG from others, we then apply the Statefinder diagnostic. Later on, the parameters ({alpha} and {omega}{sub DE}) of MGCG are constrained by combination of the sound speed c{sup 2}{sub s} , the age of the universe t{sub 0}, the growth factor m, and the bias parameter b. It yields {alpha} = -3.07{sup +5.66} {sub -4.98} x 10{sup -2} and {omega}{sub DE} = -1.05 {sup +0.06} {sub -0.11}. Through the analysis of the growth of density perturbations for MGCG, it is found that the energy will transfer from dark matter to dark energy which reach equal at z{sub e}{approx} 0.48 and the density fluctuations start deviating from the linear behavior at z {approx} 0.25 caused by the dominance of dark energy. (author)

  11. Dissipation, generalized free energy, and a self-consistent nonequilibrium thermodynamics of chemically driven open subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a system situated in a sustained environment with influx and efflux is usually treated as a subsystem in a larger, closed "universe." A question remains with regard to what the minimally required description for the surrounding of such an open driven system is so that its nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be established solely based on the internal stochastic kinetics. We provide a solution to this problem using insights from studies of molecular motors in a chemical nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) with sustained external drive through a regenerating system or in a quasisteady state (QSS) with an excess amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and inorganic phosphate (Pi). We introduce the key notion of minimal work that is needed, W(min), for the external regenerating system to sustain a NESS (e.g., maintaining constant concentrations of ATP, ADP and Pi for a molecular motor). Using a Markov (master-equation) description of a motor protein, we illustrate that the NESS and QSS have identical kinetics as well as the second law in terms of the same positive entropy production rate. The heat dissipation of a NESS without mechanical output is exactly the W(min). This provides a justification for introducing an ideal external regenerating system and yields a free-energy balance equation between the net free-energy input F(in) and total dissipation F(dis) in an NESS: F(in) consists of chemical input minus mechanical output; F(dis) consists of dissipative heat, i.e. the amount of useful energy becoming heat, which also equals the NESS entropy production. Furthermore, we show that for nonstationary systems, the F(dis) and F(in) correspond to the entropy production rate and housekeeping heat in stochastic thermodynamics and identify a relative entropy H as a generalized free energy. We reach a new formulation of Markovian nonequilibrium thermodynamics based on only the internal kinetic equation without further

  12. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  13. A generalized muon trajectory estimation algorithm with energy loss for application to muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidakis, Stylianos; Liu, Zhengzhi; Hayward, Jason P.; Scaglione, John M.

    2018-03-01

    This work presents a generalized muon trajectory estimation algorithm to estimate the path of a muon in either uniform or nonuniform media. The use of cosmic ray muons in nuclear nonproliferation and safeguard verification applications has recently gained attention due to the non-intrusive and passive nature of the inspection, penetrating capabilities, as well as recent advances in detectors that measure position and direction of the individual muons before and after traversing the imaged object. However, muon image reconstruction techniques are limited in resolution due to low muon flux and the effects of multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS). Current reconstruction algorithms, e.g., point of closest approach (PoCA) or straight-line path (SLP), rely on overly simple assumptions for muon path estimation through the imaged object. For robust muon tomography, efficient and flexible physics-based algorithms are needed to model the MCS process and accurately estimate the most probable trajectory of a muon as it traverses an object. In the present work, the use of a Bayesian framework and a Gaussian approximation of MCS is explored for estimation of the most likely path of a cosmic ray muon traversing uniform or nonuniform media and undergoing MCS. The algorithm's precision is compared to Monte Carlo simulated muon trajectories. It was found that the algorithm is expected to be able to predict muon tracks to less than 1.5 mm root mean square (RMS) for 0.5 GeV muons and 0.25 mm RMS for 3 GeV muons, a 50% improvement compared to SLP and 15% improvement when compared to PoCA. Further, a 30% increase in useful muon flux was observed relative to PoCA. Muon track prediction improved for higher muon energies or smaller penetration depth where energy loss is not significant. The effect of energy loss due to ionization is investigated, and a linear energy loss relation that is easy to use is proposed.

  14. Incorporation of Hydrogen Bond Angle Dependency into the Generalized Solvation Free Energy Density Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songling; Hwang, Sungbo; Lee, Sehan; Acree, William E; No, Kyoung Tai

    2018-04-23

    To describe the physically realistic solvation free energy surface of a molecule in a solvent, a generalized version of the solvation free energy density (G-SFED) calculation method has been developed. In the G-SFED model, the contribution from the hydrogen bond (HB) between a solute and a solvent to the solvation free energy was calculated as the product of the acidity of the donor and the basicity of the acceptor of an HB pair. The acidity and basicity parameters of a solute were derived using the summation of acidities and basicities of the respective acidic and basic functional groups of the solute, and that of the solvent was experimentally determined. Although the contribution of HBs to the solvation free energy could be evenly distributed to grid points on the surface of a molecule, the G-SFED model was still inadequate to describe the angle dependency of the HB of a solute with a polarizable continuum solvent. To overcome this shortcoming of the G-SFED model, the contribution of HBs was formulated using the geometric parameters of the grid points described in the HB coordinate system of the solute. We propose an HB angle dependency incorporated into the G-SFED model, i.e., the G-SFED-HB model, where the angular-dependent acidity and basicity densities are defined and parametrized with experimental data. The G-SFED-HB model was then applied to calculate the solvation free energies of organic molecules in water, various alcohols and ethers, and the log P values of diverse organic molecules, including peptides and a protein. Both the G-SFED model and the G-SFED-HB model reproduced the experimental solvation free energies with similar accuracy, whereas the distributions of the SFED on the molecular surface calculated by the G-SFED and G-SFED-HB models were quite different, especially for molecules having HB donors or acceptors. Since the angle dependency of HBs was included in the G-SFED-HB model, the SFED distribution of the G-SFED-HB model is well described

  15. Determination of equivalent copper thickness of patient equivalent phantoms in terms of attenuation, used in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J.Th.M.; Suliman, I.I.; Zoetelief, J.

    2002-01-01

    aluminium filtration. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) is used to calculate the attenuation in the different geometries with the PMMA or copper or no filters applied. In all these cases the detector is placed at 1.0005 m distance from the focus on the central beam axis, with all filters between the detector and the focus. No anti-scatter grid is used in these calculations. With different thickness of the PMMA phantom and appropriate tube voltage the attenuation is calculated. The copper filter thickness is adjusted to get the same attenuation as obtained with the relevant PMMA phantoms. This match is made for the PMMA-phantom in front of the image intensifier and the copper filter in front of the image intensifier or attached to the X-ray tube diaphragm. In addition a match is made with both the PMMA and copper filter attached to the X-ray tube diaphragm. The image intensifier is simulated by a CsI plate 0.5 mm thickness, placed at 1.001 m from the focus. The front filters are placed 0.15 m from the focus and the back filters are ending 1.00 m from the focus. The results will be presented as the copper equivalent filter thickness for the PMMA phantom thicknesses mentioned above for different tube voltages and both beam geometries. The situation with both the PMMA phantom and copper filter in the back position is used to estimate the patient entrance surface dose rates. The equivalent copper filter calculation is based on the detector behind the attenuators to simulate the performance of an Automatic Exposure Controller (AEC). In addition detectors are placed 0.5 mm in front of the PMMA phantom and the copper filter and corrected by the inverse square law to a focus detector distance of 0.50 m. Comparison between both situations is made to estimate the uncertainty in the ionisation chamber measurement. The equivalent copper filter is based on equal attenuation therefore the beam quality will, in general, be different. In order to characterise these

  16. The impact of increased efficiency in the industrial use of energy: A computable general equilibrium analysis for the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, Grant; Hanley, Nick; McGregor, Peter; Swales, Kim; Turner, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that improving energy efficiency will lower energy use. However, there is an extensive debate in the energy economics/policy literature concerning 'rebound' effects. These occur because an improvement in energy efficiency produces a fall in the effective price of energy services. The response of the economic system to this price fall at least partially offsets the expected beneficial impact of the energy efficiency gain. In this paper we use an economy-energy-environment computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for the UK to measure the impact of a 5% across the board improvement in the efficiency of energy use in all production sectors. We identify rebound effects of the order of 30-50%, but no backfire (no increase in energy use). However, these results are sensitive to the assumed structure of the labour market, key production elasticities, the time period under consideration and the mechanism through which increased government revenues are recycled back to the economy

  17. Using Graphs of Gibbs Energy versus Temperature in General Chemistry Discussions of Phase Changes and Colligative Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Robert M.; Riley, Patrick; Schwinefus, Jeff; Fischer, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of qualitative graphs of Gibbs energy versus temperature is described in the context of chemical demonstrations involving phase changes and colligative properties at the general chemistry level. (Contains 5 figures and 1 note.)

  18. General purpose dynamic Monte Carlo with continuous energy for transient analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjenitzer, B. L.; Hoogenboom, J. E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclide and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    For safety assessments transient analysis is an important tool. It can predict maximum temperatures during regular reactor operation or during an accident scenario. Despite the fact that this kind of analysis is very important, the state of the art still uses rather crude methods, like diffusion theory and point-kinetics. For reference calculations it is preferable to use the Monte Carlo method. In this paper the dynamic Monte Carlo method is implemented in the general purpose Monte Carlo code Tripoli4. Also, the method is extended for use with continuous energy. The first results of Dynamic Tripoli demonstrate that this kind of calculation is indeed accurate and the results are achieved in a reasonable amount of time. With the method implemented in Tripoli it is now possible to do an exact transient calculation in arbitrary geometry. (authors)

  19. Derrida's Generalized Random Energy models; 4, Continuous state branching and coalescents

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, A

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we conclude our analysis of Derrida's Generalized Random Energy Models (GREM) by identifying the thermodynamic limit with a one-parameter family of probability measures related to a continuous state branching process introduced by Neveu. Using a construction introduced by Bertoin and Le Gall in terms of a coherent family of subordinators related to Neveu's branching process, we show how the Gibbs geometry of the limiting Gibbs measure is given in terms of the genealogy of this process via a deterministic time-change. This construction is fully universal in that all different models (characterized by the covariance of the underlying Gaussian process) differ only through that time change, which in turn is expressed in terms of Parisi's overlap distribution. The proof uses strongly the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities that impose the structure of Neveu's process as the only possible asymptotic random mechanism.

  20. Generalized Gibbs distribution and energy localization in the semiclassical FPU problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipolito, Rafael; Danshita, Ippei; Oganesyan, Vadim; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2011-03-01

    We investigate dynamics of the weakly interacting quantum mechanical Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (qFPU) model in the semiclassical limit below the stochasticity threshold. Within this limit we find that initial quantum fluctuations lead to the damping of FPU oscillations and relaxation of the system to a slowly evolving steady state with energy localized within few momentum modes. We find that in large systems this state can be described by the generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE), with the Lagrange multipliers being very weak functions of time. This ensembles gives accurate description of the instantaneous correlation functions, both quadratic and quartic. Based on these results we conjecture that GGE generically appears as a prethermalized state in weakly non-integrable systems.

  1. Synthetic digital radiographs using exposure computer models of Voxels / EGS4 Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenned, Roberto; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Loureiro, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to produce synthetic digital radiographs from synthetic phantoms with the use of a Computational Model of Exposition (MCE). The literature explains a model consisted on a phantom, a Monte Carlo code and an algorithm of a radioactive source. In this work it was used the FAX phantom (Female Adult voXel), besides the EGS4 system code Eletron Shower-range version 4) and an external source, similar to that used in diagnostic radiology. The implementation of MCE creates files with information on external energy deposited in the voxels of fantoma used, here called EnergiaPorVoxel.dat. These files along with the targeted phantom (fax.sgi) worked as data entry for the DIP software (Digital Imaging Processing) to build the synthetic phantoms based on energy and the effective dose. This way you can save each slice that is the stack of pictures of these phantoms synthetics, which have been called synthetic digital radiography. Using this, it is possible to use techniques of emphasis in space to increase the contrast or elineate contours between organs and tissues. The practical use of these images is not only to allow a planning of examinations performed in clinics and hospitals and reducing unnecessary exposure to patients by error of radiographic techniques. (author)

  2. Generalized magnetic susceptibilities in metals: application of the analytic tetrahedron linear energy method to Sc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, J.; Freeman, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed study of the generalized susceptibility chi(vector q) of Sc metal determined from an accurate augmented-plane-wave method calculation of its energy-band structure is presented. The calculations were done by means of a computational scheme for chi(vector q) derived as an extension of the work of Jepsen and Andersen and Lehmann and Taut on the density-of-states problem. The procedure yields simple analytic expressions for the chi(vector q) integral inside a tetrahedral microzone of the Brillouin zone which depends only on the volume of the tetrahedron and the differences of the energies at its corners. Constant-matrix-element results have been obtained for Sc which show very good agreement with the results of Liu, Gupta, and Sinha (but with one less peak) and exhibit a first maximum in chi(vector q) at (0, 0, 0.31) 2π/c [vs (0, 0, 0.35) 2π/c obtained by Liu et al.] which relates very well to dilute rare-earth alloy magnetic ordering at vector q/sub m/ = (0, 0, 0.28) 2π/c and to the kink in the LA-phonon dispersion curve at (0, 0, 0.27) 2π/c. (U.S.)

  3. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach

  4. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  5. ENERGY AND CONSTRUCTION CONDITIONS OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF APPAATUS FOR GENERAL CRYOTHERAPEUTIC IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. U. Baranov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the correspondence of construction and power consumption of Cryotherapeutic Complexes (CTC with technological conditions of effectiveness of the General Cryotherapeutic Impact (GCI. Methods. The associated analysis method used Cryotherapeutic Complexes (CTC construction and power consumption with technological conditions of effectiveness of the General Cryotherapeutic Impact (GCI. Results. An explanation for the discrepancy of observations of different researchers in differences in design and available power of the CTC is proposed. The technical operating characteristics of single-seat and multi-seat CTC are provided and these significant differences in apparatus of identical technological designation are illustrated. The proposed system of specific CTC characteristics is capable of unifying their basic structural and energy characteristics. Calculation of the specific characteristics of existing systems showed that between objects of the same designation, there are differences in value, which may be the cause of discrepancies in their therapeutic efficacy. All functional CPC have a cryostatting cooling capacity system deficit of between 8 and 75%. In multi-seat CPC cooling capacity deficit exceeds 50%, which excludes the possibility of obtaining a significant therapeutic effect, as is confirmed by the results of independent studies that show that the procedures in multi-seat CTC safeguards skin from frigorism only up to 14°C, while at the same time for effective OKV frigorism of the skin surface is necessary to a temperature of less than about 2°C. Prior to research on the effectiveness of OKV, it is necessary to assess the energy consumption conformity of cryotherapy equipment. Conclusion. For the successful implementation of OKV in medicine and sport, it is necessary to increase energy efficiency and optimise cryotherapeutic temperature control settings. A cryotheraputic complex should safeguard such physical

  6. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah D. Lichenstein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Material and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging, a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N=14. Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods. Acronyms: BSM: ball-and-sticks model; d

  7. Computed tomography scan optimization using head phantom and radiochromic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Lorena C.; Santana, P.C.; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: lorena.cfernandes@hotmail.com, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apmourao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro de Imagem Molecular do INCT-Medicina Molecular (CIMol/UFMG) Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The research and development in technology applied to computed tomography has been improve in the image quality, resulting in the best identification of diseases, and therefore an increase in the number of exams, among them the head exams can be highlighted. In order to promote a radioprotection and reduction on the dose of the general public some international agencies have stipulated dose limits to be followed and the implementation of the principles of ALARA in all establishments that use ionizing radiation. One of these principles is the optimization that should be treated with substantial attention, because the reduction of radiation doses can be feasible as long as it does not compromise the tomographic images; such practice is difficult to perform due to the lack of proper guidance. In optimization of the CT exams, not only the lowest dose is evaluated to obtain diagnostic image, but also should be knowledge the dose distribution throughout the scanned area. In this work were used a cylindrical head phantom of PMMA, a GE Discovery CT scan with 64 channels, and radiochromic films. The films were positioned in the phantom in their central region for the dose evaluation using the automatic control for the voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The images were acquired from the scan of the phantom and the film readings were obtained through digital images. The results show an evaluation of the longitudinal kerma profiles, dose delivered, and the image noise was also observed using the central slice images. (author)

  8. Fan edits and the legacy of The Phantom Edit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Wille

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A fan edit can generally be defined as an alternative version of a film or television text created by a fan. It offers a different viewing experience, much as a song remix offers a different listening experience. The contemporary wave of fan edits has emerged during the remix zeitgeist of digital media and at a time when digital video editing technology has become more affordable and popular. The increasing number of alternative versions of films and the works of revisionist Hollywood filmmakers such as George Lucas have contributed to a greater public understanding of cinema as a fluid medium instead of one that exists in a fixed form. The Phantom Edit (2000, a seminal fan edit based on Lucas's Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999, inspired new ranks of fan editors. However, critics have misunderstood fan edits as merely the work of disgruntled fans. In order to provide a critical and historical basis for studies in fan editing as a creative practice, I examine previous interpretations of fan edits in the context of relevant contemporary works, and I use an annotated chronology of The Phantom Edit to trace its influence on subsequent fan editing communities and uncover their relationship with intellectual property disputes.

  9. Computed tomography scan optimization using head phantom and radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Lorena C.; Santana, P.C.; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2017-01-01

    The research and development in technology applied to computed tomography has been improve in the image quality, resulting in the best identification of diseases, and therefore an increase in the number of exams, among them the head exams can be highlighted. In order to promote a radioprotection and reduction on the dose of the general public some international agencies have stipulated dose limits to be followed and the implementation of the principles of ALARA in all establishments that use ionizing radiation. One of these principles is the optimization that should be treated with substantial attention, because the reduction of radiation doses can be feasible as long as it does not compromise the tomographic images; such practice is difficult to perform due to the lack of proper guidance. In optimization of the CT exams, not only the lowest dose is evaluated to obtain diagnostic image, but also should be knowledge the dose distribution throughout the scanned area. In this work were used a cylindrical head phantom of PMMA, a GE Discovery CT scan with 64 channels, and radiochromic films. The films were positioned in the phantom in their central region for the dose evaluation using the automatic control for the voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The images were acquired from the scan of the phantom and the film readings were obtained through digital images. The results show an evaluation of the longitudinal kerma profiles, dose delivered, and the image noise was also observed using the central slice images. (author)

  10. The generalized second law of thermodynamics in generalized gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaofeng; Yang Guohong; Wang Bin; Zhang Pengming

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSL) in generalized theories of gravity. We examine the total entropy evolution with time including the horizon entropy, the non-equilibrium entropy production, and the entropy of all matter, field and energy components. We derive a universal condition to protect the generalized second law and study its validity in different gravity theories. In Einstein gravity (even in the phantom-dominated universe with a Schwarzschild black hole), Lovelock gravity and braneworld gravity, we show that the condition to keep the GSL can always be satisfied. In f(R) gravity and scalar-tensor gravity, the condition to protect the GSL can also hold because the temperature should be positive, gravity is always attractive and the effective Newton constant should be an approximate constant satisfying the experimental bounds

  11. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Salmon Junior, Helio A.; Soares, Alessandro F.N.S.

    2011-01-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  12. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ). Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salmon Junior, Helio A., E-mail: heliosalmon@coinet.com.br [COI - Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas, MD.X Barra Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Soares, Alessandro F.N.S., E-mail: afacure@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  13. On the coherence between high-energy total cross-section data when compared with general principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B.; Paris-6 Univ., 75

    1993-12-01

    An essential model is performed - an independent study of the internal coherence between high-energy total cross-section data by using classes of functions satisfying general principles. The study is practically independent of the ρ-parameter values. This general analysis, made without any fit, reveals certain inconsistencies in the existing set of high-energy data. Some of these inconsistencies are eliminated by giving up arbitrary assumptions sometimes made in 'fitology'. It is shown that the ln 2 s increase of total cross-sections at high energies is clearly favoured when compared with other possible behaviours. (authors). 16 refs., 3 figs

  14. How the removal of energy subsidy affects general price in China: A study based on input–output model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhujun; Tan, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    In China, most energy prices are controlled by the government and are under-priced, which means energy subsidies existing. Reforming energy subsidies have important implications for sustainable development through their effects on energy price, energy use and CO 2 emission. This paper applies a price-gap approach to estimate China's fossil-fuel related subsidies with the consideration of the external cost. Results indicate that the magnitude of subsidies amounted to CNY 1214.24 billion in 2008, equivalent to 4.04% of GDP of that year. Subsidies for oil products are the largest, followed by subsidies for the coal and electricity. Furthermore, an input–output model is used to analyze the impacts of energy subsidies reform on different industries and general price indexes. The findings show that removal of energy subsidies will have significant impact on energy-intensive industry, and consequently push up the general price level, yet with a small variation. Removing oil products subsidies will have the largest impact, followed by electricity, coal and natural gas. However, no matter which energy price increases, PPI is always the most affected, then GDP deflator, with CPI being the least. Corresponding compensation measures should be accordingly designed to offset the negative impact caused by energy subsidies reform. - Highlights: • China's fossil-fuel subsidies were CNY 1214.24 billion in 2008 including external cost. • Removing energy subsidies will have the largest impact on energy-intensity industry. • Removal of oil products subsidies will have the largest impact. • The effect of removing energy subsidies on general price is: PPI>GDP deflator>CPI

  15. Empty calories and phantom fullness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camps, Guido; Mars, Monica; Graaf, de Kees; Smeets, Paul A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stomach fullness is a determinant of satiety. Although both the viscosity and energy content have been shown to delay gastric emptying, their relative importance is not well understood. Objective: We compared the relative effects of and interactions between the viscosity and energy

  16. A generalized electron energy probability function for inductively coupled plasmas under conditions of nonlocal electron kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouris, S.; Kokkoris, G.

    2018-01-01

    A generalized equation for the electron energy probability function (EEPF) of inductively coupled Ar plasmas is proposed under conditions of nonlocal electron kinetics and diffusive cooling. The proposed equation describes the local EEPF in a discharge and the independent variable is the kinetic energy of electrons. The EEPF consists of a bulk and a depleted tail part and incorporates the effect of the plasma potential, Vp, and pressure. Due to diffusive cooling, the break point of the EEPF is eVp. The pressure alters the shape of the bulk and the slope of the tail part. The parameters of the proposed EEPF are extracted by fitting to measure EEPFs (at one point in the reactor) at different pressures. By coupling the proposed EEPF with a hybrid plasma model, measurements in the gaseous electronics conference reference reactor concerning (a) the electron density and temperature and the plasma potential, either spatially resolved or at different pressure (10-50 mTorr) and power, and (b) the ion current density of the electrode, are well reproduced. The effect of the choice of the EEPF on the results is investigated by a comparison to an EEPF coming from the Boltzmann equation (local electron kinetics approach) and to a Maxwellian EEPF. The accuracy of the results and the fact that the proposed EEPF is predefined renders its use a reliable alternative with a low computational cost compared to stochastic electron kinetic models at low pressure conditions, which can be extended to other gases and/or different electron heating mechanisms.

  17. Econometrically calibrated computable general equilibrium models: Applications to the analysis of energy and climate politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schu, Kathryn L.

    Economy-energy-environment models are the mainstay of economic assessments of policies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, yet their empirical basis is often criticized as being weak. This thesis addresses these limitations by constructing econometrically calibrated models in two policy areas. The first is a 35-sector computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the U.S. economy which analyzes the uncertain impacts of CO2 emission abatement. Econometric modeling of sectors' nested constant elasticity of substitution (CES) cost functions based on a 45-year price-quantity dataset yields estimates of capital-labor-energy-material input substitution elasticities and biases of technical change that are incorporated into the CGE model. I use the estimated standard errors and variance-covariance matrices to construct the joint distribution of the parameters of the economy's supply side, which I sample to perform Monte Carlo baseline and counterfactual runs of the model. The resulting probabilistic abatement cost estimates highlight the importance of the uncertainty in baseline emissions growth. The second model is an equilibrium simulation of the market for new vehicles which I use to assess the response of vehicle prices, sales and mileage to CO2 taxes and increased corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards. I specify an econometric model of a representative consumer's vehicle preferences using a nested CES expenditure function which incorporates mileage and other characteristics in addition to prices, and develop a novel calibration algorithm to link this structure to vehicle model supplies by manufacturers engaged in Bertrand competition. CO2 taxes' effects on gasoline prices reduce vehicle sales and manufacturers' profits if vehicles' mileage is fixed, but these losses shrink once mileage can be adjusted. Accelerated CAFE standards induce manufacturers to pay fines for noncompliance rather than incur the higher costs of radical mileage improvements

  18. A dynamic phantom for radionuclide renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a dynamic phantom simulating radionuclide renography. The phantom consisted of five partly lead covered plastic containers simulating kidneys, heart, bladder and background (soft tissues, liver and spleen). Dynamics were performed with multiple movable steel plates between containers and a gamma camera. Control of the plates is performed manually with a stopwatch following exact time schedules. The containers were filled with activities ( 99m Tc) which produce count rates close to clinical situations. Count rates produced by the phantom were compared with ten clinical renography cases: five 99m Tc MAG3 and five 99m Tc DTPA examinations. Two phantom simulations were repeated three times with separate fillings, acquisitions and analyses. Precision errors as a coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated measurements were calculated and theoretical values were compared with the corresponding measured ones. A multicentre comparison was made between 19 nuclear medicine laboratories and three clinical cases were simulated with the phantom. Correlations between count rates produced by the phantom and clinical studies were r=0.964 for 99m Tc MAG3 (p 99m Tc DTPA (p max was 4.0±1.6%. Images and curves of the scanned phantom were close to a real patient in all 19 laboratories but calculated parameters varied: the difference between theoretical and measured values for T max was 6.8±6.2%. The difference between laboratories is most probably due to variations in acquisition protocols and analysis programs: 19 laboratories with 18 different protocols and 8 different programs. The dynamics were found to be repeatable and suitable for calibration purposes for radionuclide renography programs and protocols as well as for multicentre comparisons. (author)

  19. Development of mathematical phantoms for calculating internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals using patients' digital picture of bone scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    1996-01-01

    We made a new mathematical phantom using the patients' digital pictures of bone scintillation in nuclear medicine. The data of 99m Tc bone scintillation pictures include the information on the body sizes and shapes. In the bone scintillation pictures, no three dimensional data are available, so that the shapes and sizes of whole body and bones were modelled based on standard anatomical geometry. The organs except bone were also modelled after construction of the bone mathematical model. The mathematical phantoms were developed for each patient. The specific effective energy for each phantom can be calculated by the Monte Carlo code to compare it among the patients. Our mathematical phantoms would provide new calculation of internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals in place of the MIRD phantom. (author)

  20. Individual virtual phantom reconstruction for organ dosimetry based on standard available phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babapour Mofrad, F.; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, R.; Abbaspour Tehran Fard, A.; Akhlaghpoor, Sh.; Chen, Y. W.; Sato, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear medicine application often it is required to use computational methods for evaluation of organ absorbed dose. Monte Carlo Simulation and phantoms have been used in many works before. The shape, size and volume In organs are varied, and this variation will produce error in dose calculation if no correction is applied. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing individual phantom for dosimetry was performed on five liver CT scan data sets of Japanese normal individuals. The Zubal phantom was used as an original phantom to be adjusted by each individual data set. This registration was done by Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. Hausdorff distance was calculated for each case. Results: Result of Hausdorff distance for five lndividual phantoms showed that before registration ranged from 140.9 to 192.1, and after registration it changed to 52.5 to 76.7. This was caused by Index similarity ranged from %56.4 to %70.3. Conclusion: A new and automatic three-dimensional (3D) phantom construction approach was-suggested for individual internal dosimetry simulation via Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. The results showed that the Individual comparable phantom can be calculated with acceptable accuracy using geometric registration. This method could be used for race-specific statistical phantom modeling with major application in nuclear medicine for absorbed dose calculation.

  1. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  2. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  3. CO2, energy and economy interactions: A multisectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium model for Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoonyoung

    While vast resources have been invested in the development of computational models for cost-benefit analysis for the "whole world" or for the largest economies (e.g. United States, Japan, Germany), the remainder have been thrown together into one model for the "rest of the world." This study presents a multi-sectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Korea. This research evaluates the impacts of controlling COsb2 emissions using a multisectoral CGE model. This CGE economy-energy-environment model analyzes and quantifies the interactions between COsb2, energy and economy. This study examines interactions and influences of key environmental policy components: applied economic instruments, emission targets, and environmental tax revenue recycling methods. The most cost-effective economic instrument is the carbon tax. The economic effects discussed include impacts on main macroeconomic variables (in particular, economic growth), sectoral production, and the energy market. This study considers several aspects of various COsb2 control policies, such as the basic variables in the economy: capital stock and net foreign debt. The results indicate emissions might be stabilized in Korea at the expense of economic growth and with dramatic sectoral allocation effects. Carbon dioxide emissions stabilization could be achieved to the tune of a 600 trillion won loss over a 20 year period (1990-2010). The average annual real GDP would decrease by 2.10% over the simulation period compared to the 5.87% increase in the Business-as-Usual. This model satisfies an immediate need for a policy simulation model for Korea and provides the basic framework for similar economies. It is critical to keep the central economic question at the forefront of any discussion regarding environmental protection. How much will reform cost, and what does the economy stand to gain and lose? Without this model, the policy makers might resort to hesitation or even blind speculation. With

  4. New K-edge-balanced contrast phantom for image quality assurance in projection radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresens, Marc; Schaetzing, Ralph

    2003-06-01

    X-ray-absorber step-wedge phantoms serve in projection radiography to assess a detection system's overall exposure-related signal-to-noise ratio performance and contrast response. Data derived from a phantom image, created by exposing a step-wedge onto the image receptor, are compared with predefined acceptance criteria during periodic image quality assurance (QA). For contrast-related measurements, in particular, the x-ray tube potential requires accurate setting and low ripple, since small deviations from the specified kVp, causing energy spectrum changes, lead to significant image signal variation at high contrast ratios. A K-edge-balanced, rare-earth-metal contrast phantom can generate signals that are significantly more robust to the spectral variability and instability of exposure equipment in the field. The image signals from a hafnium wedge, for example, are up to eight times less sensitive to spectral fluctuations than those of today"s copper phantoms for a 200:1 signal ratio. At 120 kVp (RQA 9), the hafnium phantom still preserves 70% of the subject contrast present at 75 kVp (RQA 5). A copper wedge preserves only 7% of its contrast over the same spectral range. Spectral simulations and measurements on prototype systems, as well as potential uses of this new class of phantoms (e.g., QA, single-shot exposure response characterization) are described.

  5. Construction of an Anthropomorphic Phantom for Use in Evaluating Pediatric Airway Digital Tomosynthesis Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of radiolucent foreign bodies (FBs is a common task charged to pediatric radiologists. The use of a motion compensated technique to decrease breathing motion on images would greatly decrease overall exposure to ionizing radiation and increase access to treatment yielding a great impact on clinical care. This study reports on the methodology and materials used to construct an in-house anthropomorphic phantom for investigating image quality in digital tomosynthesis protocols for volumetric imaging of the pediatric airway. Availability and cost of possible substitute materials were considered and simplifying assumptions were made. Two different modular phantoms were assembled in coronal slab layers using materials designed to approximate a one- and three-year-old thorax at diagnostic photon energies for use with digital tomosynthesis protocols such as those offered on GE’s VolumeRAD application. Exposures were made using both phantoms with inserted food particles inside an oscillating airway. The goal of the phantom is to help evaluate (1 whether the currently used protocol is sufficient to image the airway despite breathing motion and (2 whether it is not, to find the optimal protocol by testing various commercially available protocols using this phantom. The affordable construction of the pediatric sized phantom aimed at optimizing GE’s VolumeRAD protocol for airway foreign body imaging is demonstrated in this study which can be used to test VolumeRAD’s ability to image the airways with and without a low-density foreign body within the airways.

  6. Dosimetric study on head CT scans using adult and newborn phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva de O, G. A.; Prata M, A., E-mail: giovanni_paiva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography is the radiodiagnostic method that most contributes to the dose deposition in population. Therefore, the dose reductions used in these tests are very important, especially for pediatric patients who have a life expectancy greater than the rest of the population. This study purpose to compare the doses generated from newborns compared to adult patients in head computed tomography scans. Two head phantoms in a cylindrical shape made in PMMA were used, one to adult and another to newborn patient dimensions. The pediatric routine scan protocol from a radiological service was used for the computed tomography scans. They were performed in General Electric Computed Tomography scanner, Bright Speed model with 4 channels. The absorbed dose measurements were performed with a pencil chamber placed into both phantoms. The newborn head phantom was developed in order to compare the amount of absorbed dose by the phantoms when it is used the same acquisition protocol. The dose found for newborn phantom was 29.9% higher than the adult phantom. (Author)

  7. Construction of voxel head phantom and application to BNCT dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Choon Ik; Lee, Jai Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    Voxel head phantom for overcoming the limitation of mathematical phantom in depicting anatomical details was constructed and example dose calculation for BNCT was performed. The repeated structure algorithm of the general purpose Monte Carlo code, MCNP4B was applied for voxel Monte Carlo calculation. Simple binary voxel phantom and combinatorial geometry phantom composed of two materials were constructed for validating the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system. The tomographic images of VHP man provided by NLM(National Library of Medicine) were segmented and indexed to construct voxel head phantom. Comparison od doses for broad parallel gamma and neutron beams in AP and PA directions showed decrease of brain dose due to the attenuation of neutron in eye balls in case of voxel head phantom. The spherical tumor volume with diameter, 5cm was defined in the center of brain for BNCT dose calculation in which accurate 3 dimensional dose calculation is essential. As a result of BNCT dose calculation for downward neutron beam of 10keV and 40keV, the tumor dose is about doubled when boron concentration ratio between the tumor to the normal tissue is 30{mu}g/g to 3 {mu}g/g. This study established the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system and suggested the feasibility of precise dose calculation in therapeutic radiology.

  8. Dosimetric study on head CT scans using adult and newborn phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva de O, G. A.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography is the radiodiagnostic method that most contributes to the dose deposition in population. Therefore, the dose reductions used in these tests are very important, especially for pediatric patients who have a life expectancy greater than the rest of the population. This study purpose to compare the doses generated from newborns compared to adult patients in head computed tomography scans. Two head phantoms in a cylindrical shape made in PMMA were used, one to adult and another to newborn patient dimensions. The pediatric routine scan protocol from a radiological service was used for the computed tomography scans. They were performed in General Electric Computed Tomography scanner, Bright Speed model with 4 channels. The absorbed dose measurements were performed with a pencil chamber placed into both phantoms. The newborn head phantom was developed in order to compare the amount of absorbed dose by the phantoms when it is used the same acquisition protocol. The dose found for newborn phantom was 29.9% higher than the adult phantom. (Author)

  9. A resistive mesh phantom for assessing the performance of EIT systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Hervé; Cousineau, Martin; Adler, Andy; Hartinger, Alzbeta E

    2010-09-01

    Assessing the performance of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) systems usually requires a phantom for validation, calibration, or comparison purposes. This paper describes a resistive mesh phantom to assess the performance of EIT systems while taking into account cabling stray effects similar to in vivo conditions. This phantom is built with 340 precision resistors on a printed circuit board representing a 2-D circular homogeneous medium. It also integrates equivalent electrical models of the Ag/AgCl electrode impedances. The parameters of the electrode models were fitted from impedance curves measured with an impedance analyzer. The technique used to build the phantom is general and applicable to phantoms of arbitrary shape and conductivity distribution. We describe three performance indicators that can be measured with our phantom for every measurement of an EIT data frame: SNR, accuracy, and modeling accuracy. These performance indicators were evaluated on our EIT system under different frame rates and applied current intensities. The performance indicators are dependent on frame rate, operating frequency, applied current intensity, measurement strategy, and intermodulation distortion when performing simultaneous measurements at several frequencies. These parameter values should, therefore, always be specified when reporting performance indicators to better appreciate their significance.

  10. A polygon-surface reference Korean male phantom (PSRK-Man) and its direct implementation in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Cho, Kun-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Bae, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physical Therapy, Kyungbuk College, Hyucheon 2-dong, Yeongju-si, Gyeongbuk 750-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-21

    Even though the hybrid phantom embodies both the anatomic reality of voxel phantoms and the deformability of stylized phantoms, it must be voxelized to be used in a Monte Carlo code for dose calculation or some imaging simulation, which incurs the inherent limitations of voxel phantoms. In the present study, a voxel phantom named VKH-Man (Visible Korean Human-Man), was converted to a polygon-surface phantom (PSRK-Man, Polygon-Surface Reference Korean-Man), which was then adjusted to the Reference Korean data. Subsequently, the PSRK-Man polygon phantom was directly, without any voxelization process, implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code for dose calculations. The calculated dose values and computation time were then compared with those of HDRK-Man (High Definition Reference Korean-Man), a corresponding voxel phantom adjusted to the same Reference Korean data from the same VKH-Man voxel phantom. Our results showed that the calculated dose values of the PSRK-Man surface phantom agreed well with those of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom. The calculation speed for the PSRK-Man polygon phantom though was 70-150 times slower than that of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom; that speed, however, could be acceptable in some applications, in that direct use of the surface phantom PSRK-Man in Geant4 does not require a separate voxelization process. Computing speed can be enhanced, in future, either by optimizing the Monte Carlo transport kernel for the polygon surfaces or by using modern computing technologies such as grid computing and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units programming.

  11. A polygon-surface reference Korean male phantom (PSRK-Man) and its direct implementation in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Bolch, Wesley E; Cho, Kun-Woo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2011-01-01

    Even though the hybrid phantom embodies both the anatomic reality of voxel phantoms and the deformability of stylized phantoms, it must be voxelized to be used in a Monte Carlo code for dose calculation or some imaging simulation, which incurs the inherent limitations of voxel phantoms. In the present study, a voxel phantom named VKH-Man (Visible Korean Human-Man), was converted to a polygon-surface phantom (PSRK-Man, Polygon-Surface Reference Korean-Man), which was then adjusted to the Reference Korean data. Subsequently, the PSRK-Man polygon phantom was directly, without any voxelization process, implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code for dose calculations. The calculated dose values and computation time were then compared with those of HDRK-Man (High Definition Reference Korean-Man), a corresponding voxel phantom adjusted to the same Reference Korean data from the same VKH-Man voxel phantom. Our results showed that the calculated dose values of the PSRK-Man surface phantom agreed well with those of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom. The calculation speed for the PSRK-Man polygon phantom though was 70-150 times slower than that of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom; that speed, however, could be acceptable in some applications, in that direct use of the surface phantom PSRK-Man in Geant4 does not require a separate voxelization process. Computing speed can be enhanced, in future, either by optimizing the Monte Carlo transport kernel for the polygon surfaces or by using modern computing technologies such as grid computing and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units programming.

  12. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lee, Y.J.; Tung, C.J.; Cheng, H.W.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R 50% ) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R 50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent R eq,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively. - Highlights: ► Proton dose simulation based on the MCNPX 2.6.0 in homogeneous and CT phantoms. ► CT number (HU) conversion to electron density based on Schneider's approach. ► Good agreement among MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes in a homogeneous water phantom. ► Water equivalent R 50 in CT phantoms are compatible to those of NIST database

  13. The influence of mammographic X-ray spectra on absorbed energy distribution in breast: Monte Carlo simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, H.; Spyrou, G.; Tzanakos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model, based on Monte Carlo simulation, is proposed for deriving absorbed energy and dose distribution in mammography utilizing a mathematical water-like phantom. The model was validated for its accuracy against experimental and published data. The main factor discriminating absorbed energy distribution characteristics among different mammographic techniques was considered the X-ray spectrum. The absorbed energy distribution inside the phantom was investigated via percentage depth dose and isodose curves. The influence of the factors affecting X-ray spectrum (tube voltage, anode material, filter material and thickness) on absorbed energy distribution was examined. The hardness of the beam, due to increase of tube voltage or filtration, was found to be the major factor affecting absorbed energy distribution inside the phantom. In general, Mo and W anode systems demonstrated superior dosimetric characteristics against those of W-Mo or Rh. The model presented can be used for estimating absolute and relative breast dose values and their spatial distributions

  14. Expansion Formulation of General Relativity: the Gauge Functions for Energy-Momentum Tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloushko, Konstantin; Karbanovski, Valeri

    At present the one of the GR (General Relativity) basic problem remains a definition of the gravitation field (GF) energy. We shall analyze this content. As well known, the energy-momentum ``tensor'' (EMT) of GF was introduced by Einstein [1] with purpose of the SRT (Special Relativity Theory) generalization. It supposed also, that EMT of matter satisfy to the condition begin{equation} ⪉bel{GrindEQ__1_1_} T^{ik} _{;i} =0 (a semicolon denotes a covariant differentiation with respect to coordinates). In absence of GF the equation (ref{GrindEQ__1_1_}) reduces to a corresponding SRT expression begin{equation} ⪉bel{GrindEQ__1_2_} T^{ik} _{,i} =0 (a comma denotes a differentiation with respect to coordinates of space-time). Obviously, the ``conservation law'' (ref{GrindEQ__1_2_}) is not broken by transformation begin{equation} ⪉bel{GrindEQ__1_3_} T^{ik} to tilde{T}^{ik} =T^{ik} +h^{ikl} _{,l} , where for h(ikl) takes place a constrain begin{equation} ⪉bel{GrindEQ__1_4_} h^{ikl} =-h^{ilk} Later the given property has been used for a construction ``pseudo-tensor'' tau (ik) of ``pure'' GF [2, S 96] begin{equation} ⪉bel{GrindEQ__1_5_} -gleft(frac{c^{4} }{8pi G} left(R^{ik} -frac{1}{2} g^{ik} Rright)+tau ^{ik} right)=h^{ikl} _{,l} However such definition was a consequence of non-covariant transition from a reference system with condition g(ik) _{,l} =0 to an arbitrary frame. Therefore the Landau-Lifshitz pseudo-tensor has no physical contents and considered problem remains actual. ``The non-covariant character'' of GF energy was the reason for criticism of GR as Einstein's contemporaries [3, 4], as and during the subsequent period (see, for example, [5]). In [6] were analyzed the grounds of given problem, which are connected with a formulation indefiniteness of ``the conservation law'' in curved space-time. In [7] contends, that the gravitational energy in EMT can be separated only ``artificially'' by a choice of the certain coordinate system. In [8] is concluded

  15. Consumer protection issues in energy: a guide for attorneys general. Insulation, solar, automobile device, home devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Harry I.; Hulse, William S.; Jones, Robert R.; Langer, Robert M.; Petrucelli, Paul J.; Schroeder, Robert J.

    1979-11-01

    The guide attempts to bring together two important and current issues: energy and consumer protection. Perhaps the most basic consumer-protection issue in the energy area is assuring adequate supplies at adequate prices. It is anticipated, though, that consumers will want to consider new ways to lower enegy consumption and cost, and will thus be susceptible to fraudulent energy claims. Information is prepared on insulation, solar, energy-saving devices for the home, and energy-saving devices for the automobile.

  16. Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients—UF Series B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    Following the previous development of the head and torso voxel phantoms of paediatric patients for use in medical radiation protection (UF Series A), a set of whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male and 14-year male) has been developed through the attachment of arms and legs from segmented CT images of a healthy Korean adult (UF Series B). Even though partial-body phantoms (head-torso) may be used in a variety of medical dose reconstruction studies where the extremities are out-of-field or receive only very low levels of scatter radiation, whole-body phantoms play important roles in general radiation protection and in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Inclusion of the arms and legs is critical for dosimetry studies of paediatric patients due to the presence of active bone marrow within the extremities of children. While the UF Series A phantoms preserved the body dimensions and organ masses as seen in the original patients who were scanned, comprehensive adjustments were made for the Series B phantoms to better match International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) age-interpolated reference body masses, body heights, sitting heights and internal organ masses. The CT images of arms and legs of a Korean adult were digitally rescaled and attached to each phantom of the UF series. After completion, the resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year and 14-year were set at 0.86 mm × 0.86 mm × 3.0 mm, 0.90 mm × 0.90 mm × 5.0 mm, 1.16 mm × 1.16 mm × 6.0 mm, 0.94 mm × 0.94 mm × 6.00 mm and 1.18 mm × 1.18 mm × 6.72 mm, respectively.

  17. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    phantom axis but were insensitive to tube voltage. H(L) was insensitive to tube voltage and CT scanner model. As phantom diameter increased from 6 to 55 cm, E in /E generally decreased but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. The curve of E in /E versus scan length was almost identical to that of H(L). Similarly, E out /E increased with scan length and asymptotically approached the equilibrium for large scan lengths. E out /D eq was much less than the equilibrium length L eq where H(L) = 0.98, even with scan lengths much larger than L eq . Conclusions: The polyethylene phantom designed by ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 is adequately long for assessing the midpoint dose and its equilibration in CT scanning. The short-to-long phantom dose ratios and the H(L) data provided in this paper allow easy evaluations of the midpoint dose, longitudinal dose distribution, and energy absorption in polyethylene phantoms. The results of dose equilibration and energy absorption presented herein may be insightful for the clinical CT scans with various subject sizes and scan lengths

  18. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    ratios changed with beam aperture and phantom axis but were insensitive to tube voltage. H(L) was insensitive to tube voltage and CT scanner model. As phantom diameter increased from 6 to 55 cm, E{sub in}/E generally decreased but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. The curve of E{sub in}/E versus scan length was almost identical to that of H(L). Similarly, E{sub out}/E increased with scan length and asymptotically approached the equilibrium for large scan lengths. E{sub out}/D{sub eq} was much less than the equilibrium length L{sub eq} where H(L) = 0.98, even with scan lengths much larger than L{sub eq}. Conclusions: The polyethylene phantom designed by ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 is adequately long for assessing the midpoint dose and its equilibration in CT scanning. The short-to-long phantom dose ratios and the H(L) data provided in this paper allow easy evaluations of the midpoint dose, longitudinal dose distribution, and energy absorption in polyethylene phantoms. The results of dose equilibration and energy absorption presented herein may be insightful for the clinical CT scans with various subject sizes and scan lengths.

  19. Statement of the Director General to the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Statement on the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency presented the past, present and future programme of the Agency in terms of the three 'pillars' that constitute its mandate: Nuclear technology (with emphasis on nuclear power and nuclear applications); Nuclear, radiation and waste safety (with emphasis on international conventions prescribing the basic legal norms for the safe use of nuclear energy, internationally accepted safety standards, and measures to assist Member States in the implementation of these conventions and standards, including technological solutions for improving safety); Nuclear verification and the security of material (with emphasis on IAEA safeguards, and physical protection of nuclear material), including possible new verification activities and specific verification issues (Iraq, DPRK, Middle East region). The Director General also touched in his Statement on two supporting elements that undergird these 'pillars': effective interaction with partners and the public, and achieving excellence in management

  20. Use of a Boron Doped Spherical Phantom for the Investigation of Neutron Directional Properties: Comparison Between Experiment and MCNP Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, P.; Kierkegaard, J

    1999-07-01

    A boron doped 19 cm diameter spherical phantom was constructed to give information on the direction of neutrons inside the Ringhals 4 containment. The phantom was made of 40% paraffin and 60% boric acid. 10B contributes 2% of the total phantom weight. The phantom was tested for its angular sensitivity to neutrons. The response was tested with a {sup 252}Cf source and with a Monte Carlo calculation (MCNP) simulating a {sup 252}Cf source. In these investigations the phantom showed a strong directional response. However, there was only a fair correspondence between the experiment and the simulation. The discrepancies are, at least in part, due to the difference in energy and angular response of the dosemeters as compared with the idealised response characteristics in the MCNP calculation. In the MCNP calculation the experimental conditions were not fully simulated. The investigations also showed that the addition of boron to the phantom reduces the leakage of thermalised neutrons from the phantom, and the production of neutron induced photons in the phantom to insignificant levels. (author)

  1. Use of a Boron Doped Spherical Phantom for the Investigation of Neutron Directional Properties: Comparison Between Experiment and MCNP Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, P.; Kierkegaard, J.

    1999-01-01

    A boron doped 19 cm diameter spherical phantom was constructed to give information on the direction of neutrons inside the Ringhals 4 containment. The phantom was made of 40% paraffin and 60% boric acid. 10B contributes 2% of the total phantom weight. The phantom was tested for its angular sensitivity to neutrons. The response was tested with a 252 Cf source and with a Monte Carlo calculation (MCNP) simulating a 252 Cf source. In these investigations the phantom showed a strong directional response. However, there was only a fair correspondence between the experiment and the simulation. The discrepancies are, at least in part, due to the difference in energy and angular response of the dosemeters as compared with the idealised response characteristics in the MCNP calculation. In the MCNP calculation the experimental conditions were not fully simulated. The investigations also showed that the addition of boron to the phantom reduces the leakage of thermalised neutrons from the phantom, and the production of neutron induced photons in the phantom to insignificant levels. (author)

  2. Optical response of the FXG solution to different phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavinato, C.C.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Cruz, J.C.; Campos, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) solution developed at IPEN, prepared with 270 Bloom gelatine (made in Brazil), for clinical electron beams to the reference depth, using different phantom materials. The colour change, optical absorption spectra, intra and inter-batches reproducibility, dose-response, lower detection limit, energy and dose rate dependent response and response uniformity were studied. The excellent results obtained indicate the viability of employing this solution in 2D spectrophotometric dosimetry (could be extended to 3D MRI dosimetry) to be applied in quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning of superficial tumours being treated with clinical electron beams.

  3. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods

  4. Thermodynamical properties of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Yungui; Wang Bin; Wang Anzhong

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the thermodynamical properties of dark energy. Assuming that the dark energy temperature T∼a -n and considering that the volume of the Universe enveloped by the apparent horizon relates to the temperature, we have derived the dark energy entropy. For dark energy with constant equation of state w>-1 and the generalized Chaplygin gas, the derived entropy can be positive and satisfy the entropy bound. The total entropy, including those of dark energy, the thermal radiation, and the apparent horizon, satisfies the generalized second law of thermodynamics. However, for the phantom with constant equation of state, the positivity of entropy, the entropy bound, and the generalized second law cannot be satisfied simultaneously

  5. The presence of a phantom field in a Randall–Sundrum scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Cárdenas, Rubén O.; Astorga-Moreno, J. A.; García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.; López-Domínguez, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    The presence of phantom dark energy in brane world cosmology generates important new effects, causing a premature big rip singularity when we increase the presence of extra dimensions and considerably competing with the other components of our Universe. This article first considers only a field with the characteristic equation ωcases we study the dynamics robustly through dynamical analysis theory, considering in detail parameters such as the deceleration q and the vector field associated to the dynamical system. Results are discussed with the purpose of treating the cosmology with a phantom field as dark energy in a Randall–Sundrum scenario.

  6. Development of the voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients and their application to organ dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik

    A series of realistic voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients were developed and then used for the radiation risk assessment for various exposure scenarios. The high-resolution computed tomographic images of live patients were utilized for the development of the five voxel phantoms of pediatric patients, 9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male. The phantoms were first developed as head and torso phantoms and then extended into whole body phantoms by utilizing computed tomographic images of a healthy adult volunteer. The whole body phantom series was modified to have the same anthropometrics with the most recent reference data reported by the international commission on radiological protection. The phantoms, named as the University of Florida series B, are the first complete set of the pediatric voxel phantoms having reference organ masses and total heights. As part of the dosimetry study, the investigation on skeletal tissue dosimetry methods was performed for better understanding of the radiation dose to the active bone marrow and bone endosteum. All of the currently available methodologies were inter-compared and benchmarked with the paired-image radiation transport model. The dosimetric characteristics of the phantoms were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation of the broad parallel beams of external phantom in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, rotational, and isotropic angles. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for extensive photon energies and compared with the conventional stylized pediatric phantoms of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The multi-slice helical computed tomography exams were simulated using Monte Carlo simulation code for various exams protocols, head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis studies. Results have found realistic estimates of the effective doses for frequently used protocols in pediatric radiology. The results were very

  7. Comparison of the automated evaluation of phantom mama in digital and digitalized images; Comparacao da avaliacao automatizada do phantom mama em imagens digitais e digitalizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: pcs@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Propedeutica Complementar; Gomes, Danielle Soares; Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Mammography is an essential tool for diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer if it is provided as a very good quality service. The process of evaluating the quality of radiographic images in general, and mammography in particular, can be much more accurate, practical and fast with the help of computer analysis tools. This work compare the automated methodology for the evaluation of scanned digital images the phantom mama. By applied the DIP method techniques was possible determine geometrical and radiometric images evaluated. The evaluated parameters include circular details of low contrast, contrast ratio, spatial resolution, tumor masses, optical density and background in Phantom Mama scanned and digitized images. The both results of images were evaluated. Through this comparison was possible to demonstrate that this automated methodology is presented as a promising alternative for the reduction or elimination of subjectivity in both types of images, but the Phantom Mama present insufficient parameters for spatial resolution evaluation. (author)

  8. Bulk viscosity, interaction and the viability of phantom solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyva, Yoelsy; Sepulveda, Mirko [Universidad de Tarapaca, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Arica (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We study the dynamics of a bulk viscosity model in the Eckart approach for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. We have included radiation and dark energy, assumed as perfect fluids, and dark matter treated as an imperfect fluid having bulk viscosity. We also introduce an interaction term between the dark matter and dark energy components. Considering that the bulk viscosity is proportional to the dark matter energy density and imposing a complete cosmological dynamics, we find bounds on the bulk viscosity in order to reproduce a matter-dominated era (MDE). This constraint is independent of the interaction term. Some late time phantom solutions are mathematically possible. However, the constraint imposed by a MDE restricts the interaction parameter, in the phantom solutions, to a region consistent with a null value, eliminating the possibility of late time stable solutions with w < -1. From the different cases that we study, the only possible scenario, with bulk viscosity and interaction term, belongs to the quintessence region. In the latter case, we find bounds on the interaction parameter compatible with latest observational data. (orig.)

  9. Comprehensive optimisation of China’s energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.X.; Liu, Y.Y.; Du, M.; Zhang, J.X.; Pang, Y.X.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy policy is defined as a complication of energy price, tax and subsidy policies. • The maximisation of total social benefit is the optimised objective. • A more rational carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton under the current situation. • The optimal coefficient pricing is more conducive to maximise total social benefit. - Abstract: Under the condition of increasingly serious environmental pollution, rational energy policy plays an important role in the practical significance of energy conservation and emission reduction. This paper defines energy policies as the compilation of energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies. Moreover, it establishes the optimisation model of China’s energy policy based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model, which maximises the total social benefit, in order to explore the comprehensive influences of a carbon tax, the sales pricing mechanism and the renewable energy fund policy. The results show that when the change rates of gross domestic product and consumer price index are ±2%, ±5% and the renewable energy supply structure ratio is 7%, the more reasonable carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton, and the optimal coefficient pricing mechanism is more conducive to the objective of maximising the total social benefit. From the perspective of optimising the overall energy policies, if the upper limit of change rate in consumer price index is 2.2%, the existing renewable energy fund should be improved

  10. Fiscal 1974 research report. General research on hydrogen energy subsystems; 1974 nendo suiso riyo subsystem sogoteki kento hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-03-01

    Based on the contract research 'General research on hydrogen energy subsystems and their peripheral technologies' with Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, each of 7 organizations including Denki Kagaku Kyokai (Electrochemical Association) promoted the research on hydrogen energy subsystem, combustion, fuel cell, car engine, aircraft engine, gas turbine and chemical energy, respectively. This report summarizes the research result on the former of 2 committees on hydrogen energy and peripheral technologies promoted by Denki Kagaku Kyokai. The first part describes the merit, demerit, domestic and overseas R and D states, technical problems, and future research issue for every use form of hydrogen. This part also outlines the short-, medium- and long-term prospects for use of hydrogen and oxygen energy, and describes the whole future research issue. The second part summarizes the content of each committee report. Although on details the original reports of each committee should be lead, this report is useful for obtaining the outline of utilization of hydrogen energy. (NEDO)

  11. Temperature effects on the generalized planar fault energies and twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lili

    2014-06-01

    Based on the quasiharmonic approach from first-principles phonon calculations, the volume versus temperature relations for Al, Ni and Cu are obtained. Using the equilibrium volumes at temperature T, the temperature dependences of generalized planar fault energies have also been calculated by first-principles calculations. It is found that the generalized planar fault energies reduce slightly with increasing temperature. Based on the calculated generalized planar fault energies, the twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu are discussed with the three typical criteria for crack tip twinning, grain boundary twinning and inherent twinning at different temperatures. The twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu also decrease slightly with increasing temperature. Ni and Cu have the inherent twinnabilities. But, Al does not exhibit inherent twinnability. These results are in agreement with the previous theoretical studies at 0 K and experimental observations at ambient temperature. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature effects on the generalized planar fault energies and twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lili; Wang, Rui; Wu, Xiaozhi; Gan, Liyong; Wei, Qunyi

    2014-01-01

    Based on the quasiharmonic approach from first-principles phonon calculations, the volume versus temperature relations for Al, Ni and Cu are obtained. Using the equilibrium volumes at temperature T, the temperature dependences of generalized planar fault energies have also been calculated by first-principles calculations. It is found that the generalized planar fault energies reduce slightly with increasing temperature. Based on the calculated generalized planar fault energies, the twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu are discussed with the three typical criteria for crack tip twinning, grain boundary twinning and inherent twinning at different temperatures. The twinnabilities of Al, Ni and Cu also decrease slightly with increasing temperature. Ni and Cu have the inherent twinnabilities. But, Al does not exhibit inherent twinnability. These results are in agreement with the previous theoretical studies at 0 K and experimental observations at ambient temperature. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarte, Martin G. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria 1428, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era. (orig.)

  14. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  15. Influence of the PMMA and the ISO slab phantom for calibrating personal dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginjaume, M.; Ortega, X.; Barbosa, A.

    2000-01-01

    Wide agreement has been achieved among the main Bodies and Organisations involved in standardisation of radiation protection, related to the operational quantities for personal dosimetry. Since their definition in 1985, several reports have been published to clarify and define the experimental set up to be used for the calibration of dosemeters in terms of the above-mentioned quantities. Among these lines, ICRU 47 has listed five different phantoms that are used for calibration and whose results were accurate, within accepted uncertainties. However, to achieve uniformity in calibration procedures, the 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm PMMA slab phantom was recommended. The secondary calibration Laboratory from the Institut de Techniques Energetiques at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) agreed with the Spanish Nacional Laboratory to adopt the recommended PMMA phantom but to improve the accuracy of the calibration procedure, by introducing a correction factor for backscatter differences in a PMMA and an ICRU slab phantom. Such corrections were of the order of 8% for the low-energy X-ray qualities. Recently, ISO in ISO 4037-3, has proposed the ISO water slab phantom which consists of a 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm water phantom with PMMA walls (front wall 2.5 mm thick). This new phantom could be substituted by the above mentioned PMMA phantom for radiation qualities with mean energy equal or above that of 137 Cs. The aim of this work is to compare the influence of both phantoms when calibrating personal dosemeters with photons. A set of four TL personal dosemeters that are used in the UPC personal dosimetry Service and an electronic personal dosemeter (SIEMENS EPD-2) were calibrated in terms of H p (10) and H p (0.07) using the two proposed phantoms. Calibration factors for ISO X-ray narrow spectra, 137 Cs and 60 Co were experimentally obtained for each phantom and compared. In the TL measurements, differences were found to be within TL statistical uncertainty, provided that a

  16. Brane world black holes in teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity and their Killing vectors, energy, momentum and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashed, Gamal G. L.

    2010-01-01

    The energy–momentum tensor, which is coordinate-independent, is used to calculate energy, momentum and angular momentum of two different tetrad fields. Although, the two tetrad fields reproduce the same space-time their energies are different. Therefore, a regularized expression of the gravitational energy–momentum tensor of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR), is used to make the energies of the two tetrad fields equal. The definition of the gravitational energy–momentum is used to investigate the energy within the external event horizon. The components of angular momentum associated with these space–times are calculated. In spite of using a static space–time, we get a non-zero component of angular momentum! Therefore, we derive the Killing vectors associated with these space–times using the definition of the Lie derivative of a second rank tensor in the framework of the TEGR to make the picture more clear. (general)

  17. NOTE: An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarot, C. B.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Haycocks, T.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D—spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy—from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery.

  18. An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarot, C B; Siewerdsen, J H; Haycocks, T; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2005-01-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D-spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy-from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery. (note)

  19. Collective processes in a tokamak with high-energy particles: general problems of the linear theory of Alfven instabilities of a tokamak with high-energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Some general problems of the theory of Alfven instabilities of a tokamak with high-energy ions are considered. It is assumed that such ions are due to either ionization of fast neutral atoms, injected into the tokamak, or production of them under thermo-nuclear conditions. Small-oscillation equations are derived for the Alfven-type waves, which allow for both destabilizing effects, associated with the high-energy particles, and stabilizing ones, such as effects of shear and bulk-plasm dissipation. A high-energy ion contribution is calculated into the growth rate of the Alfven waves. The author considers the role of trapped-electron collisional dissipation

  20. Phantom-like behaviour in dilatonic brane-world scenario with induced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam

    2008-01-01

    The Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) model has a self-accelerating solution, the positive branch, where the brane is asymptotically de Sitter. A de Sitter space-time can be seen as a boundary between quintessence-like behaviour and phantom-like behaviour. We show that in a 5D dilatonic bulk, where the dilaton has an exponential potential, with an induced gravity term on the brane, whose matter content corresponds only to vacuum energy, the positive branch solution undergoes a phantom-like stage where it faces a curvature singularity in its infinite future. The singularity can be interpreted as the 'big rip' singularity pushed towards an infinite future cosmic time. The phantom-like behaviour on the brane occurs without violating the null energy condition. There is another solution, the negative branch, where the brane can undergo an early-epoch (transient) inflationary phase induced by the dilaton field

  1. Nuclear energy: work to be done. A report of the General Council to the 1986 TUC Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The paper on nuclear energy is a Report of the General Council to the United Kingdom 1986 TUC Congress. The contents contains four sections on:- 1) control of risks to health, safety and the environment: the TUC role, 2) radioactive waste, 3) Chernobyl reactor accident, and 4) TUC energy policy. The annex contains a report of a fact finding visit to Sellafield reprocessing plant by members of the TUC Radioactive Waste Group.

  2. Trace anomaly of the stress-energy tensor for massless vector particles propagating in a general background metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.; Lieberman, J.

    1978-01-01

    We reanalyze the problem of regularization of the stress-energy tensor for massless vector particles propating in a general background metric, using covariant point separation techniques applied to the Hadamard elementary solution. We correct an error, point out by Wald, in the earlier formulation of Adler, Lieberman, and Ng, and find a stress-energy tensor trace anomaly agreeing with that found by other regularization methods

  3. Annual Bulletin of General Energy Statistics for Europe. V. 23, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Bulletin is to provide basic data on the energy situation as a whole in European countries, Canada and the United States of America. This publication is purely statistical in character. As from the 1980 edition of the bulletin the scope of statistics comprises production of energy by form, overall energy balance sheets and deliveries of petroleum products for inland consumption. While less details are given for solid and gaseous fuels as sources of energy than in previous editions of the bulletin, more information is available for liquid fuels and nuclear, hydro- and geothermal energy

  4. Development of renewable energies in the building industry and in the industry in general

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This third issue of the international DERBI conference has permitted to decipher the international actuality of renewable energies, to position the French national projects in this thriving context, and to discover the recent technological innovations. Californian companies were invited to this conference for a comparison of the policies in favor of renewable energy sources on both sides of the Atlantic ocean. This document gathers the transparencies presented at this conference and dealing with technologies, products, projects and realization in the following domains: solar cooling, biomass power plants, photovoltaic power plants and advances in photovoltaic engineering, solar thermal energy, thermodynamic solar power plants, architecture, renewable energies and the Eco-Building European project, biofuels, wood fuels, wind power and small wind power, geothermal energy. Presentations deal also with the financing of renewable energy projects, the competencies, employment and training, the numerical dimension, and the automation in the renewable energies domain. (J.S.)

  5. Report of international symposium on the 22nd Japan annual nuclear energy meeting, PNC general meeting and business report about nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-15

    This conference report consists of three parts, which report the 22nd annual nuclear energy meeting in Japan, including the list of Korean delegates, program and the contents of five session, the conference report for PNC general meeting and the report on international symposium for fruition of nuclear power business. It introduces the main conception and the contents of the symposium.

  6. Evaluation of the water equivalence of solid phantoms using gamma ray transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.F.; Brown, S.; Baldock, C.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray transmission measurements have been used to evaluate the water equivalence of solid phantoms. Technetium-99m was used in narrow beam geometry and the transmission of photons measured, using a gamma camera, through varying thickness of the solid phantom material and water. Measured transmission values were compared with Monte Carlo calculated transmission data using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to score fluence in a geometry similar to that of the measurements. The results indicate that the RMI457 Solid Water, CMNC Plastic Water and PTW RW3 solid phantoms had similar transmission values as compared to water to within ±1.5%. However, Perspex had a greater deviation in the transmission values up to ±4%. The agreement between the measured and EGSnrc calculated transmission values agreed to within ±1% over the range of phantom thickness studied. The linear attenuation coefficients at the gamma ray energy of 140.5 keV were determined from the measured and EGSnrc calculated transmission data and compared with predicted values derived from data provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using the XCOM program. The coefficients derived from the measured data were up to 6% lower than those predicted by the XCOM program, while the coefficients determined from the Monte Carlo calculations were between measured and XCOM values. The results indicate that a similar process can be followed to determine the water equivalency of other solid phantoms and at other photon energies

  7. Recycling of carbon/energy taxes and the labor market. A general equilibrium analysis for the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, H.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of a cost shift from labor to energy by means of a carbon/energy tax is provided. In the analysis a general equilibrium model for the European Community is utilized, focusing on the modelling of labor supply. The importance of the feedback from an induced increase in labor demand to wage formation is highlighted. (It is shown that the goals of C) 2 reduction and improved employment are complementary, provided that the reduction in labor costs, financed by the carbon/energy tax, is not offset by increased wage claims. Under this condition reduced CO 2 is consistent with an increase in GDP. 1 fig., 3 tabs., 17 refs

  8. Radical covalent organic frameworks: a general strategy to immobilize open-accessible polyradicals for high-performance capacitive energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Wu, Dingcai; Wu, Yang; Liu, Hao; Gu, Cheng; Fu, Ruowen; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-01

    Ordered π-columns and open nanochannels found in covalent organic frameworks (COFs) could render them able to store electric energy. However, the synthetic difficulty in achieving redox-active skeletons has thus far restricted their potential for energy storage. A general strategy is presented for converting a conventional COF into an outstanding platform for energy storage through post-synthetic functionalization with organic radicals. The radical frameworks with openly accessible polyradicals immobilized on the pore walls undergo rapid and reversible redox reactions, leading to capacitive energy storage with high capacitance, high-rate kinetics, and robust cycle stability. The results suggest that channel-wall functional engineering with redox-active species will be a facile and versatile strategy to explore COFs for energy storage. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Exploring Reaction Mechanism on Generalized Force Modified Potential Energy Surfaces (G-FMPES) for Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sanjiv; Brown, Katie; Subramanian, Gopinath

    We apply a recent formulation for searching minimum energy reaction path (MERP) and saddle point to atomic systems subjected to an external force. We demonstrate the effect of a loading modality resembling hydrostatic pressure on the trans to cis conformational change of 1,3-butadiene, and the simplest Diels-Alder reaction between ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The calculated MERP and saddle points on the generalized force modified potential energy surface (G-FMPES) are compared with the corresponding quantities on an unmodified potential energy surface. Our study is performed using electronic structure calculations at the HF/6-31G** level as implemented in the AIMS-MOLPRO code. Our calculations suggest that the added compressive pressure lowers the energy of cis butadiene. The activation energy barrier for the concerted Diels-Alder reaction is found to decrease progressively with increasing compressive pressure.

  10. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  11. Ultrasonographic Quantification of Fat Content in Fatty Liver Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Joo, Gyung Soo; Kim, Ho Jung; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Byoung Ho

    1995-01-01

    Assuming that the fat content of certain tissue might be quantified by measurirrg the ultrasound echo level, we analyzed the ultrasound histograms obtained from the fatty liver phantoms that contained various amount of fat. Various amount of margarine(Mazola. Cliff wood. USA) was mixed with 2% of agarin solution state to produce fatty liver phantoms that contained 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of fat. We obtained ultrasound histogram from each fatty liver phantom in gel state. We used 2% agar gel as a control. The ultrasound histograms from the control phantom showed gradual increase in echo level as the depth from the surface increased. The echo level from the phantom that contained 5% of fat showed gradual increase and subsequent decrease with the peak echo level at the depth of 3cm. The echo levels from the phantoms that contained more in 5% of fat gradually decreased as the depth from the surface increased; the change becoming more pronounced as the fat content of the phantom increased. The echo levels measured at the depth of 1cm were 9.3(control), 29.6(5%phantom), 3l.3 (10% phantom), 26.3 (20% phantom), l8.8 (30% phantom), and l6dB (40% phantom). Fat content of fatty phantoms can not be quantified by measuring only echo level. Simultaneous measurement of attenuation of ultrasound, which is not easy to do and not done in this study, is prerequisite to quantify fat content

  12. The Optimal Price Ratio of Typical Energy Sources in Beijing Based on the Computable General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiu He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In Beijing, China, the rational consumption of energy is affected by the insufficient linkage mechanism of the energy pricing system, the unreasonable price ratio and other issues. This paper combines the characteristics of Beijing’s energy market, putting forward the society-economy equilibrium indicator R maximization taking into consideration the mitigation cost to determine a reasonable price ratio range. Based on the computable general equilibrium (CGE model, and dividing four kinds of energy sources into three groups, the impact of price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas on the Gross Domestic Product (GDP, Consumer Price Index (CPI, energy consumption and CO2 and SO2 emissions can be simulated for various scenarios. On this basis, the integrated effects of electricity and natural gas price shocks on the Beijing economy and environment can be calculated. The results show that relative to the coal prices, the electricity and natural gas prices in Beijing are currently below reasonable levels; the solution to these unreasonable energy price ratios should begin by improving the energy pricing mechanism, through means such as the establishment of a sound dynamic adjustment mechanism between regulated prices and market prices. This provides a new idea for exploring the rationality of energy price ratios in imperfect competitive energy markets.

  13. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Pina, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  14. Homemade ultrasound phantom for simulation of hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karine Brandao Novaes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we describe the development of a simple and inexpensive simulation phantom as a surrogate of human hydronephrosis for the identification of urinary tract obstruction at bedside to be used in undergraduate training of medical students.

  15. The "Phantom Costs" of Florida's Citrus Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Muraro, Ronald P.; Roka, Fritz M.; Spreen, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory compliance, the "phantom costs of production," is an increasingly "fact-of-life" for U.S. agriculture. A survey was developed and implemented to enumerate regulatory compliance costs for Florida's 748,500 acres citrus industry. Complying with 61 production related regulations, 643,757 hours were expended at a total annual cost of over $24.3 million.

  16. IMRT delivery verification using a spiral phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan L.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Orton, Nigel P.; McNutt, Todd R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on the testing and verification of a system for IMRT delivery quality assurance that uses a cylindrical solid water phantom with a spiral trajectory for radiographic film placement. This spiral film technique provides more complete dosimetric verification of the entire IMRT treatment than perpendicular film methods, since it samples a three-dimensional dose subspace rather than using measurements at only one or two depths. As an example, the complete analysis of the predicted and measured spiral films is described for an intracranial IMRT treatment case. The results of this analysis are compared to those of a single field perpendicular film technique that is typically used for IMRT QA. The comparison demonstrates that both methods result in a dosimetric error within a clinical tolerance of 5%, however the spiral phantom QA technique provides a more complete dosimetric verification while being less time consuming. To independently verify the dosimetry obtained with the spiral film, the same IMRT treatment was delivered to a similar phantom in which LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were arranged along the spiral trajectory. The maximum difference between the predicted and measured TLD data for the 1.8 Gy fraction was 0.06 Gy for a TLD located in a high dose gradient region. This further validates the ability of the spiral phantom QA process to accurately verify delivery of an IMRT plan

  17. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gærtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...... the prevalence of PBS following mastectomy and associated risk factors....

  18. Biomass energy projects in Central and Eastern Europe. General information, favorable concepts and financing possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellenbroek, R.; Ballard-Tremeer, G.; Koeks, R.; Venendaal, R.

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information on the possibilities to invest and carry out biomass energy projects in Central and Eastern Europe. In the first part of the guide background information is given on countries in Central and Eastern Europe, focusing on bio-energy. A few cases are presented to illustrate different biomass energy concepts. Based on economic calculations an indication is given of the feasibility of those concepts. Also the most relevant sources of information are listed. In the second part an overview is given of Dutch, European and international financial tools that can be used in biomass energy projects in Central and Eastern Europe

  19. Modeling of energy consumption and related GHG (greenhouse gas) intensity and emissions in Europe using general regression neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijević, Davor; Pocajt, Viktor; Ristić, Mirjana; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the estimation of energy-related GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions at the national level that combines the simplicity of the concept of GHG intensity and the generalization capabilities of ANNs (artificial neural networks). The main objectives of this work includes the determination of the accuracy of a GRNN (general regression neural network) model applied for the prediction of EC (energy consumption) and GHG intensity of energy consumption, utilizing general country statistics as inputs, as well as analysis of the accuracy of energy-related GHG emissions obtained by multiplying the two aforementioned outputs. The models were developed using historical data from the period 2004–2012, for a set of 26 European countries (EU Members). The obtained results demonstrate that the GRNN GHG intensity model provides a more accurate prediction, with the MAPE (mean absolute percentage error) of 4.5%, than tested MLR (multiple linear regression) and second-order and third-order non-linear MPR (multiple polynomial regression) models. Also, the GRNN EC model has high accuracy (MAPE = 3.6%), and therefore both GRNN models and the proposed approach can be considered as suitable for the calculation of GHG emissions. The energy-related predicted GHG emissions were very similar to the actual GHG emissions of EU Members (MAPE = 6.4%). - Highlights: • ANN modeling of GHG intensity of energy consumption is presented. • ANN modeling of energy consumption at the national level is presented. • GHG intensity concept was used for the estimation of energy-related GHG emissions. • The ANN models provide better results in comparison with conventional models. • Forecast of GHG emissions for 26 countries was made successfully with MAPE of 6.4%

  20. Generalized Chou-Yang model for p(antip)p and. lambda. (anti. lambda. )p elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem; Azhar, I.A.

    1988-06-01

    The various characteristics of pp and antipp elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting colliding particles. The model is also used to extract the form factor and radius of the ..lambda.. particle.

  1. Mean energy of some interacting bosonic systems derived by virtue of the generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Xu, Xue-xiang

    2009-06-01

    By virtue of the generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem [H. Y. Fan and B. Z. Chen, Phys. Lett. A 203, 95 (1995)], we derive the mean energy of some interacting bosonic systems for some Hamiltonian models without proceeding with diagonalizing the Hamiltonians. Our work extends the field of applications of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and may enrich the theory of quantum statistics.

  2. On large-time energy concentration in solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations in general domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalák, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 9 (2011), s. 724-732 ISSN 0044-2267 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * large-time behavior * energy concentration Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.863, year: 2011

  3. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-01-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ 2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ 2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies

  4. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, Sabar [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, Rokiah [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  5. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients.

  6. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients

  7. No-reference stereoscopic image quality measurement based on generalized local ternary patterns of binocular energy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Wujie; Yu, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual no-reference (NR) quality measurement of stereoscopic images has become a challenging issue in three-dimensional (3D) imaging fields. In this article, we propose an efficient binocular quality-aware features extraction scheme, namely generalized local ternary patterns (GLTP) of binocular energy response, for general-purpose NR stereoscopic image quality measurement (SIQM). More specifically, we first construct the binocular energy response of a distorted stereoscopic image with different stimuli of amplitude and phase shifts. Then, the binocular quality-aware features are generated from the GLTP of the binocular energy response. Finally, these features are mapped to the subjective quality score of the distorted stereoscopic image by using support vector regression. Experiments on two publicly available 3D databases confirm the effectiveness of the proposed metric compared with the state-of-the-art full reference and NR metrics. (paper)

  8. Deep brain stimulation for phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Richard G; Otero, Sofia; Carter, Helen; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-05-