WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy future presentation

  1. Renewable Energies, Present & Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. S. Cai

    2005-01-01

    Fossil fuels are major cause of environmental destruction in pollutions. It has created much needed momentum for renewable energies, which are environmentally benign, generated locally, and can play a significant role in developing economy. As a sustainable energy sources, it can grow at a rapid pace to meet increasing demands for electricity in a cost-effective way.

  2. Energy consumption: Past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The energy consumption history of the United States and the changes which could occur in consumption characteristics in the next 50 years are presented. The various sources of energy are analyzed to show the limitations involved in development and utilization as a function of time available. Several scenarios were prepared to show the consumption and supply of energy under varying conditions.

  3. Nuclear energy: basics, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricotti M. E

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is conceived for non-nuclear experts, intended as a synthetic and simplified overview of the technology related to energy by nuclear fission. At the end of the paper, the Reader will find a minimal set of references, several of them on internet, useful to start deepening the knowledge on this challenging, complex, debated albeit engaging energy source.

  4. International nuclear energy law - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    International nuclear energy law, as discussed in this article, is the law relating to the global, peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. The position of nuclear law in the wide realm of law itself as well as the present status of nuclear legislation is assessed. This article also covers the development of international nuclear energy law, from the first nuclear law - the New Zealand Atomic Energy Act of 1945-, the present and the future. National and international organizations concerned with nuclear energy and their contribribution to nuclear law are reviewed

  5. Energy in Latin America: Present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Johnny N; Sheffield, John W [University of Missouri-Rolla (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The primary focus of this paper is on the analysis of the current situation of energy production and consumption in the region as a whole, to examine the determinants of energy supply and demand growth, and to forecast the future growth of energy production, consumption, and balances. Since the growth of oil demand in Latin American countries themselves began to accelerate in the early 1990s, the lack of investment and development and the consequence shrinking base of Latin America's energy exports may pose serious challenges to North America, where dependence on the Middle Eastern oil and gas is growing. This paper attempts to present different scenarios and strategies to tackle the problem of Latin America's future net energy supply. [Spanish] El enfoque principal de este articulo es sobre la base de la situacion actual de la produccion y consumo de energia en la region como un todo, para examinar las determinantes del suministro de energia y el crecimiento de la demanda y la prediccion del crecimiento futuro de la produccion de energia, consumo y balances. Desde el crecimiento de la demanda del petroleo, en los paises latinoamericanos, ellos mismos empezaron a acelerar a principios de los 90s, la falta de inversion y desarrollo y la consecuencia del encogimiento de la base de las exportaciones de energia de Latinoamerica podrian imponer serios retos a Norte America, en donde la dependencia del petroleo y del gas del Medio-Oeste esta creciendo. Este articulo intenta presentar diferentes escenarios y estrategias para atacar el problema del suministro neto de energia de Latinoamerica.

  6. Energy in Latin America: Present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Johnny N; Sheffield, John W [University of Missouri-Rolla (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The primary focus of this paper is on the analysis of the current situation of energy production and consumption in the region as a whole, to examine the determinants of energy supply and demand growth, and to forecast the future growth of energy production, consumption, and balances. Since the growth of oil demand in Latin American countries themselves began to accelerate in the early 1990s, the lack of investment and development and the consequence shrinking base of Latin America's energy exports may pose serious challenges to North America, where dependence on the Middle Eastern oil and gas is growing. This paper attempts to present different scenarios and strategies to tackle the problem of Latin America's future net energy supply. [Spanish] El enfoque principal de este articulo es sobre la base de la situacion actual de la produccion y consumo de energia en la region como un todo, para examinar las determinantes del suministro de energia y el crecimiento de la demanda y la prediccion del crecimiento futuro de la produccion de energia, consumo y balances. Desde el crecimiento de la demanda del petroleo, en los paises latinoamericanos, ellos mismos empezaron a acelerar a principios de los 90s, la falta de inversion y desarrollo y la consecuencia del encogimiento de la base de las exportaciones de energia de Latinoamerica podrian imponer serios retos a Norte America, en donde la dependencia del petroleo y del gas del Medio-Oeste esta creciendo. Este articulo intenta presentar diferentes escenarios y estrategias para atacar el problema del suministro neto de energia de Latinoamerica.

  7. Primary energy: present status and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielheim, K O

    1982-01-01

    A survey of the base-load energy sources available to humans is presented, starting from the point of view that all energy used is ultimately derived from nuclear processes within the sun. Specific note is made of European energy options, noting the large dependence on imported oil. Detailed exploration of available nuclear fuel resources is carried out, with attention given to fission, fusion, and breeder reactor plants and to the state-of-the-art and technology for each. The problems of nuclear waste disposal are discussed, and long term burial in salt domes is outlined as a satisfactory method of containing the materials for acceptable periods of time. The CO/sub 2/ greenhouse effect hazards caused by increased usage of coal-derived fuels are considered and precautions to be taken on a global scale to ameliorate the warming effects are recommended. The limitations to hydropower are examined, as are those of tidal power. Solar cells are projected to be produced in GW quantities by the year 2000, while wind-derived electricity is predicted to provide a minimum of 5% of the world energy needs in the future.

  8. Nuclear energy, energy for the present and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo S, C.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we will try to show that nuclear energy can contribute to the generation energy in the present and the future, considering that its effect on the climatic change is relatively low and that the fuels that uses are available a large scale. At the moment it is had already commercial thermal fission reactors , there are also them of fast fission that allow the fuel rearing, although these last ones in much smaller number, with both types of fission nuclear reactors can be obtained a very important contribution to the generation of energy at world-wide level during the time that is necessary so that it is developed, constructs and operates the first commercial fusion reactor. The energy that is generated in the present and future must come from different sources, which require to be reliable, to have little effect on the environment, to have wide reserves of fuels and to be viable from an economic and social point of view, they must be viable and safe. Between possible alternative energies it is counted on the lot, the wind one, the geothermal one, originating of the tides and some others. An energy that must be considered so that it has arrived at his maturity and he is already able to contribute widely to cover the present needs and future it is nuclear energy, as much the originating one of the fission of a heavy centre like obtained when fusing two light centers. On base in the nuclear fuel reserves at world-wide level a simple calculation takes control of the lapse in which energy by means of the nuclear fission in rearing can be generated reactors expresses demonstrating that the time sufficient to finish to the investigation and development of fusion reactors which they generate energy in economic, safe and reliable form. Combining these two options the nuclear energy can be considered the future like for the present and the future with practically null effects in the climatic change. (Author)

  9. Wind energy: the present and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, Gavin

    1996-01-01

    Wind energy has become a billion-pounds-a-year industry. Its installed capacity worldwide exceeds 4.5 gigawatts. Technical advances coupled with the buying power and mass-production techniques of the main turbine manufacturers are pushing the cost of wind energy down to attractive levels. (author)

  10. Black Sea Energy Security - Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florinel Iftode

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We chose this theme to highlight the need for continuous and sustained human society to secure energy resources needed to survive, needs reflected in an increasingly in recent years in the strategies adopted at both states, as at the level of international organizations. Achieving security and stability in the wider Black Sea area has been among the priorities of each country's interests in this region. In this context, state and non-state actors were being called to come up with new solutions to achieve those interests. Certainly not in all cases the negotiations were completed or not yet found a generally accepted formula for others to apply, but most of them show off their values. The main environmental threats to security environment in the Black Sea region are represented by ethnic conflicts and territorial secessionism. A significant contribution to the security environment of the Black Sea region has the phenomenon of globalization, which in this region is manifested by a steady increase in traffic and volume of shipping passage of communication, which largely affects the security in the region. Globalization and the need for energy resources in the Black Sea was an important area not only as energy transport route, but as a potential supplier of material energy (oil and natural gas. Black Sea Basin can be stabilized and secured only by the will and input from all States and interested international organizations in pragmatic and effective institutional frameworks, meant to promote and protect the common interests of countries decided to participate in actions aimed at ensuring a stable environment security.

  11. Nuclear energy : Present situation and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1953, President Eisenhower announced the U.S. ''Atoms for Peace'' program. After slightly more than 30 years, there are in operation, under construction or on order more than 400,000 MW of commercial nuclear power generation capacity located in 35 nations, representing a total investment around a trillion U.S. dollars. The situation is noteworthy in terms of the rate of technical development, deployment and transfer, the magnitude of the financial investment, economic benefits, the favorable impact on public health and safety, and the usual and positive character of cooperation among all concerned. The fundamentals of nuclear power generation with regard to economics, safety and environmental impact are likely to favor the increased use of nuclear power. The future prospect of the nuclear power in the U.S. also will be clarified positively. In many ways, U.S. commercial nuclear power continues to benefit from the Navy nuclear propulsion program. The prospect of supply demand situation in the conversion, enrichment and fabrication of uranium fuel is explained. The amount of spent fuel arising in OECD countries and their storage capability up to 2000 are shown, and the storage capability projected is well in excess. (Kako, I.)

  12. Energy in the world: The present situation and future options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    It is reported that the most notable changes on the world energy scene since 1973 concerned the shift in OPEC's role from a base to a swing producer, the disruption of the fast market penetration of nuclear power and the impacts caused by the technical advances at essentially all stages of the energy system. Further, several parts of the world witnessed a strong environmental movement which attracted public attention to the conduct of the energy industry and its social implications and environmental consequences. The lecture illuminates these events in some detail and evaluate their impacts on present and future energy demand, supply and trade patterns. The future energy outlook includes two fundamentally different scenarios. Each scenario in itself appears internally consistent. The diverging projections of future energy demand and supply mixes underlying these scenarios are the result of the inclusion/omission of technical change or dynamics of technology into the analyses. 19 refs, 22 figs

  13. Present state and future of new energy technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, N

    1976-08-01

    The Sunshine Project was begun in 1973 by the Japanese Ministry of Industry to investigate all alternative energy sources other than nuclear. The project is subdivided into four separate areas, those being solar energy, geothermal energy, liquefaction and gasification of coal, and hydrogen fuel. This article describes the present state of these technologies and their probable future development. Although hydrogen fuel and coal liquefaction/gasification are still in the basic research stage solar and geothermal technologies are already well developed.

  14. Renewable Energy Generation in India: Present Scenario and Future Prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Sri Niwas; Singh, Bharat; Østergaard, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The development of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) is necessary for the sustainable development of any country due to depleting fossil fuel level, climbing fossil fuel prices across the world and more recently pressure for reduction emission level. In India, several schemes and policies are launched...... by the government to support the use of RES to achieve energy security and self-sufficiency. This paper discusses the present scenario and future prospects of RES in India. Various schemes such as financial assistance, tax holiday etc for promoting RESs development and utilization are also discussed. The present...

  15. Solar energy systems: assessment of present and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, H.-M.; Aulich, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the present state and the future potential of solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) technologies, and examines both the environmental implications of these technologies and the economics which determine their viability in the energy market. Although some significant cost reductions have been achieved, particularly in PV technology, solar conversion technologies are still not generally competitive against conventional fuels, and future cost reductions may be limited. It is argued that fiscal measures will be necessary if solar conversion technologies are to make a significant global impact. (Author)

  16. Public Opinion Survey - Energy, The Present and The Future, 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Matijevic, M.; Jecmenica, R.; Duckic, P.; Lebegner, J.

    2016-01-01

    During the year 2015 the Department of Applied Physics of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb conducted a public opinion survey entitled 'Energy - The Present and the Future' among student population of 1115 individuals. The tested population consisted of the University of Zagreb six faculties' students: the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, the Faculty of Mining, Geology and Petroleum Engineering, the Faculty of Science, and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The questions in the survey covered several different energy issues, including the present and the future energy resources, the acceptability of different fuel type power plants, the environmental protection and global warming, the radioactivity, the radioactive waste issues, reliable information sources, and position of participants towards climate change issues, as well as European Union and Croatian goals set for the year 2020. The basic results of survey analysis for nuclear oriented questions, as well as the comparison of results of the current survey with the results of the similar surveys conducted in the academic years 2007/08, and 2012/2013, are reported in this paper. Participants generally express high level of formal environmental awareness. However, their choices and attitudes are in a contradiction to claimed eco-orientation, as well as to the scientific facts. The discrepancies are particularly noticeable in parts of the survey dealing with the nuclear energy and the nuclear power plants. The participants are also demonstrating lack of knowledge on nuclear issues especially regarding radioactive waste management, as well as economics and operational safety of nuclear power plants. (author).

  17. Public Opinion Survey-Energy-The Present and the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pejic Bach, M.; Pevec, D.; Bace, M.; Trontl, K.; Jecmenica, R.; Matijevic, M.; Lebegner, J.

    2008-01-01

    During the academic year 2007/08 the Department of Applied Physics of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing conducted a public opinion survey entitled 'Energy - The Present and the Future' among student population of 1439 individuals age 18-20. The tested population consisted of the University of Zagreb nine faculties' students: the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing - 367 students, the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology - 149 students, the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology - 118 students, the Faculty of Civil Engineering - 102 students, the Faculty of Philosophy - 100 students, the Faculty of Science - 50 students, the Medical School - 217 students, the School of Dental Medicine - 108 students, and the Faculty of Economics and Business - 228 students. The questions in the survey covered several different energy issues, including the present and the future energy resources, the acceptability of different fuel type power plants, the environmental protection and global warming, the radioactivity, the waste issues, as well as reliable information sources. The basic results of survey analysis for nuclear oriented questions are reported in this paper. Although participants expressed high level of formal environmental awareness, their choices and attitudes are in a contradiction to claimed eco-orientation, as well as to the scientific facts. The discrepancies are particularly noticeable in parts of the survey dealing with the nuclear energy and the nuclear power plants. The radioactive waste management, proved to be a potential stumbling-stone for the entire nuclear program. The participants are demonstrating deep lack of knowledge which results in the radioactive waste management becoming the main source of fear from the nuclear technology in general. A very disturbing attitude is a belief that the nuclear energy is non-economic, environmentally unacceptable and operationally unsafe source of energy. Such an attitude

  18. Onshore wind energy potential over Iberia: present and future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable energy sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the potential power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that potential wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest potential energy outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power potential are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  19. Social costs of energy. Present status and future trends. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmeyer, O.; Ottinger, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The social or external costs of energy have received a high degree of internatinal attention since the publication of the first empirical results in 1988. Possible global climate change and the call for a sustainable future of mankind have put the question of social costs onto the agenda of many national and international converences like the 'Earth Summit' in Rio 1992. A scientific discussion has been sparked off, searching for the best methodoligical approaches and reliable empirical data. An overview of this discussion was given by the report on the 1st international workshop published in 1991. This book reports on the 2nd international workshop on the subject and gives a broad overview of the discussion in the 25 papers presented. It is the most comprehensive picture of this subject matter avvailable. (orig.)

  20. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  1. High energy nuclear beams at Berkeley: present and future possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary goal of the Bevalac research program continues to be the study of nuclear matter at extreme conditions of temperature and baryon density while still addressing more conventional aspects of nuclear physics. Future plans are for a colliding beam machine in the energy range of 20 GeV/n. The conceptual design and basin requirements for such a relativistic nuclear collider (RNC) are outlined. In addition the central physics themes to be addressed by an RNC are briefly discussed

  2. Materials challenges in present and future wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, B.; Wedel-Heinen, J.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2008-01-01

    The main concept currently in use in wind energy involves horizontal-axis wind turbines with blades of fiber composite materials. This turbine concept is expected to remain as the major provider of wind power in the foreseeable future. However, turbine sizes are increasing, and installation......, preventing buckling failure, ensuring adequate fatigue life under variable wind loading combined with gravitational loading, and minimizing the occurrence and consequences of production defects. A major challenge is to develop cost-effective ways to ensure that production defects do not cause unacceptable...

  3. Present status and future perspective of development of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuma, Masao

    1990-01-01

    The last year was the 50th year from the discovery of the nuclear fission of uranium in 1939. The utilization of atomic energy made the unfortunate start as atomic bombs, but after the 'Atoms for Peace' declaration of President Eisenhauer, it has become to contribute to the development of mankind as nuclear power generation and radiation utilization. In Japan, the Atomic Energy Act was instituted in 1955, and the utilization of atomic energy has been eagerly promoted. As to nuclear power generation, as of the end of June, 1989, 423 power plants were in operation in the world, which generated 333 million kW, equivalent to 17 % of the total generated electric power. The nuclear power plants under construction and at planning stage were 199 with 190 million kW capacity, in this way, the development is advanced actively. At present in Japan, 38 nuclear power plants are in operation, generating 29.46 million kW, which has reached 30 % of the total generated electric power. The social environment surrounding atomic energy and the basic way of thinking on atomic energy development are discussed. The demand and supply of electric power in 21st century and atomic energy, and the policy of electric power companies to cope with it are explained. (K.I.)

  4. High energy neutrino astronomy; past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learned, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The nascent field of high energy neutrino astronomy seems to be near to blossoming in the next few years, after decades of speculation and preliminary experimental work. The motivation for the endeavor, anticipated types of sources, consideration of energy regime for first attempts, scale size needed, and techniques are qualitatively reviewed. A summary of relevant current projects is presented with emphasis on the new initiatives with detectors of the 10,000m 2 class. It seems that by the end of the decade there may be a few such new generation instruments in operation, and that with luck the business of high energy neutrino astrophysics will be underway by the turn of the century. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear energy, energy for the present and the future; Energia nuclear, una energia para el presente y el futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo S, C. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: cas@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work we will try to show that nuclear energy can contribute to the generation energy in the present and the future, considering that its effect on the climatic change is relatively low and that the fuels that uses are available a large scale. At the moment it is had already commercial thermal fission reactors , there are also them of fast fission that allow the fuel rearing, although these last ones in much smaller number, with both types of fission nuclear reactors can be obtained a very important contribution to the generation of energy at world-wide level during the time that is necessary so that it is developed, constructs and operates the first commercial fusion reactor. The energy that is generated in the present and future must come from different sources, which require to be reliable, to have little effect on the environment, to have wide reserves of fuels and to be viable from an economic and social point of view, they must be viable and safe. Between possible alternative energies it is counted on the lot, the wind one, the geothermal one, originating of the tides and some others. An energy that must be considered so that it has arrived at his maturity and he is already able to contribute widely to cover the present needs and future it is nuclear energy, as much the originating one of the fission of a heavy centre like obtained when fusing two light centers. On base in the nuclear fuel reserves at world-wide level a simple calculation takes control of the lapse in which energy by means of the nuclear fission in rearing can be generated reactors expresses demonstrating that the time sufficient to finish to the investigation and development of fusion reactors which they generate energy in economic, safe and reliable form. Combining these two options the nuclear energy can be considered the future like for the present and the future with practically null effects in the climatic change. (Author)

  6. Seminar on present and future Spanish Legislation on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Proceedings of the Seminar contain the papers presented and the conclusions of each Session. The topics cover Spanish nuclear legislation including the licensing of nuclear power plants and control, analysed in the context of legislation in other fields and the new requirements since Spain joined the European Communities. Other papers deal with the origin and evolution of Spanish nuclear law, the competent international organizations and the nuclear third party liability regime set in place by the international conventions in that field. Also discussed are the national regulations on radioactive waste management and the competent authorities. Finally, a revision of the Spanish Nuclear Energy Act is considered necessary in the light of developments since its inception [fr

  7. Renewable energy projects in Croatia: Present situation and future activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granić Goran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources should play an important role in the promotion of numerous Croatian energy goals. The development of a successful sector of renewable could in the long run contribute to energy efficiency improvement, diversification of production and supply safety, domestic production and lesser imports of energy sources and significant reduction of the environmental influences. Targets and strategy of the implementation for every renewable energy resource depends on the specifics of the particular one, with general trends in the European Union of renewable resource ratio increase in the energy balance.

  8. Present and future energy consumption for passenger transportation in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhne, M.; Wolffram, U.

    1981-01-01

    Passenger transportation in Germany was investigated in order to determine real energy consumption. For typical passengers, energy consumption for overland travel and charter flights was studied. The energy needed for air traffic was compared with that for transportation overland (railway, car, bus), taking into account transportation to the airport or railway station. Transportation makes up about 17% of German primary energy consumption, i.e., road traffic 14%, railway traffic 1.6%, and air traffic 1%. Specific energy consumption (overland travel) of intercity trains, airplanes and cars is in the proportion 1.0 to 3.7 to 4.0 (1980) and is expected to be 1 to 2.4 to 3.1 by the year 2000. For holiday trips, specific energy consumption for bus, train, car and airplane travel is in the proportion 1.0 to 1.4 to 3.6 to 3.4 (1980) and is expected to be 1 to 1.4 to 2.5 to 2.9 by 2000. (ESA)

  9. Public opinion survey 'Nuclear energy - the present and the future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matani, R.; Lebegner, J.; Jurkovi, I.-A.; Prah, M.

    2000-01-01

    As a part of Croatian Nuclear Society Young Generation Network efforts in improving relations with the general public, a survey on nuclear energy issues among a student population (18-22 years old) has been planned. The survey, although somewhat modified, is based on a similar one that has been conducted at high schools as a part of organized educational program by the Museum of Technical Sciences and Hrvatska Elektroprivreda. Preliminary results show a positive altitude among the student population when it comes to nuclear power plants. As it can be seen from the obtained data (preliminary analysis), this opinion is mostly built on student awareness of nuclear power plants as a clean energy source. (authors)

  10. Public opinion survey 'Nuclear energy - the present and the future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prah, M.; Jurkovic, I.-A.; Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2001-01-01

    As a part of Croatian Nuclear Society Young Generation Network efforts in improving relations with the general public, a survey on nuclear energy issues among a student population (18-22 years old) has been planned. The survey, although somewhat modified, is based on a similar one that has been conducted at high schools as a part of organized educational program by the Museum of Technical Sciences and Hrvatska Elektroprivreda. (authors)

  11. Public opinion survey 'Nuclear energy - the present and the future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, I.-A.; Jecmenica, R.; Prah, M.; Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2000-01-01

    As a part of Croatian Nuclear Society Young Generation Network efforts in improving relations with the general public, a survey on nuclear energy issues among a student population (18-22 years old) has been planned. The survey, although somewhat modified, is based on a similar one that has been conducted at high schools as a part of organized educational program by the Museum of Technical Sciences and Hrvatska Elektroprivreda. (author)

  12. Instrumentation buses for high energy physics, past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponting, P.; Verweij, H.

    1991-01-01

    Over the past three decades high energy physics experiments have become progressively large and more complex. Advances in electronic component technology played a massive role in this process, but the landmark development which enabled the ever growing quantities of detector data to be extracted was that of the instrumentation bus. This paper emphasizes the fact that, which bus specifications continually improve, the essential qualities of the original concept have proved invaluable allowing inestimable economies of scale as well as the melding of devices from different institutional and commercial cultures into integrated structure

  13. Automotive battery energy density — past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K.

    Energy and power densities of automotive batteries at engine starting rates have doubled over the past twenty years. Most recent improvements can be credited to the use of both very thin plates with optimized grid design and low-resistance polyethylene separators with a thin backweb and a reduced rib height. Opportunities for further improvements using the same design approach and similar processing techniques are limited. The effect of some recent innovative developments on weight reduction and performance improvement are reviewed, together with possible changes to the electrical system of vehicles.

  14. The Durham Strategic Energy Alliance : building a roadmap to meet Ontario's present and future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, K.; Lindeblom, D.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge facing Ontario in gaining access to affordable, flexible and reliable energy at a time when energy demand is escalating was discussed. The Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA) was created in 2005 to position Ontario's Durham Region as a Canadian leader in timely, sustainable and reliable energy solutions. Durham employs about 10,000 workers directly in the energy industry. The region also produces nearly 30 per cent of the province's power from local generating stations. It is also home to an energy focused teaching and research institution at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. The DSEA is composed of business, industry, government and academic institutions committed to taking action on advancing energy solutions in all aspects of the energy life-cycle. Members have a stake in promoting sustainable energy solutions in energy supply and generation, manufacturing of energy solutions, transmission, distribution, conservation and/or consumption of all forms of energy. Since its creation, the DSEA has taken measures to exploit the energy opportunities in Durham Region and plans to significantly expand its activities in the future, particularly in building commercialization capabilities through an energy cluster. New links and formalized networks will be established to achieve this goal. Innovative networks will be developed to connect Durham's academic community with business, industry and energy clusters which are developing globally. The overall DSEA strategy is to develop Durham's energy cluster so that it evolves quickly into Ontario's energy commercialization center. There are three areas where such strategy will be recognized: energy technology adoption/demonstration centre; energy technology adoption officer; and, energy cluster outreach/network. 1 fig

  15. Past, present and future of the fossil energies; Pasado, presente y futuro de las energias fosiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Fernandez, J. L.

    2004-07-01

    This article discusses on the energy that is the motor of the world, without which it would not be possible to enjoy the quality of life that we have. It will be centred fundamentally in the fossil energies, so insulted today but that are the ones that have allowed the extraordinary economic developing of the Humanity. (Author) 29 refs.

  16. Proceedings of standard model at the energy of present and future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikor, F.; Pocsik, G.; Toth, E.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Workshop on The Standard Model at the Energy of the Present and Future Accelerators, 27 June - 1 July 1989, Budapest. The Standard Model of strong and electro-weak interactions providing essential insights into the fundamental structure of matter and being the basic building block of further generalizations has a rich content. The Workshop was devoted to discussing topical problems of testing the Standard Model in high energy reactions such as jet physics and fragmentation, new applications and tests of perturbative QCD, CP-violation, B-meson physics and developments in weak decays, some of the future experimental plans and related topics

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  18. Energy Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    foresight and public and stakeholder engagement are used to reflect on?and direct?the impacts of new technology. In this essay we draw on our experience of anticipatory governance, in the shape of the ?NanoFutures? project on energy futures, to present a reflexive analysis of engagement and deliberation. We...... draw out five tensions of the practice of deliberation on energy technologies. Through tracing the lineages of these dilemmas, we discuss some of the implications of these tensions for the practice of civic engagement and deliberation in a set of questions for this community of practitioner-scholars....

  19. Energy need, energy production, waste heat quantities - the present state and a look into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikarski, W.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities and methods to keep the waste heat low in our society so dependent on energy, are manifold and they affect many aspects of our economic and social life. A society which shows concern for its environment will not hesitate to explore all possible avenues and to realize them. Nevertheless, one has to start from the assumption that the energy consumption, which is closely connected with the standard of living, will increase in the near future. Thus, we have to reckon with more waste heat. Therefore, on a medium-term basis, the amount of waste heat we will be confronted with and its distribution in the environment is to be investigated carefully in order that on the one hand hydrosphere and atmosphere, the limit load of which is given, are not burdened in excess, and that on the other hand the media taking up waste heat are utilized in an optimal way (cooling management). On a long-term basis, the limits of waste heat discharge into water and atmosphere have to be determined carefully, something which can probably be done on the basis of climatological consequences. (orig.) [de

  20. 2002/03 public opinion survey 'Nuclear Energy - the Present and the Future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Gergeta, K.

    2003-01-01

    During the years 2000 and 2002 the Croatian Nuclear Society Young Generation Network carried out public opinion surveys among student population of around 650 individuals age 18-20. The results of the surveys suggested the necessity of a more active involvement of nuclear experts in high school education. Croatian Young Generation Network decided to prepare brochures on different subjects concerning nuclear energy and distribute them to high school students, primarily third and fourth graders. To be able to evaluate the influence of distributed materials, fresh reference data are needed. Therefore, a traditional public opinion survey 'Nuclear Energy - the Present and the Future' has been carried out among faculty student population. (author)

  1. Energy futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This book provides fifteen of the futures industry's leading authorities with broader background in both theory and practice of energy futures trading in this updated text. The authors review the history of the futures market and the fundamentals of trading, hedging, and technical analysis; then they update you with the newest trends in energy futures trading - natural gas futures, options, regulations, and new information services. The appendices outline examples of possible contracts and their construction

  2. Present and future situation of Austrian petroleum supply in consideration of energy economy aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filip, G

    1982-02-02

    The author attempts to show the present situation (as of 1979/80) of the Austrian petroleum industry. Section two of the study is, to a certain extent, pointing out the range of activities of the OeMV-AG, which is the most important national petroleum company. Furthermore, the most important data and figures documenting the importance of petroleum and its processing products are mentioned in that section. In many countries the energy source petroleum contributes more than 50% to the total energy supply. Especially for this reason, it is necessary to attribute a certain weight to this energy source in making forecasts. This is considered in detail mainly in the third section, and apart from imports problems and environmental protection also the recent technologies in the field of petroleum production are described. The dissertation ends with a short view to the future energy situation and its problems.

  3. Sustainable energy development: The present (2011) situation and possible paths to the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lior, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This invited keynote paper is the most recent among similar reviews published by the author, update to year 2011. In a format similar to that in past reviews, recent estimates and forecasts of the conventional fossil fuel resources and their reserve/production ratio, nuclear power, and renewable energy potential, and energy uses are surveyed. A brief discussion of the status, sustainability (economic, environmental and social impact), and prospects of fossil, nuclear and renewable energy use, and of power generation is presented. Beyond the general review, the paper focuses this year on some of the many important areas that deserve more attention: (1) the recently emerging game-changing developments of postponement of “peak oil”, nuclear power future following the disaster in Japan, and effects of the recent global economy downturn of global sustainability, (2) the potential and impacts of electric cars (3) the often neglected energy status and promising potential of Africa. Some ways to resolve the problem of the availability, cost, and sustainability of energy resources alongside the rapidly rising demand are discussed. The author’s view of the promising energy R and D areas, their potential, foreseen improvements and their time scale, and last year’s trends in government funding are presented.

  4. Energy Requirements by the Water Sector in the Southwestern US: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyt, K.; Yates, D. N.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate, energy, and water are fundamentally linked such that shifts in one sector have cascading impacts on the others. Consideration of the integrated system is necessary to fully understand the individual risk profile of each sector. In defining vulnerabilities and potential adaptations, the policy and regulatory environment must be considered alongside the biological and physical systems. Take, for example, the Southwestern U.S., a naturally arid system, where water availability is declining as a consequence of climate change and population growth. Adaptations by the water sector to convey, store, and develop new water sources (e.g. desalination, groundwater pumping, water-reuse) are strategies designed to enhance sustainability of the sector. But, the energy requirements embedded in these management techniques pose challenges to electric utilities. West wide, approximately 20% of total electricity generation goes toward supplying and heating water. If future investments made by the water sector to deal with changing supply and demand regimes continue to follow current trends, the dependence of water on energy availability will grow, meaning that the water supply will be increasingly reliant on the electricity system. Here, we use the example of long-term aridity and the recent drought in the Western US to illustrate the tradeoffs and challenges inherent at the nexus between energy and water. We present long-term trends in the energy intensity of water supplies in the Southwestern US, with a specific focus on groundwater systems. Projected energy requirements for proposed and future conveyance systems are discussed. The potential impacts of reduced flows on the Colorado River on the energy demands for groundwater pumping in the Lower Colorado River Basin are highlighted.

  5. Aluminum hydride as a hydrogen and energy storage material: Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graetz, J., E-mail: graetz@bnl.gov [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Reilly, J.J. [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Yartys, V.A.; Maehlen, J.P. [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway); Bulychev, B.M. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Antonov, V.E. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Tarasov, B.P. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Gabis, I.E. [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Aluminum hydride (AlH{sub 3}) and its associated compounds make up a fascinating class of materials that have motivated considerable scientific and technological research over the past 50 years. Due primarily to its high energy density, AlH{sub 3} has become a promising hydrogen and energy storage material that has been used (or proposed for use) as a rocket fuel, explosive, reducing agent and as a hydrogen source for portable fuel cells. This review covers the past, present and future research on aluminum hydride and includes the latest research developments on the synthesis of {alpha}-AlH{sub 3} and the other polymorphs (e.g., microcrystallization reaction, batch and continuous methods), crystallographic structures, thermodynamics and kinetics (e.g., as a function of crystallite size, catalysts and surface coatings), high-pressure hydrogenation experiments and possible regeneration routes.

  6. Public Opinion Survey - Energy - The Present and the Future - 2012/2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, Kresimir; Pevec, Dubravko; Matijevic, Mario; Jecmenica, Radomir; Lebegner, Josip

    2014-01-01

    During the academic year 2012/13 the Department of Applied Physics of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb conducted a public opinion survey entitled 'Energy- The Present and the Future' among student population of more than 950 individuals. The tested population consisted of the University of Zagreb five faculties' and one polytechnic school's students: the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, the Faculty of Civil Engineering, the Faculty of Science, and the Polytechnic of Zagreb. The questions in the survey covered several different energy issues, including the present and the future energy resources, the acceptability of different fuel type power plants, the environmental protection and global warming, the radioactivity, the waste issues, reliable information sources, and position of participants towards climate change issues, , as well as European Union and Croatian goals set for the year 2020. The basic results of survey analysis for nuclear oriented questions, as well as the comparison of results of the current survey with the results of the similar surveys conducted in the academic years 2007/08 and 2009/2010, are reported in this paper. Participants generally express high level of formal environmental awareness. However, their choices and attitudes are in a contradiction to claimed eco-orientation, as well as to the scientific facts. The discrepancies are particularly noticeable in parts of the survey dealing with the nuclear energy and the nuclear power plants. The participants are also demonstrating lack of knowledge on nuclear issues especially regarding radioactive waste management, as well as economics and operational safety of nuclear power plants. (authors)

  7. Public Opinion Survey - Energy - The Present and the Future - 2009/10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Jecmenica, R.; Pevec, D.

    2010-01-01

    During the academic year 2009/10 the Department of Applied Physics of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing conducted a public opinion survey entitled 'Energy - The Present and the Future' among student population of 622 individuals age 18-20 (413 male students, 202 female students, and 7 students without the answer on gender question). The tested population consisted of the University of Zagreb four faculties' students: the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The questions in the survey covered several different energy issues, including the present and the future energy resources, the acceptability of different fuel type power plants, the environmental protection and global warming, the radioactivity, the waste issues, as well as reliable information sources. The basic results of survey analysis for nuclear oriented questions, as well as the comparison of results of the current survey with the results of the similar survey conducted in the academic year 2007/08, are reported in this paper. Participants generally express high level of formal environmental awareness. However, their choices and attitudes are in a contradiction to claimed eco-orientation, as well as to the scientific facts. The discrepancies are particularly noticeable in parts of the survey dealing with the nuclear energy and the nuclear power plants. The participants are also demonstrating lack of knowledge on nuclear issues especially regarding radioactive waste management, as well as economics and operational safety of nuclear power plants.(author).

  8. 2003/04 public opinion survey Nuclear energy - the present and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.

    2004-01-01

    During the academic years 2000/01, 2001/02 and 2002/03 the Croatian Nuclear Society Young Generation Network (CYGN) carried out public opinion surveys among student population of around 600 individuals age 18-20. The results of the surveys have shown that the participants are rather ignorant on nuclear issues but still very negative, especially towards nuclear power plants and radioactive waste disposal sites with emphasized Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome. As a part of the active involvement of CYGN members in upgrading of the positive public opinion, especially, young generations towards nuclear issues, a brochure on radioactivity has been prepared and distributed at the beginning of the 2002/03 school year to third and fourth graders in high schools. Hopefully a part of the 2003/04 academic year, freshman student population received a brochure during their high school education. Therefore, CYGN decided to carry out 2003/04 public opinion survey Nuclear Energy - the Present and the Future in order to investigate the effects of the brochure on student opinions on nuclear subjects. The results of the survey should also provide information on the quality of the distributed materials, as well as the quality of the distribution strategy. The results and the analyses of the 2003/04 public opinion survey, as well as the comparison of the results with the previous surveys are presented in this paper.(author)

  9. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of nuclear power over the past 40 years is outlined, with reactor and fuel cycle choice, opposition, non-proliferation, cost escalation and industrial development all being considered briefly. The current (1986) situation is summarized and future prospects for nuclear power considered in the light of energy demand, public acceptability (especially following accidents), and the nuclear technology now available, including radioactive waste management. The alternatives for producing electricity are discussed. These include buying from other producers, or generating oneself, using nuclear power plants or non-nuclear plants. If nuclear power is chosen then the type of plant to be used is considered. Waste disposal is mentioned briefly. (U.K.)

  10. Renewable energy sources in the Republic of Bulgaria - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, K.

    1999-01-01

    take place in near future. The share of renewable energy (without the big hydroelectric power stations) in the total energy balance will get up to 8 % in 2010. All kind of RES will be develop, especially solar, geothermal, hydroelectric, photovoltaic, biomass. An integrated plan, new legislation, foreign investment and domestic financial support are necessary for their development under the government of the National Agency for Energy Efficiency. Special programmes for information of the consumers and businessmen as well as new education programmes have to be created. A prognosis for development of RES till 2010 foresees: total installed capacities 1090 MW ( 91 average annually); annual energy production 3780150 MWh; necessary investment 686 mill. $ and 2285 new jobs

  11. Future energy, exotic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumon, R

    1974-01-01

    The Detroit Energy Conference has highlighted the declining oil reserves, estimated worldwide at 95 billion tons vs. an annual rate of consumption of over 3 billion tons. The present problem is one of price; also, petroleum seems too valuable to be simply burned. New sources must come into action before 1985. The most abundant is coal, with 600 billion tons of easily recoverable reserves; then comes oil shale with a potential of 400 billion tons of oil. Exploitation at the rate of 55 go 140 million tons/yr is planned in the U.S. after 1985. More exotic and impossible to estimate quantitatively are such sources as wind, tides, and the thermal energy of the oceans--these are probably far in the future. The same is true of solar and geothermal energy in large amounts. The only other realistic energy source is nuclear energy: the European Economic Community looks forward to covering 60% of its energy needs from nuclear energy in the year 2000. Even today, from 400 mw upward, a nuclear generating plant is more economical than a fossil fueled one. Conservation will become the byword, and profound changes in society are to be expected.

  12. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  13. The promotion in Romania of electricity from renewable energy sources - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciulescu, Georgeta; Popescu, Mihaela; Caracasian, Lusine; Anton, Bogdan

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the present situation and prospects of electricity generation from renewable energy sources in Romania. The following subject matters are addressed: Legal framework; - Regulatory framework; - Ministry of Economy and Commerce - competence and responsibilities; - ANRE - competence and responsibilities; - Targets by 2010; - Benefits of Electricity from RES; - Costs, by technology, for E-RES; - Renewable support mechanisms; - RES, technical and economical potential for Romania; - Sensitivity Analysis. In conclusion, one stresses that the existing legal and regulatory framework which sets up responsibilities and dead lines regarding the promotion of E-RES and it's access on the market: - ensures a transparent, nondiscriminatory and objective treatment for the E-RES producers; - gives some facilities concerning the authorization process and ensures the take over of the electricity produced from renewable sources to the national grid; -sets up state aids granting conditions for investments and operation of the renewable energy sources; - requires some improvements regarding the financial support for promoting E-RES, guarantee of origin and trade. Depending on the chosen support scheme, the institutional framework will be developed in order to comply with the legal requirements and dead-lines. The technologies for E-RES generation will be implemented depending on: - the RES potential; - the commercial maturity of the technology, i.e. the technologies implied in hydro, wind, biomass, solar, waves and tide energy generation

  14. Information resources in high-energy physics. Surveying the present landscape and charting the future course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil-Beccot, A.; Mele, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Holtkamp, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); O' Connell, H.B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Brooks, T.C. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the eld of infor- mation management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the eld reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the eld. The survey o ers an in- sight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities. (orig.)

  15. Information resources in high-energy physics. Surveying the present landscape and charting the future course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentil-Beccot, A.; Mele, S.; Holtkamp, A.; O'Connell, H.B.; Brooks, T.C.

    2008-04-01

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the eld of infor- mation management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the eld reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the eld. The survey o ers an in- sight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally ''early adopters'' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities. (orig.)

  16. Information resources in high-energy physics. Surveying the present landscape and charting the future course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil-Beccot, A; Mele, S [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Holtkamp, A [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); O' Connell, H B [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Brooks, T C [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the eld of infor- mation management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the eld reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the eld. The survey o ers an in- sight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities. (orig.)

  17. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics: Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O' Connell, Heath B.; Brooks, Travis C.

    2008-04-22

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities.

  18. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics: Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O'Connell, Heath B.; Brooks, Travis C.

    2008-01-01

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities

  19. The present and future of nuclear energy and industry in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This article is an edited version of a speech presented by Vitaly F. Konovalov, Minister of the Soviet Union's Ministry of Atomic Energy and Industry. Mr. Kovovalov presented the speech on April 8, 1991 to the 24th Annual Conference of the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum in Tokyo, Japan. In his speech, he notes that the current number of plants in operation (46) accounted for 12.5% of the electricity generated in the USSR. According to an energy policy announced in the early 1980's, by the year 2000 electricity generated at nuclear plants would reach 40% of the total generation. Changes in attitude brought about by Chernobyl resulted in a slowdown in the development of nuclear plants, and over 100,000 MWe of new capacity have been abandoned in some stage of design or construction. Current plans call for 7,000 MWe of new capacity between the years 1991 and 1995, and 12,600 MWe over the next five-year period. Accelerated growth is anticipated between 2000 and 2010. It is stated that this growth will be in the area of new designs with enhanced safety features and better economic features. The speaker also notes the impact of decommissioning and nucelar wastes

  20. IKONOS: future and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Niek

    2003-04-01

    The IKONOS satellite has been operational since January 2000 and was the first commercial satellite collecting imagery with 1 meter resolution. The current life expectancy of the satellite is 10 years. Since the launch, Space Imaging Inc. (the owner of the satellite) supplied IKONOS imagery to users in many vertical markets, such as: agriculture, defense, oil & gas and telecommunications. This oral presentation will give comprehensive information about IKONOS and the future: * Block II, the successor of IKONOS. Space Imaging expects to launch in 2004 a new high-resolution satellite, ensuring both continuity and (for some years) a tandem operation with IKONOS, greatly improving the availability of imagery. * Space Imaging affiliates. IKONOS imagery collected, processed and sold by regional affiliates. These regional affiliates are strategically located around the world, like Japan Space Imaging (Tokyo), Space Imaging Middle East (Dubai) and Space Imaging Eurasia (Ankara, Turkey). * Technical briefing IKONOS. IKONOS (compared to other commercial high-resolution satellites) has superior collection capabilities. Due to, the higher orbit altitude, local reception of the imagery, bi-directional scanning and the high agility of the satellite, is the IKONOS satellite capable to collect the imagery relative quickly.

  1. AECL present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.S.

    1975-08-01

    This is a history of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited with forecasts of its role in enabling Canada to meet a rapidly increasing share of her energy requirements from nuclear power. Its main activities will be research and development in support of contemporary and advanced CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear power systems; research into other ways to provide energy and fissile materials; and investigation into applications for nuclear energy beyond the generation of electrical power. (Author)

  2. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs

  3. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography (CMT). The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits (MDLs) obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

  4. The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy - present state and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is the biggest one within Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and it is a leading complex center for research and application of the nuclear physics in Bulgaria. The year 2003 was the first for the functioning of the new organization structure of INRNE consisting of 26 laboratories and 4 scientific experimental bases joined according their thematic in 7 scientific directions governed by the correspondent Expert Councils and Specialised Seminars. The scientific staff of the Institute has been worked on about 104 problems during the 2003 mainly on our traditional scientific areas, in particular, in the field of: theory of the elementary particles, field theory, atomic nuclei and quantum phenomena; experimental physics of the elementary particles, nuclear reactions, structure of atomic nuclei, cosmic rays and gamma-astrophysics at ultra high energies; neutron interactions and cross sections, physics of the fission; reactor physics, nuclear energy and nuclear safety and security ect. Now the results are already present and, as can been seen, almost half of the developments are connected with the problems of scientific support of the national nuclear energy production, radioactive waste, monitoring and management of the environment. With few exceptions, all these tasks are financially supported by national, foreign and international organizations. The fundamental end applied research results for 2003 have been accepted for publication or published in more than 300 articles in journals and proceeding of many international conferences. Large amount of these results has been obtained in close collaboration with international and foreign research centers, universities and institutions. Essential progress was obtained by the modernization of the scientific experimental bases of INRNE. The technical design project for the reconstruction of the old research reactor IRT 2000 in the new IRT 200 was successfully finished. The

  5. India's contribution in fulfilling the energy needs of third countries: present as well as future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, R. C.

    1980-03-15

    A combiation of skilled manpower, infrastructural development, and a sound industrial base puts India into a position for meeting not only the energy needs of developing countries, but for assiting them in their all-around development. This paper is confined to energy: petroleum, noncommercial energy sources, hydroelectric, electrical equipment, etc. (DLC)

  6. The nuclear energy picture, at present and in the future: Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-07-01

    The euphoria of the 1950s appears to have given way, first, to timidly expressed fears, then to doubts, and ultimately to a defensive attitude with respect to the role which nuclear energy could play in meeting the world's energy needs. As people began to become aware of the problems associated with the environment nuclear energy was at first considered to be 'clean'. Since that time it has been placed in the same category as other forms of energy and has been assailed together with them from all sides. However, nuclear energy is also subject to attack in contexts which are more specific to it alone and which relate to its nature (radioactive pollution), its fuel cycle (treatment of waste) and its non-peaceful uses (diversion of fissionable material). The following four articles have been written by Agency experts of the Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors in order to contribute to the documentation on energy basic information which the Agency has gathered from the studies which it carries out, either by itself or in collaboration with other organizations. In a world-wide energy context it would appear that, in the short term (1985), the share of electrical energy from nuclear sources will remain modest, but that the prospects of development after that time could have a significant effect on the prices of conventional fuels. Competition would therefore continue between nuclear energy and the other forms of energy currently produced. Towards the end of the period under consideration it will already be necessary to make a uranium prospecting effort if it is desired to maintain proven reserves at competitive prices and at a level capable of keeping pace with the output of nuclear energy envisaged for the last decade of this century. A rational investment policy will have to be carried out in order to triple the capacity for enriched uranium production between now and 1985. It does not appear, moreover, that any commercial leap forward can be expected in the field

  7. The nuclear energy picture, at present and in the future: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The euphoria of the 1950s appears to have given way, first, to timidly expressed fears, then to doubts, and ultimately to a defensive attitude with respect to the role which nuclear energy could play in meeting the world's energy needs. As people began to become aware of the problems associated with the environment nuclear energy was at first considered to be 'clean'. Since that time it has been placed in the same category as other forms of energy and has been assailed together with them from all sides. However, nuclear energy is also subject to attack in contexts which are more specific to it alone and which relate to its nature (radioactive pollution), its fuel cycle (treatment of waste) and its non-peaceful uses (diversion of fissionable material). The following four articles have been written by Agency experts of the Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors in order to contribute to the documentation on energy basic information which the Agency has gathered from the studies which it carries out, either by itself or in collaboration with other organizations. In a world-wide energy context it would appear that, in the short term (1985), the share of electrical energy from nuclear sources will remain modest, but that the prospects of development after that time could have a significant effect on the prices of conventional fuels. Competition would therefore continue between nuclear energy and the other forms of energy currently produced. Towards the end of the period under consideration it will already be necessary to make a uranium prospecting effort if it is desired to maintain proven reserves at competitive prices and at a level capable of keeping pace with the output of nuclear energy envisaged for the last decade of this century. A rational investment policy will have to be carried out in order to triple the capacity for enriched uranium production between now and 1985. It does not appear, moreover, that any commercial leap forward can be expected in the field

  8. The role of the ACCC in Australia's economic wellbeing and energy regulation: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, E.

    2004-01-01

    A recent report by the Department of Primary Industries and Energy found that demand for energy in Australia is projected to increase by 50 per cent by 2020, and the energy industry estimates that investments of at least $37 billion will be required by 2020 to meet the nation's energy needs. They are awesome statistics and place a great responsibility on the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to ensure we get the balance right when it comes to regulating the energy sector. That balance involves the right of those making those massive investments in energy sources and infrastructure to earn a decent return while at the same time ensuring these resources can continue to be made available at a price that as far as possible mimics a competitive market and does not lead to the exploitation of monopoly positions. And we have to do this in a way that ensures that whether industry or consumers choose gas or electricity is not determined by differing regulations in those sectors but by allowing both to develop in a way that encourages competition within, and between the two, to the benefit of industry, end users, and the nation. This is the philosophy behind the creation of the most recent evolutionary development in energy regulation - the Australian Energy Regulator. I will talk more about the AER shortly, but first I would to look at the record so far. NCP reforms The AER is the result of a decade of National Competition Policy reforms in the energy sector to open up the former government-controlled intra-state monopolies in gas and electricity to competition and make them more efficient. Although reforms proceeded on a sectoral basis, federal, state and territory governments agreed through the Council of Australian Governments to similar reforms for both industries, including: 1. Placing utilities on a commercial footing through corporatisation 2. Vertically separating generation, transmission, distribution and retail businesses and 'ring-fencing' these

  9. Biomass energy: State of the technology present obstacles and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, L.

    1993-06-23

    The prevailing image of wood and waste burning as dirty and environmentally harmful is no longer valid. The use of biomass combustion for energy can solve many of our nation`s problems. Wood and other biomass residues that are now causing expensive disposal problems can be burned as cleanly and efficiently as natural gas, and at a fraction of the cost. New breakthroughs in integrated waste-to-energy systems, from fuel handling, combustion technology and control systems to heat transfer and power generation, have dramatically improved system costs, efficiencies, cleanliness of emissions, maintenance-free operation, and end-use applications. Increasing costs for fossil fuels and for waste disposal strict environmental regulations and changing political priorities have changed the economics and rules of the energy game. This report will describe the new rules, new playing fields and key players, in the hope that those who make our nation`s energy policy and those who play in the energy field will take biomass seriously and promote its use.

  10. Growing energies and scaling frontiers in nuclear physics- past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.; Shrivastava, A.

    2009-01-01

    A simultaneous growth in accelerators, instrumentation, detectors and data acquisition has paved the way for the rapid progress in scaling the frontiers in nuclear physics in India. In the early years, the investigation of Isobaric Analogue resonances was the central theme for many researchers. Some of the other programmes were: The determination of proton optical model at sub-Coulomb energies, investigation of shape changes through nuclear spectroscopy of low lying bound states and keV - MeV neutron induced fission and measurement of energy and the mass distribution to understand the fission dynamics. The 5.5 MV Van de Graaff and the 1 MV Cascade generator at Mumbai were the facilities used for these programmes. At the Kolkata cyclotron facility, the research included: reaction mechanism for high energy gammas, a - nucleus optical model potential, a and p induced fission, high spin nuclear spectroscopy, quasi molecular resonances. In the last decade, tremendous progress has been achieved in heavy ion based nuclear physics research using the pelletron at Mumbai and Delhi: Fusion and fission at energies near the Coulomb barrier to understand the role of entrance channel and nuclear structure of interacting species, experimental determination of level density parameter from proton spectra, observation of linear chain configurations in nuclei through heavy ion resonance and decay studies, high excitation - high spin spectroscopy and observation of new symmetries, role of breakup in interactions involving weakly bound projectiles. With the availability of higher energy beams and associated sophisticated detector setup at Kolkata, Mumbai and Delhi, it will be possible to extend the investigations to Fermi energies to look for multifragmentation/equation of state/isospin dynamics and evolution of symmetry energy as a function of temperature and density/liquid gas phase transition, studies related to high spin spectroscopy of transuranic nuclei and pre

  11. Present situation and future of utilization of geothermal energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.; Zhi, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    From the 1970s, the Chinese government increased investment in the development of geothermal resources and other new energy, and some experimental geothermal power stations have been built successfully. In the late 1980s, the exploration of high temperature geothermal resources was increased. Geothermal fluid with temperatures over 200 C was measured in several boreholes. In ZK4002 well, Yangbajing, the temperature is even as high as 329.8 C. By the year 2010, several geothermal power plants with high temperatures and great capacity will be built, so that great advances will be made in the development of geothermal energy in China

  12. AECL present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.S.

    The history and present activities of the Crown corporation AECL are described. AECL owns limited interests in nuclear power plants and a Manitoba transmission system. AECL is the world's foremost producer of heavy water, and exports CANDU type reactors and radiation processing equipment. AECL backs up the Canadian nuclear power program wherever there is no conflict with private enterprise. (E.C.B.)

  13. Imagined futures, present lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Wildermuth, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    is discussed centrally in this attempt to contribute to an empirically grounded understanding of the role that media play for youth in their striving to ‘find a place in life'. In the empirical context presented in the article, imaginations, expanded and circulated by a globalized media circuit...

  14. Neutron scattering facilities at China Institute of Atomic Energy. Present and future situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, C.T.; Gou, C.; Yang, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    The 15 MW Heavy Water Research Reactor (HWRR) at CIAE in Beijing is the only neutron source available for neutron scattering experiments in China at present. So far totally 5 neutron scattering spectrometers are installed at 4 beam tubes. A 60 MW new research reactor, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), now is being built at CIAE to meet the increasing demand of neutron scattering research in China. A brief description of HWRR, the presently existing neutron scattering equipments at HWRP, CARR, and the neutron scattering facilities to be installed at CARR are presented. (J.P.N.)

  15. EPMA present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.

    2002-01-01

    In electron probe microanalysis the objective has always been to gain the maximum information from a sample. To this end efforts have been directed at increasing detection efficiency, reducing the size of the excitation volume, analysing more difficult specimens and improving the accuracy of quantitative measurements whilst, at the same time, attempting to minimize the complexity of the analysis. The present paper comments on the progress that has been made in this areas, focuses on the latest hardware and software developments taking place and looks forward to how these may impact on the technique of EPMA. (author)

  16. GC Side Event: Future of Nuclear Energy: Engaging the Young Generation. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This event presented the IAEA’s programmes for the education and training of a new generation of nuclear professionals. It also featured the annual European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE) award ceremony

  17. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    CERN Document Server

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O'Connell, Heath B; Brooks, Travis C

    2009-01-01

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most importan...

  18. Imagined futures, present lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Wildermuth, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The article is focused thematically on the uses and meanings of media for (some) young people in Recife, a million-inhabitant city in the northeast of Brazil. The article brings together the perspective of Anne Line Dalsgaard, a long-term anthropological field researcher who is familiar with the ......The article is focused thematically on the uses and meanings of media for (some) young people in Recife, a million-inhabitant city in the northeast of Brazil. The article brings together the perspective of Anne Line Dalsgaard, a long-term anthropological field researcher who is familiar...... is discussed centrally in this attempt to contribute to an empirically grounded understanding of the role that media play for youth in their striving to ‘find a place in life'. In the empirical context presented in the article, imaginations, expanded and circulated by a globalized media circuit...

  19. Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), a Review: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.; Charlock, T. P.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.; Rutan, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project s objectives are to measure the reflected solar radiance (shortwave) and Earth-emitted (longwave) radiances and from these measurements to compute the shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface and radiation divergence within the atmosphere. The fluxes at TOA are to be retrieved to an accuracy of 2%. Improved bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) have been developed to compute the fluxes at TOA from the measured radiances with errors reduced from ERBE by a factor of two or more. Instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft provide sampling at four local times. In order to further reduce temporal sampling errors, data are used from the geostationary meteorological satellites to account for changes of scenes between observations by the CERES radiometers. A validation protocol including in-flight calibrations and comparisons of measurements has reduced the instrument errors to less than 1%. The data are processed through three editions. The first edition provides a timely flow of data to investigators and the third edition provides data products as accurate as possible with resources available. A suite of cloud properties retrieved from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) by the CERES team is used to identify the cloud properties for each pixel in order to select the BRDF for each pixel so as to compute radiation fluxes from radiances. Also, the cloud information is used to compute radiation at the surface and through the atmosphere and to facilitate study of the relationship between clouds and the radiation budget. The data products from CERES include, in addition to the reflected solar radiation and Earth emitted radiation fluxes at TOA, the upward and downward shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the surface and at various levels in the atmosphere. Also at the surface the photosynthetically active radiation

  20. Present status and future of hydrogel dressings processed by low energy EB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugao, A.B.; Rogero, S.O.; Catalani, L.H.; Malmonge, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    and 16%. PEG and Agar concentrations were 3 and 0.8% respectively. The samples were prepared by mixing of a solution of PVP and PEG with Agar heated to 100 deg. C. Membranes with 3mm thickness were prepared by pouring the hot solution in molds of about 100cm 2 , waiting proper time to gelification of agar, packed in PE bags and hot sealed. The samples were irradiated by a electron beam electrostatic type from 'Radiation Dynamics', model 'Dynamitron', maximum energy of 1,5MeV and maximum current of 15mA, at doses of 20, 25, 30 and 35 kGy. Highly concentrated samples: It was used the same procedure, the only difference was the drying step to concentrate to the required level, as the PVP is not easily soluble over 16% concentration. Agar and PEG were kept at 0.8% and 3%, respectively for all samples. Tensile Strength and Elongation at break: It follows ABNT NBR 6241/80. They were performed for all samples 7 days after irradiation to allow a uniformization of bubbles distribution. Gel Fraction: the samples were boiled in water for 36 hs and dried in oven at 36 deg. C to Constant mass. Network characterization: network size was evaluated using a procedure described in a previous paper (Miranda a, 2000). Swelling: samples were kept in water for 216 hs. Water intake was measures at each hour during the first 24 hs and at each 24 hs afterwards. Degrees of hydration were measures gravimetrically. Morphological studies were conducted with the Scanning Electron Microscopy model JMS 840-A, from Jeol Ltd. The best combination of mechanical properties is achieved at PVP concentration of 8% and dose of 20 kGy, as higher PVP concentration imparts a small incremental benefit on elongation property. On the other hand, tensile strength improves constantly with PVP concentration, but this improvement goes together with a sensible decrease in softness and consequently decreases in pain reduction properties. So 8% would be the upper value of PVP concentration. The dose for optimizing the

  1. The alternative energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitzley, H.

    1989-02-01

    The alternative energy future can be achieved only by making energy conservation programmes successful, and by fully committing to the utilization of soft energy sources. This is the perspective drawn by the author who in this book investigates the fundamentals of an ecologically and socially sound energy policy for the future. Looking at California, USA, where completely near concepts have been put to work in the energy sector since the mid-seventies, the author shows how it can be done, by rewarding energy conserving activities, using available energy sources more efficiently, developing the means for renewable energy exploitation wherever appropriate. A turn in energy policy is feasible also in West Germany, both in technical and political terms. Starting from the experience gained in the USA, the author presents an outline of options and potentials of a new energy strategy for the Federal Republic of Germany. (orig./HP) [de

  2. World Energy Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, A.; Van der Linde, C.; Nicola, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the section World Energy Future of this magazine two articles, two interviews and one column are presented. The article 'A green example to the world' refers briefly to the second World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi, which was held from 18-21 January, 2009. The second article, 'Green Utopia in the desert' attention is paid to the Abu Dhabi government-driven Masdar Initiative. The two interviews concern an interview with BP Alternative Energy ceo Vivienne Cox, and an interview with the founder and CEO of New Energy Finance Michael Liebreich. The column ('An efficient response') focuses on the impact of the economic crisis on energy policy

  3. Report to the Congress: liquid metal fast breeder reactor program--past, present, and future, Energy Research and Development Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The past, present, and future of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) program, the Nation's highest priority energy program, are studied. ERDA anticipates that the operation of the first large commercial breeder will start in 1987, and that 186 commercial-size breeders will be in operation by the year 2000. The breeder program is made up of six major areas, each dealing with an important element of technology: reactor physics; fuels and materials; fuel recycle; safety; component development; plant experience; and facilities used in the LMFBR program. ERDA is implementing a new system for administering, managing, and controlling the breeder program that will provide increased program visibility and control. Federal funding for breeder development was $168 million in FY 1971, accounting for 40% of the total Federal R and D energy budget; in FY 1976 Federal funding for this program will be $474 million, only 26% of total Federal funding for energy research. Besides Federal funds, over half a billion dollars have been or will be invested by industry over the next 5 to 10 years to develop the breeder and to build a demonstration plant. Five other nations--the United Kingdom, France, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union--have a high priority national energy program for developing the LMFBR. These foreign breeder programs could contribute important data and information to the U.S. program

  4. Present energy status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desprairies, P

    1988-04-01

    This paper reviews the past and present situation of the World Oil Market and assumes future trends and possible future evolution. Low oil prices between 1950 and 1973 have contributed to an exceptional growth of oil demand during more than 20 years which was more and more supplied by OPEC. The oil shocks of 1973 and 1979 have dramatically changed this situation. Some of the most important changes have been the emergence of non-OPEC new oil producers, the growth of substitute energies, especially natural gas and nuclear power, on the supply side; and substantial decrease of energy consumption in many industrialized countries which has greatly reduced oil demand to OPEC on the demand side. Today this situation seems somewhat stabilized (after the reversal of world oil prices in 1986) and OPEC is producing around 18 million b/day as against a producing capacity of about 30 million b/day. It is generally considered that in coming years oil prices will remain relatively low (or occasionally even become lower than today) due to excess oil production capacity and relative abundance of other types of energy. However, many experts think that these trends can be reversed when oil supply will more and more concentrate again in the Middle East; but it is hard to say if this will begin in 1995, 2000, 2010.

  5. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I briefly review the present and future status of the burgeoning field of neu- ... near future build upon previous results. ... novel radio and acoustic techniques utilized by, for example, experiments such as. GLUE ... Left: Schematic of νµ-induced muon track in detector. Right: .... an eye toward the galactic center).

  6. QCD machines - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, N.H.

    1991-01-01

    The present status of the currently working and nearly working dedicated QCD machines is reviewed and proposals for future machines are discussed with particular emphasis on the QCD Teraflop Project in the US. (orig.)

  7. Our future energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-15

    The Danish Government's plan ''Our Future Energy'' seeks to create green growth and help the country convert to 100 percent renewable energy use by 2050. The Danish Government in November 2011 presented its plan for how the country can secure its energy future. Titled ''Our Future Energy'', the strategy presents specific measures for fulfilling the Government's goal of stimulating green growth. The plan is based on the previous government's Energy Strategy 2050, but raises the bar higher. The long-term goal of the plan is to implement an energy and transport network that relies solely on renewable energy sources. By 2020, the initiatives will lead to extensive reductions in energy consumption, making it possible for half of the country's electricity consumption to be covered by wind power. Coal is to be phased out of Danish power plants by 2030. And by 2035, all electricity and heating will be generated using renewable sources. (Author)

  8. World Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, A.; Van der Linde, C.; Nicola, S.

    2009-03-15

    In the section World Energy Future of this magazine two articles, two interviews and one column are presented. The article 'A green example to the world' refers briefly to the second World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi, which was held from 18-21 January, 2009. The second article, 'Green Utopia in the desert' attention is paid to the Abu Dhabi government-driven Masdar Initiative. The two interviews concern an interview with BP Alternative Energy ceo Vivienne Cox, and an interview with the founder and CEO of New Energy Finance Michael Liebreich. The column ('An efficient response') focuses on the impact of the economic crisis on energy policy.

  9. The future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romer, A.

    2001-01-01

    The article discusses not only the future of energy and resource consumption in various areas of the world, but also its development over the centuries since the industrial revolution. The present situation, with large discrepancies between the energy consumption of industrialised nations and the developing countries is examined. Social and environmental aspects are discussed and the sustainable use of the Earth's resources and the inconsistencies in this area is looked at. Rather than adopting a moralistic approach, the article appeals to man's powers of innovation and sense of responsibility in order to develop solutions to today's and future energy supply problems. The article is richly illustrated with diagrams and graphs on world energy and social statistics

  10. LHC: Past, Present, and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this overview talk, I give highlights of the first three years of the LHC operations at high energy, spanning heavy-ion physics, standard model measurements, and searches for new particles, which culminated in the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2012. I'll discuss what we found about the properties of the new particle in 10 months since the discovery and then talk about the future LHC program and preparations to the 2015 run at the center-of-mass energy of ~13 TeV. These proceedings are meant to be a snapshot of the LHC results as of May 2013 - the time of the conference. Many of the results shown in these proceedings have been since updated (sometimes significantly) just 4 months thereafter, when these proceedings were due. Nevertheless, keeping this writeup in sync with the results shown in the actual talk has some historical value, as, for one, it tells the reader how short is the turnaround time to update the results at the LHC. To help an appreciation of this fact, I b...

  11. The Present and Future of Szigetvár Spa – An Economic Analysis of Geothermal Energy Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Pálné Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, geothermal energy has proved to be an economical source of energy for direct use. It highlights the pros and cons of including renewable energy in the power generation mix of Hungary, and the pros and cons of local application. This paper looks at the operation of Szigetvár Spa from both economic and social aspects. In this study, qualitative analysis is used for the basic economic and social introduction of the Spa, and then real options, based on quantitative methods, are described to identify the long-term financial consequences of the project. In 1966, thermal water was found in Szigetvár. In 1997, this thermal water was certified as medicinal water. The wellhead temperature of Szigetvár thermal water is 62°C in the 790 metres deep thermal well. It is used as so-called domestic hot water in the Szent István housing estate and in Szigetvár Spa. One of the problems with the project is that it is based on single stage thermal water utilization, another problem is that the waste water is too hot. This can be solved by exploiting the heat energy of thermal water more intensively. This way, maximum benefits can be gained from geothermal energy with minimum use of energy. Static and dynamic investment analyses were carried out to examine the spa from a financial aspect. The methods used include static payback period, average rate of return, levelized cost of electricity, net present value, profitability index, dynamic payback period, internal rate of return and real options. By pricing geothermal technology, it is possible to identify the strategic value of flexibility, to quantify what was previously left unquantified, and thus to show that geothermal investments are profitable not only from a social but also from a financial aspect as well.

  12. Energy futures-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the Symposium on Energy Futures II. Topics covered include: The National Energy Strategy; The Gas and petroleum industry; energy use in the paper industry; solar energy technology; hydroelectric power; biomass/waste utilization; engine emissions testing laboratories; integrated coal gassification-combined-cycle power plants

  13. Safeguards instrumentation: past, present, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments are essential for accounting, for surveillance and for protection of nuclear materials. The development and application of such instrumentation is reviewed, with special attention to international safeguards applications. Active and passive nondestructive assay techniques are some 25 years of age. The important advances have been in learning how to use them effectively for specific applications, accompanied by major advances in radiation detectors, electronics, and, more recently, in mini-computers. The progress in seals has been disappointingly slow. Surveillance cameras have been widely used for many applications other than safeguards. The revolution in TV technology will have important implications. More sophisticated containment/surveillance equipment is being developed but has yet to be exploited. On the basis of this history, some expectations for instrumentation in the near future are presented

  14. Mobile energy sharing futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worgan, Paul; Knibbe, Jarrod; Plasencia, Diego Martinez

    2016-01-01

    We foresee a future where energy in our mobile devices can be shared and redistributed to suit our current task needs. Many of us are beginning to carry multiple mobile devices and we seek to re-evaluate the traditional view of a mobile device as only accepting energy. In our vision, we can...... sharing futures....

  15. Present Day and Future Population Dynamics of the Dengue Vector Mosquito Aedes aegypti Using a Water Container Energy Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, D.

    2017-12-01

    Dengue infections are estimated to total nearly 400 million per year worldwide, with both the geographic range and the magnitude of infections having increased in the past 50 years. The primary dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti is closely associated with humans. It lives exclusively in urban and semi-urban areas, preferentially bites humans, and spends its developmental stages in artificial water containers. Climate regulates the development of Ae. aegypti immature mosquitoes in artificial containers. Potential containers for Ae. aegypti immature development include, but are not limited to, small sundry items (e.g., bottles, cans, plastic containers), buckets, tires, barrels, tanks, and cisterns. Successful development of immature mosquitoes from eggs to larvae, pupae, and adults is largely dependent on the availability of water and the thermal properties of the water in the containers. An energy balance container model termed the Water Height And Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM) solves for water temperature and height for user-specified containers with readily available meteorological data. Output from WHATCH'EM is used to estimate development parameters for the immature life stages of the Ae. aegypti mosquito, allowing for assessment of habitat suitability across varying natural environments. Variability amongst different artificial containers (e.g., size, color, material, shape), shading scenarios, and water availability scenarios is also addressed. WHATCH'EM is also coupled with an Ae. aegypti life cycle model to include the effects of the aforementioned factors on survival. Projections of future climate scenarios that take into account changes not only in temperature but also precipitation, humidity, and radiative effects are used in WHATCH'EM to estimate how Ae. aegypti population dynamics may change.

  16. Applied Mathematics at the U.S. Department of Energy: Past, Present and a View to the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.L; Bell, J.; Estep, D.; Gropp, W.; Hendrickson, B.; Keller-McNulty, S.; Keyes, D.; Oden, J.T.; Petzold, L.; Wright, M.

    2008-01-01

    mathematical developments required to meet the future science and engineering needs of the DOE. It is important to emphasize that the panelists were not asked to speculate only on advances that might be made in their own research specialties. Instead, the guidance this panel was given was to consider the broad science and engineering challenges that the DOE faces and identify the corresponding advances that must occur across the field of mathematics for these challenges to be successfully addressed. As preparation for the meeting, each panelist was asked to review strategic planning and other informational documents available for one or more of the DOE Program Offices, including the Offices of Science, Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Legacy Management, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management as well as the National Nuclear Security Administration. The panelists reported on science and engineering needs for each of these offices, and then discussed and identified mathematical advances that will be required if these challenges are to be met. A review of DOE challenges in energy, the environment and national security brings to light a broad and varied array of questions that the DOE must answer in the coming years. A representative subset of such questions includes: (1) Can we predict the operating characteristics of a clean coal power plant? (2) How stable is the plasma containment in a tokamak? (3) How quickly is climate change occurring and what are the uncertainties in the predicted time scales? (4) How quickly can an introduced bio-weapon contaminate the agricultural environment in the US? (5) How do we modify models of the atmosphere and clouds to incorporate newly collected data of possibly of new types? (6) How quickly can the United States recover if part of the power grid became inoperable? (7) What are optimal locations and communication protocols for sensing

  17. Energy future 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syri, S; Kainiemi, L; Riikonen, V [Aalto Univ. School of Engineering, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2011-07-01

    The track was organized by the Department of Energy Technology, School of Engineering, at Aalto University. Energy future 2050 -track introduced participants to the global long-term challenges of achieving a sustainable energy supply. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), effective climate change mitigation would require the global greenhouse gas emissions to be reduced by 50-85% from the present level by 2050. For industrialized countries, this would probably mean a practically carbon-neutral economy and energy supply, as developing countries need more possibilities for growth and probably enter stricter emission reduction commitments with some delay. In the beginning of the workshop, students were introduced to global energy scenarios and the challenge of climate change mitigation. Students worked in three groups with the following topics: How to gain public acceptance of Carbon (dioxide) Capture and Storage (CCS) ? Personal emissions trading as a tool to achieve deep emission cuts, How to get rid of fossil fuel subsidies? Nordic cases are peat use in Finland and Sweden. (orig.)

  18. The future of energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lameiras, Fernando Soares

    1996-01-01

    Humanity will not face shortage of energy, but may face problems with its use, because every energy source has restrictions. Fossil fuels change the climate,nuclear energy increases the radioactivity and can be used to manufacture weapons, solar energy is very scattered, and geothermal energy is yet not well known. Delicate political issues emerge in this scenario. Due to the magnitude of energy used by many countries, isolated energy policies can disturb all planet. This may delay decisions and result in the lack of energy supply, hindering the development of many regions, or in conflict between countries. In this paper, some analyses and considerations are presented about the future of energy use, including some axiologic features. The role of nuclear energy is analysed, because, maybe, for the first time a energy source was target of axiologic issues that have affected the growth of its demand. These issues are yet to be internalized by other energy sources in the future. (author)

  19. Future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, John

    2005-01-01

    Australia has one of the most cost-effective energy conversion and delivery systems in the world. We are blessed with abundant, high-quality fossil fuels consisting mainly of coal, gas and (diminishing) oil resources. However, this past blessing is also a future curse as this fuel mix, coupled with limits to hydroelectric growth and no nuclear generation capacity, has endowed Australia with one of the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit of GDP in the developed world (currently 43 per cent above the International Energy Agency average). This prompted Claude Mandil, head of the IEA, to observe: 'Environmental sustainability represent Australia's greatest energy challenge, with high and growing carbon dioxide emissions.' The challenge for Australia is how to make the massive cuts in GHG emissions required to minimise our world trade risks (which will come at a cost, and put pressure on our energy cost-effectiveness) while maintaining an internationally competitive energy sector. This challenge is exacerbated by a healthy national growth rate which will be accompanied by at least a 50 per cent growth in energy demand by 2020, with a doubling by 2050. Electricity industry projections predict an investment in new generation capacity well in excess of $30 billion to keep up with demand over the next two decades. The stark reality is that if we con tinue to supply and use energy the way we do now, we may as well forget about stabilising our GHG emissions from the energy sector, let alone reducing them in the future. This urgent situation presents a huge opportunity for the introduction of new and improved low-emission energy conversion technologies and demand management systems that vastly reduce GHG emissions per unit of productivity - in fact, an opportunity to transform Australia's energy sector to levels of innovation, social acceptance and environmental performance that has no precedent in this country. We have little choice other than to make a start. Are

  20. Energy Informatics Panel (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2012-06-01

    Designed to be the world's most comprehensive, open, and collaborative energy information network, Open Energy Information (OpenEI - openei.org) supplies essential energy data to decision makers and supports a global energy transformation. The platform, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is intended for global contribution and collaboration.

  1. Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, A.L.; Metz, W.D.; Maygh, T.H.II.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the most important conceivable possibilities today of producing and converting energy is given. Furthermore, the energy transfer as well as possibilities for the economical use of energy are dealt with. A presentation of the research priorities characterizes the present state of the energy policy

  2. The future of energy

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, Brian F

    2014-01-01

    Using the principle that extracting energy from the environment always involves some type of impact on the environment, The Future of Energy discusses the sources, technologies, and tradeoffs involved in meeting the world's energy needs. A historical, scientific, and technical background set the stage for discussions on a wide range of energy sources, including conventional fossil fuels like oil, gas, and coal, as well as emerging renewable sources like solar, wind, geothermal, and biofuels. Readers will learn that there are no truly ""green"" energy sources-all energy usage involves some trad

  3. Future of US Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cragg, C.; Nicola, S.; Kemfert, C.

    2009-01-15

    Barack Obama has promised to boost renewable energy sources and energy efficiency and to join the global effort to curb climate change. But he also looks upon domestic energy in terms of national security. These two priorities clash in important ways. One thing is certain: US energy policy is about to change drastically - and global energy relations along with them. In this section of the magazine two articles are dedicated to the future of energy in the USA. In between the articles is a column on the question if climate protection creates jobs.

  4. Future of US Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cragg, C.; Nicola, S.; Kemfert, C.

    2009-01-01

    Barack Obama has promised to boost renewable energy sources and energy efficiency and to join the global effort to curb climate change. But he also looks upon domestic energy in terms of national security. These two priorities clash in important ways. One thing is certain: US energy policy is about to change drastically - and global energy relations along with them. In this section of the magazine two articles are dedicated to the future of energy in the USA. In between the articles is a column on the question if climate protection creates jobs

  5. Mercosur: past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Paiva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In March 2003, the Southern Common Market (Mercosur celebrated its twelfth anniversary. In twelve years, the bloc went from a substantially restricted trade structure to a practically free-trade area, with additional efforts in establishing a customs union and progressing toward a common market. Despite these advances, the integration process has experienced setbacks as the result of such different economic phenomena as the Asian financial crisis, Brazil's currency devaluation and, later, economic uncertainty in Argentina. Setbacks to the integration process create credibility issues and could jeopardize the future of the process. This paper discusses the current level of economic integration of Mercosur, the speed of the process, and the resulting mixed level of different stages of economic integration. It also discusses the main achievements in the last twelve years, identifies the shortcomings as well as the opportunities and challenges facing the bloc in the near future.

  6. Energies of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthoefer, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper outlines the general principles of the energy policy of the Federal Government. The main points of emphasis are stressed, and the limits of energy supply for the ever-growing demand without new options are pointed out. For the future, a reasonable extension of nuclear power is required. Solar energy and energy conservation are no alternatives. The tendency of this papar points to the 2nd amendment of the energy programme of the Federal Government that will soon be published. (UA) 891 UA [de

  7. Present and future SDHW technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon

    1998-01-01

    A state of the art for the technology of pumped SDHW systems is given. The potential advantages by utilizing the relatively new low flow principle are described. Experience from laboratory tests of SDHW systems and from measurements on SDHW systems in practice are summarized. The conclusion...... is that the solar tank is the most important component for small SDHW systems from a thermal performance point of view and in many countries also from an economic point of view and that the design of marketed SDHW systems can be strongly improved. Finally, recommendations for future development work on SDHW systems...

  8. Present status and future plans of web site ''NUCPAL'' for school education in the field of nuclear radiation and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    ''NUCPAL'', a newly combined word of ''nuclear'' and ''pal'', means the fellows having common information for school education in the field of radiation and energy and is actively serving Japanese web-site for internet systems since 2002. The web-site offers basic knowledge information as IT materials for education about energy and environment in elementary, junior-high, and high schools. The kids corner opens since 2003, where people, for instance, call ''Trip to Seek where electricity comes from, '' the sequential game starts from the home electric tool to arrive the power line through terminal spots, and after several steps finally arrive the generator. Following activities are already on: Arrangement of lectures for school education on energy, radiation, and environment; Free charge releasing of video-tape and DVD for education; Issuing the text based on latest information; Introducing of typical example of practical cases for class rooms. (S. Ohno)

  9. Neutrino physics present and future

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of neutrinos has been revolutionized by the discovery that they have nonzero masses and very large mixing. We will explain the phenomenology of massive neutrinos, including neutrino oscillation in vacuum and in matter, and the physics of neutrinos that are their own antiparticles. We will review the evidence for neutrino masses and mixing, and summarize what has been learned about the neutrinos so far. Identifying the very interesting open questions raised by the discovery of neutrino mass, we will discuss how these questions may be answered through future experiments. Finally, we will consider the possibility that CP violation by neutrinos is the key to understanding the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, and discuss the see-saw theory of why neutrino masses are so tiny.

  10. Vegetarian nutrition: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitzmann, Claus

    2014-07-01

    Early human food cultures were plant-based. Major religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism have recommended a vegetarian way of life since their conception. The recorded history of vegetarian nutrition started in the sixth century bc by followers of the Orphic mysteries. The Greek philosopher Pythagoras is considered the father of ethical vegetarianism. The Pythagorean way of life was followed by a number of important personalities and influenced vegetarian nutrition until the 19th century. In Europe, vegetarian nutrition more or less disappeared during the Middle Ages. In the Renaissance era and in the Age of Enlightenment, various personalities practiced vegetarianism. The first vegetarian society was started in England in 1847. The International Vegetarian Society was founded in 1908 and the first vegan society began in 1944. Prominent vegetarians during this time included Sylvester Graham, John Harvey Kellogg, and Maximilian Bircher-Benner. A paradigm shift occurred at the turn of the 21st century. The former prejudices that vegetarianism leads to malnutrition were replaced by scientific evidence showing that vegetarian nutrition reduces the risk of most contemporary diseases. Today, vegetarian nutrition has a growing international following and is increasingly accepted. The main reasons for this trend are health concerns and ethical, ecologic, and social issues. The future of vegetarian nutrition is promising because sustainable nutrition is crucial for the well-being of humankind. An increasing number of people do not want animals to suffer nor do they want climate change; they want to avoid preventable diseases and to secure a livable future for generations to come. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Toward sustainable energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasztor, J. (United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya))

    1990-01-01

    All energy systems have adverse as well as beneficial impacts on the environment. They vary in quality, quantity, in time and in space. Environmentally sensitive energy management tries to minimize the adverse impacts in an equitable manner between different groups in the most cost-effective ways. Many of the enviornmental impacts of energy continue to be externalized. Consequently, these energy systems which can externalize their impacts more easily are favoured, while others remain relatively expensive. The lack of full integration of environmental factors into energy policy and planning is the overriding problem to be resolved before a transition towards sustainable energy futures can take place. The most pressing problem in the developing countries relates to the unsustainable and inefficient use of biomass resources, while in the industrialized countries, the major energy-environment problems arise out of the continued intensive use of fossil fuel resources. Both of these resource issues have their role to play in climate change. Although there has been considerable improvement in pollution control in a number of situations, most of the adverse impacts will undoubtedly increase in the future. Population growth will lead to increased demand, and there will also be greater use of lower grade fuels. Climate change and the crisis in the biomass resource base in the developing countries are the most critical energy-environment issues to be resolved in the immediate future. In both cases, international cooperation is an essential requirement for successful resolution. 26 refs.

  12. The development of the Ptolemais lignite deposit, present situation and future perspective of the electrical energy market (Greece)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavourides, Kostas

    1997-01-01

    PPC is by far the major producer of solid fuels in Greece. Currently the known exploitable reserves of solid fuels, are 4,0 billions tones of lignite and 4 billion cubic meters of peat. Mining of Lignite in Greece started in 1951 at the Aliveri underground mine and was continued at the open cast mines at Ptolemais (1955) and Megalopolis (1919). For more than 45 years. PPC has successfully exploited the Greece Lignite deposit for the production of electricity in order to satisfy the demand in Greece. Today PPC produces 60 million tons of lignite and handles approximately 275 million cubic meters of masses (overburden, lignite and interculated) per year. Lignite is the main energy resource in Greece and its combustion provides 75-80% of the electrical energy consumed in Greece.The Lignite Center of Ptolemais - Amyndeon (LCP-A) operated by the Greece PPC is located in northern Greece, about 110 km west of the city of Thessaloniki. The lignite deposits under exploitation cover an area. of 120 km 2 including 4000 Mt of proven geological reserves and 2700 Mt of exploitable lignite under current economic and technological criteria. Today LCP-A manages six active mines which in 1997 have a rate of handling 245 mil cubic meter of material and producing approx. 48 mil for of lignite. The continuous mining method which employs BWES, conveyors and strackers is the principal mining method used in all the lignite mines at the Ptolemais-Amyndeon Lignite Center. The implementation of selective mining procedures as well as discontinuous and /or combined mining methods differentiates the mining technology at the LCP-A from the respective technology applied in Germany lignite mines. The quality properties suggest that the lignite deposits in Greece are among the world's worst quality deposits exploited for energy production, where approximately 2 kg of lignite are consumed per I kWh of generated power. The main advantages of PPC'S coal orientated development program are the following

  13. Present and future superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief review of the status of present superconducting (SC) cyclotron projects, including the two which are currently operating and the six which are under construction. The next section summarizes the main features shared by five of these machines, while the third section presents recent developments and new concepts introduced in the other three ''second generation'' SC cyclotrons. Projects in early stages of development are discussed in the fourth section

  14. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  15. EPR dosimetry - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as co-ordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as biomarkers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Organisation of Standards (ISO) as well as those of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (author)

  16. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  17. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  18. Chirped pulse amplification: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, P.; Strickland, D.; Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G.; Harter, D.

    1988-01-01

    Short pulses with ultrahigh peak powers have been generated in Nd: glass and Alexandrite using the Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) technique. This technique has been successful in producing picosecond terawatt pulses with a table-top laser system. In the near future, CPA will be applied to large laser systems such as NOVA to produce petawatt pulses (1 kJ in a 1 ps pulse) with focused intensities exceeding 10/sup /plus/21/ W/cm 2 . These pulses will be associated with electric fields in excess of 100 e/a/sub o/ 2 and blackbody energy densities equivalent to 3 /times/ 10 10 J/cm 3 . This petawatt source will have important applications in x-ray laser research and will lead to fundamentally new experiments in atomic, nuclear, solid-state, plasma, and high-energy density physics. A review of present and future designs are discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs

  19. Petroleum - its present and future

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.; Qasim, S.Z.

    World's "published proved" reserve of oil by the end of 1984 was known to be of the order of 95,000 million tonnes. Of this, 57% lies buried in the middle eastern countries. At the present rate of growth in consumption and production of oil...

  20. BVDV: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    The term bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) has come to refer to a collection of diverse clinical presentations that include respiratory, enteric and reproductive diseases accompanied by immunosuppression. BVD may be caused by one of three different species of bovine pestivirus, bovine viral diarrhea viru...

  1. Intermetallics: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallics have seen extensive world-wide attention over the past decades. For the most part these studies have examined multi-phase aluminide based alloys, because of their high stiffness, combined with reasonable strength and ductility, good structural stability and oxidation resistance, and attempted to improve current Ni-base superalloys, Ti-base alloys, or Fe-base stainless steels for structural aerospace applications. The current status of development and application of such materials is briefly reviewed. Future developments are taking intermetallics from the realm of "improved high-temperature but low-ductility metallic alloys" into the realm of "improved aggressive-environment, high-toughness ceramic-like alloys". Such evolution will be outlined.

    Durante los últimos décadas ha habido un desarrollo de los intermetálicos, sobre todo por aplicaciones estructurales a alta temperatura en aplicaciones aeroespaciales, donde, por su rigidez alta, en combinación con una resistencia mecánica y ductilidad razonable, su buena estabilidad estructural y resistencia a la oxidación, han sido vistos como versiones avanzadas y mejoradas de las aleaciones metálicas como, por ejemplo, las superaleaciones a base de nitrógeno y las aleaciones de titanio. Se discute el desarrollo importante durante las últimas décadas, y también los nuevos desarrollos probables durante los próximos años. Se podrían ver los intermetálicos como versiones mejoradas de los cerámicos.

  2. Computer training, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The products of educational firms today lead toward a multimedia approach to the education and training of commercial programmers and systems analysts. Computer-assisted instruction or CAI is a relatively new medium to augment the other media. The government use of computers is discussed together with the importance of computer pretests. Pretests can aid in determining a person's ability to absorb a particular instructional level. The material presented in a number of computer courses is listed.

  3. Epidemiology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesteloot, H

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiology in the past was concerned essentially by the study of infectious diseases which were the cause of huge mortalities especially since urbanisation was initiated. Epidemics of pest, typhus, cholera, influenza a.o. were common. The epidemics were halted by better hygiene, vaccination and antibiotics. Since the second world war epidemiology was dominated by an "epidemic" of new chronic diseases, especially heart disease and cancer. This was due to an increase in life span and to an increase in smoking habits and in the intake of saturated fat and a too small intake of fruit and vegetables combined with a too high intake of salt (NaCl). Gradually epidemiology evolved as the study of the causes, the distribution, the risk factors and the prevention of chronic diseases, but also including accidents, suicide, depression a.o., diseases with a mass occurrence at the population level. The importance of nutrition as a determinant of health gradually became recognized, but remains undervalued by the medical profession. Mortality at the population level follows some simple mathematical laws and can be represented accurately (r2>0.99) between the ages of 35 and 84 year by either Gompertz equations (ln mortality versus age) or by a polynomial equation (ln mortality versus age, age2). This is valid for all populations and both sexes and remains valid at times of great and rapid changes in mortality. This shows that measures for prevention should be directed towards the total population. The future of epidemiology should be directed towards the slowing of the ageing process at the population level by a healthy life style consisting of: not smoking, avoiding obesity, a fair amount of physical activity and a healthy nutrition i.e little salt, little saturated fat, an adequate amount of omega-3 fatty acids and a large amount of fruit and vegetables, with an occasional glass of red wine. This contains the secret of a long and healthy life. Conceptually it will be important

  4. Cartography past, present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Rhind, DW

    2013-01-01

    Making maps dates back at least four thousand years and it is widely recognised that many maps are of great historical value and present a skilled method of summarising the real world on a sheet of paper. Less well known is the judgement involved in the selection and simplification of features, the complex transformation of space and the exacting standards which are needed in cartography. This book is primarily a tribute to Professor F.J. Ormeling, former President and Secretary/Treasurer of the ICA and gives a wide ranging review of the current status of cartography, how this status was atta

  5. Present and future arboviral threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott C; Reisen, William K

    2010-02-01

    , invaded Europe after climate warming and enabled the major midge vector to expand is distribution northward into southern Europe, extending the transmission season and vectorial capacity of local midge species. Perhaps the greatest health risk of arboviral emergence comes from extensive tropical urbanization and the colonization of this expanding habitat by the highly anthropophilic (attracted to humans) mosquito, Aedes aegypti. These factors led to the emergence of permanent endemic cycles of urban DENV and CHIKV, as well as seasonal interhuman transmission of yellow fever virus. The recent invasion into the Americas, Europe and Africa by Aedes albopictus, an important CHIKV and secondary DENV vector, could enhance urban transmission of these viruses in tropical as well as temperate regions. The minimal requirements for sustained endemic arbovirus transmission, adequate human viremia and vector competence of Ae. aegypti and/or Ae. albopictus, may be met by two other viruses with the potential to become major human pathogens: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, already an important cause of neurological disease in humans and equids throughout the Americas, and Mayaro virus, a close relative of CHIKV that produces a comparably debilitating arthralgic disease in South America. Further research is needed to understand the potential of these and other arboviruses to emerge in the future, invade new geographic areas, and become important public and veterinary health problems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Teratology - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujházy, Eduard; Mach, Mojmír; Navarová, Jana; Brucknerová, Ingrid; Dubovický, Michal

    2012-12-01

    Teratology is the science that studies the causes, mechanisms, and patterns of abnormal development. The authors present an updated overview of the most important milestones and stages of the development of modern teratology. Development of knowledge and society led to the recognition that causes of congenital developmental disorders (CDDs) might be caused by various mechanical effects, foetal diseases, and retarded or arrested development of the embryo and foetus. Based on the analysis of the historical development of hypotheses and theories representing a decisive contribution to this field, we present a survey of the six Wilson's fundamental principles of teratology. The aim of observing these principles is to get insight into developmental relations and to understand mechanisms of action on the level of cell populations (elementary morphogenetic processes), tissues and organs. It is important to realise that any negative intervention into the normal course of these processes, either on genetic or non-genetic basis, inevitably leads to a sequence of subsequent changes resulting in CDDs. Moreover, the classical toxicologic monotonic dose-response paradigm recently has been challenged by the so-called "low dose-hypothesis", particularly in the case of endocrine active substances. These include some pesticides, dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A. Despite modern approaches of molecular biology and genetics, along with top diagnostic techniques, we are still not able to identify the actual cause in more than 65 to 70% of all congenital defects classified as having an unknown etiology. Today CDDs include any birth defect, either morphological, biochemical, or behavioural.

  7. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  8. Crafting our energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Schagen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The new Asia-Pacific Greenhouse Agreement offers Australia a great opportunity to take full advantage of both its brains and its energy resources. The energy debate is often, simplistically, characterised as coal versus nuclear, or non-renewables versus renewables. In reality we will need a mix of energy sources to power our economy, cleanly, into the future. The issues are cost, environmental protection, national security, skills and security of energy supply. If we wish our economy to continue growing at present rates, we will need 50 per cent more energy in 2030 than we use today - and it is not too soon to start planning how we will produce it. We have around 500 years' supply of coal resources at present rates of usage. Power generation from coal is capable of achieving zero, or near zero, carbon emissions using technologies such as oxy-fuel combustion or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle). In both, C0 2 can be captured and stored underground. The greenhouse debate has revived interest in nuclear power generation. The cost of generating electricity with nuclear is similar to clean coal. However, we would have to start a nuclear power industry from a very small base, buying costly generation plant and training or importing an entire, highly-skilled workforce, in competition with other countries. Waste disposal is an issue for both coal and nuclear. For coal, the main option is carbon capture and its storage in deep saline aquifers. This technology is well understood and widely used by the oil and gas industry but we have to determine the most suitable places and techniques, and we have to build the infrastructure. Nuclear waste storage is also well-understood. Which technology we choose depends on an evaluation of both short and long term risks for the community and environment. One thing that Australia must get right is the economics. The wrong decision will cost us jobs, if not entire industries and regions. While renewables like solar and wind are

  9. EDITORIAL: The present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2006-09-01

    , Trends in Neuroscience, Journal of Physiology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science as well as in engineering and physics journals such as Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Physical Review Letters and IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. However, the number of citations in clinical journals is limited. What is special about Journal of Neural Engineering? JNE has published two special issues: (1) The Eye and the Chip (visual prostheses) (vol. 2, (1), 2005) and (2) Sensory Integration: Role of Internal Models (vol. 2, (3), 2005). These special issues have attracted a lot of attention based on the number of article downloads. JNE also publishes tutorials intended to provide background information on specific topics such as classification, sensory substitution and cortical neural prosthetics. A series of tutorials from the 3rd Neuro-IT and Neuroengineering Summer School has been published with the first appearing in vol. 2 (4), 2005. What is in the future for Journal of Neural Engineering? The goal of any journal should be to provide a particular field with the best venue for scientists and engineers to make their work available and noticeable to the rest of the community. In particular, attracting a strong readership base and high quality manuscripts should be the first priority. Providing accurate, reliable and speedy reviews should be the next. With an international board of experts in the field of neural engineering, a solid base of reviewers, readers and contributors, JNE is in a strong position to continue to serve the neural engineering community. However, this is still a small community and growth is essential for continued success in this area. There are two areas of expansion of great interest for the field of neural engineering currently poised between basic science on one hand and clinical implementation on the other: translational neuroscience and therapeutic neural engineering. We should strive to bridge the gap between basic neuroscience

  10. Surface Disinfections: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Saccucci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of antibiotic resistance increases the chances of major infections for patients during hospitalization and the spread of health related diseases. Therefore finding new and effective solutions to prevent the proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms is critical, in order to protect hospital environment, such as the surfaces of biomedical devices. Modern nanotechnology has proven to be an effective countermeasure to tackle the threat of infections. On this note, recent scientific breakthroughs have demonstrated that antimicrobial nanomaterials are effective in preventing pathogens from developing resistance. Despite the ability to destroy a great deal of bacteria and control the outbreak of infections, nanomaterials present many other advantages. Moreover, it is unlikely for nanomaterials to develop resistance due to their multiple and simultaneous bactericidal mechanisms. In recent years, science has explored more complex antimicrobial coatings and nanomaterials based on graphene have shown great potential in antibacterial treatment. The purpose of this article is to deepen the discussion on the threat of infections related to surface disinfection and to assess the state of the art and potential solutions, with specific focus on disinfection procedures using nanomaterials.

  11. Database Systems - Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The database systems have nowadays an increasingly important role in the knowledge-based society, in which computers have penetrated all fields of activity and the Internet tends to develop worldwide. In the current informatics context, the development of the applications with databases is the work of the specialists. Using databases, reach a database from various applications, and also some of related concepts, have become accessible to all categories of IT users. This paper aims to summarize the curricular area regarding the fundamental database systems issues, which are necessary in order to train specialists in economic informatics higher education. The database systems integrate and interfere with several informatics technologies and therefore are more difficult to understand and use. Thus, students should know already a set of minimum, mandatory concepts and their practical implementation: computer systems, programming techniques, programming languages, data structures. The article also presents the actual trends in the evolution of the database systems, in the context of economic informatics.

  12. UNSCEAR: present and future activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Lars-Erik

    2000-01-01

    United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established in 1955. The Committee reviews the exposure of the world population to all sources of radiation under normal circumstances as well as after accidents, and is also the prime international scientific body reviewing and assessing the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. Its estimates have been and are still being used by major international bodies including the ICRP, IAEA, and WHO. UNSCEAR's publications form the scientific basis on which international and national agencies develop appropriate radiation protection standards for workers, patients and the general public. UNSCEAR reports yearly to the General Assembly and submits regularly comprehensive reports with detailed scientific annexes on the sources and biological effects of ionizing radiation. In 1995, UNSCEAR began a new program of review of the sources, exposure and biological effects of ionizing radiation. A comprehensive report with scientific annexes will be published in the year 2000. The report will include exposures from natural and man-made radiation sources, occupational and medical radiation exposures, and dose assessment methodologies. The biological effects will cover epidemiological evaluation of radiation-induced cancer, DNA repair and mutagenesis, hereditary effects, combined effects of radiation and other agents, as well as models, mechanisms and uncertainties of biological effects at low radiation doses. An assessment of exposures and effects of the Chernobyl accidents is also made. A brief overview is presented here of the range of subjects considered by the Committee. (author)

  13. Exoplanets: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsiu Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of extra-solar planet systems is highly driven by advances in observations in the past decade. Thanks to high precision spectrographs, we are able to reveal unseen companions to stars with the radial velocity method. High precision photometry from the space, especially with the Kepler mission, enables us to detect planets when they transit their stars and dim the stellar light by merely one percent or smaller. Ultra wide-field, high cadence, continuous monitoring of the Galactic bulge from different sites around the southern hemisphere provides us the opportunity to observe microlensing effects caused by planetary systems from the solar neighborhood, all the way to the Milky Way center. The exquisite AO imaging from ground-based large telescopes, coupled with high-contrast coronagraph, captured the photons directly emitted by planets around other stars. In this article, I present a concise review of the extra-solar planet discoveries, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the major planetary detection methods, providing an overview of our current understanding of planetary formation and evolution given the tremendous observations delivered by various methods, as well as on-going and planned observation endeavors to provide a clear picture of extra-solar planetary systems.

  14. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  15. [ISRAEL NEONATOLOGY: PRESENT AND FUTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollberg, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    The practice of neonatology in Israel debuted in the 1970s as local enterprises by individual hospitals that needed to provide sick and preterm newly born infants with up-to-date and effective care. Descriptions of research and advances in humane and gentle treatment during neonatal care for preterm infants and their families, as well as prevention of neonatal infections, follow-up of preterm infants and care of full-term infants are presented in this issue. The Israel National Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) Infant database provides an excellent source of knowledge, which has led to multiple scientific publications. Recent international comparisons of the outcome of preterm VLBW infants, made possible by this unique database in Israel, has provided the neonatal community and the Ministry of Health with insights as to the differences in prognosis between Israel and other countries, especially among extremely low birth weight infants. At the border of viability, mortality in Israelis significantly higher than that reported in other countries and proactive steps undertaken to examine these differences and prompt correctional action should be pursued. The Israel Ministry of Health started positive initiatives and should ensure that their steps are implemented at the preterm infant's bedside.

  16. Energies of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    This document takes stock on the researches concerning the energies of the future. The hydrogen and the fuel cells take the main part with also the new fuels. Some researches programs are detailed as the costs decrease of the hydrogen engines, the design of an hydrogen production reactor from ethanol or the conversion of 95% of ethanol in gaseous hydrogen. (A.L.B.)

  17. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs

  18. Denmark`s energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The stated aim of the document published by the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy and the Danish Energy Agency is that it should form the basis for a broad public debate on the country`s future energy policy. The report has four main objectives: 1. To describe, with emphasis on the environment and the market, challenges that the energy sector will have to face in the future. 2. To illustrate the potentials for saving energy and for utilising energy sources and supply systems. 3. To present two scenarios of extreme developmental positions; the first where maximum effort is expended on increasing energy efficiency and the utilization of renewable energy and the second where no new initiative is taken and change occurs only when progress in available technology is exploited and 4. To raise a number of questions about our future way of living. Following the extensive summary, detailed information is given under the headings of: Challenges of the energy sector, Energy consumption and conservation, Energy consumption in the transport sector, Energy resources, Energy supply and production, Development scenario, and Elements of Strategy. The text is illustrated with maps, graphs and coloured photographs etc. (AB)

  19. A challenge in future transportation research and planning: paper presented at the Conference "Energy Technologies for a Sustainable Future", Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, 24.11.2000

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Peter

    2000-01-01

    To understand the future challenge for transportation research and planning, we must make a clear distinction between “mobility” and “transportation”. Mobility is understood to be the ca- pability or possibility of changing position within a specific system (space, society, economy, etc.). On the other hand “transportation” is “spatial mobility”, that is the capability or possibility of changing position within a spatial system (change of location, overcoming of space by peo- ple, goods, ener...

  20. Future energy perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Christensen, J.M. [Risoe National Lab., Systems Analysis Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-10-01

    Future energy perspectives: 1) The global energy consumption will continue to grow primarily in developing countries, their share of global energy consumption will grow from approx. 35% in 1990 to 60% in 2050. 2) Policy focus will be primarily on environmental concerns in the industrial countries and on energy for development and access to energy for the poor in developing countries. 3) With global climate concerns and the implementation of the Kyoto protocol, global environment issues will have increased prominence in energy sector priorities. 4) Fossil fuel resources are on a global level still abundant and prices are expected to be relatively low in the short to medium term. 5) Energy supply security has for geopolitical reasons become an increasing concern especially in the US and the EU. 6) Significant investments are required to ensure development of new clean energy technologies for introduction in the medium to long term. 7) Market reforms are being implemented in almost all regions of the world changing both the investment and policy regimes. 8) International studies (IPCC and WEC) have analysed several alternative energy scenarios Alternative policies and priorities can lead to a wide range of different energy futures. 9) WEC middle scenario B, from 1990 to 2050; predicts growth in GDP 3.5 times and primary energy consumption 2.2 times and CO{sub 2} 1.5 times. This scenario is expecting supply to be dominated by fossil fuel (80% in 1990 and still 65% in 2050), with high share of natural gas and nuclear with slow growth in renewable energy. 10) A more radical scenario (C1) is expecting renewable energy such as biomass, solar and wind to contribute 27% in 2050; declining oil and coal; increased use of natural gas and a minor contribution from nuclear. A development path like this require significant near-term investments in technology research and development. 11) The large increase in global energy demand in the next century will require large investments

  1. Future energy perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsnaes, K.; Christensen, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Future energy perspectives: 1) The global energy consumption will continue to grow primarily in developing countries, their share of global energy consumption will grow from approx. 35% in 1990 to 60% in 2050. 2) Policy focus will be primarily on environmental concerns in the industrial countries and on energy for development and access to energy for the poor in developing countries. 3) With global climate concerns and the implementation of the Kyoto protocol, global environment issues will have increased prominence in energy sector priorities. 4) Fossil fuel resources are on a global level still abundant and prices are expected to be relatively low in the short to medium term. 5) Energy supply security has for geopolitical reasons become an increasing concern especially in the US and the EU. 6) Significant investments are required to ensure development of new clean energy technologies for introduction in the medium to long term. 7) Market reforms are being implemented in almost all regions of the world changing both the investment and policy regimes. 8) International studies (IPCC and WEC) have analysed several alternative energy scenarios Alternative policies and priorities can lead to a wide range of different energy futures. 9) WEC middle scenario B, from 1990 to 2050; predicts growth in GDP 3.5 times and primary energy consumption 2.2 times and CO 2 1.5 times. This scenario is expecting supply to be dominated by fossil fuel (80% in 1990 and still 65% in 2050), with high share of natural gas and nuclear with slow growth in renewable energy. 10) A more radical scenario (C1) is expecting renewable energy such as biomass, solar and wind to contribute 27% in 2050; declining oil and coal; increased use of natural gas and a minor contribution from nuclear. A development path like this require significant near-term investments in technology research and development. 11) The large increase in global energy demand in the next century will require large investments. The

  2. Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The history of electrical energy production in Ontario and the surge of energy needs; water, coal and nuclear power are discussed. A look at CRNL, NPD, Pickering A and Bruce B stations is presented. The fission process is explained as well

  3. The Energy Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John; Bonino, Christopher A; Trainham, James A

    2018-06-07

    The foreseeable energy future will be driven by economics of known technologies and the desire to reduce CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere. Renewable energy options are compared with each other and with the use of fossil fuels with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). Economic analysis is used to determine the best of several alternatives. One can disagree on the detailed costs, including externalities such as climate change and air and water pollution. But the differences in capital and operating costs between known technologies are so significant that one can draw clear conclusions. Results show that renewable energy cannot compete with fossil fuels on a cost basis alone because energy is intrinsic to the molecule, except for hydroelectricity. However, fossil fuels are implicated in climate change. Using renewable energy exclusively, including transportation and electricity needs, could reduce the standard of living in the United States by 43% to 62%, which would correspond to the level in about 1970. If capture and sequester of CO 2 are implemented, the cost of using fossil fuels will increase, but they beat renewable energy handily as an economic way to produce clean energy.

  4. Bioenergy, its present and future competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Erik

    1999-01-01

    The thesis deals with aspects of the competitiveness of bioenergy. The central aim is to develop a number of concepts that enables an extended analysis. The thesis is composed of four studies. In study 1 and 2 the emphasis is put on two institutional frameworks within the forest company, i.e. the framework around the forest fuel operations and the framework around the industrial timber operations. Depending on which of the two institutional frameworks that makes up the basis for the understanding of forest fuel operations, the forest fuel operations will be given different roles and different priorities. Different goals and the process of integrating the forest fuel operations into the forest company will therefore be carried out with different means, different feelings and different resources. Study 3 examines the conceptions that the actors of the energy system uphold. The study presents the concept of logic, which is an institutionalised conception of the competitiveness of bioenergy. Logics can be seen as the dominating conceptions within the energy system and are decisive in determining the factors and parameters that state the competitiveness of different forms of energy. Study 4 argues that the strategical work concerning the competitiveness of bioenergy in the long-run to a great extent is about understanding, shaping and utilising the conceptions that affect the bioenergy system. The study problematises strategies that are used to develop bioenergy by introducing the uncertainty of the future into the analysis. The uncertainty of the future is captured in different scenarios

  5. The future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbia, C.

    2000-01-01

    The interest of politicians, businessmen, technologists, scientists and the people at large is focused today on the problem of energy. Everybody will agree on the fact that energy is necessary for the future of mankind. But many tend to paraphrase this by saying that energy is necessary evil. No objection to the necessity: but an analysis of the motivations for regarding energy as evil reveals some Freudian undertones. This scepticism towards technology, as a solution to the rising environmental concerns, perceived as a Faustian deal, after centuries of a passionate technical endeavour deeply engraved in the conception of the world, is a curious phenomenon to say the least. All these problems and the associated concerns are serious: the inevitable growth of energy consumption under the sheer momentum of society and the very human expectations of the poor, may indeed add enough yeast to make them leaven beyond control. However, like in the case of famine, illness etc., also here science and technology should be trusted; indeed there are reasonable expectations that, combined, they will have the possibility of solving also this problem, in full accord with the economic, dynamic and technical constraints that a working system has to comply with

  6. The future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbia, C.

    2001-01-01

    The interest of politicians, businessmen, technologists, scientists and the people at large is focused today on the problem of energy. Everybody will agree on the fact that energy is necessary for the future of mankind. But many tend to paraphrase this by saying that energy is necessary evil. No objection to the necessity: but an analysis of the motivations for regarding energy as evil reveals some Freudian undertones. This scepticism towards technology, as a solution to the rising environmental concerns, perceived as a Faustian deal, after centuries of a passionate technical endeavour deeply engraved in the conception of the world, is a curious phenomenon to say the least. All these problems and the associated concerns are serious: the inevitable growth of energy consumption under the sheer momentum of society and the very human expectations of the poor, may indeed add enough yeast to make them leaven beyond control. However, like in the case of famine, illness etc., also here science and technology should be trusted; indeed there are reasonable expectations that, combined, they will have the possibility of solving also this problem, in full accord with the economic, dynamic and technical constraints that a working system has to comply with

  7. The future of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbia, C. [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The interest of politicians, businessmen, technologists, scientists and the people at large is focused today on the problem of energy. Everybody will agree on the fact that energy is necessary for the future of mankind. But many tend to paraphrase this by saying that energy is necessary evil. No objection to the necessity: but an analysis of the motivations for regarding energy as evil reveals some Freudian undertones. This scepticism towards technology, as a solution to the rising environmental concerns, perceived as a Faustian deal, after centuries of a passionate technical endeavour deeply engraved in the conception of the world, is a curious phenomenon to say the least. All these problems and the associated concerns are serious: the inevitable growth of energy consumption under the sheer momentum of society and the very human expectations of the poor, may indeed add enough yeast to make them leaven beyond control. However, like in the case of famine, illness etc., also here science and technology should be trusted; indeed there are reasonable expectations that, combined, they will have the possibility of solving also this problem, in full accord with the economic, dynamic and technical constraints that a working system has to comply with.

  8. Securing India's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuraman, V.

    2009-01-01

    India's development aspirations are challenged by energy security and climate change considerations. The integrated energy policy clearly deliberates the need to intensify all energy options with emphasis on maximizing indigenous coal production, harnessing hydropower, increasing adoption of renewables, intensifying hydrocarbon exploration and production and anchoring nuclear power development to meet the long-term requirements. The report also emphasizes the need to secure overseas hydrocarbon and coal assets. Subsequently the National Action Plan on climate change has underscored the need to wean away from fossil fuels, the ambitious National Solar Mission is a case in point. Ultimately securing India's energy future lies in clean coal, safe nuclear and innovative solar. Coal is the key energy option in the foreseeable future. Initiatives are needed to take lead role in clean coal technologies, in-situ coal gasification, tapping coal bed methane, coal to liquids and coal to gas technologies. There is need to intensify oil exploration by laying the road-map to open acreage to unlock the hydrocarbon potential. Pursue alternate routes based on shale, methane from marginal fields. Effectively to use oil diplomacy to secure and diversify sources of supply including trans-national pipelines and engage with friendly countries to augment strategic resources. Technologies to be accessed and developed with international co-operation and financial assistance. Public-Private Partnerships, in collaborative R and D projects need to be accelerated. Nuclear share of electricity generation capacity to be increased 6 to 7% of 63000 MW by 2031-32 and further to 25% (300000 MW) capacity by 2050 is to be realized by operationalizing the country's thorium programme. Nuclear renaissance has opened up opportunities for the Indian industry to meet not only India's requirements but also participate in the global nuclear commerce; India has the potential to emerge as a manufacturing hub

  9. MOX in reactors: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Marc; Gros, Jean Pierre; Niquille, Aurelie; Marincic, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, MOX fuel has been supplied by AREVA for more than 30 years, to 36 reactors: 21 in France, 10 in Germany, 3 in Switzerland, 2 in Belgium. For the present and future, recycling is compulsory in the frame of sustainable development of nuclear energy. By 2030 the overall volume of used fuel will reach about 400 000 t worldwide. Their plutonium and uranium content represents a huge resource of energy to recycle. That is the reason why, the European Utilities issued an EUR (European Utilities Requirement) demanding new builds reactors to be able of using MOX Fuel Assemblies in up to 50 % of the core. AREVA GEN3+ reactors, like EPR TM or ATMEA TM designed with MHI partnership, are designed to answer any utility need of MOX recycling. The example of the EPR TM reactor operated with 100 % MOX core optimized for MOX recycling will be presented. A standard EPR TM can be operated with 100 % MOX core using an advanced homogeneous MOX (single Pu content) with highly improved performances (burn-up and Cycle length). The adaptations needed and the main operating and safety reactor features will be presented. AREVA offers the utilities throughout the world, fuel supply (UO 2 , ERU, MOX), and reactors designed with all the needed capability for recycling. For each country and each utility, an adapted global solution, competitive and non proliferant can be proposed. (authors)

  10. Evaporative cooling in ATLAS - present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Viehhauser, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector cooling system is the largest evaporative cooling system used in High Energy Physics today. During the installation and commissioning of this system many lessons had to be learned, but the system is now operating reliably, although it does not achieve all original design specifications in all its circuits. We have re-evaluated the requirements for the cooling system, in particular for the evaporation temperature, over the full ATLAS operational lifetime. We find that the critical requirement is for thermal stability at the end of the operation in the high-radiation environment. To predict this we have developed a simple thermal model of the detector modules which yields analytical expressions to evaluate the results of changes in the operating conditions. After a comparison of the revised requirements and the actual present cooling system performance we will discuss various modifications to the system which will be required for future operation. In parallel we are developing a cooling...

  11. Climatic Change--Past, Present & Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Roy C.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of studies investigating factors affecting climatic changes in the Earth's atmosphere--past, present, and future. Dating methods, particularly the Oxygen 18/16 method, are discussed. (SL)

  12. Fusion: Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    Fusion, which occurs in the sun and the stars, is a process of transforming matter into energy. If we can harness the fusion process on Earth, it opens the way to assuring that future generations will not want for heat and electric power. The purpose of this booklet is to introduce the concept of fusion energy as a viable, environmentally sustainable energy source for the twenty-first century. The booklet presents the basic principles of fusion, the global research and development effort in fusion, and Canada's programs for fusion research and development

  13. Maturity effects in energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos (Calgary Univ., AB (CA). Dept. of Economics)

    1992-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of maturity on future price volatility and trading volume for 129 energy futures contracts recently traded in the NYMEX. The results provide support for the maturity effect hypothesis, that is, energy futures prices to become more volatile and trading volume increases as futures contracts approach maturity. (author).

  14. Present market for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzo, M.A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present market for nuclear energy is present since nuclear production and electric power generation to the utilization of radioisotopes in medicine and biology. Some data about the main world suppliers to this market are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Storage rings: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisch, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    This lecture will attempt to review storage rings: past, present and future. I will spend more time on the past, because the past has produced most of our data, while the present can be rather brief. There is not yet much future data, but there are some plans about what we hope for. Professor Andy Sessler of Berkeley, who recently reviewed the early history of colliders, loaned me his slides; for this I have much appreciation

  16. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned

  17. Nuclear energy in our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear energy for electricity generation will extend its market portion in Europe in the coming decades because: 1) its economic and/or environment-relevant advantages compared with the fossil energy sources are so explicit that the latter will no longer be competitive; 2) the improvements of the system engineering, which are presently being implemented and are to be expected in the future, will enhance the safety facilities to the extent that accident risk will cease to be a decisive factor; 3) energy-saving effects or the use of solar energy will not provide an appropriate large scale alternative for coal and/or nuclear energy; 4) the problems of radioactive waste disposal will be definitely solved within the foreseeable future. Considering all the technological systems available the light water reactor will continue to dominate. The change to the breeder reactor is not yet under discussion because of the medium-term guaranteed uranium supply. The use of nuclear technology in the heating market will depend for the moment on the availability and cost of oil and gas development. In principle nuclear energy can play an important role also in this sector

  18. Food production - Present and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, C.G.

    1974-01-01

    This year the joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture celebrates its 10th anniversary. The aim of these two United Nations organizations is to ensure that the technical services of both FAO and IAEA are fully co-ordinated and their programmes are designed to assist developing Member States to apply isotopes and radiation techniques to the solution of food and agricultural problems. More precisely, the medium-term objectives of the Joint Division are to exploit the potential of nuclear techniques in research and development for increasing and stabilizing agricultural production, improving food quality, protecting agricultural products from spoilage and losses and minimizing pollution of food and the agricultural environment. This account of what radioisotopes can do for man in the agricultural field is therefore to a great extent a review of the activities of the Joint Division and a prediction of its future fields of emphasis, especially in the light of the present long-range and world-wide food crisis. (author)

  19. Socially responsible energy futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, C.

    1979-01-01

    After examining briefly the usual positions of nuclear critics and nuclear proponents, Dr. Starr says that the proponents (of whom he is one) have a broader case for nuclear power not thus far effectively advanced - a case based chiefly on a visible concern with social values and the future welfare of humanity. Such a broader case for nuclear power has always existed - a case based on motivations that initially spurred development of this energy resource over the past several decades, but one that has tended to be neglected in the public debate. A concern to avoid worldwide catastrophe is central to this broader case for nuclear power. The threat is perceived as resulting directly from the pending unavailability of petroleum and natural gas at a reasonable cost. This unavailability could lead to global tensions and political instabilities, economic crises, and, ultimately, to military conflicts based on need to obtain and control liquid-fuel resources. It is felt that past history and current events substantiate the threat inherent in the international struggle for raw materials. The broader - and more compelling - case for nuclear power lies in its potential for removing a major threat to the peace, stability, and welfare of the world that is inherent in the growing scarcity of petroleum and natural gas resources and in the limited geographical availability of coal. The catastrophe that could be avoided is at least as threatening as the one projected by those who oppose the use of nuclear power, and, Dr. Starr argues, more realistic in its potential for world-shattering impacts

  20. Nuclear energy, energy of the future or bad solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document presents the speeches of the debate on the nuclear energy solution for the future, presented during the meeting of the 6 may in Rennes, in the framework of the National Debate on the energies. The debate concerns the risks assessment and control, the solutions for the radioactive wastes, the foreign examples and the future of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  1. The present and future place of nuclear power in the world and its role in relation to environmental risks and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1987-03-01

    This speech was delivered at a Seminar on Managing Environmental Risks, 1987. It states and enlarges on the three following propositions: First, that the world will need more energy - not least electric energy - energy savings and modified lifestyles will not be enough to compensate for new needs; Second, that our choice of energy mixes is one of the important factors deciding what future environmental risk and damage we shall live with; Third, that nuclear power offers us one of the most environmentally benign sources of energy generation. The paper points to coal and nuclear energy as the two principal realistic options for future large-scale production of electricity in the world. Questions regarding nuclear safety are discussed in particular the accident at Chernobyl. As regards the use of coal and gas it is concluded that it is imperative to tighten the emission restrictions for environmental reasons. It is also stressed that the use of nuclear power should not be examined in isolation. The Agency's nuclear safety standards are mentioned since they are being reviewed to see if some of them should be updated in the light of lessons from Chernobyl. 2 refs

  2. Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethna, H.N.

    1981-01-01

    The very existence of modern civilization is dependent on the supply of energy which comes from sun, geothermal energy sources, hydroelectricity, tides, ocean winds and nuclear sources. Potential of these sources for long-term solution of man's energy problems is examined. Nuclear source of energy is discussed in detail and other sources are dealt in brief. Fission reactor system which is now generating power on commercial basis is described. The work being done on thermonuclear fusion reactor system to make it a practical system is surveyed. Research programs on laser and particle beam fusion are described. (M.G.B.)

  3. Present and future oscillation experiments at reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaehlyan, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    A report is presented on recent progress and developments (since the NANP'99 Conference) in the current and future long baseline (∼100 - 800 km) oscillation experiments at reactors. These experiments, under certain assumptions, can fully reconstruct the internal mass structure of the electron neutrino and provide a laboratory test of solar and atmospheric neutrino problems

  4. Present and Future of Gravitational Wave Experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    The status of the present detectors and of the main future projects will be reported. The recent results of a search for gravitational wave bursts, using the data collected by the ROG Collaboration cryogenic bar detectors EXPLORER (at CERN) and NAUTILUS (at LNF), will be discussed.

  5. Past, Present and Future in Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdorf, Georges

    1977-01-01

    Presents examples of interdisciplinary research since the origin of western science and predicts that future interdisciplinary approaches to epistemological writing will take into account divergent thinking patterns and thereby end the domination by western intellectual imperialism. For journal availability, see SO 506 201. (Author/DB)

  6. The energy future to 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy de la Tour, X.

    1999-01-01

    The energy future will continue for a long time to be dominated by fossil fuels, particularly oil and gas, which will still account for over half the energy supply in 202. Between now and then, the increasing share of the developing countries in he demand for energy will significantly alter energy geopolitics

  7. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs

  8. Food irradiation - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    A review is presented of historical developments, the present situation, and expected future developments in the field of food irradiation. Acceptance of the process in different parts of the world is not uniform. In the USA and in some other countries where health authorities actively encourage the use of this technology, commercial application has greatly advanced in recent years. In contrast, progress in the European Union is still slow

  9. Present and future development at Ganil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferme, J.

    1988-01-01

    GANIL has been in operation since January 1983. During this period beams from Carbon to Xenon have been available continuously for physics. There is now a demand to extend the ion range up to uranium, and to increase the beam intensity above the present level of about 3 microamperes with light ions. The corresponding modifications of the machine have been studied and will be made in the near future. Progress in ion sources, beam diagnostics, computer control is reported. Speculative considerations on the distant future are discussed

  10. The Future of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, John

    2006-01-01

    The idea of an energy crisis is fuelled by some legitimate concerns-security of supplies, climate change-and some groundless ones, be it the depletion of oil resources, the predatory nature of big oil companies, the link between energy prices and recession, or the role of the resources released by the producers. Many of these problems could be solved by a global market of increasing integration

  11. Vivos Voco: Herzen's Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Frances Parthe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A close reading of the journalism, correspondence, and memoirs of Alexander Herzen (1812–1870 yields a finely tuned relationship to past, present, and future, but not a complete philosophy of history. Herzen described no system, but repeated key metaphors (e.g., the libretto and concepts (e.g. contingency that reflected his understanding of the historical process. For Herzen, history became interesting when it was relieved of predetermined plots and algebraic formulas. However much he studied Russia’s past and planned its future, his preference was for the present, where freedom is most fully experienced in debate and in the need to choose a path forward. He understood the instrumentality of history in how the lives of ordinary people were affected, which remained his measure of progress. Herzen was a “historian of the present,” and his insights are remarkably applicable to twenty-first-century Russia.

  12. The Economics of America's Energy Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Henry

    This is an Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) pamphlet which reviews economic and technical considerations for the future development of energy sources. Included are sections on petroleum, synthetic fuels, oil shale, nuclear power, geothermal power, and solar energy. Also presented are data pertaining to U.S. energy production…

  13. Energy in India's Future: Insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourne, J.; Ramsay, W.C.; Jaureguy-Naudin, Maite; Boillot, Jean-Joseph; Autheman, Nicolas; Ruet, Joel; Siddiqui, Zakaria; Zaleski, C. Pierre; Cruciani, Michel

    2009-01-01

    In the decades following India's independence from British rule in 1947, the West's image of India was summarized in three simple cliches: the world's largest democracy, an impoverished continent, and economic growth hampered by a fussy bureaucracy and the caste system, all in a context of a particular religion. These cliches are perhaps one of the reasons that the success of India's green revolution was recognized so late, a revolution that allowed the country to develop its agricultural sector and to feed its population. Since the 1990's, the easing of planning constraints have liberated the Indian economy and allowed it to embark on a more significant path of growth. New cliches have begun to replace the old: India will become a second China and, lagging by 10 to 20 years, will follow the same trajectory, with its development marked more by services and the use of renewable energy. However, these trends will not prevent primary energy demand from exploding. On the contrary, India faces difficult choices on how it increases clean, secure, affordable energy to all its citizens. Many of the choices are the same as found elsewhere, but on a scale matched only by China. The IFRI European Governance and Geopolitics of Energy Project intends this study to deepen public understanding of the magnitude of India's challenges. Various aspects of the serious energy problems are studied throughout this monograph. The authors have written freely on these matters without attempting to reconcile their different viewpoints. The first chapter, by Maite Jaureguy-Naudin and Jacques Lesourne, presents an overview of India's present and future energy system. The authors follow a prudent but realistic view of India's future. The second chapter, by Jean-Joseph Boillot, a French expert on India who has published several books and articles on this subject, and Nicolas Autheman, research fellow, describes in greater detail the specifics of India's economy and the actors who are now present

  14. Scenarios of future energy intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present scenarios of potential change in energy intensities in the OECD countries and in the Soviet Union. These scenarios are meant to illustrate how intensities might evolve over the next 20 years given different conditions with respect to energy prices, energy-efficiency policies, and other key factors. Changes in intensity will also be affected by the rates of growth and stock turnover in each sector. They have not tried to forecast how activity levels and structure will evolve. However, the OECD scenarios assume a world in which GDP averages growth in the 2-3%/year range, with some differences among countries. For the Soviet Union, the degree and pace of intensity decline will be highly dependent on the success of the transition to a market economy; each scenario explicitly envisions a different degree of success. They have not constructed comparable scenarios for the developing countries. The scenarios presented in this chapter do not predict what will happen in the future. They believe, however, that they illustrate a plausible set of outcomes if energy prices, policies, programs, and other factors evolve as described in each case. With higher energy prices and vigorous policies and programs, intensities in the OECD countries in 2010 could be nearly 50% less on average than the level where trends seem to be point. In the former Soviet Union, a combination of rapid, successful economic reform and extra effort to improve energy efficiency might result in average intensity being nearly 40% less than in a slow reform case. And in the LDCs, a mixture of sound policies, programs, and energy pricing reform could also lead to intensities being far lower than they would be otherwise. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Nuclear energy - the future climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, Eric Sir

    2000-01-01

    In June 1999, a report entitled Nuclear Energy-The Future Climate was published and was the result of a collaboration between the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering. The report was the work of a group of nine people, made up of scientists, engineers and an economist, whose purpose was to attempt a new and objective look at the total energy scene and specifically the future role of nuclear energy. This paper discusses the findings of that report. (author)

  16. Contemplating future energy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooley, D.

    2005-01-01

    All political parties in the UK accept that we should move away from our reliance on fossil fuels towards a much greater use of alternative energy technologies. Nuclear power is one of these but finds minimal support in the political spectrum. The article reviews the European Commission's Advisory Group on Energy submission to the EC's report entitled 'Key Tasks for European Energy R and D'. The 'strength and weaknesses' of the various 'alternative energy' systems (including nuclear power) are summarised and then the key R and D tasks which, if they are carried out successfully, should make the eight selected technologies significantly more attractive. However, the message here is clear enough: there are no easy options, only a range of very imperfect possibilities, despite what enthusiastic proponents of each may say. Nuclear fission is certainly one of the most attractive options available, but the industry needs to continue to strive to eliminate the possibility of significant off-site releases, whether caused by plant failure or by human error or intention, and to prove beyond reasonable doubt the safety of high-level radioactive waste disposal. (author)

  17. Foreword. The Knowledge Economy: The Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Bratianu

    2017-01-01

    All the statistics and evaluations show that the Knowledge Economy is our future. However, a close look at the developed economies demonstrates that the Knowledge Economy is already here, shaping our present time. Although there are many definitions of this new economic framework, their core content stresses the importance of data, information, and knowledge in the production of goods and delivering services in creating value for society. For instance, Powell and Snellman (2004, p.1999) defin...

  18. Pastoral research: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, John J

    2004-01-01

    In healthcare environments of excellence, clinically trained chaplains are valued members of the medical treatment team. There are skills and values they hold in common with medicine and allied health disciplines: enhancing the health and well-being of the patient as a unity of body, mind, and spirit within a unique family and cultural system. This article examines the past, present, and future of pastoral research, including the chaplain's moral imperative to examine practice and to share what is found.

  19. Electric power: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnetzer, H.

    1994-01-01

    When, at the turn of the century, public electric power supply facilities were created and in 1908, the electric power stations of the Swiss canton of Zurich (EKZ) were built, only a third of the communities in the Zurich area could boast about being the consumers of this new energy. But what did the first electrically powered devices and machines look like? This, and more, is presented in the ''electric power house'' in Burenwisen Glattfelden in the canton of Zurich. Besides a Kaplan turbine and a sample of the most interesting devices from the past and the present, the focus of the exhibition is on the presentation of the new and old sources of light. The EKZ are pleased to be able to present their ''electric power house'' to the public, providing a broad range of information on energy-related questions and the development of electric power supply. (orig.) [de

  20. China's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsnell, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The influence of China's growing energy demand on world oil markets is considered. Starting from a very low base of energy consumption per capita, China's potential for growth in oil demand is likely still to be subject to the extremely strong impact of a stop-go economic policy in which the availability of oil is used as a macroeconomic control variable to counter inflation. This has led to considerable monthly variations in oil import levels. While this situation continues, the buying pressure from China will tend to alternate between a trickle and a flood with consequent destabilizing impacts on the market. The markets potentially involved are those of Asia, the Middle East, West Africa and the Mediterranean with knock-on effects in the North Sea and Rotterdam. China is likely to constitute a major indirect force in these markets as a volatile source of demand at the margin. (UK)

  1. The Windscale piles - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.M.; Adams, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the Windscale reactor piles, in which a fire occurred in the core of pile 1 thirty years ago. A description is given of the two Windscale piles, along with the events leading up to the accident, and the state of the piles following shutdown. The surveillance and maintenance to ensure that the pile and associated buildings were in a safe condition is outlined. The present state of the core, water ducts and pile chimneys is described. The present and future programme of work to ensure long term safety is discussed. This includes the initial steps in decommissioning of the piles. (U.K.)

  2. The PV market - Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper forecasts the photovoltaic (PV) market growth for the 1900's. Ten years of PV history are reviewed and used to establish market trends in terms of average selling price (ASP) and kilowatts shipped by market segment. The market is segmented into indoor consumer, stand-alone, and grid-connected applications. Indoor consumer presently represents a saturated market and is fairly predictable. The stand-alone market (i.e. not connected to the utility grid) is fairly stable and predictable. The utility PV market, however, is highly dependent on a number of market factors such as the cost of conventional energy, the cost of PV systems, utility acceptance of PV, and regulatory controls. Government and institutional regulations, environmental issues, OPEC and Middle East politics will have the greatest impact on the cost of conventional fuels. Private and federal investment in PV technology development could have a significant impact on the cost of PV systems. Forecasts are provided through the year 2000 for indoor consumer, stand-alone, and utility markets. PV has unique attributes which make it a desirable source of energy in specific applications. It is a renewable source of energy, non-polluting, very reliable, predictable, low maintenance, modular, and has a very low operating cost. The energy source (sunlight) is distributed around the globe. Its limitations are high initial cost, no inherent energy storage, and low energy density

  3. Speaker's presentations. Energy supply security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierret, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of most of the papers used by the speakers of the European Seminar on Energy Supply Security organised in Paris (at the French Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry) on 24 November 2000 by the General Direction of Energy and Raw Materials, in co-operation with the European Commission and the French Planning Office. About 250 attendees were present, including a lot of high level Civil Servants from the 15 European State members, and their questions have allowed to create a rich debate. It took place five days before the publication, on 29 November 2000, by the European Commission, of the Green Paper 'Towards a European Strategy for the Security of Energy Supply'. This French initiative, which took place within the framework of the European Presidency of the European Union, during the second half-year 2000. will bring a first impetus to the brainstorming launched by the Commission. (author)

  4. Hydroelectric power in Romania. Past - present - future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the past and present situation in hydroelectric power (achievements, rates of commissioning and so on) and the future strategies for the hydroelectric power resource development in the conditions of a free market economy. At present the contribution of hydroelectric power in the Romania's total power balance is about 16,500 GW h/year which represents nearly 28 %. The theoretical hydroelectric power potential of Romania is 75,000 GW h/year while the technical potential, which could actually be developed, is only 40,000 GW h/year. Finally, there are presented the main directions in the hydroelectric power development up to the year 2020. (author) 3 tabs

  5. Quantum technology past, present, future: quantum energetics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2017-04-01

    Since the development of quantum physics in the early part of the 1900s, this field of study has made remarkable contributions to our civilization. Some of these advances include lasers, light-emitting diodes (LED), sensors, spectroscopy, quantum dots, quantum gravity and quantum entanglements. In 1998, the NASA Langley Research Center established a quantum technology committee to monitor the progress in this area and initiated research to determine the potential of quantum technology for future NASA missions. The areas of interest in quantum technology at NASA included fundamental quantum-optics materials associated with quantum dots and quantum wells, device-oriented photonic crystals, smart optics, quantum conductors, quantum information and computing, teleportation theorem, and quantum energetics. A brief review of the work performed, the progress made in advancing these technologies, and the potential NASA applications of quantum technology will be presented.

  6. Space exploration - Present and future challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Our future deep-space exploration faces many daunting challenges, but three of them loom high above the rest: physiological debilitation, radiation sickness and psychological stress. Many measures are presently being developed to reduce these difficulties. However, in the long run, two important new developments are required: abundant supply of power, and advanced space propulsion. The future looks bright, however. While the road is a long one, it is now well defined and many exciting explorations are within near-term reach.BiographyDr. Chang-Diaz graduated from MIT in the field of applied plasma physics and fusion research. He has been a NASA space shuttle astronaut on seven missions between 1986 and 2002. As director of the ASP Laboratory in Houston, he continues research on plasma rockets.For more details: see www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/chang.htmlNote: Tea and coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs.

  7. Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David S.; Davis, Michael G.

    2010-09-01

    Questions about global warming concern climate scientists and the general public alike. Specifically, what are the reliable surface temperature reconstructions over the past few centuries? And what are the best predictions of global temperature change the Earth might expect for the next century? Recent publications [National Research Council (NRC), 2006; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2007] permit these questions to be answered in a single informative illustration by assembling temperature reconstructions of the past thousand years with predictions for the next century. The result, shown in Figure 1, illustrates present and future warming in the context of natural variations in the past [see also Oldfield and Alverson, 2003]. To quote a Chinese proverb, “A picture's meaning can express ten thousand words.” Because it succinctly captures past inferences and future projections of climate, the illustration should be of interest to scientists, educators, policy makers, and the public.

  8. A Wedge of Time: Futures in the Present and Presents Without Futures in Maputo, Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    its own inevitable collapse, thus making it crucial to maintain appropriate distance between the two. Whereas the imagined perspective from the future suggests an immediate readability of the present, the inverse temporal gaze (i.e. from the present) reflects the radical uncanniness of the future...

  9. Canada's energy future : 2008 workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The National Energy Board hosted this Energy Futures Workshop as a follow-up to its report entitled Canada's Energy Future: Reference Case and Scenarios to 2030, which focused on emerging trends in energy supply and demand. Various energy futures that may be available to Canadians up to the year 2030 were examined. This workshop addressed issues regarding the growing demand for energy, the adequacy of future energy supplies, and related issues of greenhouse gas emissions, emerging technologies, energy infrastructure and energy exports. The workshop was attended by 18 experts who presented their diverse views on long-term energy issues. The sessions of the workshop focused on external and key geopolitical issues that will influence Canadian energy markets; the adoption of alternative and emerging sources of energy; outlook for Canadian oil supply, including oil sands development, reservoir quality, and financial, environmental and technological issues; issues in electricity generation and transmission; gas market dynamics; and carbon dioxide capture and storage and the associated benefits and challenges. There was general consensus that global and Canadian energy markets will remain in a state of flux. Crude oil prices are likely to remain high and volatile. The combination of maturing energy resource basins and geopolitical tensions has created uncertainty about future availability and access to global energy resources. 2 figs., 3 appendices

  10. Sustainability in Australia, past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sligar, J.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 50 years Australia has generally maintained adequate energy supplies to its population in an increasingly efficient and sustainable manner It has also been able to help sustain other economies in supplying energy resources of coal, gas and uranium. This provides 20% of Australia's export income, contributing to the quality of life experienced by Australians.Presently the reserve margin in the electricity power system is adequate and, with the exception of oil, ample local energy resources are available. Over the same period the doubling in energy generation efficiency has matched the population growth in NSW The same contributions by technology and population can be expected over the next 50 years. The growth in demand has however increased by a factor of about five.Sensible demand management could reduce this to a more acceptable figure over the next 50 years as shown in two possible scenarios. This, coupled with ongoing energy exports will help sustain the quality of life in this economy

  11. Present and Future of Nuclear Robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielza Ciaz-Caneja, M.; Carmena Servet, P.; Gomez Santamaria, J.; Gonzalez Fernandez, J.; Izquierdo Mendoza, J.A.; Linares Pintos, F.; Martinez Gonzalez; Muntion Ruesgas, A.; Serna Oliveira, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    New technologies have increased the use of robotic systems in fields other than Industry. As a result, research and developers are focusing their interest in concepts like Intelligent Robotics and Robotics in Services. This paper describes the use of Robotics in Nuclear facilities, where robots can be used to protect workers in high radiation areas, to reduce total worker exposure and to minimise downtime. First, the structure of robot systems is introduced and the benefits of nuclear robots is presented. Next, the paper describes some specific nuclear applications and the families of nuclear robots present in the market. After that, a section is devoted to Nuclear Robotics in Spain, with emphasis in some of the developments being carried out at present. Finally, some reflections about the future of robots in Nuclear Industry are offered. (Author) 18 refs

  12. African rainforests: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Yadvinder; Adu-Bredu, Stephen; Asare, Rebecca A; Lewis, Simon L; Mayaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The rainforests are the great green heart of Africa, and present a unique combination of ecological, climatic and human interactions. In this synthesis paper, we review the past and present state processes of change in African rainforests, and explore the challenges and opportunities for maintaining a viable future for these biomes. We draw in particular on the insights and new analyses emerging from the Theme Issue on 'African rainforests: past, present and future' of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. A combination of features characterize the African rainforest biome, including a history of climate variation; forest expansion and retreat; a long history of human interaction with the biome; a relatively low plant species diversity but large tree biomass; a historically exceptionally high animal biomass that is now being severely hunted down; the dominance of selective logging; small-scale farming and bushmeat hunting as the major forms of direct human pressure; and, in Central Africa, the particular context of mineral- and oil-driven economies that have resulted in unusually low rates of deforestation and agricultural activity. We conclude by discussing how this combination of factors influences the prospects for African forests in the twenty-first century.

  13. Econometrics in R: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Zeileis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, computational methods and software have been receiving more attention in the econometrics literature, emphasizing that they are integral components of modern econometric research. This has also promoted the development of many new econometrics software packages written in R and made available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network. This special volume on "Econometrics in R" features a selection of these recent activities that includes packages for econometric analysis of cross-section, time series and panel data. This introduction to the special volume highlights the contents of the contributions and embeds them into a brief overview of other past, present, and future projects for econometrics in R.

  14. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  15. In Celebration of Past, Present and Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Per Frederik Vilhelm; Jakobsen, David; Øhrstrøm, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of determinism led him to a reconstruction of the famous Diodorean Master Argument which had for centuries been regarded as a strong argument in favour of determinism. In his further analysis of the problem, he made extensive use of tense-logic and the idea of branching time suggested to him by Saul Kripke....... However, in Past, Present and Future Prior also stresses that time as such should not simply be understood in terms of branching time diagrams. Such diagrams should be seen not as direct representations of time but rather as figures helpful for understanding a deeper tense-logical structure....

  16. Australian internet histories: Past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2012-01-01

    be worth considering in the future: constituting the field based on shared theoretical and methodological reflections; using archived web material to a larger extent; participating in the shaping of a digital research infrastructure for internet studies; and increasing international research relations.......This Afterword compares the articles in this issue of Media International Australia to the ‘first wave’ of Australian internet historiography, a field of study established by Australian internet scholars around 2000. After identifying what is new in the present issue, I outline four paths that may...

  17. Automotive sensors: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosser, S J

    2007-01-01

    This paper will provide a review of past, present and future automotive sensors. Today's vehicles have become highly complex sophisticated electronic control systems and the majority of innovations have been solely achieved through electronics and the use of advanced sensors. A range of technologies have been used over the past twenty years including silicon microengineering, thick film, capacitive, variable reluctance, optical and radar. The automotive sensor market continues to grow with respect to vehicle production level in recognition of the transition to electronically controlled electrically actuated systems. The environment for these sensors continues to be increasingly challenging with respect to robustness, reliability, quality and cost

  18. Automotive sensors: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, S. J.

    2007-07-01

    This paper will provide a review of past, present and future automotive sensors. Today's vehicles have become highly complex sophisticated electronic control systems and the majority of innovations have been solely achieved through electronics and the use of advanced sensors. A range of technologies have been used over the past twenty years including silicon microengineering, thick film, capacitive, variable reluctance, optical and radar. The automotive sensor market continues to grow with respect to vehicle production level in recognition of the transition to electronically controlled electrically actuated systems. The environment for these sensors continues to be increasingly challenging with respect to robustness, reliability, quality and cost.

  19. Past, present, and future of statistical science

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xihong; Banks, David L; Molenberghs, Geert; Scott, David W; Wang, Jane-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Past, Present, and Future of Statistical Science was commissioned in 2013 by the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies (COPSS) to celebrate its 50th anniversary and the International Year of Statistics. COPSS consists of five charter member statistical societies in North America and is best known for sponsoring prestigious awards in statistics, such as the COPSS Presidents' award. Through the contributions of a distinguished group of 50 statisticians who are past winners of at least one of the five awards sponsored by COPSS, this volume showcases the breadth and vibrancy of statisti

  20. Scientific visualization - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodlie, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of scientific visualization from a historical orientation. It looks first at visualization before the advent of computers, and then goes on to describe the development of early visualization tools in the 'computer age'. There was a surge of interest in visualization in the latter part of the 1980s, following the publication of an NSF report. This sparked the development of a number of major visualization software systems such as AVS and IRIS Explorer. These are described, and the paper concludes with a look at future developments. ((orig.))

  1. IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-14

    This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

  2. The future of energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.; O' Keefe, P.; Snape, C.

    1994-12-15

    An analysis of the use of different forms of energy and its environmental and social impacts. Giving an overview of the development of different forms of energy provision and patterns of supply and demand, this book shows how enduse applies to energy industries, how the environment and social costs of energy use have to be introduced into energy planning and accounting and the crucial role of efficiency. Case studies will include the transport and building sectors of industrial economies, the use of stoves and woodfuel and agroforestry planning in developing countries. It will then examine the different forms of energy - conventional, nuclear and renewable - concluding by setting out different energy futures and the policy requirements for sustainable futures. (author)

  3. Internet interventions: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Andersson

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Internet interventions have been around now for about 20 years. While the field still suffers from a scattered terminology a large number of programs and studies exist. In the present paper I present an overview of my experiences of studying internet-supported cognitive-behaviour therapy (ICBT, but also mention other approaches including the use of smartphones. The paper covers the history of ICBT, short-term effects in controlled trials for a range of conditions, long-term effects, comparisons against face-to-face therapy, effectiveness studies, prediction studies, how the treatment is perceived, critique, and finally future directions. I conclude that we have now reached a stage in which we have numerous evidence-based treatments and procedures, and increasingly internet interventions including ICBT are disseminated. Keywords: Internet treatment, Therapist guidance, Anxiety, Mood disorders, Somatic disorders

  4. Transmission access issues: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahl, P.K.; Gray, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the electric industry has undergone dramatic changes as the federal and state governments have encouraged bulk power production by Independent Power Producers (IPPS) and Qualified Facilities (QFs). With decentralization and the consequent competition in the field of bulk power production, there has emerged the problem of non-utility generators (NUGS) and of transmission dependent utilities accessing the existing transmission systems owned by electric utilities. This paper presents current and future issues related to transmission access by IPPS, QFs and transmission dependent utilities. These issues include: (a) impact on system reliability, (b) impact of pricing strategies, (c) changes in state and federal regulations, (d) transmission proposals by various entities, (e) present access arrangements, (f) formation of the Western Systems Power Pool (WSPP), and (g) siting difficulties. The transmission access problem warrants consideration of transmission services, coordination among electric utilities, joint planning on a regional basis, and accommodation of IPPs and NUGs

  5. Nuclear energy facing the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the IAEA, the contribution that nuclear energy can make to future world energy requirements is discussed and nuclear power generation statistics examined with especial reference to data on capacity and outages. (U.K.)

  6. Future of energy managers groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshaw, T.

    1979-07-01

    The objectives of the Energy Managers Groups, formed to provide a regular opportunity for industry and commerce to exchange views and experiences on energy conservation matters are discussed. Group procedure, liaison and cooperation, government support, and options for the future are discussed. (MCW)

  7. Clinic exam room design: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freihoefer, Kara; Nyberg, Gary; Vickery, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to deconstruct various design qualities and strategies of clinic exam rooms, and discuss how they influence users' interaction and behavior in the space. Relevant literature supports the advantages and disadvantages of different design strategies. Annotated exam room prototypes illustrate the design qualities and strategies discussed. Advancements in technology and medicine, along with new legislative policies, are influencing the way care providers deliver care and ultimately clinic exam room designs. The patient-centered medical home model has encouraged primary care providers to make patients more active leaders of their health plan which will influence the overall functionality and configuration of clinic exam rooms. Specific design qualities discussed include overall size, location of doors and privacy curtains, positioning of exam tables, influence of technology in the consultation area, types of seating, and placement of sink and hand sanitizing dispensers. In addition, future trends of exam room prototypes are presented. There is a general lack of published evidence to support design professionals' design solutions for outpatient exam rooms. Future research should investigate such topics as the location of exam tables and privacy curtains as they relate to patient privacy; typical size and location of consultation table as it relates to patient connection and communication; and placement of sinks and sanitization dispensers as they relate to frequency and patterns of usage. Literature review, outpatient, technology, visual privacy.

  8. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  9. WOODEN FLOORING – BETWEEN PRESENT AND FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan CISMARU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at presenting a systematization of the wood floors, both in terms of the areas of application, and in terms of the fastening solutions and structures in constructions. In this respect, an extensive bibliographic research was achieved, on the researchers’ preoccupations. Starting from the current situation and forecasting the future, from the point of view of the chances held by wooden flooring, in competition with other types of materials, we dare say the wooden flooring or the wood in combination with other materials are not likely to be eliminated from the “civil-engineering market”. The wood floors are likely to develop as an application, especially in the area of the “special floors”, specific to the indoor sports or social halls; and even for some industrial sectors, with strict operating conditions (elasticity, thermal insulation, soundproofing that cannot be provided by other types of materials or structures. Starting from this last observation, the paper also aims at submitting current opinions with respect to this type of floors, both in the light of the current databases and in the light of the future researches, to this end

  10. ATLAS Forward Detectors: present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In addition to the main central detectors, the ATLAS experiment has also four subdetectors situated in a forward region hundreds of meters far from the interaction point and dedicated to measure particles leaving under very small angles the ATLAS proton-proton impact point. Particularly, LUCID is dedicated to luminosity measurement while ALFA, ZDC and AFP are committed to forward physics studies. ALFA is devoted to the measurement of proton elastic scattering, ZDC is dedicated to detect proton and neutral particles travelling along the beam axis and AFP aims to measure momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. This presentation will give an overview on the detectors status, the results obtained during the RUN 2 period of data taking and the future plans for the next years.

  11. Clinical linguistics: its past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    Historiography is a growing area of research within the discipline of linguistics, but so far the subfield of clinical linguistics has received virtually no systematic attention. This article attempts to rectify this by tracing the development of the discipline from its pre-scientific days up to the present time. As part of this, I include the results of a survey of articles published in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics between 1987 and 2008 which shows, for example, a consistent primary focus on phonetics and phonology at the expense of grammar, semantics and pragmatics. I also trace the gradual broadening of the discipline from its roots in structural linguistics to its current reciprocal relationship with speech and language pathology and a range of other academic disciplines. Finally, I consider the scope of clinical linguistic research in 2011 and assess how the discipline seems likely develop in the future.

  12. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE – PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Monica ALEXE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In a society constantly evolving, with information technologies being in a permanent transformation, the managers of agile, flexible organizations, which are equipped with the latest tools for making decisions and with people well trained to use them, will be able to successfully meet the challenges of the future. This paper presents the evolution of Business Intelligence and a comparative analysis between two modern developments of it, such as Mobile Business Intelligence and Cloud Business Intelligence, with accent on the advantages, disadvantages, implications and benefits at the company level. These are useful tools suitable for the management of the companies that are obliged to operate in a global economy facing with crisis.

  13. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  14. CANDU fuel cycles - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooradian, A.J.

    1976-05-01

    The present commercially proven Canadian nuclear power system is based on a once-through natural uranium fuel cycle characterized by high uranium utilization and a high conversion efficiency. The cycle closes with secure retrievable storage of spent fuel. This cycle is based on a CANDU reactor concept which is now well understood. Both active and passive fuel storage options have been investigated and will be described in this paper. Future development of the CANDU system is focussed on conservation of uranium by plutonium and thorium recycle. The full exploitation of these options requires continued emphasis on neutron conservation, efficiency of extraction and fuel refabrication processes. The results of recent studies are discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Medical physics: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostylev, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    History of the medical physics is briefly described, assessment of its present status in the world and in Russia is performed, its prospects are discussed. It was shown that the first period of interrelation of medicine and physics (18-19 centuries) was characterized by active study of mechanical, thermal physical, electrical, optical, acoustic phenomena in human body and by creation of corresponding devices. The second period (the end of 19 - the middle of 20 century) is connected with the discoveries of X-rays and radioactivity, development of the theory of atomic structure, atomic nuclei, electromagnetic radiations. The second half of the 20 century is notable for the development and wide practical application of radionuclide gamma apparatuses, electron and proton accelerators, radiodiagnostic gamma cameras, X-ray computerized tomographs, single photon emission radionuclide tomographs, magnetic resonance tomographs, magnetotherapy, laser, ultrasonic and other techniques and devices. It is marked that in future the efficiency and quality of medicophysical technologies will advance [ru

  16. Comparison of future energy scenarios for Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Pil Seok; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2012-01-01

    Scenario-making is becoming an important tool in energy policy making and energy systems analyses. This article probes into the making of scenarios for Denmark by presenting a comparison of three future scenarios which narrate 100% renewable energy system for Denmark in 2050; IDA 2050, Climate...... Commission 2050, and CEESA (Coherent Energy and Environmental System Analysis). Generally, although with minor differences, the scenarios suggest the same technological solutions for the future such as expansion of biomass usage and wind power capacity, integration of transport sector into the other energy...

  17. African rainforests: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Yadvinder; Adu-Bredu, Stephen; Asare, Rebecca A.; Lewis, Simon L.; Mayaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The rainforests are the great green heart of Africa, and present a unique combination of ecological, climatic and human interactions. In this synthesis paper, we review the past and present state processes of change in African rainforests, and explore the challenges and opportunities for maintaining a viable future for these biomes. We draw in particular on the insights and new analyses emerging from the Theme Issue on ‘African rainforests: past, present and future’ of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. A combination of features characterize the African rainforest biome, including a history of climate variation; forest expansion and retreat; a long history of human interaction with the biome; a relatively low plant species diversity but large tree biomass; a historically exceptionally high animal biomass that is now being severely hunted down; the dominance of selective logging; small-scale farming and bushmeat hunting as the major forms of direct human pressure; and, in Central Africa, the particular context of mineral- and oil-driven economies that have resulted in unusually low rates of deforestation and agricultural activity. We conclude by discussing how this combination of factors influences the prospects for African forests in the twenty-first century. PMID:23878339

  18. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, K-H

    2014-01-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  19. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, K-H [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  20. Charged particle activation analysis: present status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis is a highly sensitive nuclear analytical technique for the determination of elements at trace and ultra trace levels. CPAA involves the irradiation of samples with high energy charged particles, both light ions and heavy ions, from an accelerator in the energy range of 10 to 100 MeV. CPAA has been developed and standardized for the determination of several elements at trace levels in various types of materials using high energy ion beams from VEC machine at Kolkata. A brief review on CPAA is presented here based on our present works and its applications in future. (author)

  1. Optical MEMS: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Chandra Mouli

    2005-09-01

    Spurred by the growth of the internet, Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, experienced unprecedented growth during late 1990's. During this time of great economic expansion, the creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was breathtaking. Unfortunately, this positive economic state was short-lived. This period was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. During those 10 years of economic growth, about $20B in venture capital was invested in the optical telecom industry, most of this investment was lost in recent years. Many start-up industries which experienced unprecedented growth at the end of the 20th century were lost at the start of the 21st. (1) During this time many, innovative technologies were born and buried. However, many new capabilities emerged from this period of unrest; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Many academics and corporate laboratories pursued the development of MOEMS during the economic boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS surfaced as a powerful and versatile tool set that has proved invaluable and in the last few years during economic downturn, stood the test of time. In the Telecommunications industry, for optical switching and wavelength management applications MOEMS has proven to be the technology of choice. (2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss its byproducts and offer a window into the future of the technology.

  2. Cognition in schizophrenia: Past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Green

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia Research: Cognition will serve an important function – a place where interests converge and investigators can learn about the recent developments in this area. This new journal will provide rapid dissemination of information to people who will make good use of it. In this initial article, we comment globally on the study of cognition in schizophrenia: how we got here, where we are, and where we are going. The goal of this first article is to place the study of cognition in schizophrenia within a historical and scientific context. In a field as richly textured as ours it is impossible to hit all the important areas, and we hope the reader will forgive our omissions. Phrased in cognitive terms, our limited presentation of the past is a matter of selective memory, the present is a matter of selective attention, and the future is a matter of selective prospection. This broad introduction emphasizes that cognition in schizophrenia provides clues to pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. In fact, the study of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia has become wholly intertwined with the study of schizophrenia itself.

  3. Biography of biophenols: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan K. Obied

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: The term “biophenols” was first coined by Romeo and Uccella in 1996 to denote bioactive phenols in olives replacing the more common and less chemically accurate term “polyphenols”. “Biophenols” has started gaining popularity beyond olive chemistry and currently used by researchers to refer to plant phenols in general. Biophenols constitute the largest group of secondary plant metabolites with ubiquitous presence in plants and wide spectrum of biological activities. During the last three decades, biophenols have seized scientific attention, lured industry and attracted consumers’ interest due to their antioxidative potential in preservation of food and maintaining human health. For the first time, a definition for “biophenols” has been proposed to present a more precise and comprehensive umbrella term to encompass all phenolic compounds of botanical origin. In this article, the author is tracing the landmarks of the history of biophenol research; profiling contemporary research directions; highlighting research controversies and uncertainties; and presenting an outlook of the biophenols future research.Keywords: polyphenols, chemistry, pharmacology, biological activities, antioxidant

  4. PAH Spectroscopy: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in the 1970's, astronomers, astrophysicists and astrochemists have been intrigued by the nearly ubiquitous unidentified infrared emission (UIR) bands. In the 1980's, investigators determined the most probably source of these emissions was a family of molecules known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or simply PAHs. In order to better understand these interstellar IR features and utilize them as chemical probes of the cosmos, laboratory spectroscopists have spent the last three decades investigating the spectroscopy of PAHs under astrophysically relevant conditions. This presentation will discuss the similarities and differences in the spectroscopic properties of PAHs as one goes from the Far to Mid to Near infrared wavelength regions and probe the changes observed in PAH spectra as they go from neutral to ionized molecules suspended in an inert gas matrix, to PAHs in a water ice matrix and as a thin film. In selected instances, the experimental results will be compared to theoretical values. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on the future directions of PAH spectroscopy.

  5. Global Energy Assessment. Toward a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, T B; Nakicenovic, N; Patwardhan, A; Gomez-Echeverri, L [eds.

    2012-11-01

    The Global Energy Assessment (GEA) brings together over 300 international researchers to provide an independent, scientifically based, integrated and policy-relevant analysis of current and emerging energy issues and options. It has been peer-reviewed anonymously by an additional 200 international experts. The GEA assesses the major global challenges for sustainable development and their linkages to energy; the technologies and resources available for providing energy services; future energy systems that address the major challenges; and the policies and other measures that are needed to realize transformational change toward sustainable energy futures. The GEA goes beyond existing studies on energy issues by presenting a comprehensive and integrated analysis of energy challenges, opportunities and strategies, for developing, industrialized and emerging economies. This volume is an invaluable resource for energy specialists and technologists in all sectors (academia, industry and government) as well as policymakers, development economists and practitioners in international organizations and national governments.

  6. Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reategui, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

  7. The motor car past, present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Genta, Giancarlo; Cavallino, Francesco; Filtri, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to automotive engineering, to give freshmen ideas about this technology. The text is subdivided in parts that cover all facets of the automobile, including legal and economic aspects related to industry and products, product configuration and fabrication processes, historic evolution and future developments. The first part describes how motor vehicles were invented and evolved into the present product in more than 100 years of development. The purpose is not only to supply an historical perspective, but also to introduce and discuss the many solutions that were applied (and could be applied again) to solve the same basic problems of vehicle engineering. This part also briefly describes  the evolution of automotive technologies and market, including production and development processes. The second part deals with the description and function analysis of all car subsystems, such as: ·         vehicle body, ·         chassis, including wheels, suspensions, brakes a...

  8. Present and future of developmental neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Celso

    2015-05-01

    The field of child and adolescent psychiatry has always lagged behind adult psychiatry. With recent evidence that the vast majority of mental disorders, even when they emerge in adulthood, cause abnormal neurodevelopment and resultant emphasis on prevention and early intervention, there is a need to put child psychiatry at the top of the agenda in mental health research. This should also be the case for developmental neuropsychopharmacology. The target of drug discovery should shift toward a population younger than the one that is typically included in clinical trials. This is not only a matter of trying to replicate what has been found in individuals with mature brains; it is about searching for new strategies that address developing brains while the therapeutic window for their effect is still open. At present, major concerns in developmental psychopharmacology are over-prescription rates and use of psychotropic medications for conditions with a particularly underdeveloped evidence base, as well as adverse effects, especially potentially life-shortening cardiometabolic effects and suicidal ideation. The future of research in this area should focus on the use of drugs for primary and secondary prevention that would modify abnormal brain development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Foreword. The Knowledge Economy: The Present Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Bratianu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available All the statistics and evaluations show that the Knowledge Economy is our future. However, a close look at the developed economies demonstrates that the Knowledge Economy is already here, shaping our present time. Although there are many definitions of this new economic framework, their core content stresses the importance of data, information, and knowledge in the production of goods and delivering services in creating value for society. For instance, Powell and Snellman (2004, p.1999 define the knowledge economy as “production and services based on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to an accelerated pace of technical and scientific advance, as well as a rapid obsolescence. The key component of the knowledge economy is a greater reliance on intellectual capabilities than on physical inputs or natural resources”. In the knowledge economy, knowledge becomes a strategic resource (Davenport & Prusak, 2000; Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995 and knowledge strategies contribute directly to the competitive advantage (Bratianu & Bolisani, 2015. In this new economy, data, information, and knowledge are the driving forces of development and the knowledge economy is the engine of the global economy growth...

  10. Cogan's syndrome: present and future directions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Grainne

    2009-08-01

    Cogan\\'s syndrome, typified by the combination of interstitial keratitis and immune-mediated sensorineural hearing loss, is a rare condition, and commonly associated with a diagnostic delay. Using a standard search protocol, we review the literature to date, focusing on a number of key areas pertaining to diagnosis, presentation and treatment. Using a case illustration of atypical disease which led to fulminant aortic regurgitation, we highlight the need for continued and collaborative research in order to identify negative prognostic factors and thus tailor therapeutic regimens. Atypical Cogan\\'s syndrome is more commonly associated with systemic manifestations than typical disease, and may be refractory to immunosuppressive treatment. We discuss the application of laboratory (e.g antibodies targeting inner ear antigens) and radiological (PET-CT) aids to disease confirmation and detection of sub-clinical vascular inflammation. As illustrated by the included case description, some patients remain refractory to intense immunosuppression and delineation of adverse prognostic factors which may direct treatment, perhaps including the use of PET-CT, will contribute in the future to improving patient outcomes.

  11. Radioactive wastes: present problems and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvenet, Andre

    1975-01-01

    The main characteristics of radioactive wastes are described and the present problems arising from liquid or gas effluents are considered. It is concluded that nuclear power stations are considerably less pollutant, at equal capacity, than conventional power stations. Programs of investigation are now being developed to meet with the foreseeable increase of activity. The problem is: first, to maintain absorbed doses at their present level and second, to study the problem of long-lived elements the storage of which would, in the long run create a nuisance on a world scale. The different waste storage techniques now in use are described and current investigations and works are exposed some of which, like vitrification, have already begun to be put into application. After having noted that the problem of wastes constitutes doubtless a difficulty in the technical field and, maybe even more so in the psychological field, the conditions are defined which will have to be met in order that this problem should not hinder the short- and long-term development of nuclear energy [fr

  12. Chevrel phases: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Octavio

    2015-07-01

    The ternary molybdenum chalcogenides MxMo6X8 (X = chalcogen), known as Chevrel phases, constitute an outstanding family of materials presenting numerous and spectacular properties. More than 100 examples of these compounds have been synthesized thanks to their versatile crystal structure. Numerous variants are found, from the binary material formed just by the molybdenum clusters Mo6X8 leaving a three-dimensional lattice where the third element M can be inserted, up to a condensation of clusters giving rise to a monodimensional material. The great interest in these compounds, discovered more than 40 years ago, came from their superconducting critical temperature and upper critical fields (15 K for the former, 50 Tesla at 4.2 K for the latter), both being reasonably high values at the time of their discovery thus opening enormous hopes for their use in the fabrication of magnets. Other fundamental features are found, such as the coexistence of magnetic order with the superconducting state. These features are still of interest for the scientific community, but other potential applications are now foreseen, such as their use in batteries, catalysis and thermopower technology. We recall herein some basic characteristic of Chevrel-phases, mentioning several important families, their crystal structure and mode of elaboration. This contribution being focused on the superconducting properties, we put an accent on some fundamental aspects, such as the structural and electronic transitions, the vortex lattice, their granular behavior, critical current densities, upper field and anisotropy, to finally discuss the so-called unconventional superconductivity, classifying these materials among the "exotic superconductors" and making a parallel with other superconductors which, in spite of their quite different electronic and crystal structures, present similar features. Chevrel phases have a long and incredible past as outstanding materials for basic and applied research but, in

  13. Historical ecology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2015-11-01

    The term 'historical ecology' has been used with various meanings since the first half of the 20th century. Studies labelled as historical ecology have been produced in at least four academic disciplines: history, ecology, geography and anthropology. Although all those involved seem to agree that historical ecology concerns the historical interconnectedness of nature and human culture, this field of study has no unified methodology, specialized institutional background and common publication forums. Knowledge of the development of historical ecology is also limited. As a result, the current multitude of definitions of historical ecology is accompanied by divergent opinions as to where the origins of the field are to be sought. In this review, I follow the development of historical ecology from the 18th century to the present. In the first part, I briefly describe some early examples of historical ecological investigations, followed by a description of the various scientific strands in the 20th century that contributed to the formation of historical ecology. In the second part, I discuss the past five decades of historical ecological investigations in more detail, focusing mostly (but not exclusively) on works that their respective authors identified as historical ecology. I also examine the appearance and interconnectedness of the two main trends (ecological and anthropological) in historical ecological research. In the last part, I attempt to outline the future of historical ecology based on common features in existing research. It appears that at present historical ecology is at a crossroads. With rapidly growing interest in historical ecological research, it may move towards institutionalization or remain an umbrella term. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  14. Present and Future Supply of Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Stuart H.

    During the 1960's, nursing education shifted dramatically away from hospital-operated diploma schools toward associate degree and baccalaureate programs. This report examines the nature of this shift in training and its anticipated impact on future supply. Other important factors affecting the future supply of nurses are analyzed, including the…

  15. Assessing the future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncomble, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The World Energy Council has designed 2 tools named Jazz and Symphonie that allow the assessment of the potential impacts of energy choices on the future in terms of climate warming, investments, energy mix,... The Jazz roadmap aims at energy equity which means individual access to energy at a reasonable cost while the Symphonie roadmap focuses on environmental issues through appropriate practice and coordinated international policies. Both tools are integrated it means that they describe a whole world by most of its aspects: population, GDP per capita, number of cars by inhabitant, economic growth... A basic application of both tools shows that in 2050 the nuclear power will have increased (compared to today's level) but the share of nuclear power in the energy mix will have decreased for Jazz and increased for Symphonie. (A.C.)

  16. The future of nuclear energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polie, P.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of current situation and future trends in nuclear energy production in Europe is made. Main factors characterizing differences in atomic policy of each particular European country are discussed. They are: readiness of the governments to implement a long-term energy policy; technical, economical and energy aspects; public opinion. Future development of new power plants is connected with overproduction of electricity, safety operation of present NPP, reduction of CO 2 emissions and public opinion. The energy policy of the European Union is also discussed and the necessity of transparency in industrial strategy of the governments is outlined

  17. Toward an energy surety future.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; )

    2005-10-01

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  18. Fusion energy - an abundant energy source for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... this goal, mankind will have a sustainable base load energy source with abundant resources, having no CO2 release, and with no longlived radioactive waste. This presentation will describe the basics of fusion energy production and the status and future prospects of the research. Considerations...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  19. Past, present and future of tourist tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Thimm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to find out tourism movement patterns via the tracking of tourists with the help of positioning systems like GPS in the rural area of the Lake Constance destination in Germany. In doing so past, present and future of tourist tracking is illustrated. Design/methodology/approach – The tracking is realized via common smartphones extended by an app, with dedicated sensors like position loggers and a survey. The three different approaches are applied in order to compare and cross-check results (triangulation of data and methods. Findings – Movement patterns turned out to be diverse and individualistic within the rural destination of Lake Constance and following an ants trail in sub-destinations like the city of Constance. Repeat visitors and first-time visitors alike always visit the bigger cities and main day-trip destinations of the Lake. A possible prediction tool enables new avenues of governing tourism movement patterns. Research limitations/implications – The tracking techniques can be developed further into the direction of “quantified self” using gamification in order to make the tracking app even more attractive. Practical implications – An algorithm-based prediction tool would offer new perspectives to the management of tourism movements. Social implications – Further research is needed to overcome the feeling of invasiveness of the app to allow tracking with that approach. Originality/value – This study is original and innovative because of the first-time use of a smartphone app in tourist tracking, the application on a rural destination and the conceptual description of a prediction tool.

  20. Orbital Debris: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbery, Gene; Johnson, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    In the early days of spaceflight, the gBig Sky h theory was the near universally accepted paradigm for dealing with collisions of orbiting objects. This theory was also used during the early years of the aviation industry. Just as it did in aviation, the gBig Sky h theory breaks down as more and more objects accumulate in the environment. Fortunately, by the late 1970 fs some visionaries in NASA and the US Department of Defense (DoD) realized that trends in the orbital environment would inevitably lead to increased risks to operational spacecraft from collisions with other orbiting objects. The NASA Orbital Debris Program was established at and has been conducted at Johnson Space Center since 1979. At the start of 1979, fewer than 5000 objects were being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network and very few attempts had been made to sample the environment for smaller sizes. Today, the number of tracked objects has quadrupled. Ground ]based and in situ measurements have statistically sampled the LEO environment over most sizes and mitigation guidelines and requirements are common among most space faring nations. NASA has been a leader, not only in defining the debris environment, but in promoting awareness of the issues in the US and internationally, and in providing leadership in developing policies to address the issue. This paper will discuss in broad terms the evolution of the NASA debris program from its beginnings to its present broad range of debris related research. The paper will discuss in some detail current research topics and will attempt to predict future research trends.

  1. Past, present, future of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although the method of NAA was originated in 1936, use of the method was minimal for about the next ten years - due to the lack of a high-flux source of thermal neutrons. When such a copious source of neutrons - the nuclear reactor - became available, commencing in 1945, the power of the method to determine many elements, quantitatively, even though present in samples at concentrations as low as ppb, attracted many scientists. During about the next 20 years (1945-1965), NAA provided the first major results on trace elements (essential and toxic) in biomedical materials. These studies constituted the first major achievement of NAA - and such studies continue. Due to the initial lack of a high-efficiency detector of gamma radiation, work during the early part of this period had to be carried out by tedious radiochemical separations. Starting in the early 1950's, with the advent of the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and multichannel pulse-height analyzers, the purely-instrumental form of the method (INAA) was born, and research and applications mushroomed. In the 1960s, two additional important applications of NAA were its vital use in the semiconductor industry and in the analysis of the lunar rocks. The INAA method in this period was greatly advanced by the availability of high-resolution germanium detectors. Applications in environmental studies, archaeology, and forensic chemistry were also of note. INAA is now a mature method, but still improving. As for the future, what is still needed are less expensive high-flux neutron sources, simple automated systems, gamma-ray detectors of even better resolution, and faster electronics. The field of NAA has been, and is, blessed by a large number of outstanding scientists, world-wide, all intrigued by the atomic nucleus and radioactive decay

  2. Microfluidic standardization: Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeren, H. van; Atkins, T.; Blom, M.; Bullema, J.E.; Tantra, R.; Verhoeven, D.; Verplanck, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of standardization in microfluidics. It contains the main points of an industry wide agreement about microfluidic port pitches and port nomenclature. It also addresses device classification and future steps.

  3. Chevrel phases: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peña, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    so-called unconventional superconductivity, classifying these materials among the “exotic superconductors” and making a parallel with other superconductors which, in spite of their quite different electronic and crystal structures, present similar features. Chevrel phases have a long and incredible past as outstanding materials for basic and applied research but, in addition to that, they have a bright future ahead because of a large range of potentialities

  4. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybom, Hilde; Weising, Kurt; Rotter, Björn

    2014-01-03

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67-73 and Nature 1985, 316:76-79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined "Fingerprint News" was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on "DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications". Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting ("the past") was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as "DNA fingerprinting in the present", and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA sequencing

  5. Future of nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyojiro

    1989-09-01

    In spite of the easing of worldwide energy supply and demand situation in these years, we believe that research efforts towards the next generation nuclear energy are indispensably necessary. Firstly, the nuclear colleagues believe that nuclear energy is the best major energy source from many points of view including the global environmental viewpoint. Secondly, in the medium- and long-range view, there will once again be a high possibility of a tight supply and demand situation for oil. Thirdly, nuclear energy is the key energy source to overcome the vulnerability of the energy supply structure in industrialized countries like Japan where virtually no fossil energy source exists. In this situation, nuclear energy is a sort of quasi-domestic energy as a technology-intensive energy. Fourthly, the intensive efforts to develop the nuclear technology in the next generation will give rise to a further evolution in science and technology in the future. A few examples of medium- and long-range goals of the nuclear energy research are development of new types of reactors which can meet various needs of energy more flexibly and reliably than the existing reactors, fundamental and ultimate solution of the radioactive waste problems, creation and development of new types of energy production systems which are to come beyond the fusion, new development in the biological risk assessment of the radiation effects and so on. In order to accomplish those goals it is quite important to introduce innovations in such underlying technologies as materials control in more microscopic manners, photon and particle beam techniques, accelerator engineering, artificial intelligence, and so on. 32 refs, 2 figs

  6. Future of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e - colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place

  7. IVF culture media: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Elpiniki; Harper, Joyce C

    2015-01-01

    The advances in the world of IVF during the last decades have been rapid and impressive and culture media play a major role in this success. Until the 1980s fertility centers made their media in house. Nowadays, there are numerous commercially available culture media that contain various components including nutrients, vitamins and growth factors. This review goes through the past, present and future of IVF culture media and explores their composition and quality assessment. A computerized search was performed in PubMed regarding IVF culture media including results from 1929 until March 2014. Information was gathered from the websites of companies who market culture media, advertising material, instructions for use and certificates of analysis. The regulation regarding IVF media mainly in the European Union (EU) but also in non-European countries was explored. The keyword 'IVF culture media' gave 923 results in PubMed and 'embryo culture media' 12 068 results dating from 1912 until March 2014, depicting the increased scientific activity in this field. The commercialization of IVF culture media has increased the standards bringing a great variety of options into clinical practice. However, it has led to reduced transparency and comparisons of brand names that do not facilitate the scientific dialogue. Furthermore, there is some evidence suggesting that suboptimal culture conditions could cause long-term reprogramming in the embryo as the periconception period is particularly susceptible to epigenetic alterations. IVF media are now classified as class III medical devices and only CE (Conformité Européene)-marked media should be used in the EU. The CE marking of IVF culture media is a significant development in the field. However, the quality and efficiency of culture media should be monitored closely. Well-designed randomized controlled trials, large epidemiological studies and full transparency should be the next steps. Reliable, standardized models assessing

  8. Hepatitis in Malaysia: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raihan, Ruksana

    2016-01-01

    aged 15-64 years), of whom 59% acquired their infection through injection and the most common genotypes found are genotype 3 and 1. The HCV-related disease burden is already high and is forecast to rise steeply over the coming decades under current levels of antiviral treatment. Increased governmental resources to improve HCV screening and treatment rates and to reduce transmission are essential to address the high projected HCV disease burden in Malaysia. Raihan R. Hepatitis in Malaysia: Past, Present, and Future. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2016;6(1):52-55.

  9. The universe - present, past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longair, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is the text of the Halley Lecture 1985 which was delivered on 21 May 1985 in Oxford. It addresses the major problems of contemporary cosmology. The Universe as understood to astronomers in 1985 is discussed, and this is compared with the observations of what happened in earlier epochs. Questions about the origin of galaxies and the Universe itself are raised. Although some guesses are made about the future of the Universe the main look at the future is about what astronomers want to do about the major problems facing them today. (UK)

  10. Future development of nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy development in Japan has passed about 30 years, and reaches to a step to supply about 35 % of total electric power demand. However, together with globalization of economic and technical development, its future progressing method is required for its new efforts. Among such conditions, when considering a state of future type nuclear energy application, its contribution to further environmental conservation and international cooperation is essential, and it is required for adoption to such requirement how it is made an energy source with excellent economics.The Research Committee on 'Engineering Design on Nuclear Energy Systems' established under recognition in 1998 has been carried out some discussions on present and future status of nuclear energy development. And so forth under participation of outer specialists. Here were summarized on two year's committee actions containing them and viewpoints of nuclear industries, popularization of nuclear system technology, and so forth. (G.K.)

  11. Sustainable Energy Future - Nordic Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This invited paper first outlines the methodologies applied in analysing the energy savings potentials, as applied to a Nordic and a European case study. Afterwards are shown results for how a high quality of life can be achieved with an energy consumption only a small fraction of the present in ...... in Europe. The energy policy in Denmark since 1973 is outlined, including the activities and the roles of NGOs. Finally are described some of the difficulties of implementing energy saving policies, especially in combination with increasing liberalization of the energy market....

  12. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, John C.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors briefly describe the origins, theory, and development of interpersonal psychotherapy: its roots in clinical outcome research, its spread from major depression to other psychiatric disorders and its increasing dissemination as an empirically validated clinical intervention included in treatment guidelines. They attempt to forecast research, organizational and training issues the growing interpersonal psychotherapy community may face in the future.

  13. Silicon drift detectors, present and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; Dyke, H.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Humanic, T.; Kotov, I.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, W.; Li, Z.; Lynn, D.; Minor, R.; Munhoz, M.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Schambach, J.; Soja, R.; Sugarbaker, E.; Willson, R. M.

    2001-04-01

    Silicon drift detectors provide unambiguous two-dimensional position information for charged particle detection with a single detector layer. A large area silicon drift detector was developed for the inner tracking detector of the STAR experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned and the future prospects of this technology.

  14. The future of energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.; O`Keefe, P.; Snape, C. [University of Northumbria, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Photovoltaics Application Centre

    1995-12-31

    The book gives a comprehensive analysis of the history and use of different forms of energy, their environmental and social impacts and, in particular, their economic costs and the future of their supply. It examines all the major forms of energy - conventional fuels such as oil and coal, nuclear power and alternative and renewable sources - and includes case studies on the transport and building sectors in the North and agroforestry and fuelwood problems in the South. The authors discuss the development of energy provision and patterns of supply and demand, and examine the use of end-use analyses. They look at the ways in which social and environmental costs should be introduced into energy planning and accounting, and emphasise the crucial role of efficiency to limit over-consumption. 91 refs., 100 figs., 62 tabs.

  15. Energy sources for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, J.L.; Cloutier, R.J. (eds.)

    1977-04-01

    The symposium program was designed for college faculty members who are teaching or plan to teach energy courses at their educational institutions. Lectures were presented on socio-economic aspects of energy development, fusion reactors, solar energy, coal-fired power plants, nuclear power, radioactive waste disposal, and radiation hazards. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 16 of the 18 papers presented; two papers were processed earlier: Residential Energy Use Alternatives to the Year 2000, by Eric Hurst (EAPA 2:257; ERA 1:25978) and The Long-Term Prospects for Solar Energy, by W. G. Pollard (EAPA 3:1008). Fourteen of the papers are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. (EAPA).

  16. Present Status of Nuclear Energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, SI (2013), s. 89-94 ISSN 0375-8842. [European Nuclear Forum. Praha, 12.05.2013-13.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear energy * nuclear reactors * electricity production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  17. The Present is Less than the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Christina; Hellström, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    experimentation and imagination by actively envisioning various futures, or ‘possible worlds’ in the design process, and how they use these temporal explorations in conceiving of novel design concepts. Apart from temporality figuring as the designer drawing actively on past experiences, we were able to discern...... two additional cognitive factors affecting how designers use temporality: by projecting a future goal; and by investing this goal or image with an emotional loading, i.e. by ‘emoting a vision of the future’. Finally, these results are used to extend current thinking on the role of time and temporality...... in design processes, and suggest a line of further inquiry into the significance of affective dispositions and moods on temporal orientation in other creative contexts....

  18. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO2 emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Rajat

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO 2 emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO 2 emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO 2 emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO 2 emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO 2 emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO 2 emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO 2 reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions

  19. A review of initiatives to reduce energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions from the city of Oxford: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajat [Dept. of Architecture, School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This paper reviews three key initiatives undertaken in the historical city of Oxford to bring about reductions in energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions on a city-wide scale. The author has been part of all the three initiatives. In 2002, a collaborative partnership between academia, industry and city council started the Oxford Solar Initiative (OSI) which uses a community-based approach to help households and organisations in Oxford, financially and technically, to install solar energy systems and energy efficiency measures in buildings. So far OSI has facilitated the installation of 80 active solar systems, over 450 energy efficiency measures and 3,000 low energy bulbs. The scientific basis of OSI is a GIS-based DECoRuM model which estimates and maps baseline energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions on a house-by house level, identifies 'pollution' hotspots, predicts the potential for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions and monitors reductions achieved as a result of deploying energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. The application of DECoRuM model to a case study in Oxford shows that CO{sub 2} emission reductions above 60 % are possible, at a cost of between GBP 6 to GBP 77 per tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions saved, depending upon the package of measures used, and the scenario of capital costs (low or high) employed. The OSI and DECoRuM projects have led to the development of an action-oriented Oxford Climate Change Action Plan (OCCAP) which constructs an accurate CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for Oxford city for a baseline year, establishes CO{sub 2} reduction targets and proposes action for each of the energy-related sectors to meet those targets. The OCCAP will be implemented by Oxford City Council and provides a useful example for other cities in their endeavour for emission reductions.

  20. VAlidation STandard antennas: Past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drioli, Luca Salghetti; Ostergaard, A; Paquay, M

    2011-01-01

    designed for validation campaigns of antenna measurement ranges. The driving requirements of VAST antennas are their mechanical stability over a given operational temperature range and with respect to any orientation of the gravity field. The mechanical design shall ensure extremely stable electrical....../V-band of telecom satellites. The paper will address requirements for future VASTs and possible architecture for multi-frequency Validation Standard antennas....

  1. Space reactors - past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the 1990s and beyond, advanced-design nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. Many sophisticated military and civilian space missions of the future will require first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. This paper reviews key technology developments that accompanied past US space nuclear power development efforts, describes on-going programs, and then explores reactor technologies that will satisfy megawatt power level needs and beyond

  2. Nuclear energy, future of ecology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, B.

    1995-01-01

    This work can surprise; because it is said that nuclear energy is the only one that will allow to satisfy the energy needs of the planet by reducing the pollution. It gives answers on: Chernobyl accident, the existence of natural radioactivity, the comparison between natural radioactivity and medical, military and industrial irradiation, the pollution of our environment, the petroleum whom reserves are going to decrease, the advantages of the 'clever' nuclear and the disadvantages of the 'dustbin' nuclear, why some of ecologists are favourable to the nuclear, the effects of radiations on health, the foods irradiation, the wastes processing and the future of our planet. (N.C.)

  3. Challenges for future energy usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the last 2000 years the world's population and the worldwide total energy consumption have been continuously increasing, at a rate even greater than exponential. By now a situation has been reached in which energy resources are running short, which for a long time have been treated as though they were almost inexhaustible. The ongoing growth of the world's population and a growing hunger for energy in underdeveloped and emerging countries imply that the yearly overall energy consumption will continue to grow, by about 1.6 percent every year so that it would have doubled by 2050. This massive energy consumption has led to and is progressively leading to severe changes in our environment and is threatening a climatic state that, for the last 10 000 years, has been unusually benign. The coincidence of the shortage of conventional energy resources with the hazards of an impending climate change is a dangerous threat to the well-being of all, but it is also a challenging opportunity for improvements in our energy usage. On a global scale, conventional methods such as the burning of coal, gas and oil or the use of nuclear fission will still dominate for some time. In their case, the challenge consists in making them more efficient and environmentally benign, and using them only where and when it is unavoidable. Alternative energies must be expanded and economically improved. Among these, promising techniques such as solar thermal and geothermal energy production should be promoted from a shadow existence and further advanced. New technologies, for instance nuclear fusion or transmutation of radioactive nuclear waste, are also quite promising. Finally, a careful analysis of the national and global energy flow systems and intelligent energy management, with emphasis on efficiency, overall effectiveness and sustainability, will acquire increasing importance. Thereby, economic viability, political and legal issues as well as moral aspects such as fairness to disadvantaged

  4. East Germany's future energy economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjon, F; Zuehlke, R [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.). FG Energie und Rohstoffwirtschaft

    1991-01-01

    Since unification, the former German Democratic Republic has had to face major changes, one of which concerns the energy supply system. A secure energy supply system is an absolute requirement for the political and economical development of this Republic. Its former strategy of 'autarkical' energy supply until the end of 1989 was one of the factors which led to an economic downfall. This essay gives an overview of the major structural changes to the economy which have occurred since unification. First, the former energy situation is described and the status quo analyzed. Then, efforts in reorganizing the present energy supply system are outlined. Finally, new perspectives and strategies are described. The aspects taken into consideration include: energy price deregulation; European fossil fuel marketing trends; investments for the build up of an efficient energy supply system; and the creation of surcharges for environmental pollution abatement, in particular, the reduction of carbon and sulfur dioxide emissions.

  5. The future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, J.; Bhabha, H.J.; Goldschmidt, B.

    1959-01-01

    A public discussion on the future of nuclear energy was organized by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna on 22 September 1959 in conjunction with the third regular session of the Agency's General Conference. The three eminent scientists who participated in the discussion - Dr. Homi J. Bhabha of India, Sir John Cockcroft of the United Kingdom and Dr. Bertrand Goldschmidt of France - are members of the Agency's Scientific Advisory Committee. The Secretary of the Committee, Dr. Henry Seligman, Deputy Director General of IAEA, acted as moderator. The meeting was presided over by the Director General, Mr. Sterling Cole. The discussion began with opening statements by the three scientists surveying recent developments, current trends and future possibilities. After these general statements, they answered a number of questions from the audience. A record of the discussion, including the opening statements as well as the questions and answers, is contained in this special number of the IAEA Bulletin. (author)

  6. Membrane-based seawater desalination: Present and future prospects

    KAUST Repository

    Amy, Gary L.

    2016-10-20

    Given increasing regional water scarcity and that almost half of the world\\'s population lives within 100 km of an ocean, seawater represents a virtually infinite water resource. However, its exploitation is presently limited by the significant specific energy consumption (kWh/m) required by conventional desalination technologies, further exasperated by high unit costs ($/m) and environmental impacts including GHG emissions (g CO-eq/m), organism impingement/entrainment through intakes, and brine disposal through outfalls. This paper explores the state-of-the-art in present seawater desalination practice, emphasizing membrane-based technologies, while identifying future opportunities in step improvements to conventional technologies and development of emerging, potentially disruptive, technologies through advances in material science, process engineering, and system integration. In this paper, seawater reverse osmosis (RO) serves as the baseline conventional technology. The discussion extends beyond desalting processes into membrane-based salinity gradient energy production processes, which can provide an energy offset to desalination process energy requirements. The future membrane landscape in membrane-based desalination and salinity gradient energy is projected to include ultrahigh permeability RO membranes, renewable-energy driven desalination, and emerging processes including closed-circuit RO, membrane distillation, forward osmosis, pressure retarded osmosis, and reverse electrodialysis according various niche applications and/or hybrids, operating separately or in conjunction with RO.

  7. The future of energy and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

  8. Life cycle assessment : Past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guinée, Jeroen B.; Heijungs, Reinout; Huppes, Gjalt; Zamagni, Alessandra; Masoni, Paolo; Buonamici, Roberto; Ekvall, Tomas; Rydberg, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) has developed fast over the last three decades. Whereas LCA developed from merely energy analysis to a comprehensive environmental burden analysis in the 1970s, full-fledged life cycle impact assessment and life cycle costing models were introduced in the

  9. Internal dosimetry monitoring equipment: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Lynch, T.P.; Strom, D.J.; Lardy, M.M.

    1993-09-01

    We have attempted to characterize the current and future status of in vivo and in vitro measurement programs coupled with the associated radioanalytical methods and workplace monitoring. Developments in these areas must be carefully integrated by internal dosimetrists, radiochemists and field health physicists. Their goal should be uniform improvement rather than to focus on one specific area (e.g., dose modeling) to the neglect of other areas where the measurement capabilities are substantially less sophisticated and, therefore, the potential source of error is greatest

  10. Epilepsy Genetics—Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Annapurna; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Human epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous condition in which genetics play an important etiological role. We begin by reviewing the past history of epilepsy genetics, a field that has traditionally included studies of pedigrees with epilepsy caused by defects in ion channels and neurotransmitters. We highlight important recent discoveries that have expanded the field beyond the realm of channels and neurotransmitters and that have challenged the notion that single genes produce single disorders. Finally, we project toward an exciting future for epilepsy genetics as large-scale collaborative phenotyping studies come face to face with new technologies in genomic medicine. PMID:21277190

  11. The Lederman Science Center: Past, Present, Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    For 30 years, Fermilab has offered K-12 education programs, building bridges between the Lab and the community. The Lederman Science Center is our home. We host field trips and tours, visit schools, offer classes and professional development workshops, host special events, support internships and have a strong web presence. We develop programs based on identified needs, offer programs with peer-leaders and improve programs from participant feedback. For some we create interest; for others we build understanding and develop relationships, engaging participants in scientific exploration. We explain how we created the Center, its programs, and what the future holds.

  12. Immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroldi, Francesca; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Despite the identification of some efficient drugs for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, this tumor remains one of the most lethal cancers and is characterized by a strong resistance to therapies. Pancreatic cancer has some unique features including the presence of a microenvironment filled with immunosuppressive mediators and a dense stroma, which is both a physical barrier to drug penetration and a dynamic entity involved in immune system control. Therefore, the immune system has been hypothesized to play an important role in pancreatic cancer. Thus, therapies acting on innate or adaptive immunity are being investigated. Here, we review the literature, report the most interesting results and hypothesize future treatment directions.

  13. DNA fingerprinting in forensics: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roewer, Lutz

    2013-11-18

    DNA fingerprinting, one of the great discoveries of the late 20th century, has revolutionized forensic investigations. This review briefly recapitulates 30 years of progress in forensic DNA analysis which helps to convict criminals, exonerate the wrongly accused, and identify victims of crime, disasters, and war. Current standard methods based on short tandem repeats (STRs) as well as lineage markers (Y chromosome, mitochondrial DNA) are covered and applications are illustrated by casework examples. Benefits and risks of expanding forensic DNA databases are discussed and we ask what the future holds for forensic DNA fingerprinting.

  14. Space immunology - Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Gary R.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Research results on the causes and mechanisms of change in immune systems during spaceflight are briefly reviewed. The most reliable conclusion from the sparse existing data is that postflight crew members exhibit a transient neutrophilia, eosinopenia, monocytopenia, reduced numbers of circulating T cells, and an often pronounced decrease in the ability of their T cells to respond to mitogen stimulation. Clinically, no direct predictive relationship between any of these measurements and increased health risk or disease has been established. Future areas of research are suggested in light of NASA's emerging requirements to support long-duration missions.

  15. Thermal Protection Systems: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (TPS) have been critical to fulfilling humankinds desire to explore space. Composite and ceramic materials have enabled the early missions to orbit, the moon, the space station, Mars with robots, and sample return. Crewed missions to Mars are being considered, and this places even more demands on TPS materials. This talk will give some history on the materials used for earth and planetary entry and the demands placed upon such materials. TPS needs for future missions, especially to Mars, will be identified and potential solutions discussed.

  16. Elastic Scattering - Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Rashid, Haris; Tahir, Sohail Afzal

    2007-01-01

    Various aspects of elastic and diffractive scattering have been studied at Fermilab and CERN. Search for more results is ongoing at RHIC and planned at LHC. In this talk, we review the progress made so far and elaborate future prospects. Theoretical study focuses on the analysis of the available data in the light of predictions of various models with special emphasis on Eikonal picture and QCD inspired models. In the light of this analysis, various possibilities have been explored with reference to RHIC and LHC measurements

  17. Labor epidural analgesia: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most severe pains experienced by a woman is that of childbirth. Providing analgesia for labor has always been a challenge more so because of the myths and controversies surrounding labor. It is imperative to understand the pain transmission during various stages of labor in order to select a proper technique for providing labor analgesia. The adverse effects of labor pain are numerous and affect both the mother as well as the fetus. Currently lumbar epidural is considered to be the gold standard technique for labor analgesia. Local anaesthetics like bupivacaine and ropivacaine are commonly used and adjuvants like clonidine, fentanyl and neostigmine have been extensively studied. However, despite being so popular, epidural analgesia is not without complications, with hypotension being the most common. Other complications include accidental dural puncture, infection, intravascular placement, high block and epidural hematoma. Other neuraxial techniques include continuous caudal analgesia, and combined spinal epidural analgesia. The numerous studies investigating the various aspects of this method have also served to dispel various myths surrounding epidural analgesia like increased incidence of cesarean section and instrumental delivery, prolongation of labor and future back pain. The future of labor analgesia lies in the incorporation of ultrasound in identifying the epidural space helping in proper catheter placement. The keywords "labor epidural" in the PUBMED revealed a total of 5018 articles with 574 review articles and 969 clinical trials. The relevant articles along with their references were extensively studied.

  18. Present and future aspects of PET examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomio

    2003-01-01

    The PET examination gives the body distribution image of a compound labeled with the positron emitter manufactured by cyclotron. Recently, PET with F18-deoxyglucose (FDG) attracts considerable attention because the imaging is particularly useful for cancer detection. Since the technique was authorized by the United States (US) official health insurance in 1998, the number of the examination is increasing, which is also under similar situation in Japan due to the latest partial authorization for some malignant tumors. In Japan, about 30,000 examinations per year are carried out, half of which, in private hospitals. Their purpose is increasingly for cancer detection. For future PET examination, awaited are improvement of PET camera and development of a novel imaging agent. PET/CT imaging is for the former and F18-α-methyltyrosine, for the latter. Miniaturization of cyclotron, FDG delivery system, improved FDG synthetic method, popularization of PET/CT, development of PET camera for health examination, clinical trial of a novel imaging agent, and spread of PET health examination and operation of PET Center, are expected for future progress of PET technique. (N.I.)

  19. Urban phenological studies – Past, present, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochner, Susanne; Menzel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Phenology is believed to be a suitable bio-indicator to track climate change. Based on the strong statistical association between phenology and temperature phenological observations provide an inexpensive means for the temporal and spatial analysis of the urban heat island. However, other environmental factors might also weaken this relationship. In addition, the investigation of urban phenology allows an estimation of future phenology from current information since cities with their amplified temperatures may serve as a proxy for future conditions. Nevertheless, the design of spatial compared to long-term studies might be influenced by different factors which should be taken into consideration when interpreting results from a specific study. In general, plants located in urban areas tend to flush and bloom earlier than in the countryside. What are the consequences of these urban–rural differences? This review will document existing findings on urban phenology and will highlight areas in which further research is needed. - Highlights: • Urban phenology can be used for the estimation of the urban heat island effect. • Confounding factors weaken the phenology–temperature relationship. • Urban phenology is useful as a proxy for climate change impacts on phenology. • Differences in the study design hinder the generalisation of one specific method. • Urban–rural variations in phenology affect vegetation, meteorology, human health. - Studies on urban phenology can be used to detect urban heat islands and to assess climate change impacts but it still remains important to adequately link spatial and long-term data

  20. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plicht, J. van der E-mail: plicht@phys.rug.nl

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15 600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS measurements became available, covering the complete {sup 14}C dating range. No calibration curve can presently be recommended for the older part of the dating range until discrepancies are resolved.

  1. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicht, J. van der

    2004-01-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15 600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS measurements became available, covering the complete 14 C dating range. No calibration curve can presently be recommended for the older part of the dating range until discrepancies are resolved

  2. Satellite Ocean Biology: Past, Present, Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1978 when the first satellite ocean color proof-of-concept sensor, the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner, was launched, much progress has been made in refining the basic measurement concept and expanding the research applications of global satellite time series of biological and optical properties such as chlorophyll-a concentrations. The seminar will review the fundamentals of satellite ocean color measurements (sensor design considerations, on-orbit calibration, atmospheric corrections, and bio-optical algorithms), scientific results from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) missions, and the goals of future NASA missions such as PACE, the Aerosol, Cloud, Ecology (ACE), and Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) missions.

  3. Nuclear analytical methods: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The development of nuclear analytical methods as an analytical tool began in 1936 with the publication of the first paper on neutron activation analysis (NAA). This year, 1996, marks the 60th anniversary of that event. This paper attempts to look back at the nuclear analytical methods of the past, to look around and to see where the technology is right now, and finally, to look ahead to try and see where nuclear methods as an analytical technique (or as a group of analytical techniques) will be going in the future. The general areas which the author focuses on are: neutron activation analysis; prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA); photon activation analysis (PAA); charged-particle activation analysis (CPAA)

  4. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Space reactors - past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The successful test flights of the Space Shuttle mark the start of a new era--an era of routine manned access into cislunar space. Human technical development at the start of the next Millenium will be highlighted by the creation of Man's extraterrestrial civilization with off-planet expansion of the human resource base. In the 1990s and beyond, advanced-design nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. Many sophisticated military and civilian space missions of the future will require first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. This paper reviews key technology developments that accompanied past US space nuclear power development efforts, describes on-going programs, and then explores reactor technologies that will satisfy megawatt power level needs and beyond

  6. Indian power sector: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, C.V.J.; Lal, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    In India population and economic growth is expected to create serious power shortages triggering the need for new power generation capacity. The situation is worsened on account of stagnant conditions prevailing in the country during the past few years. The opening of economy to the global market is expected to usher in an increased economic growth bringing in its wake greater demand for power. It will, thus, be seen that to cater these requirements the power sector industry in the country will have to grow at a much faster rate in the near future. However, to have a correct perspective of the emerging scenario, it might be worthwhile to have a look at the past patterns of development. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs

  7. Vaccines and pregnancy: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sonja A; Watson, Amelia K; Kennedy, Erin D; Broder, Karen R; Jamieson, Denise J

    2014-06-01

    Vaccination during pregnancy with certain vaccines can prevent morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their infants. However, previous recommendations often focused on the potential risks of vaccines to the fetus when used during pregnancy. In recent years, additional data have become available on the absence of increased risks for adverse events associated with vaccines when administered during pregnancy and on their benefits to mothers and infants. Currently two vaccines - (i) inactivated influenza, and (ii) tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) - are recommended for use by all pregnant women by the United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Here we review the history of vaccination during pregnancy, the current status of recommendations for vaccination during pregnancy in the USA, and the potential for future advances in this area, including key barriers that must be overcome to accommodate these advances. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Teapot Dome: past, present, and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, W.H. Jr.

    1977-05-01

    The Teapot Dome field is the 99th largest oil field in the United States with a proved reserve of 42,515,000 bbl, yet the field is sparsely drilled and underdeveloped. The writer credits Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 with 38 million bbl of future reserves. The long history of Teapot Dome since the early 1900s, sometimes turbulent, sometimes dormant, was marred by government scandal, akin to Watergate in notoriety, in the 1920s. Harry F. Sinclair's Mammoth Oil Company obtained leases from the Department of the Interior in a fraudulent manner which led to prison sentences for some of the principals. Oil production in the Teapot Dome field is from three formations; the shallow Shannon at depths of 400 to 1,000 ft (122 to 305 m); the Second Wall Creek member of the Frontier Formation at 2,500 to 3,000 ft (362 to 914 m); and the Tensleep Sandstone at 5,500 ft (1,676 m). The Second Wall Creek is the principal producing sandstone and has the greatest future production potential. Current production is small. As of December 1973, each of the 42 Navy wells averaged 4.4 b/d from the Shannon Sandstone, and 49 offset wells averaged 2.2 b/d each. In the Second Wall Creek, each of the 23 Navy wells averaged 10 b/d and 8 offset wells averaged 14.9 b/d each. Total daily production was 416 bbl and grand total for Teapot Dome through December 1975 was 7,762,709 bbl.

  9. Solar Thermal Utilization: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    SO•C NON-FOCUSSING FLAT PLATE / (FPC) 100- 150•C For low temperature 50- 200•C COMPOUND applications PARABOLIC EVACUATED CONCENTRATOR ~ (ETC...2030 Ø 200GW BY 2050 Ø 20 MILLION SQ.METER SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTORS (20GW power) Ø 20 MILLION SOLAR LIGHTS LAUNCHING OF SOLAR INDIA SOLAR THERMAL...Temperature (20oC- 80oC) NALSUN ApplicationsThermal Conversion range SOLAR ENERGY COLLECTORS 40- GO•C UNGLAZED COLLECTORS 60- 90•C SOLAR POND 60

  10. Safeguards technology: present posture and future impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    With widespread and growing concern over the issues of nuclear safeguards, international nuclear trade and nuclear weapons proliferation, the full development of the world's nuclear energy potential could well depend on how effectively the strategic nuclear materials that fuel nuclear power are controlled and safeguarded. The broad U.S. program in nuclear safeguards and security is directed toward a balanced safeguards system incorporating the two major components of physical security and materials control. The current posture of modern safeguards technology, its impact on plant operations, and the key role it must play in the implementation of stringent cost-effective safeguards systems in facilities throughout the nuclear fuel cycle are outlined

  11. Transforming and Building the Future Energy Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Vernon

    1998-12-31

    The petroleum industry is experiencing unprecedented change: increasing competition within a global context, deregulation in the European gas market, technological innovation that will fundamentally alter the economics of the industry. Sustainable Development, the challenge of balancing the Financial, Social and Environmental demands: collectively these demands are fundamentally altering the future shape of the industry. In this presentation the author describes his perspectives on the impact of change on the future shape of the energy industry in the years to come

  12. Transforming and Building the Future Energy Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Vernon

    1999-12-31

    The petroleum industry is experiencing unprecedented change: increasing competition within a global context, deregulation in the European gas market, technological innovation that will fundamentally alter the economics of the industry. Sustainable Development, the challenge of balancing the Financial, Social and Environmental demands: collectively these demands are fundamentally altering the future shape of the industry. In this presentation the author describes his perspectives on the impact of change on the future shape of the energy industry in the years to come

  13. [Cervical cancer screening: past--present--future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenecker, G

    2009-12-01

    in combination with cytology. Various models and approaches are in the testing phase and appear promising. HPV testing is on the other hand well accepted and recommended as a triage test to select women with equivocal smear results (Pap group III, ASCUS) if a biopsy is required or can be followed up and also for follow-up of patients after cone biopsy. However, vaccination of young girls against oncogenic HPV types which has now become widespread still leaves many questions open for the future because the observation period is too short. There is justified hope that this will become a valuable tool in cervical cancer control and may lead to a substantial reduction in the burden of cervical cancer in the future. However, as the current vaccines on the market do not cover all oncogenic virus types and the effects of vaccination will only be observed after many years, the necessity of a cytological screening will remain unrestricted. Therefore, cervical cytology will remain as the trusted, simple to use, economic and proven, like no other method for early cancer detection, efficient procedure even in the foreseeable future. If carried out with the highest quality demands it will play a central role in the early detection of cervical cancer.

  14. Astronomical Photometry Past, Present, and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F

    2011-01-01

    This book brings together experts in the field of astronomical photometry to discuss how their subfields provide the precision and accuracy in astronomical energy flux measurements that are needed to permit tests of astrophysical theories. Differential photometers and photometry, improvements in infrared precision, the improvements in precision and accuracy of CCD photometry, the absolute calibration of flux, the development of the Johnson UBVRI photometric system and other passband systems to measure and precisely classify specific types of stars and astrophysical quantities, and the current capabilities of spectrophotometry and polarimetry to provide precise and accurate data, are all discussed in this volume. The discussion of `differential’ or `two-star’ photometers ranges from early experiments in visual photometry through the Harvard and Princeton polarizing photometers to the pioneering work of Walraven and differential photometers designed to minimize effects of atmospheric extinction and to count...

  15. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead.

  16. [TMJ and orthodontics, "past, present and future"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manière-Ezvan, A; Oueiss, A; Busson, F

    2016-12-01

    In the past, the ATM was mainly associated with the growth of the mandibular condyle. Many studies (on rats) showed the role of condylar cartilage in the growth response following stimulation by orthopedic appliances. From where, Class II dysmorphosis "orthopedic" treatments to grow the mandible; but this concept is discussed in the literature in the absence of fully conclusive results and especially since the contribution of orthognathic surgery. Currently, the operating concept is the mechanical stimulation and therefore the function will shape the ATM during growth and that, from an early age. Prevention of dysmorphoses must go through behavioral counseling to be adopted by parents from the birth of their child: to stimulate mandibular propulsion breastfeeding, then by a hard diet inducing an alternating unilateral chewing. Ignorance of the specificity of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) notably among teenagers has, in the past, left a doubt about the positive or negative role that could have orthodontic treatment on the TMJ. Currently, the best knowledge of TMJ and TMD provides a better therapeutic conduct: behavioral counseling especially for the girl hyperdivergente with small condyles, control of the condylar position, occlusal adjustments at the end of orthodontic treatment. The future of TMJ in relation with orthodontics is based on prevention, screening and deepening of our knowledge. The orthodontist will thus not make a treatment in patients at risk or will identify it and finish the treatment perfectly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Male hormonal contraception: past, present, future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Norbert; Hegyi, Borbála Eszter; Badó, Attila; Németh, Gábor

    2017-11-01

    In certain regions of the world the enormous rate of population growth raises economic and public health concerns and widely accessible contraceptive methods would be desired. In contrast, in other countries the use of effective contraception is a question of individual preferences. Today, most of the reliable contraceptive methods are applied by women, while the options for male methods are quite limited. It is well known that significant portion of pregnancies are still unplanned and several data revealed men's willingness to take part in family planning. Based on these needs, remarkable efforts have been made to develop a suitable hormonal contraceptive agent for men. With the exogenous suppression of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion, the inhibition of the testicular testosterone production and the spermatogenesis can be achieved. In the beginning, testosterone-derivatives, or testosterone-progestin combinations were administered, later synthetic androgen agents were developed. Despite of these efforts, unfortunately, there is no safe, widely feasible male hormonal contraception to date, but in the future this goal can be achieved by solving the key hurdles. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(46): 1819-1830.

  18. Leadless cardiac pacemakers: present and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Derek S; Kuriachan, Vikas

    2018-01-01

    Pacing technology for many decades has been composed of a generator attached to leads that are usually transvenous. Recently, leadless pacemakers have been studied in clinical settings and now available for use in many countries. This includes the single-component Nanostim Leadless Cardiac Pacemaker and Micra Transcatheter Pacing System, as well as the multicomponent Wireless Stimulation Endocardial system. Clinical studies in single-component leadless pacing technology has shown that they can be successfully implanted with minimal complications. The follow-up studies also seem to confirm the findings from the initial clinical trials. These systems offer some advantages over a traditional pacing system comprised of a subcutaneous generator and transvenous leads. In many ways, these leadless systems are disruptive technologies that are changing the traditional pacemaker concept and preferred for some patients. Ongoing research is needed to better assess their long-term function, safety, and end-of-life strategies. In the future, multichamber leadless pacing is expected to be developed and perhaps obviating the need for transvenous leads and their associated complications.

  19. Past, present, and future life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C. P.

    1998-01-01

    Although the Viking results indicated that the surface of Mars is dry and lifeless, there is direct geomorphological evidence that Mars had large amounts of liquid water on its surface in the past. From a biological perspective the existence of liquid water, by itself, motivates the question of the origin of life on Mars. One of the martian meteorites dates back to this early period and may contain evidence consistent with life. The Mars environment 3.5 to 4.0 Gyr ago was comparable to that on the Earth at this time in that both contained liquid water. Life had originated on Earth and reached a fair degree of biological sophistication by 3.5 Gyr ago. To determine if life similarly arose on Mars may require extensive robotic exploration and ultimately human exploration. Intensive exploration of Mars will require a continued presence on the Martian surface and the development of a self sustaining community in which humans can live and work for very long periods of time. A permanent Mars research station can obtain its life support requirements directly from the martian environment enabling a high degree of self-sufficiency. In the longer term, it is possible that in the future we might restore a habitable climate on Mars, returning it to the life-bearing state it may have enjoyed early in its history.

  20. Tourism education: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airey David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism education, as we know it today, has a history going back about 50 years. There are examples of tourism being studied in higher education before this time, at the Universities of Rome in 1925, Vienna, 1936 and st. Gailen and Berne 1941 (Medlik, 1965 but it was not until the middle of the 1960s that 'tourism began to appear more generally in the academic repertoire of higher education' (Airey, Dredge, & Gross, 2015, p. 6. since then, from very small beginnings, tourism has become established as a subject of teaching and research in universities and colleges across the world, with its distinctive literature, academic community and areas of research. This paper sets out to examine the background and development of this new subject area and in doing so it explores three main themes. The first deals with the growth and maturing of tourism in higher education. This then leads to a consideration of the current tensions and pressures on the subject, which in many ways raise questions about its survival as a separate area of study. And from this the possible futures of tourism are examined with the suggestion that it is very well suited as a subject of study for a post-industrial world. The paper draws on a range of sources and in particular makes use of evidence provided by research carried out by the author and colleagues over the past decade (Airey, 2008a, 2008b, 2015; Airey, Tribe, Benckendorff, & Xiao, 2015; Dredge, Airey, & Gross, 2015.

  1. Koopman operator theory: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven; Kaiser, Eurika; Kutz, Nathan

    2017-11-01

    Koopman operator theory has emerged as a dominant method to represent nonlinear dynamics in terms of an infinite-dimensional linear operator. The Koopman operator acts on the space of all possible measurement functions of the system state, advancing these measurements with the flow of the dynamics. A linear representation of nonlinear dynamics has tremendous potential to enable the prediction, estimation, and control of nonlinear systems with standard textbook methods developed for linear systems. Dynamic mode decomposition has become the leading data-driven method to approximate the Koopman operator, although there are still open questions and challenges around how to obtain accurate approximations for strongly nonlinear systems. This talk will provide an introductory overview of modern Koopman operator theory, reviewing the basics and describing recent theoretical and algorithmic developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of data-driven Koopman theory to characterize and control high-dimensional fluid dynamic systems. This talk will also address key advances in the rapidly growing fields of machine learning and data science that are likely to drive future developments.

  2. Endocrine pathology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2018-01-01

    Endocrine pathology is the subspecialty of diagnostic pathology which deals with the diagnosis and characterisation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the endocrine system. This relatively young subspecialty was initially focused mainly on thyroid and parathyroid pathology, with some participants also involved in studies of the pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, and the adrenal glands. However, the endocrine system involves much more than these traditional endocrine organs and the discipline has grown to encompass lesions of the dispersed neuroendocrine cells, including neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, thymus, breast and prostate, as well as paraganglia throughout the body, not just in the adrenals. Indeed, the production of hormones is the hallmark of the endocrine system, and some aspects of gynecological/testicular, bone and liver pathology also fall into the realm of this specialty. Many of the lesions that are the focus of this discipline are increasing in incidence and their pathology is becoming more complex with increased understanding of molecular pathology and a high incidence of familial disease. The future of endocrine pathology will demand a depth of understanding of structure, function, prognosis and prediction as pathologists play a key role in the multidisciplinary care team of patients with endocrine diseases. It is anticipated that new technologies will allow increased subspecialisation in pathology and growth of this important area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation processing dosimetry - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    Since the two United Nations Conferences were held in Geneva in 1955 and 1958 on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy and the concurrent foundation of the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1957, the IAEA has fostered high-dose dosimetry and its applications. This field is represented in industrial radiation processing, agricultural programmes, and therapeutic and preventative medicine. Such dosimetry is needed specifically for pest and quarantine control and in the processing of medical products, pharmaceuticals, blood products, foodstuffs, solid, liquid and gaseous wastes, and a variety of useful commodities, e.g. polymers, composites, natural rubber and elastomers, packaging, electronic, and automotive components, as well as in radiotherapy. Improvements and innovations of dosimetry materials and analytical systems and software continue to be important goals for these applications. Some of the recent advances in high-dose dosimetry include tetrazolium salts and substituted polydiacetylene as radiochromic media, on-line real-time as well as integrating semiconductor and diamond-detector monitors, quantitative label dosimeters, photofluorescent sensors for broad dose range applications, and improved and simplified parametric and computational codes for imaging and simulating 3D radiation dose distributions in model products. The use of certain solid-state devices, e.g. optical quality LiF, at low (down to 4K) and high (up to 500 K) temperatures, is of interest for materials testing. There have also been notable developments in experimental dose mapping procedures, e.g. 2D and 3D dose distribution analyses by flat-bed optical scanners and software applied to radiochromic and photofluorescent images. In addition, less expensive EPR spectrometers and new EPR dosimetry materials and high-resolution semiconductor diode arrays, charge injection devices, and photostimulated storage phosphors have been introduced. (author)

  4. The future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuester, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Europe is one of the world leaders in nuclear technology advancement. The development of spent fuel reprocessing is but one example of this. This process continues today with the development by France and Germany of the European Pressurised-Water Reactor. Nuclear research and development work is continuing in Europe, and must be continued in the future, if Europe is to retain its world leadership position in the technological field and on the commercial front. If we look at the benefits, which nuclear energy has to offer, in economic and environmental terms, 1 support the view that nuclear is an energy source whose time has come again. This is not some fanciful notion or wishful thinking. There is clear evidence of greater long-term reliance on nuclear energy. Perhaps we do not see new nuclear plants springing up in Europe, but we do see ambitious nuclear power development programmes underway in places like China, Japan and Korea. Closer to home, Finland is seriously considering the construction of a new nuclear unit. Elsewhere, in Europe and the US, we see a growing trend towards nuclear plant life extension and plant upgrades geared towards higher production capacity. These are all signs that nuclear will be around for a long time to come and that nuclear will indeed have a future

  5. Hydrogen, energy of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2007-01-01

    A cheap, non-polluting energy with no greenhouse gas emissions and unlimited resources? This is towards this fantastic future that this book brings us, analyzing the complex but promising question of hydrogen. The scientific and technical aspects of production, transport, storage and distribution raised by hydrogen are thoroughly reviewed. Content: I) Energy, which solutions?: 1 - hydrogen, a future; 2 - hydrogen, a foreseeable solution?; II) Hydrogen, an energy vector: 3 - characteristics of hydrogen (physical data, quality and drawbacks); 4 - hydrogen production (from fossil fuels, from water, from biomass, bio-hydrogen generation); 5 - transport, storage and distribution of hydrogen; 6 - hydrogen cost (production, storage, transport and distribution costs); III) Fuel cells and ITER, utopias?: 7 - molecular hydrogen uses (thermal engines and fuel cells); 8 - hydrogen and fusion (hydrogen isotopes, thermonuclear reaction, ITER project, fusion and wastes); IV) Hydrogen acceptability: 9 - risk acceptability; 10 - standards and regulations; 11 - national, European and international policies about hydrogen; 12 - big demonstration projects in France and in the rest of the world; conclusion. (J.S.)

  6. Coal: Energy for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  7. Overview of present and future sludge regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonetti, R.

    1980-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is mandated by several acts of Congress to develop sludge management regulations. These include the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, Clean Water Act, Marine Resources and Sanctuaries Act, Clean Air Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act. Congress had two main goals: the protection of the public health and the promotion of the use of sludge as a natural resource. This presentation will review the development of present and anticipated regulation as they seek to support achievement of these goals

  8. Nitrogen footprints: past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galloway, J.N.; Winiwarter, W.; Leip, A.; Leach, A.M.; Bleeker, A.; Erisman, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has evolved from minimal in the mid-19th century to extensive in the present time. The consequences to human and environmental health are significant. While much attention has been given to the extent and impacts of the alteration, little attention has been

  9. The future energy situation in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This book is the result of a study into the future energy situation in the Netherlands, performed by the electricity companies in the country. The first five chapters sketch the framework within which energy policy is currently forced to operate. Further technical and physical conditions are considered in the following six chapters, including environmental and safety aspects. A prognosis for energy demand in the Netherlands until the end of the century is presented and five different scenarios are discussed, as means of supplying this demand. Nuclear energy is one of the sources considered throughout the text. (C.F.)

  10. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James F; Poruk, Katherine E; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19(th) century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20(th) century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections.

  11. Contraception technology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and nonhormonal modern contraceptives have improved women's lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However, the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users, and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs, and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol and estradiol valerate with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi-long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Although clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of nonhormonal methods is still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as well as

  12. Clinical Neurotoxic Disorders : Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nag Devika

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxins have existed on the earth from times immemorial. Old neurotoxic disorders were due to ingestion/ exposure of heavy metals and food like lathyrus sativus over a long period of time. The 20th Century with rapid industrialsation and expanding chemical and drug industry has spawned several new, hitherto unknown disorders. Old disorders continue to exist e.g. fluorosis, arsenicosis, lathyrism, manganism and lead neuropathy, along with new diseases like Minamata disease, subacute myelo optic neuropathy (SMON, MPTP-Parkinsonian syndorme, triorthcresyl phosphate (TOCP neuroparalytic disease, pesticide induced seizures, tremor and neuropathy, solvent encephalopthy, antipileptic drug foetal syndrome and excitotoxin induced behavioural disorders. Studies on pesticides Organochlorine and organophosphates, synthetic pyrethrins, solvents, heavy metals and substances abuse in the Indian context confirm the neurotoxic nature of many synthetic substances. Future problems envisaged are of concern to clinical neurologists as many of these neurotoxic disorders mimic syndromes of well known neurological disease. The new millenium poses a challenge to the clinician as newer compounds in industry, food, drugs and chemical war agents are being developed. Molecular genetics has advanced rapidly with release of the human genome map. Animal cloning and genetically modified plant products have entered the food chain. How safe are these new inventions for the central nervous system is a big question? India cannot afford disasters like Union Carbide′s Bhopal gas leak nor be a silent spectator to manipulative biotechnology. Unless it is proven beyond all doubt to be a safe innovation, Chemicals have to be cautiously introduced in our environment. To Study, ascertain and confirm safety or neurotoxicity is an exciting challenge for the neuroscientists of the 21st century.

  13. Analysis of Public Opinion Survey ''Nuclear Energy - the Present and the Future'' (2000-2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, Irena; Filipin, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Technical Museum Zagreb, in co-operation with Hrvatska elektroprivreda, has been organizing high-school students' visits to the nuclear power plant Krsko since 1989. From schools that have visited the nuclear power plant so far, Zagreb high schools and technical schools are the most represented ones. They filled in the copies of questionnaire after watching film about nuclear energy and before visiting nuclear power plant Krsko. The copies of the public opinion survey (questionnaire) have been filled since 2000 and results of analysis of data until 2012 are in this paper. Questions were the same and that makes possible comparison of the results. (authors)

  14. Oil and nuclear power: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Ferenc L.; Rogner, Hans-Holger

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between oil and nuclear energy in the global energy scene over the past 50 years is analysed. The former nuclear-oil product competition in power generation and various end-use markets is found to have transformed into a complementary relationship. Current concerns associated with both energy sources and related technologies, including price volatility, supply security, geopolitical sensitivity, depletion alarms, and environmental pollution issues for oil, economic performance, operational safety, proliferation, terrorism, radioactive waste disposal, and the resulting public acceptance for nuclear are examined as determinants of their future roles in the world energy balance. An assessment of the long-term prospects for oil and nuclear energy is presented at the scale of a century to support further economic and energy policy analyses. It is the first in-depth study of global energy projections based on a comparative examination of long-term socio-economic scenarios and their coordinated quantifications by a set of integrated energy-economy models

  15. The nuclear marketplace. Past, present, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Demand for uranium and heavy water depends on demand for power reactors, which in turn depends on demand for electricity. There is electric power generation over capacity at the moment, due to the fact that during the period of rapid economic growth in the 1960s and 1970s electricity production was growing about 50% faster than the GDP. The rapid escalation of energy costs between 1973 and 1980 fueled inflation and drove interest rates up, resulting in low growth rates and a recession. Even during this period electricity production capacity grew 50% faster than the GDP. The inevitable rationalization resulted in cancellations and near bankruptcy for electric utilities. The IAEA forecasts that more than the world's total nuclear generating capacity as of 1982 will be added in the 1990s, so the long-term prospect for nuclear power remains good. Until then, the nuclear industry will be experiencing a buyer's market, and the Canadian nuclear industry must select its markets carefully, in both the domestic and the international markets. (L.L.)

  16. Resistor trimming geometry; past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alafogianni, M; Penlington, R; Birkett, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the key developments in thin film resistive trimming geometry for use in the fabrication of discrete precision resistors. Firstly an introduction to the laser trimming process is given with respect to well established trim geometries such as the plunge, 'L' and serpentine cuts. The effect of these trim patterns on key electrical properties of resistance tolerance and temperature co-efficient of resistance (TCR) of the thin films is then discussed before the performance of more recent geometries such as the three-contact and random trim approaches are reviewed. In addition to the properties of the standard trim patterns, the concept of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and ablation energy and the effect of introducing a 'fine' trim in areas of low current density to improve device performance are also studied. It is shown how trimming geometry and laser parameters can be systematically controlled to produce thin film resistors of the required properties for varying applications such as high precision, long term stability and high power pulse performance

  17. Present and future nuclear power financing schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, R.

    1977-01-01

    The financial requirement for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany for the period up until 1985 was estimated to run up to some DM 100 billion already in the Nuclear Energy Study published by the Dresdner Bank in 1974. This figure is not changed in any way by the reduction the nuclear power program has suffered in the meantime, because the lower requirement for investment capital is more than offset by the price increases that have occurred meanwhile. A capital requirement in the order of DM 100 billion raises major problems for the power producing industry and the banks which, however, are not going to hamper the further expansion of nuclear power, because new financing schemes have been specially developed for the nuclear field. They include financing by leasing, the use of funds from real estate credit institutions for long term financing, borrowing of long term funds in the Euro market, and financing through subsidiaries of the utilities. The new financing schemes also apply to the large financial requirement associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, waste management in particular. In this sector the utilities agree to bear the economic risk of the companies implementing the respective projects. Accordingly, financing will not entail any major difficulties. Another area of great importance is export financing. The German-Brazilian nuclear agreement is a model of this instrument. (orig.) [de

  18. Present and future of kaon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, R.

    1983-07-01

    The aim of this talk is to present experimental results that could provide a clue to decide whether the relativistic mean field approach or the quark picture is more appropriate to describe the nuclear phenomena dependent on short range interactions. I discuss Λ and Σ hypernucleus experiments, dibaryon strange resonances and strange baryon radiative decays. All these experiments belong to be a powerful tool to explore this challenging field at nuclear physics

  19. Influenza Pandemics: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chia Hsieh

    2006-01-01

    the virus interacts with the host's immune system will be helpful in guiding future therapeutic strategies in facing influenza pandemics.

  20. Strengthened safeguards: Present and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The safeguards system is experiencing what has been seen as a revolution and, in doing so, it is confronting a series of challenges. These can be grouped into three areas. Drawing and maintaining safeguards conclusions - The process by which the safeguards conclusions are derived is based upon the analysis, evaluation and review of all the information available to the Agency. This process is on- going, but the State Evaluation Reports are compiled and reviewed periodically. For States with an additional protocol in force, the absence of indicators of the presence of undeclared nuclear material or activities provides the basis for the safeguards conclusion. Future challenges center on States' expectations of, and reactions to, the results of the evaluation and review process. Designing and implementing integrated safeguards - The conceptual framework of integrated safeguards is being actively pursued. Basic principles have been defined and integrated safeguards approaches have been developed for various types of facilities. Work is also progressing on the design of integrated safeguards approaches for specific States. Complementary access is being successfully implemented, and procedures for the use of unannounced inspections are being developed with the prospect of cost- effectiveness gains. Costs neutrality vs. quality and credibility - The Department faces serious staff and financial challenges. It has succeeded so far in 'doing more' and 'doing better' within a zero-real growth budget, but the scope for further significant efficiency gains is exhausted. There is no capacity to absorb new or unexpected tasks. Difficulties in recruiting and retaining qualified and experienced staff exacerbate the problems and add to costs. The Director General of the IAEA has referred to the need for new initiatives to bridge the budgetary gap; a possible measure is proposed. The tasks of meeting the challenges and demands of strengthened safeguards have been added to

  1. Life On Mars: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    human presence on Mars will be the most economical way to study that planet in detail. It is possible that at some time in the future we might recreate a habitable climate on Mars, returning it to the life-bearing state it may have enjoyed early in its history. Our studies of Mars are still in a preliminary state but everything we have learned suggests that it may be possible to restore Mars to a habitable climate.

  2. Dermatology hospital fellowships: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Natalie Z; Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    The question of what makes a successful dermatology hospitalist has risen to the forefront due to the rapidly increasing number of these providers. Inpatient dermatology fellowships have formed as a direct consequence. Though mostly in their infancy, these programs have primary or secondary goals to train providers in the dermatologic care of the hospitalized patient. This article presents a brief synopsis of the history of traditional hospitalist fellowships and extrapolates these findings to existing hospitalist dermatology fellowships. As more of these programs arise, these fellowships are poised to revolutionize dermatologic inpatient care from a systems perspective. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. Combinatorial and computational mathematics present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Sungpyo; Kim, Ki Hang; Roush, Fred W

    2001-01-01

    This book describes and summarizes past work in important areas of combinatorics and computation, as well as gives directions for researchers working in these areas in the 21st century. It contains primarily survey papers and presents original research by Peter Fishburn, Jim Ho Kwak, Jaeun Lee, K H Kim, F W Roush and Susan Williams. The papers deal with some of the most exciting and promising developments in the areas of coding theory in relation to number theory, lattice theory and its applications, graph theory and its applications, topological techniques in combinatorics, symbolic dynamics

  4. Radiation Damage Theory: Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashev, Aleksandr; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2009-01-01

    Efforts of many scientists for more than a half of a century have resulted in substantial understanding of the response of various materials to irradiation. The theory has contributed significantly to this process but has not acquired a status allowing it to play a decisive role in creating radiation-resistant materials. Moreover, some theoretical predictions are in contradiction with observations, which indicates that something important has escaped attention. In the present paper, the current theoretical framework and experimental data are analyzed to elucidate the reasons for such a situation. A way of developing a predictive theory is proposed.

  5. Sea Global Containerized Trade. Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Boşneagu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The global economy, global trade and maritime transport show a trend of development in the next period of time, remaining still some serious risks with the potential to reduce the positive trend, including: modest economic recovery of developed economies, difficulties in emerging growth and development of increasing geopolitical tensions in many parts of the world. Stimulating measures are presently applied in order to achieve the world economic growth, the international trade, the investment and profit growth in consumer’s demand, especially in Western Asia and Africa, as well as increased exports of mineral resources.

  6. The ELMO Bumpy Torus: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment at ORNL was designed to circumvent the MHD stability problem encountered in standard bumpy tori by using the ''minimum-B'' properties of annular high-beta, hot-electron plasmas formed by microwave heating. The EBT combines the attractive features of both mirrors and tokamaks. The feasibility of this combined system has been demonstrated successfully in the EBT-I experiment and discussed at greater length elsewhere. The present status of the EBT research activities at ORNL is described briefly

  7. Future of nuclear energy is promising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1999-01-01

    Paper is trying to clearly present the facts about World nuclear energy production in the past and in the future. The production has increased in last ten years for about 26% and will continue to grow. After next ten years we can expect between 12,5% and 25% higher production than this year. Therefore we, nuclear professionals, should not be pessimistic. We should strive not to use negative words in our communications between ourselves and especially to general public. Instead, we should proudly underline our achievements in the past and prospects for the future stressing all the benefits of this type of energy production.(author)

  8. Human Lunar Destiny: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, David

    2002-01-01

    This paper offers conceptual strategy and rationale for returning astronauts to the moon. NASA's historic Apollo program enabled humans to make the first expeditionary voyages to the moon and to gather and return samples back to the earth for further study. To continue exploration of the moon within the next ten to fifteen years, one possible mission concept for returning astronauts using existing launch vehicle infrastructure is presented. During these early lunar missions, expeditionary trips are made to geographical destinations and permanent outposts are established at the lunar south pole. As these missions continue, mining operations begin in an effort to learn how to live off the land. Over time, a burgeoning economy based on mining and scientific activity emerges with the formation of more accommodating settlements and surface infrastructure assets. As lunar activity advances, surface infrastructure assets grow and become more complex, lunar settlements and outposts are established across the globe, travel to and from the moon becomes common place, and commerce between earth and the moon develops and flourishes. Colonization and development of the moon is completed with the construction of underground cities and the establishment of a full range of political, religious, educational, and recreational institutions with a diverse population from all nations of the world. Finally, rationale for diversifying concentrations of humanity throughout earth's neighborhood and the greater solar system is presented.

  9. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Present and Future Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Vasapollo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Imprinting Technology (MIT is a technique to design artificial receptors with a predetermined selectivity and specificity for a given analyte, which can be used as ideal materials in various application fields. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs, the polymeric matrices obtained using the imprinting technology, are robust molecular recognition elements able to mimic natural recognition entities, such as antibodies and biological receptors, useful to separate and analyze complicated samples such as biological fluids and environmental samples. The scope of this review is to provide a general overview on MIPs field discussing first general aspects in MIP preparation and then dealing with various application aspects. This review aims to outline the molecularly imprinted process and present a summary of principal application fields of molecularly imprinted polymers, focusing on chemical sensing, separation science, drug delivery and catalysis. Some significant aspects about preparation and application of the molecular imprinting polymers with examples taken from the recent literature will be discussed. Theoretical and experimental parameters for MIPs design in terms of the interaction between template and polymer functionalities will be considered and synthesis methods for the improvement of MIP recognition properties will also be presented.

  10. Dnepropetrovsk hygienic school: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beletskaya E.M.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents historical analysis of formation of hygiene school of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy over the 100 year period - from formation of Katerinoslav province sanitary district council, as a unique self-government social organization in XIX century to the present. The basic stages of its development, including foundation of Hygiene Courses at High Mining School, their transformation into department of general hygiene, social hygiene and hygiene of labor in Katerinoslav Medical Academy in 1922, foundation of separate departments of hygiene in 1940-1948, their reorganization at the end of XX – beginning of XXI centuries are outlined. It is established, that Dnipropetrovsk hygiene school during its existence formed a great number of outstanding scientists, more than 100 dissertations in different directions devoted to hygienic diagnostics of technogenically changing environment, its impact on human health as well as hygienic control levers and health strengthening of population of industrial areas were defended. Scientific contribution of prominent scientists and teachers, their achievements and discoveries in the field of preventive medicine, role in the formation of preventive world outlook of students are estimated. At the XIV hygienic congress 30 hygienists were recognized as leading scientists of Ukraine over XX century, seven of them are from Dnipropetrovsk hygiene school; this indicates its importance in the noble cause of serving public health.

  11. How a future energy world could look?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  12. How a future energy world could look?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, M.

    2012-10-01

    The future energy system will change significantly within the next years as a result of the following Mega Trends: de-carbonization, urbanization, fast technology development, individualization, glocalization (globalization and localization) and changing demographics. Increasing fluctuating renewable production will change the role of non-renewable generation. Distributed energy from renewables and micro generation will change the direction of the energy flow in the electricity grids. Production will not follow demand but demand has to follow production. This future system is enabled by the fast technical development of information and communication technologies which will be present in the entire system. In this paper the results of a comprehensive analysis with different scenarios is summarized. Tools were used like the analysis of policy trends in the European countries, modelling of the European power grid, modelling of the European power markets and the analysis of technology developments with cost reduction potentials. With these tools the interaction of the main actors in the energy markets like conventional generation and renewable generation, grid transport, electricity storage including new storage options from E-Mobility, Power to Gas, Compressed Air Energy storage and demand side management were considered. The potential application of technologies and investments in new energy technologies were analyzed within existing frameworks and markets as well as new business models in new markets with different frameworks. In the paper the over all trend of this analysis is presented by describing a potential future energy world. This world represents only one of numerous options with comparable characteristics.

  13. Carcinoma Gall Bladder: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma gall bladder is a very aggressive disease with poor outcomes. Despite achievements in the field of advanced imaging techniques, there is a very high mortality rate of the disease Cancer is the second most common disease in India responsible for maximum mortality with about 0.3 million deaths per year. The magnitude of cancer problem in the Indian Sub-continent (sheer numbers is increasing due to poor to moderate living standards and inadequate medical facilities. Women are more commonly affected than men. The peak incidence occurs in people in their 60s, but the disease age range is from 29 to 90 years of age and there is great geographic and ethnic variation. Carcinoma gall bladder, a disease of old age, is now found in the younger age group and presents with greater ferocity.

  14. Male contraception: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher; Goldberg, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Current contraceptive options available to men include withdrawal, condoms, and vasectomy, each of which has its own drawbacks. In this chapter we will describe the pros and cons for each, as well as methodological and product updates. Statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control on acceptance and satisfaction will be included. Advances in vasectomy and reversal will be presented. Methods to develop new contraceptive technologies fall into two categories: hormonal and non-hormonal. Many targets and strategies have been proposed for non-hormonal male contraception within the testis. Targets include structural components in the testis, as well as enzymes, ion channels and other proteins specific to spermatozoa. Here we provide an overview of the spermatogenic mechanisms and proteins that have received research interest to date. We also discuss potential novel targets, such as ubiquitin specific proteases, that warrant greater research emphasis.

  15. Nuclear proliferation: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, M.

    1983-01-01

    Three things can be learned from the past and present that might tell us how to get a larger share of attention for nuclear nonproliferation. First, a decision to develop nuclear weapons has always been a conscious, serious, deliberate choice by the head of the government concerned. The complicated historical record of our and other country's efforts in this field suggests that no country can have a coherent policy on proliferation unless the subject enjoys the sustained attention of a leader, nearly always a head of government, who is able to make his purposes clearly understood and to ensure that they are persistently carried through. The most important contribution any one country can make is to exhibit understanding and restraint in its own appetite for nuclear solution, economic as well as military. The US is in a favorable position to take a lead, even a unilateral lead, in reducing the number of nuclear weapons. 1 reference

  16. Science in the archives pasts, presents, futures

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    "Science in the Archives" reveals affinities and continuities among the sciences of the archives, across many disciplines and centuries, in order to present a better picture of essential archival practices and, thereby, the meaning of science. For in both the natural and human sciences, archives of the most diverse forms make cumulative, collective knowledge possible. Yet in contrast to laboratories, observatories, or the field, archives have yet to be studied across the board as central sites of science. The volume covers episodes in the history of astronomy, geology, genetics, classical philology, climatology, history, medicine, and ancient natural philosophy, as well as fundamental practices such as collecting, retrieval strategies, and data mining. The time frame spans doxology in Greco-Roman antiquity to NSA surveillance techniques and the quantified-self movement. Each chapter explores the practices, politics, economics, and open-ended potential of the sciences of the archives, making this the first boo...

  17. Present and Future: Pharmacologic Treatment of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Glandt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity now presents one of the biggest health problems of our times. Diet and exercise are best for both prevention and treatment; unfortunately, both require much discipline and are difficult to maintain. Medications offer a possible adjunct, but their effect is modest, they are limited by side effects, and the weight loss lasts only as long as the drug is being taken, since as soon as treatment is stopped, the weight is regained. Sibutramine, a sympathomimetic medication which was available for long-term treatment, is the most recent of the drugs to be withdrawn from the market due to side effects; in this case it was an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This paper reviews those medications which are available for treatment of obesity, including many of those recently taken off the market. It also discusses some of the newer treatments that are currently being investigated.

  18. Microbicides in India-present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available India continues to wage a battle against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS epidemic. Despite an array of preventive and control efforts directed against the disease, it continues to finds its way from the high risk groups to the general population. Women are more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS because of biological as well as socio-cultural factors. Microbicides appear to provide an attractive option as a means of protection to be used by women. At present, microbicide trials are in study phases I and II in India. The development of an ideal microbicide candidate which would be effective and confirms to user satisfaction poses a major challenge to researchers.

  19. NEPHROTIC SYNDROME: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ignatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review is focused to change our ideas about the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment tactics of the nephrotic syndrome  in recent decades. The change in the treatment outcomes of the primary nephrotic syndrome in connection with the emergence of new  therapy technologies, is shown. Features of the course, examination and therapy of congenital and infantile nephrotic syndrome and  the possibility of the debut of a nephrotic syndrome associated with various gene mutations and at an older age are presented. Principal differences in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are accentuated depending on the cause of the development of the disease.  Modern syndromological and pathogenetic methods of therapy of primary nephrotic syndrome are presented, and the immediate opportunities for the introduction of new treatment technologies based on the use of monoclonal antibodies, are shown.

  20. Teratology – past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Mojmír; Navarová, Jana; Brucknerová, Ingrid; Dubovický, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Teratology is the science that studies the causes, mechanisms, and patterns of abnormal development. The authors present an updated overview of the most important milestones and stages of the development of modern teratology. Development of knowledge and society led to the recognition that causes of congenital developmental disorders (CDDs) might be caused by various mechanical effects, foetal diseases, and retarded or arrested development of the embryo and foetus. Based on the analysis of the historical development of hypotheses and theories representing a decisive contribution to this field, we present a survey of the six Wilson′s fundamental principles of teratology. The aim of observing these principles is to get insight into developmental relations and to understand mechanisms of action on the level of cell populations (elementary morphogenetic processes), tissues and organs. It is important to realise that any negative intervention into the normal course of these processes, either on genetic or non-genetic basis, inevitably leads to a sequence of subsequent changes resulting in CDDs. Moreover, the classical toxicologic monotonic dose-response paradigm recently has been challenged by the so-called “low dose-hypothesis”, particularly in the case of endocrine active substances. These include some pesticides, dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A. Despite modern approaches of molecular biology and genetics, along with top diagnostic techniques, we are still not able to identify the actual cause in more than 65 to 70% of all congenital defects classified as having an unknown etiology. Today CDDs include any birth defect, either morphological, biochemical, or behavioural. PMID:23554558

  1. Nitrogen footprints: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, James N.; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison M.; Bleeker, Albert; Willem Erisman, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has evolved from minimal in the mid-19th century to extensive in the present time. The consequences to human and environmental health are significant. While much attention has been given to the extent and impacts of the alteration, little attention has been given to those entities (i.e., consumers, institutions) that use the resources that result in extensive reactive nitrogen (Nr) creation. One strategy for assessment is the use of nitrogen footprint tools. A nitrogen footprint is generally defined as the total amount of Nr released to the environment as a result of an entity’s consumption patterns. This paper reviews a number of nitrogen footprint tools (N-Calculator, N-Institution, N-Label, N-Neutrality, N-Indicator) that are designed to provide that attention. It reviews N-footprint tools for consumers as a function of the country that they live in (N-Calculator, N-Indicator) and the products they buy (N-Label), for the institutions that people work in and are educated in (N-Institution), and for events and decision-making regarding offsets (N-Neutrality). N footprint tools provide a framework for people to make decisions about their resource use and show them how offsets can be coupled with behavior change to decrease consumer/institution contributions to N-related problems.

  2. Carbapenems: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Endimiani, Andrea; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the current “state of the art” of carbapenem antibiotics and their role in our antimicrobial armamentarium. Among the β-lactams currently available, carbapenems are unique because they are relatively resistant to hydrolysis by most β-lactamases, in some cases act as “slow substrates” or inhibitors of β-lactamases, and still target penicillin binding proteins. This “value-added feature” of inhibiting β-lactamases serves as a major rationale for expansion of this class of β-lactams. We describe the initial discovery and development of the carbapenem family of β-lactams. Of the early carbapenems evaluated, thienamycin demonstrated the greatest antimicrobial activity and became the parent compound for all subsequent carbapenems. To date, more than 80 compounds with mostly improved antimicrobial properties, compared to those of thienamycin, are described in the literature. We also highlight important features of the carbapenems that are presently in clinical use: imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem, panipenem-betamipron, and biapenem. In closing, we emphasize some major challenges and urge the medicinal chemist to continue development of these versatile and potent compounds, as they have served us well for more than 3 decades. PMID:21859938

  3. Making PACS the present, not the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D

    1998-01-01

    Why haven't you moved forward with PACS? Have you just procrastinated or does your facility have legitimate reasons? Some say the technology is too confusing or too new, while others say the cost of PACS is too high. Many facilities say they haven't found a satisfactory way to deal with the conflicting opinions of their radiologists, IS department, administration, referring physicians and staff. Take time to compare the technology you do understand with something familiar such as your own PC or perhaps the current networks inside your facility. You'll soon begin to see that PACS is not a new technology, but rather a new methodology. To handle the perceived high cost of PACS, remember that every facility has different needs. Look at your work flow and then the many byproducts of PACS, such as marketing. If you are the first in your area to implement this new technology, you'll gain a marketing advantage in competing for referring physicians and managed care referral business. Follow the process you use to purchase other products, such as CT or MRI, as you investigate the vendors. Finally, make a plan! Determine departmental goals and gather information from vendors. Create a timeline, a financial plan and your marketing strategy. Together, these steps will help move PACS into the present for you.

  4. Present status and future prospects of HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Sung-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Korean industry is in the transition from component to basic material production stage, which consequently requires basic science research utilizing neutron beam to support it. The demand for medical radioisotopes is strongly increasing according to the elevation of life standards, which in turn requires very stable supply of short half-lived radioisotopes. Research on these areas is possible through the capabilities provided by horizontal beam tubes and vertical experimental holes of HANARO. The experimental facilities are available not only for in-house research and development groups but also for external user communities in universities, research institutes and industries. And they are open to the international users as well. Utilization of a research reactor will be enhanced through the active development of user programs and the strengthened cooperation between supplier and users of the facility. Most of the worldwide high performance research reactors of the first generation are reaching end of life. Hence the construction of new research reactors and the refurbishment of present ones are very demanding because research reactors continue to be utilized in many areas. Since HANARO is recently constructed with a new design, experiences of design, construction, and commissioning work for the research reactor are valuable for our country and for other countries as well. As more utilization facilities are being designed and installed in the reactor, international cooperation with experienced institutions is important in the course of installation. Sharing experiences will contribute to the advancement of nuclear technologies for international communities. (author)

  5. SPECT of the brain: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, F.; Lenzi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    In both PET and SPECT, most of the studies and the models have been addressed to two organs: brain and heart. So far, brain has certainly been investigated more. The several comparisons between planar scintigraphy and SPECT, between X-ray TCT and SPECT, and also between PET and SPECT, have tended to consider SPECT a cheap but scarcely useful tool for a nuclear medicine section. Again the authors feel that this is due to the fact that SPECT is really a ''physiological tomography'', with little known about its physiology or how it is measured. Thus the present state of the art of SPECT of the brain is characterized by a collection of data and reports on brain imaging and by a slowly growing basic understanding of the utilized modes. The introduction of a new brain-imaging radiopharmaceutical is immediately signaled by its ''first clinical application'' without parallel studies on the kinetics, the metabolic degradation, and the real suitability of the molecule as a tracer for measurement of regional CBF. Only a few attempts seek to narrow this discussion between clinic and biology, and the authors like to emphasize the need for nuclear medicine people to dedicate more time and effort

  6. Optimising preterm nutrition: present and future

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Ann-Marie

    2016-04-01

    The goal of preterm nutrition in achieving growth and body composition approximating that of the fetus of the same postmenstrual age is difficult to achieve. Current nutrition recommendations depend largely on expert opinion, due to lack of evidence, and are primarily birth weight based, with no consideration given to gestational age and\\/or need for catch-up growth. Assessment of growth is based predominately on anthropometry, which gives insufficient attention to the quality of growth. The present paper provides a review of the current literature on the nutritional management and assessment of growth in preterm infants. It explores several approaches that may be required to optimise nutrient intakes in preterm infants, such as personalising nutritional support, collection of nutrient intake data in real-time, and measurement of body composition. In clinical practice, the response to inappropriate nutrient intakes is delayed as the effects of under- or overnutrition are not immediate, and there is limited nutritional feedback at the cot-side. The accurate and non-invasive measurement of infant body composition, assessed by means of air displacement plethysmography, has been shown to be useful in assessing quality of growth. The development and implementation of personalised, responsive nutritional management of preterm infants, utilising real-time nutrient intake data collection, with ongoing nutritional assessments that include measurement of body composition is required to help meet the individual needs of preterm infants.

  7. Nitrogen footprints: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, James N; Leach, Allison M; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Leip, Adrian; Bleeker, Albert; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    The human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has evolved from minimal in the mid-19th century to extensive in the present time. The consequences to human and environmental health are significant. While much attention has been given to the extent and impacts of the alteration, little attention has been given to those entities (i.e., consumers, institutions) that use the resources that result in extensive reactive nitrogen (Nr) creation. One strategy for assessment is the use of nitrogen footprint tools. A nitrogen footprint is generally defined as the total amount of Nr released to the environment as a result of an entity’s consumption patterns. This paper reviews a number of nitrogen footprint tools (N-Calculator, N-Institution, N-Label, N-Neutrality, N-Indicator) that are designed to provide that attention. It reviews N-footprint tools for consumers as a function of the country that they live in (N-Calculator, N-Indicator) and the products they buy (N-Label), for the institutions that people work in and are educated in (N-Institution), and for events and decision-making regarding offsets (N-Neutrality). N footprint tools provide a framework for people to make decisions about their resource use and show them how offsets can be coupled with behavior change to decrease consumer/institution contributions to N-related problems. (paper)

  8. Trauma networks: present and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakaris Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In England, trauma is the leading cause of death across all age groups, with over 16,000 deaths per year. Major trauma implies the presence of multiple, serious injuries that could result in death or serious disability. Successive reports have documented the fact that the current ad hoc unstructured management of this patient group is associated with considerable avoidable death and disability. The reform of trauma care in England, especially of the severely injured patient, has already begun. Strong clinical leadership is embraced as the way forward. The present article summarises the steps that have been made over the last decade that led to the recent decision to move towards a long anticipated restructure of the National Health Service (NHS trauma services with the introduction of Regional Trauma Networks (RTNs. While, for the first time, a genuine political will and support exists, the changes required to maintain the momentum for the implementation of the RTNs needs to be marshalled against arguments, myths and perceptions from the past. Such an approach may reverse the disinterest attitude of many, and will gradually evolve into a cultural shift of the public, clinicians and policymakers in the fullness of time.

  9. Ebola virus disease: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Rajak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is one of the most deadly ailments known to mankind due to its high mortality rate (up to 90% accompanying with the disease. Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF is an infectious disease of animal that can be transmitted to both human and non-human primates. The first epidemic of EHF occurred in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The incubation period of ebola is less than 21 days. Ebola virus infections are depicted by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that leads to damage of the vascular, coagulation and immune systems, causing multi-organ failure and shock. Five genetically distinct members of the Filoviridae family responsible for EHF are as follows: Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus and Reston ebolavirus. The ongoing 2014 West Africa ebola epidemic has been considered as the most serious panic in the medical field with respect to both the number of human cases and death toll. The natural host for ebola virus is unknown, thus it is not possible to carry out programs to regulate or abolish virus from transmission to people. The ebola virus infection provides little chance to develop acquired immunity causing rapid progression of the disease. It is pertinent to mention that at present, there is no antiviral therapy or vaccine that is helpful against ebola virus infection in humans. The impediment of EHF necessitates much better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, particularly the role of wildlife, as well as bats, in the spread of ebola virus to humans.

  10. Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Energy Sources: Where are We Now and Where Might We Be in the Near Future? (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Margolis, R.; Feldman, D.; Markel, T.

    2011-07-01

    A precipitous drop in the price of the crystalline silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules typically employed for residential applications has recently been observed: The typical sales price for modules was around $4/WP DC in 2008 but could easily approach $1.50/W WP DC by the end of this year. As module price declines continue, and as gains are also realized in balance-of-system costs, the economics of PV systems for power generation become increasingly competitive. In this presentation, we will examine whether solar will reach grid parity in the United States if monocrystalline silicon modules achieve an optimistic-case scenario in efficiency and cost. The analysis suggests that PV systems are already economically viable in select markets, but further cost reductions and efficiency improvements above and beyond the monocrystalline optimistic-case scenarios are necessary in order to be competitive against incumbent electricity production in most markets across the United States. In this presentation we also provide an initial overview of cost considerations for electric vehicle charging with PV.

  11. (Nuclear) energy policy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    With this report the German Federal Diet submits the final results of the opinion-forming and decision-making process concerning the recommendations made by the investigation committee 'Future Nuclear Energy Policy' in June 1980. By means of this report it is intended to point out to an interested public the difficult and time-consuming process of parliamentary decision-making. This report is also to be seen as the final opinion delivered on the recommendations made by the investigation committee. The recommendations were to continue to pursue the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the necessity and technical justifiability of which had basically been approved by all parliamentary groups. In view of the import of the subject and in recognition of the work done by the investigation committee, the German Parliament has thoroughly discussed the report and has reviewed the analyses and recommendations in conjunction with other political fields to be considered. One part of the recommendations was taken up almost unanimously. As far as the safety of nuclear installations is concerned, the investigation committee could not submit any new findings which would give reasons for modifying the hitherto positive assessment of the safety of nuclear installations. The recommendations of the investigation committee mainly referred to the decision-making process in the field of energy policy which will effect the next decade. What fundamental decisions are to be made until when was pointed out as well as the findings and experience to be made until then. (orig./HP) [de

  12. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  13. Low-β SC linacs: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is a general review of superconducting low-β technology and applications from its beginning in 1969 into the near-term future. The emphasis is on studies of accelerating resonators and on SC linacs that boost the energy of heavy-ion beams from tandem electrostatic accelerators used for nuclear-physics research. Other topics are positive-ion SC injectors to replace tandems and the need for accelerating structures with β outside of the present proven range, 0.008 < β < 0.2

  14. Present day problems concerning the energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, G.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of the regional energy supply industry touching directly the energy supply utilities (e.g. territorial reform, power prices) are discussed. In a survey on the overall energy situation in the FRG as seen by energy supply utilities, the following conclusions are drawn: 1) The electricity supply industry is in the favourite position to make the required structural changes by utilizing primary energy for generating electric power. It offers - via electric energy - an effective opportunity for substituting oil. 2) The electricity supply industry alone will be in a position to use nuclear energy during the next few decades. A decision in favour of nuclear energy must not be at disposal to make oneself momentarily politically popular. This indispensable decision results exclusively from our responsibility for the future of our national economy and thus our society. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Survey on the present situation and future outlook of energy/environment issues mainly on coal in the APEC region; APEC ikinai no sekitan wo chushin to suru energy kankyo mondai no genjo oyobi kongo no mitoshi ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    For the purpose of studying the energy supply/demand trend and the environmental problem relating mainly to coal in the APEC region, the paper surveyed the situation from the past to the present and outlooked the beginning of the 21st century. GDP in the whole APEC region increased at an annual rate of 3.4% from 1971 to 1991 and made a rapid growth of an annual rate over 7% especially in the non-OECD region. The supply/demand balance of coal, etc. in the non-OECD region is expected to be tight, and the energy price also to be higher. This will be a major factor causing hindrance to the economic growth of resource-importing countries. It is necessary to prepare the energy infrastructure. With the increasing coal utilization, it is feared that pollutants such as SOx, NOx and CO2 will increase, and it is necessary to introduce energy utilization technology/facilities which are high-efficient and environment-friendly and to expedite introduction of non-fossil energy. The APEC region, where the worldwide growth is expected, is a priming for the world development, and a policy which is well balanced in economic growth, stabilized energy supply, and environmental protection is needed for the region to achieve its sustainable growth. 50 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Use of cyclotrons in medical research: Past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, James B.; Myers, Lee T.

    1985-05-01

    The use of cyclotrons in medical research started in the late 1930s with the most prominent use being neutron irradiation in cancer therapy. Due to a lack of understanding of the biological effect of neutrons, the results were less than encouraging. In the 1940s and 1950s, small cyclotrons were used for isotope production and in the mid 60s, the biological effect of neutrons was more thoroughly studied, with the result that a second trial of neutron therapy was initiated at Hammersmith Hospital, England. Concurrent with this, work on the use of high energy charged particles, initially protons and alphas, was initiated in Sweden and Russia and at Harvard and Berkeley. The English success in neutron therapy led to some pilot studies in the USA using physics cyclotrons of various energies and targets. These results in turn lead to the present series of machines presently being installed at M.D. Anderson Hospital (42 MeV), Seattle (50 MeV) and UCLA (46 MeV). The future probably bodes well for cyclotrons at the two extremes of the energy range. For nuclear medicine the shift is away from the use of multiple isotopes, which requires a large range of particles and energies to 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F, which can be incorporated in metabolic specific compounds and be made with small 8-10 MeV p+ "table top" cyclotrons. For tumor therapy machines of 60 MeV or so will probably be the choice for the future, as they allow the treatment of deep seated tumors with neutrons and the charged particles have sufficient range to allow the treatment of ocular tumors.

  17. Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleby, A J

    1976-06-01

    Society will not be able to afford nonfossil fuel energy in the future without a major restructuring of industrial activity, involving a complete rethinking of the basis of our present social and economic establishment. This restructuring must be combined with the evident necessity of policies of population restriction and controls in the form of international allocation of the dwindling supply of raw materials, including fossil (and, in future, nonfossil) primary energy. Only by such means, and by adopting a very low-growth future, can some moderate degree of standard of living be expected to be perpetuated for at least a few generations in the industrialized countries, especially in the case of those that are major energy importers at present. This type of future will also be of more help to the third world than one involving the now impossible ideal of a spiraling energy growth rate. The society which, on an optimistic view, will emerge toward the end of the fossil fuel era, will be supplied with abundant, though efficiently applied, energy, and will survive with natural products and by economizing its recylced mineral resources. The approach to this goal will require political leadership, serious education of the public, and a real population policy, all on a world-wide scale. (Conclusions)

  18. The gas turbine: Present technology and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minghetti, E.

    1997-03-01

    The gas turbine is the most widely used prime mover all over the world for either power generation or mechanical drive applications. The above fact is due to the recent great improvements that have been done especially in terms of efficiency, availability and reliability. The future for gas turbine technological development looks very promising. In fact, although tremendous growth has already taken place, there is still the potential for dramatic improvements in performance. Compared with the competitive prime movers (conventional steam power plants and reciprocating piston engines) the gas turbine technology is younger and still following a strong growth curve. The coming decades will witness the continued increasing in turbine inlet temperature, the development of new materials and refrigeration systems and the commercialization of inter cooled system and steam cooled turbines. With the very soon introduction of the G and H technology, expected single and combined cycle efficiencies for heavy duty machines are respectively 40% and 60%, while maintaining 'single digit' levels in pollutant emissions. In this report are given wide information on gas turbine present technology (Thermodynamics, features, design, performances, emission control, applications) and are discussed the main lines for the future developments. Finally are presented the research and technological development activities on gas turbine of Italian National Agency for new Technology Energy and the Environment Energy Department

  19. Energy and the future : Canada's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymont, M.

    2005-01-01

    The rise in global energy consumption is driven by economic growth, particularly in developing countries. It is expected that by 2030, the world population will consume 50 per cent more energy than today. This increase in global energy demand can no longer be met through the business as usual approach. Graphs depicting emerging energy demand in Asia were presented for nuclear energy, coal, natural gas, oil and renewables. The issue of how China can meet it's growing energy demand was discussed with reference to energy consumed by its industrial, agricultural, commercial, residential and transportation sectors. The author emphasized the uneven distribution of resources, where consuming areas do not coincide with producing areas. It is expected that traditional energy sources will still supply most of the world's energy need for the foreseeable future, but they will leave less of an environmental impact. The author suggested that renewable energy sources will also increase but will comprise less than 20 per cent of the world supply in 2050. The author also discussed the issue of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Kyoto obligations and projections of what will happen with Kyoto post 2012. Canada's GHG record and recent environmental findings were also discussed with reference to Arctic ice coverage and the decline in average winter temperature. It was suggested that technology is the key to the energy shortage the environment and security. With declining conventional oil reserves, old nuclear technology and aging electric power technology, new technology must be used to address supply issues, distribution, interconversion, environmental impacts and risks. It was emphasized that since the energy sector is Canada's greatest economic driver, Canada should focus on energy technologies to build a more competitive energy sector. Huge export opportunities also exist for energy technologies. The role of industry and governments in achieving this goal was also discussed. figs

  20. Nuclear energy, energy of the future or bad solution?; Energie nucleaire, energie d'avenir ou fausse solution?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The document presents the speeches of the debate on the nuclear energy solution for the future, presented during the meeting of the 6 may in Rennes, in the framework of the National Debate on the energies. The debate concerns the risks assessment and control, the solutions for the radioactive wastes, the foreign examples and the future of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  1. Integrating hydrogen into Canada's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, P.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation outlines the steps in integrating of hydrogen into Canada's energy future. Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell investment is primarily driven by two government commitments - climate change commitments and innovation leadership commitments. Canada's leading hydrogen and fuel cell industry is viewed as a long-term player in meeting the above commitments. A hydrogen and fuel cell national strategy is being jointly developed to create 'Win-Wins' with industry

  2. The energy future in France?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, Paul Henri

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, the author indicates figures for primary energy sources in France, outlines what is expected from a source of energy, and discusses the energy transformation efficiency. He addresses the case of electricity production and consumption, production costs for the different sources, nuclear energy, primary fluid mechanical energies, issue of intermittency and storage, photovoltaic, storage, subsidies and purchase obligation for EDF, fossil energies and carbon dioxide production. He questions the possibility of reduction of energy consumption, evokes and criticizes the French energy policy concerning electricity production, and possibilities of energy saving in housing and in transports, and by developing smart grids

  3. Future Energy Grid. Migration paths into the energy Internet; Future Energy Grid. Migrationspfade ins Internet der Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelrath, Hans-Juergen [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany); Kagermann, Henning [acatech - Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften, Berlin (Germany). Hauptstadtbuero; Mayer, Christoph (eds.) [OFFIS e.V., Oldenburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The present study describes the migration path that must be taken up to the year 2030 in pursuit of the Future Energy Grid. For this purpose it has explored what possible future scenarios must be taken into account along the migration path. The following key factors were identified in preparation of drawing up scenarios: expansion of the electrical infrastructure; system-wide availability of an information and communication technology infrastructure; flexibilisation of consumption; energy mix; new services and products; final consumer costs; and standardisation and political framework conditions. These eight key factors were combined with each other in different variants to give three consistent scenarios for the year 2030.

  4. Proceedings. Future Energy - Resources, Distribution and Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    the environment, energy and the use of resources will be an important foundation for bringing about changes in the future. The environmental effects caused by the Energy System are local as well as global. Regarding the global challenges, it is important to find solutions and incentives that are financially, politically and administratively sound, that will work across borders and give a fair distribution of burdens between rich and poor countries, at the same time giving poor countries good opportunities for development. The Proceedings from the seminar should be a useful contribution to the debate on the Energy System for both specialists and the general public. It will also be a useful background document for setting priorities for energy policies and energy research in the future. Furthermore, it should provide a useful summary of the current scientific debate for both the laymen and specialized experts in the field of energy research. This will also provide guidance for the task of setting national research priorities in the future. The seminar describes status and future prospects within different resource-, technology- and application areas globally as well as from a Norwegian perspective. International trends in the energy markets are described, and an ambitious Swiss plan to halve the consumption of fossil fuels in the future will be presented.

  5. Proceedings. Future Energy - Resources, Distribution and Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    will be an important foundation for bringing about changes in the future. The environmental effects caused by the Energy System are local as well as global. Regarding the global challenges, it is important to find solutions and incentives that are financially, politically and administratively sound, that will work across borders and give a fair distribution of burdens between rich and poor countries, at the same time giving poor countries good opportunities for development. The Proceedings from the seminar should be a useful contribution to the debate on the Energy System for both specialists and the general public. It will also be a useful background document for setting priorities for energy policies and energy research in the future. Furthermore, it should provide a useful summary of the current scientific debate for both the laymen and specialized experts in the field of energy research. This will also provide guidance for the task of setting national research priorities in the future. The seminar describes status and future prospects within different resource-, technology- and application areas globally as well as from a Norwegian perspective. International trends in the energy markets are described, and an ambitious Swiss plan to halve the consumption of fossil fuels in the future will be presented.

  6. Medical image processing on the GPU - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Dufort, Paul; Forsberg, Daniel; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-12-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used today in a wide range of applications, mainly because they can dramatically accelerate parallel computing, are affordable and energy efficient. In the field of medical imaging, GPUs are in some cases crucial for enabling practical use of computationally demanding algorithms. This review presents the past and present work on GPU accelerated medical image processing, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to existing GPU implementations. The review covers GPU acceleration of basic image processing operations (filtering, interpolation, histogram estimation and distance transforms), the most commonly used algorithms in medical imaging (image registration, image segmentation and image denoising) and algorithms that are specific to individual modalities (CT, PET, SPECT, MRI, fMRI, DTI, ultrasound, optical imaging and microscopy). The review ends by highlighting some future possibilities and challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The future of nuclear energy (group 17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncomble, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the work of a group of students from the ''Ecole Nationale d'Administration'', they had to study the perspective of nuclear energy in France. Nuclear energy is an important element to assure the stability of the energy supply of the country. Uranium purchases appear to be safe for being diversified and the price of the nuclear fuel contributes to only 20% of the price of the kWh compared to 40% for natural gas. Today the competitiveness of nuclear energy is assured but technological progress concerning gas turbines might challenge it in the years to come. Sustainable development implies not only abundant energy for all but also a preserved environment for the generations to come. The development of nuclear energy is hampered by the lack of satisfactory answers to the problem of fuel back-end cycle and more generally to the issue of radioactive wastes. On the other hand nuclear energy presents serious assets concerning the preservation of environment: nuclear energy as a whole from the uranium ore mining to the production of electricity emits very few atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse effect gases, and requires little room for its installations. The composition of the future energy mix will depend greatly on opinions and assumptions made about the reserves of fossil fuels, technological perspectives and the perception by the public of industrial risks (environmental damage, nuclear accidents...). (A.C.)

  8. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations

  9. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-01-01

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e + e - and μ + μ - colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained

  10. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-12-31

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained.

  11. Alberta's clean energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the future of clean energy in Alberta. With the present economic growth of the oil sands industry in Alberta, it is expected that there will be very considerable increases in job opportunities and GDP in both Canada and US. The challenges include high-energy demand and reduction of the carbon footprint. Alberta has adopted certain approaches to developing renewable and alternate forms of energy as well as to increasing the efficiency of present energy use and raising environmental consciousness in energy production. Three areas where the effects of clean energy will be felt are energy systems, climate change, and regional impacts, for instance on land, water, and wildlife. Alberta's regulatory process is shown by means of a flow chart. Aspects of oil sands environmental management include greenhouse gas targets, air quality assurance, and water quality monitoring, among others. Steps taken by Alberta to monitor and improve air quality and water management are listed. In conclusion, the paper notes that significant amounts of money are being pumped into research and development for greenhouse gas and water management projects.

  12. Gas Fride Heat Pumps : The Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Shigekichi; Ogura, Masao

    In japan techniques for saving energy is an important goal since energy resources such as oil and nuclear power are limited. Recently gas fired absorption heat pumps and gas engine driven heat pumps have been installed in facilifies such as hotels, swimming pools and offices. In this article recent techniques, applications and future aspects for gas fired heat pumps are explained.

  13. Global energy context: future scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, Gian Paolo

    2006-01-01

    After a brief analysis of the history of global energy consumption, this paper discusses a plausible scenario of energy needs and related carbon emissions for the rest of the century. The global outlook and the probable evolution of several factors that impact on energy policy considerations - even on the local scale - demonstrate the great complexity and planetary dimension of the problems, as well as the almost certain sterility of out-of-context domestic energy-policy measures [it

  14. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15

    In addition to promoting energy efficiency, China has actively pursued alternative energy development as a strategy to reduce its energy demand and carbon emissions. One area of particular focus has been to raise the share of alternative energy in China’s rapidly growing electricity generation with a 2020 target of 15% share of total primary energy. Over the last ten years, China has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar, wind, nuclear, hydro, geothermal and biomass power as well as biofuels and coal alternatives. This study thus seeks to examine China’s alternative energy in terms of what has and will continue to drive alternative energy development in China as well as analyze in depth the growth potential and challenges facing each specific technology. This study found that despite recent policies enabling extraordinary capacity and investment growth, alternative energy technologies face constraints and barriers to growth. For relatively new technologies that have not achieved commercialization such as concentrated solar thermal, geothermal and biomass power, China faces technological limitations to expanding the scale of installed capacity. While some alternative technologies such as hydropower and coal alternatives have been slowed by uneven and often changing market and policy support, others such as wind and solar PV have encountered physical and institutional barriers to grid integration. Lastly, all alternative energy technologies face constraints in human resources and raw material resources including land and water, with some facing supply limitations in critical elements such as uranium for nuclear, neodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solar PV. In light of China’s potential for and barriers to growth, the resource and energy requirement for alternative energy technologies were modeled and scenario analysis

  16. Solar Energy - An Option for Future Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the exponential growth of energy consumption and future consequences. Possible methods of converting solar energy to power such as direct energy conversion, focusing collectors, selective rediation absorbers, ocean thermal gradient, and space solar power are considered. (DF)

  17. Panel discussion on laboratory accelerator programs: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-09-01

    The present SLAC accelerator program is summarized briefly, and the future of electron-positron colliders is discussed. Present activities discussed include the PEP storage ring, the SPEAR storage ring, the Linear Accelerator, and the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project. Future prospects include a larger scale linear collider. The stability requirements on acceleration are briefly discussed

  18. Lasers and future high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    Future high energy colliders, directions for particle physics and relationship to new technology such as lasers are discussed. Experimental approaches to explore New Physics with emphasis on the utility of high energy colliders are also discussed

  19. The future of wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koughnett, K. Van

    2003-01-01

    This presentation provided a brief history of wind power through the ages, and culminated with a look at installed capacity in 2002. Vision Quest has been in the wind power business since 1980, and the first turbines were installed in 1997. The company operates 40 per cent of Canada's wind capacity. Vision Quest became part of TransAlta in December 2002, the largest non-regulated electric generation and marketing company in Canada. The reasons for investing in wind power were briefly reviewed. The author then examined the physics of wind power and wind energy resources. The key resource issues were identified as being resource availability and constancy, which is similar to oil and gas exploration. Utility scale turbines were described. The pros and cons of larger turbines were compared, and it was shown that larger turbines offer better economics, a higher capacity factor and fewer turbines to permit. Manufacturers are focused on larger machines for offshore. The various permitting authorities and their areas of responsibility were listed, from municipal, provincial and federal levels. The key drivers are: wind speed, installed cost of equipment, revenue, operating expense, and financial expense. Project risks include: power purchase agreements, technology risk, financial risk, construction risk, regulation, operating risks, dependence on third parties, and reliance on advisors. Some of the challenges facing Vision Quest are being early, permitting, electric grid interconnection, openness of markets, market supply, demand forces, and getting capital costs down. tabs., figs

  20. The Lake Baikal neutrino experiment: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubsandorzhiev, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    We review the present status and future of the Lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment. Selected physics results concerning a search for upward-going atmospheric neutrinos, WIMPs and relativistic magnetic monopoles are presented

  1. The energy future and the chemical fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockris, J.O'M.

    1976-01-01

    An account is first given of the origin of present chemical fuels, with particular reference to the lastingness of coal. Methods of estimation of these fuels are discussed and the greenhouse effect arising from the burning of coal is described. Consideration is then given to methods available for extending the uses of chemical fuels, including interfacing them with new inexhaustible, clean energy sources. Finally, accounts are given of the Hydrogen Economy and of the production of chemical fuels from wind energy in massive wind belts. The paper includes references to the part that nuclear power was expected to play in future energy policy. Problems of breeder reactor development and the safety and management of plutonium and radioactive wastes are discussed. (author)

  2. Nuclear energy, understand the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauquis, P.R.; Barre, B.

    2006-01-01

    In spite of its first use for military needs, the nuclear became a substitution energy, especially for the electric power production. For many scientist the nuclear seems to be the main part to the world energy supply in an economic growth context, provided the radioactive wastes problems is solved. From the military origins to the electric power generation, this book explains the technical economical and political aspects of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  3. Energy Efficiency in Future PONs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reschat, Halfdan; Laustsen, Johannes Russell; Wessing, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    There is a still increasing tendency to give energy efficiency a high priority, even in already low energy demanding systems. This is also the case for Passive Optical Networks (PONs) for which many different methods for saving energy are proposed. This paper uses simulations to evaluate three...... proposed power saving solutions for PONs which use sleep mechanisms for saving power. The discovered advantages and disadvantages of these methods are then used as a basis for proposing a new solution combining different techniques in order to increase the energy efficiency further. This novel solution...

  4. Metabolic Modulators in Heart Disease: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They continue to be major burden on health care systems throughout the world, despite major advances made over the past 40 years in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat these debilitating diseases. A potential therapeutic approach that has been underutilized in treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure is "metabolic modulation." Major alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in ischemic heart disease and heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the heart. A metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency (oxygen consumed per work performed) and functional impairment in ischemic heart disease as well as in heart failure. This has led to the concept that optimizing energy substrate use with metabolic modulators can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, primarily by improving cardiac efficiency. Two approaches for metabolic modulator therapy are to stimulate myocardial glucose oxidation and/or inhibit fatty acid oxidation. In this review, the past, present, and future of metabolic modulators as an approach to optimizing myocardial energy substrate metabolism and treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure are discussed. This includes a discussion of pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation in the heart, as well as enzymes involved in ketone and branched chain amino acid catabolism in the heart. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubik, Michelle [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of enhanced, or engineered, geothermal systems was carried out by an 18-member panel assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to evaluate the potential of geothermal energy becoming a major energy source for the United States.

  6. Biomass energy: its important and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    The development of photo-biological energy conversion systems has long-term implication from the energy, wood fibre and chemical points etc. Power generation through biomass combustion and gasification has proved to be very successful venture. The energy needs of the people in the remote, rural and even urban areas of the country can be met economically by the energy from the renewable source such as biomass. The biomass energy is full of opportunities, and future trends are emerging towards renewable energy

  7. I want to know future energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Cheol

    2009-04-01

    This book introduces future energy. These are the contents ; sun light which is infinite energy, hydrogen has siblings, good point of nuclear fusion, hydrogen fueled vehicle and imaginative power, application of infinite solar energy, who discovers hydrogen, sunlight generation which can make electricity from sunlight, people against wind power generation, making energy from sea, generation using wave power, making electricity from temperature differential of sea, what is bio energy, the reason that bio energy rare uses and bio fuel that people make.

  8. Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Silvia

    2017-06-01

    This Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction symposium draws together a series of articles that were each submitted independently by their authors to the JBI and which explore the biopower axis in the externalization of reproduction in four contexts: artificial gestation (ectogenesis), PGD for sex selection, women's (reproductive) rights, and testicular cryopreservation (TCCP). While one contribution explores a "future" of reproduction, the other three explore a "present," or better, explore different "presents." What may counts as "present," and what may count as "future," has dramatically different connotations depending on the geographical declination of the tense.

  9. Global perspectives on future nuclear energy utilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is presented as an overview of the nuclear sector from a global perspective. The aim is to show that nuclear power does have a future but that this will only be fully realised when the industry is able to demonstrate that it is part of the solution to the world's energy and environmental difficulties rather than part of the problem. The paper looks at the projected world energy demand as the population increases and countries develop, showing that nuclear power is required to meet this demand. In presenting nuclear power as a solution, the paper addresses the challenges facing us such as public confidence, environmental opposition, political issues and finance. It addresses the debate over reprocessing and direct disposal of irradiated nuclear fuel and looks at the competition from other fuels. The paper suggests how the industry might approach these issues such that nuclear power is indeed regarded globally as a solution to some of the worlds most pressing problems. (author)

  10. Future energy mix - also without nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, C.

    2005-01-01

    The considerable rises in the price of oil in the months of October and November 2004 assigned topical importance to the 'Future Energy Mix - also without Nuclear Power?' meeting of young nuclear engineers and students with experts from politics, industry, and research at the YOUNG GENERATION event organized at the Biblis nuclear power station on November 4-6, 2004. Specialized presentations were made about these topics: The Biblis Nuclear Power Plant Site. The Effects of Deregulation on the Electricity Market Emission Trading - a Combination of Economy and Ecology? Energy Mix for the 21 st Century. The event was completed by a round-table discussion among leading experts, and a presentation of perspectives in university education in areas encompassing power technology. (orig.)

  11. The Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.

    2005-01-01

    Current nuclear energy represents 23.5% of the total electrical power available within the OECD countries. This is the energy offering the lowest costs to generate, it does not emit greenhouse-effect fumes nor does it contribute to global warming, however, it does generate radioactive and toxic waste which society perceives as an unacceptable risk. For this reason the development of new nuclear installation in Europe is at a stand still or moving backward. Truthful information and social participation in decisions is the best way to achieve the eradication of the social phobia produced by this energy source. (Author)

  12. The energy future of Central Europe; Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejon, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this part of the book author deals with the energy future of Central Europe. The energy strategy, structure of energy supplies in Austria, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Bavaria, as well as restructuralization of the energy sources are analysed. From the ecological perspective, the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros Project (GNP) represents a very clear example, since the Project could play a very important role as a part of the strategy to reject nuclear energy , the same strategy that was clearly declared by the Austrian government, as well as for a transportation strategy based more on railroads and navigation. The GNP could serve as an impulse promoting further and more close Central European cooperation in renewable energy sources. It could assist in harmonization of the interest in the sphere of transportation policies of Switzerland, Bavaria, Austria, Slovakia, and Hungary. Such a community oriented towards common interests would definitely be of enormous importance for the development of transportation in Central Europe. Geothermal potential of Slovakia and other Central European states are presented. Surveys conducted in Slovakia show that it is possible to reduce pollution in specific areas by substituting fossil energy sources with geothermal heating a total reduction of pollution by 39,000 tons annually, out of which 159 tons represent the annual reduction of sulfur dioxide pollution. The reduction per GWh of geothermal heat in the particular cities was calculated to be about 527 tons of carbon dioxide and 2.1 ton of sulfur dioxide. Other opportunities for renewable energy in Slovakia, as well as potential of energy savings are estimated

  13. Astro-particle physics in Europe: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourquin, M.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago physicist Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays during balloon flights. This discovery can be considered as the birth of a new field of research: astro-particle physics. This article gives an overview of the main lines of experimental and theoretical research and future plans in the domains of dark matter, dark energy, high-energy cosmic messengers, gravitational waves, proton decay and the properties of neutrinos. (author)

  14. Nuclear energy and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The status of nuclear power in the world and its future are briefly discussed. It is shown that nuclear power capacity is increasing in the Asian and Pacific rim region and that new reactor designs, with the increased emphasis on safety and standardisation, could make nuclear power a more acceptable option in the future. The author also outlines the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization wide range of skills and facilities which are bringing the benefits of nuclear science and technology to Australia. These include: the development of Synroc as an advanced second generation waste management; production of radiotracers for biomedical researches and environmental problems; application of gamma irradiation in industry and of ion beam analysis in biology, archaeology, semi-conductor and environmental science. 2 tabs

  15. Nuclear energy in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear energy plays a major role in the French economy because of the lack of fossil fuels on the French territory. About 75% of the French electric power is of nuclear origin. This paper gives an analysis of the French public attitude about nuclear energy and the methods used by the nuclear industrialists to better the electro-nuclear image. Communication, advertising and transparency are the best attitudes for a suitable public information and are necessary to reduce the public anxiety after the Chernobyl accident. Television advertising, magazines and organized visits of nuclear installations have allowed to explain the interest of nuclear energy in the environmental reduction of pollutants. However, public information must include the topic about nuclear wastes to remain credible. (J.S.)

  16. Air quality and future energy system planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral Mourao, Zenaida; Konadu, Dennis; Lupton, Rick

    2016-04-01

    energy system planning. Some example applications of this work are: (1) to discover conflicts and synergies between air quality regulations and future developments in the energy system and land use change; (2) to show the drivers of air quality in a given spatial context; (3) to explore effective ways to visualize impacts of different energy, land use and emissions control policies on air quality. An initial test case for the Bay Area in California will be presented, extending the scope of the existing California ForeseerTM tool to identify impacts of different policies within the water-energy-land nexus on local air quality.

  17. Renewable energy shaping our future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeiler, W.

    2010-01-01

    ISES, de International Solar Energy Society is een wereldwijde organisatie met ongeveer 4.000 Leden. Hoogtepunt van de ISES-activiteiten is steeds weer het tweejaarlijkse Solar World Congres waarin deskundigen hun ervaringen uitwisselen. Dit jaar werd de 29e conferentie in Johannesburg gehouden en

  18. Energy futures project : backgrounder for consultation sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, A.

    2006-05-01

    The National Energy Board periodically publishes a long-term energy and demand report as part of an ongoing monitoring program. The next report is planned for release in 2007. This background document provided background information to ensure that consultation participants have a common understanding of key issues to be addressed during the cross-country consultations that have been planned before the release of the final version of the report. An outline of the proposed analytical approach was presented, as well as details of major assumptions and scenario storylines. Scenario themes included: economic, energy and environmental sustainability; a security-focused world shaped by war and civil strife; and strong global economic growth fueled by the rapid growth of the Chinese and Indian economies. A methodology overview was provided as well as a reference case. Issues related to energy supply included oil; natural gas liquids; natural gas; and electricity. Issues related to energy demand included the residential sector; the commercial sector; the industrial sector; and the transportation sector. Historical trends and forecasts were outlined using the macroeconomic variable of interest. Supply, demand, and supporting infrastructure across all energy forms within a North American and global context were considered. The impact of environmental management strategies were reviewed, as well as the role of the government in shaping policies. It was concluded that the purpose of the final report is to serve as a standard of references for parties interested in Canadian energy issues and trends as well as to inform decision makers of key risks and uncertainties facing the energy future.9 tabs., 1 fig

  19. The Philippine nuclear power project, its past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovellanos, J.U.

    1993-01-01

    The article discussed the historical background of the nuclear power plants; how it operates; the government opinion on the operation of the nuclear power plant; the application of power resources to industry; the implementation of PNPP-1 particularly the economic aspects of energy in the near future. (IMA)

  20. Dark energy: Recent observations and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2003-01-01

    Dark energy presents us with a challenging puzzle: understanding the new element of physics evident in the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Type Ia supernovae first detected this acceleration and have been instrumental in breaking the matter dominated universe paradigm, measuring the current acceleration of the expansion, and probing back to the decelerating phase. To further study the nature of dark energy requires understanding of systematic errors entering into any cosmological probe. Type Ia supernovae provide simple, transparent tracers of the expansion history of the universe, and the sources of systematic uncertainties in the supernova measurement have been identified. We briefly review the progress to date and examine the promise of future surveys with large numbers of supernovae and well bounded systematics

  1. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  2. I think of Ronald Reagan: future selves in the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P

    1992-01-01

    A nonlinear perspective on time (where the future exists in and affects the present) has been described by several theorists but there is little research on the extent, quality or origins of the personal future perspective. The present study examined the existence and origin of the future in the present by asking adults aged nineteen to eighty-three to: 1) project themselves into the oldest age imaginable, 2) describe their hopes and fears for that age, and 3) name role models for those hopes and fears. Data analysis revealed that length of future perspective, number of hopes and number of role models for the distant future declined with age. In addition, types of fears for the future varied with age, with older adults stressing dependency issues while younger adults reported concerns about personality and mental health. Despite age differences, most participants could name role models for both their hopes and fears for aging, but specific models were identified more often for hopes than for fears. Personalized hopes and fears for the distant future as motivators for the present are discussed.

  3. Nuclear energy has a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy appears to be a main asset to France in the context of the worldwide economic slump. Nuclear power provides a cheap electricity that spares the buying power of households and increases the competitiveness of French enterprises. Nuclear industry with major companies like EDF, AREVA and CEA and 450 small and medium-sized enterprises, represents a core resistant to industrial decline. Nuclear industry is a good provider of work and globally it represents 2% of all the jobs in France. Concerning the trade balance, nuclear power plays twice; first by exporting equipment and services for a value of 7 billions euros a year and secondly by sparing the cost of energy imports that would be necessary if nuclear power was not here which is estimated to 20 billions euros a year. (A.C.)

  4. Leverage effect in energy futures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-9 ISSN 0140-9883 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-11402P Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : energy commodities * leverage effect * volatility * long-term memory Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.708, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/kristoufek-0433531.pdf

  5. Coal, energy of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit, V.; Guezel, J.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    Coal is no longer considered as a 'has been' energy source. The production and demand of coal is growing up everywhere in the world because it has some strategic and technological advantages with respect to other energy sources: cheap, abundant, available everywhere over the world, in particular in countries with no geopolitical problems, and it is independent of supplying infrastructures (pipelines, terminals). Its main drawback is its polluting impact (dusts, nitrogen and sulfur oxides, mercury and CO 2 ). The challenge is to develop clean and high efficiency coal technologies like supercritical steam power plants or combined cycle coal gasification plants with a 50% efficiency, and CO 2 capture and sequestration techniques (post-combustion, oxy-combustion, chemical loop, integrated gasification gas combined cycle (pre-combustion)). Germany, who will abandon nuclear energy by 2021, is massively investing in the construction of high efficiency coal- and lignite-fired power plants with pollution control systems (denitrification and desulfurization processes, dust precipitators). (J.S.)

  6. THE FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Renner

    2006-11-01

    Recent national focus on the value of increasing our supply of indigenous, renewable energy underscores the need for reevaluating all alternatives, particularly those that are large and welldistributed nationally. This analysis will help determine how we can enlarge and diversify the portfolio of options we should be vigorously pursuing. One such option that is often ignored is geothermal energy, produced from both conventional hydrothermal and Enhanced (or engineered) Geothermal Systems (EGS). An 18-member assessment panel was assembled in September 2005 to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of EGS becoming a major supplier of primary energy for U.S. base-load generation capacity by 2050. This report documents the work of the panel at three separate levels of detail. The first is a Synopsis, which provides a brief overview of the scope, motivation, approach, major findings, and recommendations of the panel. At the second level, an Executive Summary reviews each component of the study, providing major results and findings. The third level provides full documentation in eight chapters, with each detailing the scope, approach, and results of the analysis and modeling conducted in each area.

  7. Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

  8. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschera, W

    1988-05-20

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -15/ relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 8/ years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and manmade (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotopes are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, mineral exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS will be discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned field. Depending on the specific problem to be investigated, different aspects of an AMS system are of importance. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators.

  9. Pool-cooled superconducting coils: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Dawson, A.M.

    1985-08-01

    An overview of large magnet systems which have been studied, constructed, or operated in the last 12 years is presented and shows a substantial advance in overall current density, stored energy, and magnet complexity. The preferable coolant mode for very large magnets is still a bath of helium I, but it is clear that other coolant modes are gaining acceptance. The data base for design using stability criteria dependent on transients has expanded to the point where the risk is often acceptable, compared to the lower current density, low risk, steady state stability criteria which launched large superconducting magnet technology. The limitation imposed by structure and protection on increasing overall current density in large magnets is discussed and a simple model is used to illustrate the extreme requirements imposed on a winding without direct helium contact. The latter implies that a significant technological step is required before conduction cooling or indirect cooling will be used in the large magnets envisioned for the future and that helium contact with the conductor will remain the key ingredient for risk reduction in large magnet design

  10. Present and future prospects of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1987-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has become a powerful technique for measuring extremely low abundances (10 -10 to 10 -15 relative to stable isotopes) of long-lived radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from 10 2 to 10 8 years. With a few exceptions, tandem accelerators turned out to be the most useful instruments for AMS measurements. Both natural (mostly cosmogenic) and man-made (anthropogenic) radioisotopes are studied with this technique. In some cases very low concentrations of stable isotope are also measured. Applications of AMS cover a large variety of fields including anthropology, archaeology, oceanography, hydrology, climatology, volcanology, minerals exploration, cosmochemistry, meteoritics, glaciology, sedimentary processes, geochronology, environmental physics, astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics. Present and future prospects of AMS are discussed as an interplay between the continuous development of new techniques and the investigation of problems in the above mentioned fields. Typical factors to be considered are energy range and type of accelerator, and the possibilities of dedicated versus partial use of new or existing accelerators

  11. The past, present and future supernova threat to Earth's biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Martin

    2011-12-01

    A brief review of the threat posed to Earth's biosphere via near-by supernova detonations is presented. The expected radiation dosage, cosmic ray flux and expanding blast wave collision effects are considered, and it is argued that a typical supernova must be closer than ˜10-pc before any appreciable and potentially harmful atmosphere/biosphere effects are likely to occur. In contrast, the critical distance for Gamma-ray bursts is of order 1-kpc. In spite of the high energy effects potentially involved, the geological record provides no clear-cut evidence for any historic supernova induced mass extinctions and/or strong climate change episodes. This, however, is mostly a reflection of their being numerous possible (terrestrial and astronomical) forcing mechanisms acting upon the biosphere and the difficulty of distinguishing between competing scenarios. Key to resolving this situation, it is suggested, is the development of supernova specific extinction and climate change linked ecological models. Moving to the future, we estimate that over the remaining lifetime of the biosphere (˜2 Gyr) the Earth might experience 1 GRB and 20 supernova detonations within their respective harmful threat ranges. There are currently at least 12 potential pre-supernova systems within 1-kpc of the Sun. Of these systems IK Pegasi is the closest Type Ia pre-supernova candidate and Betelgeuse is the closest potential Type II supernova candidate. We review in some detail the past, present and future behavior of these two systems. Developing a detailed evolutionary model we find that IK Pegasi will likely not detonate until some 1.9 billion years hence, and that it affords absolutely no threat to Earth's biosphere. Betelgeuse is the closest, reasonably well understood, pre-supernova candidate to the Sun at the present epoch, and may undergo detonation any time within the next several million years. The stand-off distance of Betelgeuse at the time of its detonation is estimated to fall

  12. RegionRegenerativ in the Western Weser uplands - presentation of a future-oriented energy and waste management concept; RegionRegenerativ Westliches Weserbergland - Vorstellung eines zukunftsweisenden Energie- und Abfallwirtschaftkonzeptes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, S. [Fachhochschule Hildesheim/Holzminden/Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany). Fachgebiet Technischer Umweltschutz; Nacke, O. [ARCHEA GmbH, Hess. Oldendorf (Germany); Nelles, M.

    2002-07-01

    In the past years the realisation that the Earth's fossil energy energy resources are not inexhaustible has speeded up explorations of the scope of renewable energy resources. In this context biogas technology is becoming an option of increasing significance. Its greatest potential lies in agriculture, which in Germany accounts for 86% of the total biogas potential. In addition to this there is also a substantial potential for biogas production from industrial and municipal wastes. [German] Die Erkenntnis der Endlichkeit fossiler Energietraeger hat insbesondere in den letzten Jahren zu einer verstaerkten Beschaeftigung mit den Moeglichkeiten einer regenerativen Energiegewinnung gefuehrt. Die Biogastechnologie stellt eine Alternative dar, die in diesem Zusammenhang zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnt. Die groessten Potenziale liegen in der Landwirtschaft; in Deutschland sind dies ca. 86% des gesamten Biogaspotenzials. Darueber hinaus bestehen jedoch erhebliche Potenziale in der Biogaserzeugung aus industriellen und kommunalen Abfaellen. (orig.)

  13. U. S. Fusion Energy Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, John A.; Jassby, Dan; Larson, Scott; Pueyo, Maria; Rutherford, Paul H.

    2000-01-01

    Fusion implementation scenarios for the US have been developed. The dependence of these scenarios on both the fusion development and implementation paths has been assessed. A range of implementation paths has been studied. The deployment of CANDU fission reactors in Canada and the deployment of fission reactors in France have been assessed as possible models for US fusion deployment. The waste production and resource (including tritium) needs have been assessed. The conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that it is challenging to make a significant impact on energy production during this century. However, the rapid deployment of fission reactors in Canada and France support fusion implementation scenarios for the US with significant power production during this century. If the country can meet the schedule requirements then the resource needs and waste production are found to be manageable problems

  14. Sources, availability and costs of future energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.G.

    1977-08-01

    An attempt is made to put the future energy scene in perspective by quantitatively examining energy resources, energy utilization and energy costs. Available data on resources show that conventional oil and gas are in short supply and that alternative energy sources are going to have to replace oil and gas in the not too distant future. Cost/applications assessments indicate that a mix of energy sources are likely to best meet our energy needs of the future. Hydro, nuclear and coal are all practical alternatives for meeting electrical needs and electricity is a practical alternative for space heating. Coal appears to be the most practical alternative for meeting much of the industrial energy need and frontier oil or oil from the tar sands appear to be the most practical alternatives for meeting the transportation need. Solar energy shows promise of meeting some of the space heating load in Canada if economical energy storage systems can be developed. The general conclusion is that the basic energy problem is energy conversion. (author)

  15. Automated and interactive fuel management tools: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.G.; Casadei, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The past, present and future status of automated and interactive fuel management tools are reviewed. Issues such as who are the customers for these products and what are their needs are addressed. The nature of the fuel management problem is reviewed. The Westinghouse fuel management tools and methods are presented as an example of how the technology has evolved

  16. Costly waiting for the future gas energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The article discusses solutions while waiting for the pollution free gas power plant and points out that Norway will have to import Danish power from coal and Swedish nuclear energy for a long time yet. Various future scenarios are mentioned

  17. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  18. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2011-09-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  19. Overview of nuclear energy: Present and projected use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanculescu, Alexander [Idaho National Laboratory 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    2012-06-19

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  20. Towards a fossil free energy future. The next energy transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, M.; Greber, L.; Hall, J.; Bartels, C.; Bernow, S.; Hansen, E.; Raskin, P.; Von Hippel, D. (Stockholm Environment Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The report provides technical analysis and documentation as input to the Greenpeace project 'Towards a fossil free energy future'. It presents a main scenario and several variants for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the technical methods and assumptions used to develop them. The goal is to investigate the technical, economic and policy feasibility to phasing out fossil fuels over the next century as part of a strategy to avert unacceptably high levels or rates of global warming. 209 refs., 42 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. The status of the CYGNUS experiment: Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, T.J.; Berley, D.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Goodman, J.A.; Stark, M. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA)); Burman, R.L.; Cady, D.R.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.; Sandberg, V.D.; Wilkinson, C.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X.Q.; Vishwanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B. (California Univ., Irvine (USA)); Ellsworth, R.W. (George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (USA)); CYGNUS Collaboration

    1990-03-01

    The CYGNUS experiment, located in Los Alamos, NM, has been continuously operating since April 2, 1986. The experiment consists of an air shower array and an associated 44 m{sup 2} detector; its large size, good angular resolution, muon detection, and low energy threshold make it a unique experiment among those currently operating. The experiment has undergone continuous expansion in several stages since it began operation. The experiment, its expansion, and further plans for the future will be described. (orig.).

  2. Past, present and future of the nuclear activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirimelo, Roberto O.

    2001-01-01

    A short history is given of the activities of the National Atomic Energy Commission. The present program in the field of the fuel cycle, material sciences, waste management, nuclear reactors, radioisotope production, radiation and radioisotope applications, research and development and education and training is described. The objectives and activities of the companies related to the National Atomic Energy Commission are also outlined

  3. Past, present and future variations of extreme rainfall in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Ida Bülow

    of non-stationary extreme rainfall behaviour, in Denmark as well as worldwide. To provide recommendations on future design intensities it is necessary to explore and understand patterns of temporal variation in urban design rainfall and identify potential drivers behind past, present and future changes...... to the natural variability, the expected impacts of climate change and their interplay. A large part of the uncertainty is inherent and cannot be reduced. On top of this come the many unknown features in the climate system. The irrational behaviour of mankind contributes to the uncertainty, as it both affects...... the greenhouse gas emissions, and the requirements to cities of the future. Simple case studies based on different decision making frameworks show that the uncertainty of the future is not a hindrance for adaptation....

  4. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  5. Hydropower and the world's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    The potential role of hydropower in the context of world-wide demographic growth and increasing demand for energy, and the benefits inherent in hydroelectric power in comparison with other energy options are discussed. Environmental and social impacts, and examples of mitigation measures are reviewed. Recommendations regarding best practices in the future development of hydroelectric power projects proposed

  6. Renewable energies: an initiation guidebook to the energies of the future; Les energies renouvelables: un guide d'initiation sur les energies du futur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walisiewicz, M.

    2003-07-01

    This book reveals the economical, political and environmental dimensions of the present day energy situation and makes a status of the available technical solutions and of the future prospects. Content: energy addiction; reserves distribution; growth limits; technical problems; nuclear energy: a false promise?; the renewable resources; hydraulic energy; wind power; sun light for lighting; green generators; ground energy; alternative realities; glossary, index. (J.S.)

  7. Energy in France. Present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-07-01

    This brochure, edited by ADEME, the French office for energy management and sustainable development, gives a basic but comprehensive outlook of the energy situation in France: the importance of energy and its various forms; the production and transformation of energy (energy sources, production means, other sources of energy); the transport and the distribution of energy (transportation systems, energy losses, the case of electric power transportation and distribution systems), energy utilization (demand and supply, energy management), the energy policy (historical aspects, the nowadays energy policy and its transition towards a sustainable and renewable energy policy

  8. Lidar-Enhanced Wind Turbine Control: Past, Present, and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholbrock, Andrew; Fleming, Paul; Schlipf, David; Wright, Alan; Johnson, Kathryn; Wang, Na

    2016-08-01

    The main challenges in harvesting energy from the wind arise from the unknown incoming turbulent wind field. Balancing the competing interests of reduction in structural loads and increasing energy production is the goal of a wind turbine controller to reduce the cost of producing wind energy. Conventional wind turbines use feedback methods to optimize these goals, reacting to wind disturbances after they have already impacted the wind turbine. Lidar sensors offer a means to provide additional inputs to a wind turbine controller, enabling new techniques to improve control methods, allowing a controller to actuate a wind turbine in anticipation of an incoming wind disturbance. This paper will look at the development of lidar-enhanced controls and how they have been used for various turbine load reductions with pitch actuation, as well as increased energy production with improved yaw control. Ongoing work will also be discussed to show that combining pitch and torque control using feedforward nonlinear model predictive control can lead to both reduced loads and increased energy production. Future work is also proposed on extending individual wind turbine controls to the wind plant level and determining how lidars can be used for control methods to further lower the cost of wind energy by minimizing wake impacts in a wind farm.

  9. Towards a sustainable future of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Diaz-Balart, Fidel

    1999-01-01

    The only form of having a future energy insurance is to find a road environmentally sustainable to take place and to use the energy. Their production and non alone use should be compatible with the environmental priorities of the society but rather they should be organized in such a way that they have a social consent, under the principle that so that there is economic development an economic and sure energy supply it should exist

  10. Planetary X-ray studies: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Our solar system is a fascinating physics laboratory and X-ray observations are now firmly established as a powerful diagnostic tool of the multiple processes taking place in it. The science that X-rays reveal encompasses solar, space plasma and planetary physics, and the response of bodies in the solar system to the impact of the Sun's activity. This talk will review what we know from past observations and what we expect to learn in the short, medium and long term. Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated that the origin of Jupiter's bright soft X-ray aurorae lies in the Charge eXchange (CX) process, likely to involve the interaction with atmospheric neutrals of local magnetospheric ions, as well as those carried in the solar wind. At higher energies electron bremsstrahlung is thought to be the X-ray emitting mechanism, while the whole planetary disk acts as a mirror for the solar X-ray flux via Thomson and fluorescent scattering. This 'X-ray mirror' phenomenon is all that is observed from Saturn's disk, which otherwise lacks X-ray auroral features. The Earth's X-ray aurora is bright and variable and mostly due to electron bremsstrahlung and line emission from atmospheric species. Un-magnetised planets, Venus and Mars, do not show X-ray aurorae but display the interesting combination of mirroring the solar X-ray flux and producing X-rays by Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) in their exospheres. These processes respond to different solar stimulation (photons and solar wind plasma respectively) hence their relative contributions are seen to vary according to the Sun's output. Present and future of planetary X-ray studies are very bright. We are preparing for the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter this summer and for coordinated observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton on the approach and later during Juno's orbital phase. These will allow direct correlation of the local plasma conditions with the X-ray emissions and the establishment of the

  11. Photoionization cross sections: present status and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    The existing experimental data situation for photoionization cross section of ground-state atoms, excited states and positive ions is reviewed. The ability of theory to predict these cross sections is also discussed. The likely progress for the near future is presented [pt

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future | Jemilohun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future. ... The discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by Warren and Marshall in 1982 was preceded by nearly a hundred year of inconspicuous publications in ... A major challenge is the absence of a specific antibiotic monotherapy for effective treatment of the infection.

  13. Present and future strategies for neutrinoless double beta decay ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The scope of this paper is not only to review the present results reached in the field by the different groups and technologies worldwide, but also to illustrate and comment on the (near and long-term) future strategies that experimentalists are trying to pursue to reach the needed sensitivity required to explore the inverted ...

  14. Panel - People and riparian ecosystems: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Periman; Carol Raish; Frank E. Wozniak; David S. Brookshire; Michael McKee; Christian Schmidt; Tony Barron

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this panel is to review past, present, and future human needs and desires associated with riparian environments. Our focus concerns the diverse demands, interactions, and expectations that people have for the riverine lands. The discussion is designed to take place within historic, economic, and social/cultural contexts.

  15. "Fortid", "Nutid", "Fremtid" (Past, Present, Future): Professional Counseling in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrea L.; Hansen, Nanja Holland

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a comprehensive overview of the counseling profession in Denmark. The history and development of counseling is considered, followed by a review of the current state of Danish professional counseling. Finally, impressions of the future of professional counseling in Denmark are presented based on the past and…

  16. Special Education in Canada: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Clive

    The paper reviews the history and present status of special education in Canada (with particular emphasis on the province of Ontario) and identifies recommended future directions. The legislative authority for special education and current policies are summarized in sections on the following provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan,…

  17. Building models for marketing decisions : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, PSH; Wittink, DR

    We review five eras of model building in marketing, with special emphasis on the fourth and the fifth eras, the present and the future. At many firms managers now routinely use model-based results for marketing decisions. Given an increasing number of successful applications, the demand for models

  18. Plasma polarization spectroscopy: past, present, and future - a subjective view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csanak, G.

    2004-01-01

    I describe how I got into the field of plasma polarization spectroscopy (PPS), how the PPS Workshops started, and how the whole field got consolidated and strengthened. Subsequently I describe what kind of present theoretical and experimental activities I am aware of. Finally I explain why I think that the future of PPS is bright. (author)

  19. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  20. The empirical relationship between energy futures prices and exchange rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadorsky, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction between energy futures prices and exchange rates. Results are presented to show that futures prices for crude oil, heating oil and unleaded gasoline are co-integrated with a trade-weighted index of exchange rates. This is important because it means that there exists a long-run equilibrium relationship between these four variables. Granger causality results for both the long- and short-run are presented. Evidence is also presented that suggests exchange rates transmit exogenous shocks to energy futures prices. 22 refs

  1. Nuclear energy - option for the future. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this conference was to analyse the future national and international problems arising with energy supplies with regard to the large mass flows and CO 2 flows involved in the use of nuclear energy. The following topics are dealt with: - nuclear energy, world-wide energy management and developments in Europe and Asia - disposal and ultimate waste disposal, plutonium management, an assessment of the Chernobyl accident 10 years on - new reactor developments in the energy mix - the costs arising with nuclear energy in the energy mix. In view of the demand made by climate researchers, to reduce CO 2 , and the additional construction work planned in the eastern and Asian areas, it will remain necessary for the Federal Republic of Germany,too, to maintain the know-how and technology for nuclear energy generation. (orig./DG)

  2. The Past, Present, and Future of Statistical Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    We now have a standard paradigm for the evolution of the Universe and the distribution of matter on large scales. This model has many seemingly strange aspects: an inflationary period, during which quantum mechanical fluctuations set the initial conditions for the formation of galaxies and clusters; dark matter and dark energy, which make up most of the Universe, and yet have no established relation to the more familiar visible particles and fields; and -- if dark energy is a cosmological constant -- a future in which the Universe enters a permanent exponential expansion phase, with a limiting finite "temperature" and observable volume. Over the past 15 years, a diverse array of observations have continued to support the simplest version of this model at ever-improving levels of precision (although not without a few anomalies). I will describe this development from the perspective of one participant, with an emphasis on a subset of the observational probes -- the cosmic microwave background, galaxy surveys, and gravitational lensing. I will emphasize in particular the demands of tight control of systematic errors in both the observations and the theoretical predictions, and the impact this has had on the organization of research programs in cosmology.I will then turn to the the future of statistical cosmology. In the near term, a major goal in dark energy is to use new facilities to go beyond fitting a small number of parameters, and map out the full history of the expansion of the Universe and the growth of structures. I will describe some of these ambitious efforts to probe the effects of dark energy in the distant past, when it was a subdominant component of the cosmic energy budget. Finally, I will speculate on what cosmology as a field might look like in 25 years.

  3. Curating NASA's Past, Present, and Future Extraterrestrial Sample Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Allton, J. H.; Evans, C. A.; Fries, M. D.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Righter, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Zolensky, M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office (henceforth referred to herein as NASA Curation Office) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Under the governing document, NASA Policy Directive (NPD) 7100.10E "Curation of Extraterrestrial Materials", JSC is charged with "...curation of all extra-terrestrial material under NASA control, including future NASA missions." The Directive goes on to define Curation as including "...documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach." Here we describe some of the past, present, and future activities of the NASA Curation Office.

  4. Nuclear energy of the future, solar energy of the future: some convergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamant, G.

    2006-01-01

    Most medium- and long-term energy scenarios foresee the joint development of renewable and nuclear energies. In other words, the energy sources must be as various as possible. Among the renewable energy sources, the solar energy presents the highest development potential, even if today the biomass and wind energies are quantitatively more developed. In France, the solar power generation is ensured by photovoltaic systems. However, the thermodynamical conversion of solar energy (using concentrating systems) represents an enormous potential at the world scale and several projects of solar plants are in progress in Spain and in the USA. The advantages of this solution are numerous: high efficiency of thermodynamic cycles, possibility of heat storage and hybridization (solar/fuels), strong potential of innovation. Moreover, the solar concentrators allow to reach temperatures higher than 1000 deg. C and thus allow to foresee efficient thermochemical cycles for hydrogen generation. The future solar plants will have to be efficient, reliable and will have to be able to meet the energy demand. In order to reach high thermodynamic cycle efficiencies, it is necessary to increase the temperature of the hot source and to design combined cycles. These considerations are common to the communities of researchers and engineers of both the solar thermal and nuclear industries. Therefore, the future development of generation 4 nuclear power plants and of generation 3 solar plants are conditioned by the resolution of similar problems, like the coolants (molten salts and gases), the materials (metals and ceramics), the heat transfers (hydrogen generation), and the qualification of systems (how solar concentrators can help to perform qualification tests of nuclear materials). Short communication. (J.S.)

  5. Basic Science for a Secure Energy Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Anticipating a doubling in the world's energy use by the year 2050 coupled with an increasing focus on clean energy technologies, there is a national imperative for new energy technologies and improved energy efficiency. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research that provides the foundations for new energy technologies and supports DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research crosses the full spectrum of materials and chemical sciences, as well as aspects of biosciences and geosciences, with a focus on understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter and energy at electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. In addition, BES is the home for national user facilities for x-ray, neutron, nanoscale sciences, and electron beam characterization that serve over 10,000 users annually. To provide a strategic focus for these programs, BES has held a series of ``Basic Research Needs'' workshops on a number of energy topics over the past 6 years. These workshops have defined a number of research priorities in areas related to renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy -- as well as cross-cutting scientific grand challenges. These directions have helped to define the research for the recently established Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and are foundational for the newly announced Energy Innovation Hubs. This overview will review the current BES research portfolio, including the EFRCs and user facilities, will highlight past research that has had an impact on energy technologies, and will discuss future directions as defined through the BES workshops and research opportunities.

  6. Rural Landscape, Production and Human Consumption: Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Ulf; Miliander, Sofia

    2006-01-01

    Production and consumption of food and in a rural area over the last 400 years were reconstructed for a parish in south east Sweden. This was based on a number of different data sources, including historical maps and official demographic and agricultural statistics. Changes in population (and thus consumption) and the production from arable land and livestock were calculated and used to provide an estimate of the area's supply and demand over time, and of the historical sustainability of the area. Overall food productivity was remarkably constant over time, at approximately 0.04 kgC/m 2 /y, despite recent changes in population size and the area of cultivated land. The empirical results from the past and the present, together with the future land changes due to shoreline displacement were used to predict the situation in the future. These final estimates can be used in the assessment of risk for exposure to contaminated food for the future population in the area

  7. High efficiency USC power plant - present status and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, R. [Faelleskemikerne I/S Fynsvaerket (Denmark); Hald, J. [Elsam/Elkraft/TU Denmark (Denmark)

    1998-12-31

    Increasing demand for energy production with low impact on the environment and minimised fuel consumption can be met with high efficient coal fired power plants with advanced steam parameters. An important key to this improvement is the development of high temperature materials with optimised mechanical strength. Based on the results of more than ten years of development a coal fired power plant with an efficiency above 50 % can now be realised. Future developments focus on materials which enable an efficiency of 52-55 %. (orig.) 25 refs.

  8. High efficiency USC power plant - present status and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, R [Faelleskemikerne I/S Fynsvaerket (Denmark); Hald, J [Elsam/Elkraft/TU Denmark (Denmark)

    1999-12-31

    Increasing demand for energy production with low impact on the environment and minimised fuel consumption can be met with high efficient coal fired power plants with advanced steam parameters. An important key to this improvement is the development of high temperature materials with optimised mechanical strength. Based on the results of more than ten years of development a coal fired power plant with an efficiency above 50 % can now be realised. Future developments focus on materials which enable an efficiency of 52-55 %. (orig.) 25 refs.

  9. Tissue banking in Asia Pacific region: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, Aziz; Mandy, Foong Shi Yun; Ning, Tan; Kaiying, Wang

    2018-04-25

    Tissue banking in the Asia Pacific regions is driven by two main forces-firstly the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) via Regional Co-operative Agreement projects and secondly by the Asia Pacific Association of Surgical Tissue Banking (APASTB). This overview is written in three sections: (1) History of tissue banking in individual country in the region. (2) History of APASTB. (3) History of IAEA programme in Asia Pacific region. The current status and future of the tissue banking programme in the region will be discussed.

  10. Shaping a sustainable energy future for India: Management challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Subhes C.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the studies on the Indian energy sector focus on the possible future scenarios of Indian energy system development without considering the management dimension to the problem-how to ensure a smooth transition to reach the desired future state. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some sector management concerns to a sustainable energy future in the country. The paper follows a deductive approach and reviews the present status and possible future energy outlooks from the existing literature. This is followed by a strategy outline to achieve long-term energy sustainability. Management challenges on the way to such a sustainable future are finally presented. The paper finds that the aspiration of becoming an economic powerhouse and the need to eradicate poverty will necessarily mean an increase in energy consumption unless a decoupling of energy and GDP growth is achieved. Consequently, the energy future of the country is eminently unsustainable. A strategy focussing on demand reduction, enhanced access, use of local resources and better management practices is proposed here. However, a sustainable path faces a number of challenges from the management and policy perspectives.

  11. Nuclear and radiochemistry in China. Present status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, W.Q.; Zhao, Y.L.; Chai, Z.F.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear and radiochemistry is one of the frontier areas of chemistry with high impact on national security, energy supply, scientific advances, social and economic development. Nuclear and radiochemistry in China is now experiencing a renaissance, which is being strongly motivated by China's huge demand for nuclear energy. With this in review, the progress in nuclear and radiochemistry of China is selectively addressed. Some hot topics have been summarized and the main research results achieved by Chinese scientists in this field are highlighted, with emphasis on the basic nuclear chemistry, actinide and trans-actinide chemistry, chemistry of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, radioanalytical chemistry, environmental radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry, etc. Some measures about how to promote the radiochemical education and research in China are suggested, and future perspectives are briefly outlined as well. (orig.)

  12. Disposal of radioactive waste in Romania. Present and future strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodna, A.; Garlea, C.

    2002-01-01

    The paper begins with the presentation of the actual situation of radioactive waste management in Romania. The organizations responsible for radioactive waste management and their capabilities are described, including radioactive waste disposal. The main provisions of the 'Draft law regarding the management of nuclear spent fuel and radioactive waste, in view of their final disposal' are also presented, with accent on the responsibilities of the National Radioactive Waste Agency (ANDRAD) and on the fund for radioactive waste and spent fuel management and for decommissioning. The paper ends with the presentation of the future radioactive waste and spent fuel management strategy. (author)

  13. Risoe energy report 7. Future low carbon energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)

    2008-10-15

    This Risoe Energy Report, the seventh of a series that began in 2002, takes as its point of reference the recommendations of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007. The IPCC states that if anticipated climate change is to remain in the order of 2 to 3 degrees centigrades over the next century, the world's CO{sub 2} emissions would have to peak within the next 10-15 years and ultimately be reduced to approximately 50% of their present level by the middle of the century. The IPCC states further that this would be possible, provided that serious action is taken now. The different regions and countries of the world are in various states of development, and hence have different starting points for contributing to these reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. This report presents state-of-the-art and development perspectives for energy supply technologies, new energy systems, end-use energy efficiency improvements and new policy measures. It also includes estimates of the CO{sub 2} reduction potentials for different technologies. The technologies are characterized with regard to their ability to contribute either to ensuring a peak in CO{sub 2} emissions within 10-15 years, or to long-term CO{sub 2} reductions. The report outlines the current and likely future composition of energy systems in Denmark, and examines three groups of countries: i) Europe and the other OECD member nations; ii) large and rapidly growing developing economies, notably India and China; iii) typical least developed countries, such as many African nations. The report emphasises how future energy developments and systems might be composed in these three country groupings, and to what extent the different technologies might contribute. The report addresses the need for research and demonstration together with market incentives, and policy measures with focus on initiatives that can promote the development towards CO{sub 2} reductions. Specifically, the report identifies system

  14. Growing America's Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.

  15. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients.

  16. ESA remote-sensing programme - Present activities and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevin, J [ESA, Directorate of Planning and Future Programmes, Paris, France; Pryke, I [ESA, Directorate of Applications Programmes, Toulouse, France

    1979-02-01

    The present activities and future missions of the ESA program of spaceborne remote sensing of earth resources and environment are discussed. Program objectives have been determined to be the satisfaction of European regional needs by agricultural, land use, water resources, coastal and polar surveys, and meeting the requirements of developing nations in the areas of agricultural production, mineral exploration and disaster warning and assessment. The Earthnet system of data processing centers presently is used for the distribution of remote sensing data acquired by NASA satellites. Remote sensing experiments to be flown aboard Spacelab are the Metric Camera, to test high resolution mapping capabilities of a large format camera, and the Microwave Remote-Sensing Experiment, which operates as a two-frequency scatterometer, a synthetic aperture radar and a passive microwave radiometer. Studies carried out on the definition of future remote sensing satellite systems are described, including studies of system concepts for land applications and coastal monitoring satellites.

  17. The promotion of green electricity in Europe: present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio, Pablo del [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Facultad de Ciencias Juridicas y Sociales, Toledo (Spain); Gual, Miguel [Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Public support schemes for electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) are undergoing a period of change. Two interrelated processes can be discerned at both the EU and member state (MS) levels. On the one hand, the RES-E Directive sets targets for consumption of renewable electricity for the year 2010 and opens the possibility that the European Commission sets a community support framework for RES-E promotion in the future. On the other hand, different types of support scheme have been and are used by countries in order to promote the deployment of renewable electricity. A move from tendering/bidding systems and feed-in tariffs to tradable green certificates can be observed in some MSs. This move may take place in the future in some other MSs while others will certainly continue to rely on their current scheme. This paper provides an overview and assessment of the instruments currently used to promote renewable electricity in Europe and considers some possible trends in the choice of support schemes in the future. (Author)

  18. Decommissioning in the United States - Past, present and future - 16318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, Jas S.

    2009-01-01

    gearing up for the design and licensing of new reactors. Lessons from the past are useful in the development of such designs so that along with the other factors, the designs are optimized for eventual decommissioning as well. This paper provides an overview of the past reactor decommissioning, lessons learned from the past experience, and status of the current decommissioning activities and issues. It also presents some long term projections for the future of decommissioning in the United States. (authors)

  19. Radioisotopes and fungicide research- present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatrath, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The developments in pesticides and radioisotopes fields were so near to each other that at a very early stage in this history, both became linked together and their usefulness was recognised for faster development. The purpose of this communication is to illustrate the present status these techniques in fungicide research by drawing suitable examples and also to bring out the directions in which future research will be going with the aid of these tools. 72 refs

  20. AI in space: Past, present, and possible futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Donald D.; Post, Jonathan V.

    1992-01-01

    While artificial intelligence (AI) has become increasingly present in recent space applications, new missions being planned will require even more incorporation of AI techniques. In this paper, we survey some of the progress made to date in implementing such programs, some current directions and issues, and speculate about the future of AI in space scenarios. We also provide examples of how thinkers from the realm of science fiction have envisioned AI's role in various aspects of space exploration.

  1. Past, Present, and Future in the Scientific Study of Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccorkle, William W.; Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The study of religion is by its nature and by its history multi-disciplinary, incorporating diverse research paradigms ranging from historiography to experimental approaches and from scientific positivism to postmodern reflection. At a conference on the Past, Present, and Future in the Scientific...... in the humani- ties. The Laboratory for the Experimental Research of Religion in Brno, who hosted this conference, is the product of these developments...

  2. Theoretical development of atomic structure: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1994-11-01

    Theoretical development of atomic structure is briefly discussed. The role of correlation, relativity, quantum electrodynamic (QED), finite nuclear size (FNS) and parity nonconservation (PNC) in high precision theoretical investigation of properties of atomic and ionic systems is demonstrated. At present, we do not have a comprehensive and practical atomic structure theory which accounts all these physical effects on an equal footing. Suggestions are made for future directions. (author). 108 refs, 5 figs, 9 tabs

  3. Present situation and future prospects for French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1984-01-01

    The author depicts the present situation and future of the French nuclear power programme which has now become a major industrial reality after successful acceptance of a twofold challenge: the technical problem and that of training the personnel responsible for operating the power stations. The large number of nuclear plants now in operation and planned for the next few years makes electricity generated from nuclear power a ''new industrial reality'', which we must still learn to utilize to the best effect [fr

  4. Past, present and future of the fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum P, M.

    1992-01-01

    Among the alternate technologies that have acquired a special interest in the present decade, we find the nuclear fusion. Within this, the fusion reactors by magnetic confinement of the Tokamak type have shown an increasing technological progress during this period. For this reason, a new strategy, coordinated at international level, has been implemented for the specific development of the nuclear fusion reactors, aimed to face those scientific and technological aspects which still remain, and which will determine their future economic feasibility. (Author)

  5. Air Force Strategic Planning: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Raphael S. Cohen Air Force Strategic Planning Past, Present, and Future C O R P O R A T I O N Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This... intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance QDR Quadrennial Defense Review TAC Tactical Air Command UAV unmanned aerial vehicles 1 1...Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2000, p. 258. 5 U.S. Government Printing Office, Army Air Forces Field Manual: Employment of Aviation of the

  6. The energy future: cards on the table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Derdevet, Michel; Geoffron, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, energy policies have been revisited in many nuclearized countries. The energy debate is complex and must encompass several levels of reflection: an international level marked by the energy/climate equation, and by energy resources economy and geopolitics; a European level because we have made the commitment to build a common electricity and gas energy market; a national level where some strategic priorities can be put forward by governments and populations; a local level where energy-related experiments are more and more frequent. Thus, energy choices cannot be made within the single national and governmental frame any longer. At the international scale, it has become urgent to develop low-carbon energy systems. In the framework of the inevitable implementation of a responsible energy policy, the authors examine the main qualities that energy industries should develop: a safe, real-price and environmentally-friendly energy. These qualities must fit with a European framework capable to use complementarities in a perspective of competitiveness, environmental liability and short-, medium- and long-term security of supplies. All new opportunities for companies, in France and abroad, will develop in this framework as well. The energy future question has become essential and must be dealt beyond the national frame and in close relation with the climate question

  7. A "present" for the future: the unexpected value of rediscovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Tami; Brooks, Alison Wood; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I

    2014-10-01

    Although documenting everyday activities may seem trivial, four studies reveal that creating records of the present generates unexpected benefits by allowing future rediscoveries. In Study 1, we used a time-capsule paradigm to show that individuals underestimate the extent to which rediscovering experiences from the past will be curiosity provoking and interesting in the future. In Studies 2 and 3, we found that people are particularly likely to underestimate the pleasure of rediscovering ordinary, mundane experiences, as opposed to extraordinary experiences. Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that underestimating the pleasure of rediscovery leads to time-inconsistent choices: Individuals forgo opportunities to document the present but then prefer rediscovering those moments in the future to engaging in an alternative fun activity. Underestimating the value of rediscovery is linked to people's erroneous faith in their memory of everyday events. By documenting the present, people provide themselves with the opportunity to rediscover mundane moments that may otherwise have been forgotten. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Climatic changes and uplift patterns - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerck, S.; Svensson, N.O.

    1992-11-01

    Our knowledge about the Pleistocene (= last 2.5 million years) climatic changes and their global environmental effects on the Earth system, e.g. the glacial-interglacial cycles, the sea level changes, and the significant crustal movements in glaciated regions, has increased greatly during the last decades. This report outlines the historical background and the present state-of-the-arts on these matters. Because the driving mechanisms and feed-back effects behind these changes have been more and more discussed in earth-science literature, analysed, and probably also better and better understood, it has become possible to present theoretical models for future climates (not including mans influence on the earth system). The report presents and discusses one such climate model (short of predicting mans future behaviour and its consequent effect on climate) and its likely implications on future climatic and glacial conditions, and bedrock movements, with focus on the Stockholm region. Possibilities for quaternary geologists to establish and map post glacial fault zones, related to irregular bedrock movements, are also briefly outlined in the report. (222 refs.)

  9. Potential future waste-to-energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thorin, Eva; Guziana, Bozena; Song, Han; Jääskeläinen, Ari; Szpadt, Ryszard; Vasilic, Dejan; Ahrens, Thorsten; Anne, Olga; Lõõnik, Jaan

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses potential future systems for waste-to-energy production in the Baltic Sea Region, and especially for the project REMOWE partner regions, the County of Västmanland in Sweden, Northern Savo in Finland, Lower Silesia in Poland, western part of Lithuania and Estonia. The waste-to-energy systems planned for in the partner regions are combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) and solid recovered fuels from household and industry as well as anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge ...

  10. Finnish energy technologies for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The global energy sector is going through major changes: the need for energy is growing explosively, while at the same time climate change is forcing US to find new, and cleaner, ways to generate energy. Finland is one of the forerunners in energy technology development, partly because of its northern location and partly thanks to efficient innovations. A network of centres of expertise was established in Finland in 1994 to boost the competitiveness and internationalisation of Finnish industry and, consequently, that of the EU region. During the expertise centre programme period 2007-2013, substantial resources will be allocated to efficient utilisation of top level expertise in thirteen selected clusters of expertise. The energy cluster, focusing on developing energy technologies for the future, is one of these

  11. Radiation protection of the public: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the historical development of radiation protection standards for the public, the present system in the United States for limiting radiation exposures of the public primarily by means of environmental radiation standards for specific practices or sources, and recent developments that may affect future standards and policies for radiation protection of the public. The radiobiological and epidemiological basis for radiation protection standards and policies is emphasized. Difficulties associated with the current regulatory framework are discussed, and proposal for addressing these difficulties are presented. 16 refs., 1 tab

  12. Past, Present and Future of Linac 2 Vacuum System

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E

    2011-01-01

    This note aims to review the past, present, and future operation of CERN's Linac 2 vacuum system. The machine vacuum system layout with its major components is summarized. Operational problems arising in 2006 yielded to a leak test campaign of the whole machine, which detected a new, major leak on tank 3. Details about the mitigation of this leak are described as well as additional diagnostics installed during shutdown 2006/07. The pressure evolution of the most critical vacuum sector is analyzed. A statistics of vacuum system faults observed since 2000 is presented and compared with other systems. Finally, a perspective for the vacuum system operation until 2017/18 is outlined.

  13. The present state and future directions of PDF methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the workshop are presented in viewgraph format, as is this entire article. The objectives are to discuss the present status and the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion; to assure that combustion is an essential part of propulsion; and to discuss Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for turbulent combustion. Essential to the integration of turbulent combustion models is the development of turbulent model, chemical kinetics, and numerical method. Some turbulent combustion models typically used in industry are the k-epsilon turbulent model, the equilibrium/mixing limited combustion, and the finite volume codes.

  14. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  15. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  16. U.S. energy outlook and future energy impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Randolph John

    2011-12-01

    Energy markets were not immune to the 2007 financial crisis. Growth in the Indian and Chinese economies is placing strains on global energy supplies that could force a repeat of the 2008 price spike of $145/bbl for crude oil. Emerging market growth coupled with inefficiencies, frictions, and speculation in the energy markets has the potential to create drastic economic shocks throughout the world. The 2007 economic crisis has pushed back investment in energy projects where a low-growth scenario in world GDP could create drastic price increases in world energy prices. Without a long-term energy supply plan, the U.S. is destined to see growth reduced and its trade imbalances continue to deteriorate with increasing energy costs. Analysis of the U.S. natural gas futures markets and the impact of financial speculation on natural gas market pricing determined that financial speculation adds to price movements in the energy markets, which could cause violent swings in energy prices.

  17. Energy Choices. Choices for future technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billfalk, Lennart; Haegermark, Harald

    2009-03-01

    will present Swedish industry with a good opportunity to develop new technology and new system solutions. Speed up the permitting processes for plants and energy production and electricity networks. Prepare a long-term plan regarding decisions on strengthening the electricity networks, as well as a time schedule for associated decisions and processes. Furthermore, a joint plan regarding foreign connections should be developed for the Nordic region. Lobby for an EU-wide certificate system for renewable energy. The EU target on renewable energy will result in improved opportunities for Sweden to export electricity, but the certificate system currently in force in Sweden will result in the future surplus in electricity production being paid for by Swedish electricity customers. Carry out an immediate change in legislation to facilitate planning for new nuclear power. This is necessary if Sweden wants to replace electricity production from the two oldest nuclear power plants, which may have to close around 2020- 2025 for financial reasons. Power companies need to plan their investments and the safety authorities need to make their preparations. Since other existing nuclear power plants will be decommissioned on a relatively frequent basis in the period 2035-2045, there are even more reasons to keep open the option of new nuclear power. Invest heavily in Sweden in research, development, demonstration and implementation of new technology and systems in several areas. Swedish companies and universities should continue their investments in the area of CCS (capture and storage of carbon dioxide). This is necessary in order for it to be possible to evaluate the consequences of the technology for Sweden and its usefulness and safety in the longer term. A breakthrough is envisaged after 2020 and will in the first instance concern CCS at power stations, but CCS may also be applied to large point sources of carbon dioxide emissions from energy intensive industry. Formulate a

  18. A Carbon-Free Energy Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, H. R.; Singer, S. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is generally agreed that hydrogen is an ideal energy source, both for transportation and for the generation of electric power. Through the use of fuel cells, hydrogen becomes a high-efficiency carbon-free power source for electromotive transport; with the help of regenerative braking, cars should be able to reach triple the current mileage. Many have visualized a distributed electric supply network with decentralized generation based on fuel cells. Fuel cells can provide high generation efficiencies by overcoming the fundamental thermodynamic limitation imposed by the Carnot cycle. Further, by using the heat energy of the high-temperature fuel cell in co-generation, one can achieve total thermal efficiencies approaching 100 percent, as compared to present-day average power-plant efficiencies of around 35 percent. In addition to reducing CO2 emissions, distributed generation based on fuel cells also eliminates the tremendous release of waste heat into the environment, the need for cooling water, and related limitations on siting. Manufacture of hydrogen remains a key problem, but there are many technical solutions that come into play whenever the cost equations permit . One can visualize both central and local hydrogen production. Initially, reforming of abundant natural gas into mixtures of 80% H2 and 20% CO2 provides a relatively low-emission source of hydrogen. Conventional fossil-fuel plants and nuclear plants can become hydrogen factories using both high-temperature topping cycles and electrolysis of water. Hydro-electric plants can manufacture hydrogen by electrolysis. Later, photovoltaic and wind farms could be set up at favorable locations around the world as hydrogen factories. If perfected, photovoltaic hydrogen production through catalysis would use solar photons most efficiently . For both wind and PV, hydrogen production solves some crucial problems: intermittency of wind and of solar radiation, storage of energy, and use of locations that are not

  19. Lithium-thionyl chloride batteries - past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCartney, J.F.; Lund, T.J.; Sturgeon, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    Lithium based batteries have the highest theoretical energy density of known battery types. Of the lithium batteries, the lithium-thionyl chloride electrochemistry has the highest energy density of those which have been reduced to practice. The characteristics, development status, and performance of lithium-thionyl chloride batteries are treated in this paper. Safety aspects of lithium-thionyl chloride batteries are discussed along with impressive results of hazard/safety tests of these batteries. An orderly development plan of a minimum family of standard cells to avoid a proliferation of battery sizes and discharge rates is presented.

  20. Political electricity: What future for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.

    1993-01-01

    Political Electricity first reviews the history of nuclear power development in nine countries (USA, France, Japan, UK, West Germany, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland, Australia). Second the book analyses major issues shaping the future of the industry: nuclear power economincs, nuclear hazards, alternative energy economics, and greenhouse gas constraints

  1. The Hurst exponent in energy futures prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Apostolos; Rosenberg, Aryeh Adam

    2007-07-01

    This paper extends the work in Elder and Serletis [Long memory in energy futures prices, Rev. Financial Econ., forthcoming, 2007] and Serletis et al. [Detrended fluctuation analysis of the US stock market, Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos, forthcoming, 2007] by re-examining the empirical evidence for random walk type behavior in energy futures prices. In doing so, it uses daily data on energy futures traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange, over the period from July 2, 1990 to November 1, 2006, and a statistical physics approach-the ‘detrending moving average’ technique-providing a reliable framework for testing the information efficiency in financial markets as shown by Alessio et al. [Second-order moving average and scaling of stochastic time series, Eur. Phys. J. B 27 (2002) 197-200] and Carbone et al. [Time-dependent hurst exponent in financial time series. Physica A 344 (2004) 267-271; Analysis of clusters formed by the moving average of a long-range correlated time series. Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 026105]. The results show that energy futures returns display long memory and that the particular form of long memory is anti-persistence.

  2. Future nuclear energy scenarios for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Van Heek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is back on the agenda worldwide. In order to prepare for the next decades and to set priorities in nuclear R and D and investment, market share scenarios are evaluated. This allows to identify the triggers which influence the market penetration of future nuclear reactor technologies. To this purpose, scenarios for a future nuclear reactor park in Europe have been analysed applying an integrated dynamic process modelling technique. Various market share scenarios for nuclear energy are derived including sub-variants with regard to the intra-nuclear options taken, e.g. introduction date of Gen-III (i.e. EPR) and Gen-IV (i.e. SCWR, HTR, FR) reactors, level of reprocessing, and so forth. The assessment was undertaken using the DANESS code which allows to provide a complete picture of mass-flow and economics of the various nuclear energy system scenarios. The analyses show that the future European nuclear park will exist of combinations of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors. This mix will always consist of a set of reactor types each having its specific strengths. Furthermore, the analyses highlight the triggers influencing the choice between different nuclear energy deployment scenarios. In addition, a dynamic assessment is made with regard to manpower requirements for the construction of a future nuclear fleet in the different scenarios. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen, an energy carrier with a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The inefficient use, associated with pollutants, of the fossil energy carriers coal, crude oil and natural gas, will deplete resources, if the energy demand increases exponentially, in the not-too-distant future. That is the reason why the hydrogen-energy concept gains in importance. This requires drastic changes in structure in a lot of technological fields. This task is only to be mastered if there is cooperation between all special fields, in order to facilitate the economical production, distribution and utilization of hydrogen. (orig.) [de

  4. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  5. VIII. THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL METHODOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Todd D; Wang, Eugene W; Gorrall, Britt K

    2017-06-01

    This chapter selectively reviews the evolution of quantitative practices in the field of developmental methodology. The chapter begins with an overview of the past in developmental methodology, discussing the implementation and dissemination of latent variable modeling and, in particular, longitudinal structural equation modeling. It then turns to the present state of developmental methodology, highlighting current methodological advances in the field. Additionally, this section summarizes ample quantitative resources, ranging from key quantitative methods journal articles to the various quantitative methods training programs and institutes. The chapter concludes with the future of developmental methodology and puts forth seven future innovations in the field. The innovations discussed span the topics of measurement, modeling, temporal design, and planned missing data designs. Lastly, the chapter closes with a brief overview of advanced modeling techniques such as continuous time models, state space models, and the application of Bayesian estimation in the field of developmental methodology. © 2017 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  6. Present and future applications of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresa, J.M. de [CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Saragossa (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Saragossa (Spain); Fernandez-Pacheco, A. [University of Cambridge, TFM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Currently, magnetic nanostructures are routinely grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). In the present article, we review the milestones produced in the topic in the past as well as the future applications of this technology. Regarding past milestones, we highlight the achievement of high-purity cobalt and iron deposits, the high lateral resolution obtained, the growth of 3D magnetic deposits, the exploration of magnetic alloys and the application of magnetic deposits for Hall sensing and in domain-wall conduit and magnetologic devices. With respect to future perspectives of the topic, we emphasize the potential role of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID for applications related to highly integrated 2D arrays, 3D nanowires devices, fabrication of advanced scanning-probe systems, basic studies of magnetic structures and their dynamics, small sensors (including biosensors) and new applications brought by magnetic alloys and even exchange biased systems. (orig.)

  7. Can renewable energy power the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Honnery, Damon

    2016-01-01

    Fossil fuels face resource depletion, supply security, and climate change problems; renewable energy (RE) may offer the best prospects for their long-term replacement. However, RE sources differ in many important ways from fossil fuels, particularly in that they are energy flows rather than stocks. The most important RE sources, wind and solar energy, are also intermittent, necessitating major energy storage as these sources increase their share of total energy supply. We show that estimates for the technical potential of RE vary by two orders of magnitude, and argue that values at the lower end of the range must be seriously considered, both because their energy return on energy invested falls, and environmental costs rise, with cumulative output. Finally, most future RE output will be electric, necessitating radical reconfiguration of existing grids to function with intermittent RE. - Highlights: •Published estimates for renewable energy (RE) technical potential vary 100-fold. •Intermittent wind and solar energy dominate total RE potential. •We argue it is unlikely that RE can meet existing global energy use. •The need to maintain ecosystem services will reduce global RE potential. •The need for storage of intermittent RE will further reduce net RE potential.

  8. Advanced reactors and future energy market needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, Henri; )

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of a very well-attended international workshop on 'Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs' that took place in April 2017, the NEA has embarked on a two-year study with the objective of analysing evolving energy market needs and requirements, as well as examining how well reactor technologies under development today will fit into tomorrow's low-carbon world. The NEA Expert Group on Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs (ARFEM) held its first meeting on 5-6 July 2017 with experts from Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Poland, Romania, Russia and the United Kingdom. The outcome of the study will provide much needed insight into how well nuclear can fulfil its role as a key low-carbon technology, and help identify challenges related to new operational, regulatory or market requirements

  9. Creating a sustainable energy future for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneborn, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A joint industry approach is needed to put in place a sustainable energy system that is economically and technologically feasible. The industry sectors involved must include the renewable energy industry, energy efficiency industry and the natural gas industry. Conventional forecasts of energy futures make far less use of these industries than is economically and technically feasible. Existing forecasts make the trade off between acceptable levels of economic growth, limitation of greenhouse gases and dependence on coal and oil appear more difficult than they actually are and overlook the benefits of sustainable energy industry development. This paper outlines how national gains from carefully targeted action can exceed national losses while substantially reducing greenhouse gases and creating jobs at zero or negative costs. (author). 3 figs., 27 refs

  10. Silicon solar cells: Past, present and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Byung-Sung; Ifitiquar, S. M.; Park, Cheolmin; Yi, Junsin

    2014-08-01

    There has been a great demand for renewable energy for the last few years. However, the solar cell industry is currently experiencing a temporary plateau due to a sluggish economy and an oversupply of low-quality cells. The current situation can be overcome by reducing the production cost and by improving the cell is conversion efficiency. New materials such as compound semiconductor thin films have been explored to reduce the fabrication cost, and structural changes have been explored to improve the cell's efficiency. Although a record efficiency of 24.7% is held by a PERL — structured silicon solar cell and 13.44% has been realized using a thin silicon film, the mass production of these cells is still too expensive. Crystalline and amorphous silicon — based solar cells have led the solar industry and have occupied more than half of the market so far. They will remain so in the future photovoltaic (PV) market by playing a pivotal role in the solar industry. In this paper, we discuss two primary approaches that may boost the silicon — based solar cell market; one is a high efficiency approach and the other is a low cost approach. We also discuss the future prospects of various solar cells.

  11. Silicon solar cells: past, present and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Kim, B. S.; Ifitiquar, S. M.; Park, C. M.; Yi, J. S. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    There has been a great demand for renewable energy for the last few years. However, the solar cell industry is currently experiencing a temporary plateau due to a sluggish economy and an over supply of low-quality cells. The current situation can be overcome by reducing the production cost and by improving the cell is conversion efficiency. New materials such as compound semiconductor thin films have been explored to reduce the fabrication cost, and structural changes have been explored to improve the cell's efficiency. Although a record efficiency of 24.7% is held by a PERL - structured silicon solar cell and 13.44% has been realized using a thin silicon film, the mass production of these cells is still too expensive. Crystalline and amorphous silicon - based solar cells have led the solar industry and have occupied more than half of the market so far. They will remain so in the future photovoltaic (PV) market by playing a pivotal role in the solar industry. In this paper, we discuss two primary approaches that may boost the silicon - based solar cell market; one is a high efficiency approach and the other is a low cost approach. We also discuss the future prospects of various solar cells.

  12. Present trends in nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the current trends of nuclear energy in Europe, the issue of radioactive waste management, the modern technical solutions for building new nuclear power plants and, also, the nuclear power long term prospects. The following trends and methods of reducing costs are addressed: - upgrading the availability of nuclear power units; since 1990 till now in Europe the availability factor has risen from 74 % to 84%; - extending the operation life of nuclear power plants from 30 - 40 years to 60 years; - stable reduction of the duration of annual planned outages necessary for maintenance and nuclear fuel re-loading; it is noteworthy the performance of Unit 2 Olkiluoto NPP, Finland, that was shutdown for annual outage and fuel re-loading for a 7 days only; - stable cuts of nuclear fuel cost by using advanced nuclear fuel and by increasing the fuel burnup; over the last years, nuclear fuel cost share in the operation costs has constantly decreased to values of about 0.5 USD cent/KWh e; - increase of the rated capacity of the existing in Europe nuclear power units, through upgrading programs that contribute to enhancing their efficiency. In the year 2002 Generation IV International Forum (GIF) finalized the technological strategy in the field, identifying the most promising nuclear power systems for which the research will continue. This strategy also identifies the main objectives that must by pursued within the research-development programs out of which one mentions the following: - identifying sustainable solution for generating electricity; - minimizing the radioactive waste and its management; - optimization of operation costs; - reducing the financial risk comparable to other energy solutions; - excellence in nuclear safety and reliability; - increasing resistance to proliferation; - ruling out the emergency solutions. Finally, the paper mentions the international engagement, representing a new approach in nuclear power, namely the transition to the use

  13. Chaos theory in geophysics: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, B.

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades of research on chaos theory in geophysics has brought about a significant shift in the way we view geophysical phenomena. Research on chaos theory in geophysics continues to grow at a much faster pace, with applications to a wide variety of geophysical phenomena and geophysical problems. In spite of our success in understanding geophysical phenomena also from a different (i.e. chaotic) perspective, there still seems to be lingering suspicions on the scope of chaos theory in geophysics. The goal of this paper is to present a comprehensive account of the achievements and status of chaos theory in geophysics, and to disseminate the hope and scope for the future. A systematic review of chaos theory in geophysics, covering a wide spectrum of geophysical phenomena studied (e.g. rainfall, river flow, sediment transport, temperature, pressure, tree ring series, etc.), is presented to narrate our past achievements not only in understanding and predicting geophysical phenomena but also in improving the chaos identification and prediction techniques. The present state of chaos research in geophysics (in terms of geophysical phenomena, problems, and chaos methods) and potential for future improvements (in terms of where, why and possibly how) are also highlighted. Our popular views of nature (i.e. stochastic and deterministic), and of geophysical phenomena in particular, are discussed, and the usefulness of chaos theory as a bridge between such views is also put forth

  14. Radiation pollution: present and future perplexities about human rights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raj; Bharti, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Out of the several pollutions included in environmental pollution, the radiation pollution is also a part of this, which is most damageable and serious for the society. Historical evidences reveal about the devastating effects of radiation pollution on human being. No form of pollution exists in the world which influences the human race with its devastating affects for more than one generation except radiation pollution. The radiation pollution affects human health in several ways. It is a man made problem and also affects human rights of masses for which state are responsible ultimately. The radiation pollution affects a big spectrum of human rights. The sources of radiation pollution and its impact on human health may be different according to the sources. These sources may be classified as electronic goods, Nuclear tests, Nuclear war, Reactors and thermal plants etc. Although we have some legal provisions to handle the problem of radiation pollution but there is no specific laws available for the protection and promotion of human rights from radiation pollution in the lights of international human rights principles. At present, there is no human right oriented policy framework is available to protect and promote the human rights of the radiation pollutions sufferers. The paper explores Present and Future Perplexities about Human Rights. It also tells about the available legal framework, state obligations and judicial responses for radiation pollution. The paper concludes with some suggestions in the light of present and future perplexities about human rights. (author)

  15. Nuclear engineering career path - Past, present and future in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, O.; Goicea, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Today's nuclear workforce is growing older. The nuclear industry is at a turning point, mainly when we try to evaluate future needs. The paper tries to explore what is the present status of nuclear engineering career in Europe and which are the future trends. Today's students are either unaware of, or indifferent to, nuclear power. But it is not their fault - after all, an entire generation has grown to adulthood since the Three Miles Island and Chernobyl accidents. If their parents' views about nuclear power have been changed after these unhappy accidents, today's teens appear to be almost ambivalent toward it. What could be done to attract younger to the nuclear field in Europe? Probably the main key is in education and even more in a positive image-making of nuclear industry. Creation of more possibilities for gaining work experience and an improvement of economical situation and successful completion of reforms in the industry could attract young people. Political viewpoint is very important, if we consider that people in general thinks that nuclear will be phased out within a short future. A good advertising about job opportunities to come is another factor that plays a role in information of young generation. The paper provides information about university programmes in nuclear engineering in European countries. (authors)

  16. Present and future of flat panel detectors in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Kiyonari

    2002-01-01

    Present status of development of flat panel detectors and their clinical application in the world have been surveyed, and future trends are also explored especially in the field of material researches and methods of manufacturing. Also the importance of role of medical physicists on user side is described because characteristic physics measurement of a detector assembly is unavoidable and essential in quality assurance in clinical routine and acceptance test in hospitals. Even though physics measurements and clinical evaluations on flat panel detectors have shown remarkable progress and advances in these several years, future problems of cost down in manufacturing and quality assurance to prevent individual differences between detector assemblies must be resolved. Results of evaluation in mammography, chest radiography, fluoroscopy for cardiovascular examination, bone tumor examination and radiotherapy application indicate that flat panel detectors are future promising materials. Their systematic operation is contributing to heighten accuracy of image examinations and preciseness of radiation therapy. Encouragement to medical physicists relevant to flat panel detectors is also raised in this paper. (author)

  17. Nuclear model developments in FLUKA for present and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Francesco; Empl, Anton; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ruben, GarciaAlia; Sala, Paola R.; Smirnov, George; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2017-09-01

    The FLUKAS code [1-3] is used in research laboratories all around the world for challenging applications spanning a very wide range of energies, projectiles and targets. FLUKAS is also extensively used for in hadrontherapy research studies and clinical planning systems. In this paper some of the recent developments in the FLUKAS nuclear physics models of relevance for very different application fields including medical physics are presented. A few examples are shown demonstrating the effectiveness of the upgraded code.

  18. Modelling and simulation-based acquisition decision support: present & future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Naidoo1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 24551 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Naidoo1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Modelling & Simulation...-Based Acquisition Decision Support: Present & Future Shahen Naidoo Abstract The Ground Based Air Defence System (GBADS) Programme, of the South African Army has been applying modelling and simulation (M&S) to provide acquisition decision and doctrine...

  19. [Ecology and health in Chile: present and future development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, M

    1997-09-01

    In response to the progressive environmental deterioration, the Ecological Society of America has made a proposal, called "Sustainable Biosphere Initiative", to do research, teaching and decision making processes on biodiversity, global change and the effects of human activities on environment. The goal of appropriate environmental protection and welfare for mankind includes health and quality of life. Presently, Chile faces a number of environmental problems such as pollution, excessive urban growth, loss of agricultural areas, disposal of solid waste and species extinction. The lack of education and information in Chile, on these problems, is worrisome. The role of universities to overcome this deficit should be crucial in the future sustainable development of Chile.

  20. Overview of mycotoxin methods, present status and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews current requirements for the analysis for mycotoxins in foods and identifies legislative as well as other factors that are driving development and validation of new methods. New regulatory limits for mycotoxins and analytical quality assurance requirements for laboratories to only use validated methods are seen as major factors driving developments. Three major classes of methods are identified which serve different purposes and can be categorized as screening, official and research. In each case the present status and future needs are assessed. In addition to an overview of trends in analytical methods, some other areas of analytical quality assurance such as participation in proficiency testing and reference materials are identified.