WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy draft waste

  1. Life-cycle costs for the Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement (draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherick, M.J.; Shropshire, D.E.; Hsu, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has produced a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) in order to assess the potential consequences resulting from a cross section of possible waste management strategies for the DOE complex. The PEIS has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and includes evaluations of a variety of alternatives. The analysis performed for the PEIS included the development of life-cycle cost estimates for the different waste management alternatives being considered. These cost estimates were used in the PEIS to support the identification and evaluation of economic impacts. Information developed during the preparation of the life-cycle cost estimates was also used to support risk and socioeconomic analyses performed for each of the alternatives. This technical report provides an overview of the methodology used to develop the life-cycle cost estimates for the PEIS alternatives. The methodology that was applied made use of the Waste Management Facility Cost Information Reports, which provided a consistent approach and estimating basis for the PEIS cost evaluations. By maintaining consistency throughout the cost analyses, life-cycle costs of the various alternatives can be compared and evaluated on a relative basis. This technical report also includes the life-cycle cost estimate results for each of the PEIS alternatives evaluated. Summary graphs showing the results for each waste type are provided in the main document, and tables showing different breakdowns of the cost estimates are provided in the Appendices A-D. Appendix E contains PEIS cost information that was developed using an approach different than the standard methodology described in this report

  2. Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy's Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex

  3. Responses to comments received on the draft final report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Task Force solicited comments on its Draft Final Report from a variety of sources. Letters were sent to over 400 individuals who had expressed interest in the interest in the Department's radioactive waste, management programs, a notice was placed in the Federal Register, the morning session of the January 1993 meeting of the full Secretary of Energy Advisory Board was given over to discussion of the draft, and Task Force members and staff presented the effort at several professional meetings. Altogether 32 written comments were received. They are reproduced here, followed in each case by the Task Force's response to specific suggestions made to improve the draft. (The panel did not respond to comments that simply reflected policy preferences or that praised the group's effort.) With one exception, those specific suggestions are highlighted and given a letter designation from open-quotes Aclose quotes to open-quotes Zclose quotes. The Task Force's responses, written in the Fall 1993, are labeled in a like manner. For the one exception, a comments submitted by Judy Treichel, the Task Force's response is printed on copies of her annotated pages

  4. Responses to comments received on the draft final report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Task Force solicited comments on its Draft Final Report from a variety of sources. Letters were sent to over 400 individuals who had expressed interest in the interest in the Department`s radioactive waste, management programs, a notice was placed in the Federal Register, the morning session of the January 1993 meeting of the full Secretary of Energy Advisory Board was given over to discussion of the draft, and Task Force members and staff presented the effort at several professional meetings. Altogether 32 written comments were received. They are reproduced here, followed in each case by the Task Force`s response to specific suggestions made to improve the draft. (The panel did not respond to comments that simply reflected policy preferences or that praised the group`s effort.) With one exception, those specific suggestions are highlighted and given a letter designation from {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} to {open_quotes}Z{close_quotes}. The Task Force`s responses, written in the Fall 1993, are labeled in a like manner. For the one exception, a comments submitted by Judy Treichel, the Task Force`s response is printed on copies of her annotated pages.

  5. Leak of draft report on radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Environment Committee's second report discusses the leak of the draft report on radioactive waste. The circumstances of the leak are discussed and ''The Times'' and ''The Guardian'' articles of December 1985 are printed in full, as are the letter from the Chairman of the environmental committee to the members and their replies. The letters from Mr John Large of Large and Associates to the Chairman of the Environment Committee, and Mr Large's correspondence with Greenpeace are also printed. (UK)

  6. Radiological health review of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0026-D) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, US Department of Energy. Report EEG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.; Channell, J.K.; Wofsy, C.; Greenfield, M.A.

    1979-08-01

    This review of radiological health considerations contains a number of concerns, questions and recommendations that should be addressed by the Department of Energy in the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Using the assumptions contained in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) calculated a number of radiation doses and the results were found to be in general agreement with those presented in the DEIS. The doses resulting from the operational and long-range releases from WIPP to the general population are no more than a fraction of existing radiation doses to the public. However, there are a number of technical considerations in the assessment of radiation exposure that were not adequately evaluated in the DEIS. They are discussed in this review. A number of additional dosage estimates have been identified that need to be calculated by both DOE and EEG. As the DEIS did not contain estimates of the amounts of radioactivity to be permanently located in the repository, it was necessary to calculate these amounts. Health effects, transportation, waste acceptance criteria, site evaluation, site selection criteria, operational exposure, the experimental waste program, long term radiation releases, retrievability, and decommissioning are the categories of the DEIS which were evaluated

  7. Public comments on the draft generic environmental impact statement for management of commercially generated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiter, M.R.; Unruh, C.M.; McCallum, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has the responsibility for developing the technology required for managing commercial radioactive wastes in an environmentally acceptable manner. As part of this responsibility, DOE has prepared a draft environmental impact statement on the management of commercially generated radioactive waste. The draft was issued for public comment in April of 1979; five public hearings were held. The draft GEIS is intended to provide environmental input for the selection of an appropriate program strategy for the permanent isolation of commercially generated high-level and transuranic wastes. The scope of such a strategy includes research and development into alternative treatment processes and emplacement media, site investigations into candidate media, and the examination of advanced waste management technologies. The draft statement describes the commercial radioactive wastes that would have to be managed for very long periods of time from an assumed nuclear generation scenario of 10,000 GWe-yr of power over a 65-year period ending in 2040

  8. Draft of regulations for road transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gese, J.; Zizka, B.

    1979-06-01

    A draft regulation is presented for the transport of solid and solidified radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. The draft takes into consideration dosimetric, safety and fire-fighting directives, transport organization, anticipated amounts of radioactive wastes, characteristics of containers, maintenance of vehicles, and equipment of vehicles and personnel. The draft is based on the provisional regulations governing the transport on public roads issued in 1973, valid directives, decrees, acts and standards, and complies with 1973 IAEA requirements. (J.P.)

  9. 75 FR 1048 - Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland..., Office of Environmental Compliance, Office of Environmental Management. [FR Doc. 2010-224 Filed 1-7-10; 8... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management...

  10. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan

  11. Radioactive Waste Management System: Draft Project Decision Schedule. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 (Pub. L. 97-425) requires that the Secretary of Energy prepare, in cooperation with affected Federal agencies, a Project Decision Schedule that portrays the optimum way to attain the operation of geologic repositories. The Draft Project Decision Schedule portrays the major milestones of the Radioactive Waste Management System. It also depicts the set of activities for which Federal agencies have responsibility and the deadlines for taking the required action that are associated with the activities. The NWPA also requires that Federal agencies having determined that they: (1) cannot comply with a deadline for taking a required action; or (2) fail to comply with a deadline contained in the Project Decision Schedule; submit a comprehensive report to the Secretary of Energy and Congress to explain their failure or expected failure. The Secretary, in turn, is required to submit to Congress a response to the agency's report. 7 figs., 13 tabs

  12. State of Nevada comments on the US Department of Energy draft environmental assessment for the proposed high-level nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    In order to assure development of a comprehensive and coordinated State response to the Nevada draft EA, the State Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) performed an extensive review of the draft document and its supporting references. Comments were also solicited from other State agencies and from local governments in southern Nevada. The results of this overall State effort are contained in subsequent sections of this document. Because the draft EA and the decision process of which it is a part are of major importance to the state as a whole as well as to individual local communities (especially those in southern Nevada), we have attempted to organize the State response in such a way as to clearly reflect areas of commonality without abridging the need for a clear delineation of issues of specific concern to local governments and individual State agencies. Part I of our response document focuses on those issues and topics that are considered to be of major concern. These comments are relatively general in nature and are organized according to subject area--not according to chapter or location in the draft EA. As such, this section represents something of an overview of our response to the document

  13. Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

    1990-06-01

    A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

    1990-06-01

    A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations

  15. 75 FR 3902 - Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland... Environmental Management. [FR Doc. 2010-1306 Filed 1-22-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-P ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management...

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes

  17. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes

  18. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  19. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes

  20. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  1. Wasted energy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Steg

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Verspilde energie? Many environmental problems are increasing primarily due to rising production and consumption, in other words due to the behaviour of consumers. Accordingly, there is a growing realisation that environmental problems must be partly resolved through a change

  2. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities

  3. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

  4. Energy market review releases draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2002-01-01

    The Energy Market Review Releases draft report has made recommendations consistent with the Australian Gas Association (AGA)'s submissions in a number of areas. In particular, it has endorsed: 1. the need for an independent review of the gas access regime, to address the deficiencies with current access regulation identified by the Productivity Commission's Review of the National Access Regime; 2. the need for greater upstream gas market competition; 3. the principle that significant regulatory decisions should be subject to clear merits and judicial review; and 4. the need to avoid restrictions on retail energy prices. The report also endorses the need for a 'technology neutral' approach to greenhouse emissions abatement policy. It states that 'many of the current measures employed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are poorly targeted', and that they 'target technologies or fuel types rather than greenhouse gas abatement.' Additionally, it explicitly recognises the key conclusions of the AGA's recently-released Research Paper, Reducing Greenhouse Emissions from Water Heating: Natural Gas as a Cost-effective Option. The draft report recommends the development of an economy-wide emissions trading system, to achieve a more cost-effective approach to greenhouse abatement

  5. 75 FR 78980 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy... Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern... preferred method of commenting. Mail: Addressed to: Solar Energy Draft Programmatic EIS, Argonne National...

  6. 78 FR 17653 - Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0408)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Wildlife Service Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS... Plains Wind Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Draft [[Page 17654

  7. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel

  8. Draft low level waste technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information

  9. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

  10. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals

  11. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently deciding the direction of its environmental restoration and waste management programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the next 10 years. Pertinent to this decision is establishing policies for the environmentally sensitive and safe transport, storage, and management of spent nuclear fuels. To develop these policies, it is necessary to revisit or examine the available options. As a part of the DOE complex, the Hanford Site not only has a large portion of the nationwide DOE-owned inventory of spent nuclear fuel, but also is a participant in the DOE decision for management and ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Efforts in this process at Hanford include assessment of several options for stabilizing, transporting, and storing all or portions of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. Such storage and management of spent nuclear fuel will be in a safe and suitable manner until a final decision is made for ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Five alternatives involving the Hanford Site are being considered for management of the spent nuclear fuel inventory: (1) the No Action Alternative, (2) the Decentralization Alternative, (3) the 1992/1993 Planning Basis Alternative, (4) the Regionalization Alternative, and (5) the Centralization Alternative. AU alternatives will be carefully designed to avoid environmental degradation and to provide protection to human health and safety at the Hanford Site and surrounding region

  12. Energy recovery from wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stefanis, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper are reported analysis of some energy recovery form wastes plants. In this work are considered materials and energy flows, environmental impacts and related treatment costs and financial resources [it

  13. Waste to energy

    CERN Document Server

    Syngellakis, S

    2014-01-01

    Waste to Energy deals with the very topical subject of converting the calorific content of waste material into useful forms of energy. Topics included cover: Biochemical Processes; Conversions by Thermochemical Processes; Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling; Combustion; Pyrolysis; Gasification; Biofuels; Management and Policies.

  14. 76 FR 58543 - Draft Policy Statement on Volume Reduction and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ...-Level Radioactive Waste Management AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Reopening of comment... for public comment a draft Policy Statement on Volume Reduction and Low-Level Radioactive Waste...-based approaches to managing waste are also needed to safely manage Low-Level Radioactive Waste. The...

  15. Status of nuclear fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, and high-level waste disposal. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Committee, California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the current status of technologies and issues in the major portions of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented. The discussion on nuclear fuel reprocessing covers the reprocessing requirement, reprocessing technology assessment, technology for operation of reprocessing plants, and approval of reprocessing plants. The chapter devoted to spent fuel storage covers the spent fuel storge problem, the legislative response, options for maintaining full core discharge capacity, prospective availability of alterntive storage options, and the outlook for California. The existence of a demonstrated, developed high-level waste disposal technology is reviewed. Recommendations for Federal programs on high-level waste disposal are made

  16. Energy transformation and flow topology in an elbow draft tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan D.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a computational study of energy transformation in two geometrical configurations of Kaplan turbine elbow draft tube. Pressure recovery, hydraulic efficiency and loss coefficient are evaluated for a series of flow rates and swirl numbers corresponding to operating regimes of the turbine. These integral characteristics are then correlated with local flow field properties identified by extraction of topological features. Main focus is to find the reasons for hydraulic efficiency drop of the elbow draft tube.

  17. Draft legislation aimed at creating a climate-energy contribution - Nr 1317

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sas, Eva; Rugy, Francois de; Pompili, Barbara; Baupin, Denis; Auroi, Danielle; Alauzet, Eric; Abeille, Laurence; Allain, Brigitte; Attard, Isabelle; Bonneton, Michele; Cavard, Christophe; Coronado, Sergio; Lambert, Francois-Michel; Mamere, Noel; Massonneau, Veronique; Molac, Paul; Pompili, Barbara; Roumegas, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    After having discussed the motivations of this draft legislation (necessary energy saving, drawbacks of radioactive wastes, climate change and energy crisis), this document presents a set of articles which respectively address the following topics: indication of energy consumptions (including nuclear electricity) submitted to the climate-energy contribution, indication of energetic product dealers who pay this contribution, determination of the contribution by the Parliament, pay-back to households of the contribution paid by households, creation of 'energy transition cheques', information of the consumer on his contribution

  18. Energy from waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    In accordance with the fast growing population, the demand for energy and the discharge of waste are also increasing day by day. So, there is two method of waste treatment that practiced by our company, centralised and de centralised. For de centralised treatment, there are some advantages like no collection, no transportation, small investment and for disadvantages, more treatment plants are needed. Waste of food materials and other bio degradable wastes generated in Factory canteens, Convents, Hospitals, Hostels, Hotels and other industrial organizations can be treated in an eco-friendly way for the production of cooking gas in very large scale. BIOTECH has completed the installation of 52 Nos. power generation projects using market /slaughter house waste. The power generated from these projects is being utilized for energy requirements of the concerned markets and to meet the in-house requirements of the projects. In recognition of our selfless services to the society through our system of waste management and the generation of Energy from waste. BIOTECH was honored by conferring on it the prestigious International Ashden Award GREEN OSCAR 2007. (Author)

  19. 78 FR 57538 - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule and Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Chief, Communication, Planning, and Rulemaking Branch Waste Confidence Directorate, Office of Nuclear...-2012-0246] RIN 3150-AJ20 Proposed Waste Confidence Rule and Draft Generic Environmental Impact... disposal (proposed Waste Confidence rule). In addition, the NRC will receive public comment on its...

  20. Waste energy harvesting mechanical and thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ling Bing, Kong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    Waste Energy Harvesting overviews the latest progress in waste energy harvesting technologies, with specific focusing on waste thermal mechanical energies. Thermal energy harvesting technologies include thermoelectric effect, storage through phase change materials and pyroelectric effect. Waste mechanical energy harvesting technologies include piezoelectric (ferroelectric) effect with ferroelectric materials and nanogenerators. The book aims to strengthen the syllabus in energy, materials and physics and is well suitable for students and professionals in the fields.

  1. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy's Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site

  2. Draft environmental assessment: Vacherie Dome site, Louisiana. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Vacherie dome in Louisiana as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Vacherie dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Vacherie dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Gulf Interior Region of the Gulf Coastal Plain, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites - the Cypress Creek dome site and the Richton dome site. Although the Vacherie dome site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf Interior Region. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Richton dome site rather than the Vacherie dome site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization

  3. Draft environmental assessment: Swisher County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Swisher site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Swisher site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Deaf Smith site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site in the Permian Basin and is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site rather than the Swisher site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization

  4. Draft environmental assessment: Cypress Creek Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Cypress Creek dome site in Mississippi as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Cypress Creek dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Cypress Creek dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Gulf Interior Region of the Gulf Coastal Plain, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites - the Richton dome site and the Vacherie dome site. Although the Cypress Creek dome site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf Interior Region and is proposing to nominate the Richton dome site rather than the Cypress Creek dome site as one of the three sites suitable for characterization

  5. Draft environmental assessment: Lavender Canyon site, Utah. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Lavender Canyon site in Utah, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Lavender Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Lavender Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Davis Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Davis Canyon site rather than the Lavender Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization

  6. Draft environmental assessment: reference repository location, Hanford Site, Washington. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the reference repository location at the Hanford Site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received on the draft EA. The reference repository location at Hanford is located in the Columbia Plateau, one of five distinct geohydrologic settings that are being considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the reference repository location at Hanford is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the reference repository location at Hanford as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Furthermore, having performed a comparative evaluation of the five sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the reference repository location at Hanford is one of three sites preferred for site characterization

  7. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures

  8. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This volume addresses the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at two US Department of Energy sites, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These sites are being considered to provide a reasonable range of alternative settings at which future SNF management activities could be conducted. These locations are not currently involved in management of large quantities of SNF; NTS has none, and ORR has only small quantities. But NTS and ORR do offer experience and infrastructure for the handling, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and they do exemplify a broad spectrum of environmental parameters. This broad spectrum of environmental parameters will provide, a perspective on whether and how such location attributes may relate to potential environmental impacts. Consideration of these two sites will permit a programmatic decision to be based upon an assessment of the feasible options without bias, to the current storage sites. This volume is divided into four parts. Part One is the volume introduction. Part Two contains chapters one through five for the NTS, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Three contains chapters one through five for the ORR, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Four is summary information including the list of preparers, organizations contacted, acronyms, and abbreviations for both the NTS and the ORR. A Table of Contents, List of Figures, and List of Tables are included in parts Two, Three, and Four. This approach permitted the inclusion of both sites in one volume while maintaining consistent chapter numbering

  9. Public Energy Education: Issues for Discussion. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Energy Education Task Force.

    This paper was intended to stimulate discussion of energy education issues at a conference on energy issues. The discussion ranges through numerous topics at issue in energy education including public energy awareness, definition of public education, the distinction between public education and public relations, and the presentation of a model…

  10. Energy recovery from plastic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, A; Atzger, J

    1983-07-01

    The conversion of plastic wastes to energy is suggested as a practicable and advantageous alternative to recycling. A two-stage pilot gasification plant for the pyrolysis of wastes is described and the utilization of the resulting fuel gas discussed.

  11. Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Richton dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Gulf Interior Region of the Gulf Coastal Plain. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites - the Cypress Creek dome site and the Vacherie dome site. Although these other two sites appear to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf Interior Region. Furthermore, the DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Richton dome site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Richton dome site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Richton dome site is not one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization

  12. Draft environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. Furthermore, the DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Davis Canyon site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Davis Canyon site is not one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization

  13. Draft environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment, which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Swisher site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site. The DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Deaf Smith site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Deaf Smith site is one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization

  14. Implications of draft ICRP recommendations: the View of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, S.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has taken an active interest in the work being performed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop a new set of general recommendations. As several key junctures, the Nea, through the lead of its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) has performed in-depth analyses of the possible implications that draft ICRP materials, in order to inform policy makers of the regulatory and application implications that would result should draft ICRP Recommendations for a system of radiological protection be published. Comments from the Nea have constructively contributed to the ICRP development process, and it is hoped that the final ICRP recommendations in this area will be developed to best serve the needs of national and international radiation protection policy makers, regulators and implementers. Having assessed and commented on previous drafts, the C.R.P.P.H. has co-ordinated the views of all the relevant standing technical committees within the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide constructive suggestions as to how the text could be usefully improved. Comments were requested from the Nea committees dealing with radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, nuclear regulatory activities, nuclear development and nuclear science. The present paper summarises the results of the C.R.P.P.H. review process related to the new ICRP recommendations. (author)

  15. Griffith energy project draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fired, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Arizona. The Project would be a merchant plant which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. The existing environmental resource conditions in the Project area and the potential impacts on the resources by the proposed action and alternatives are described. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management

  16. Energy and wastes. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the Chapter 1 'Energy and wastes' it is shown the wastes generation inevitability at power production, because there are no absolutely wasteless technologies. After energy production technologies analysis the data that nuclear energy is most ecologically acceptable at maintenance related radiation safety measures

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Draft Supplement Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this supplement to the 1980 Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in order to assess the environmental impacts that may occur from the continued development of the WIPP as a minced geologic repository for transuranic (TRU) waste. Since the publication of the FEIS in October 1980, new data collected at the WIPP have led to changes in the understanding of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the area and their potential implications for the long-term performance of the WIPP. In addition, there have been changes in the FEIS Proposed Action and new regulatory requirements. This supplement to the FEIS (SEIS) evaluates the environmental consequences of the Proposed Action as modified since 1980 in light of new data and assumptions. The new information pertains mainly to the geologic and hydrologic systems at the WIPP site and their effect on the long-term performance of the WIPP. The SEIS includes new data indicating that: the permeability of the Salado Formation, the geologic formation in which the WIPP underground facilities are located, is lower than previously believed; the moisture content of the Salado Formation and the consequent brine inflow is higher than previously believed; a higher transmissivity zone is present in the Rustler Formation in the southeastern portion of the WIPP site; and ''salt creep'' (convergence) in the repository occurs faster than previously believed. Volume 2 contains 11 appendices

  18. Safety requirements to be met in final storage of heat-producing waste an evaluation of the BMU draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomauske, B.

    2008-01-01

    The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) on August 12, 2008 published a July 29, 2008 draft of the ''Safety Requirements to Be Met in Final Storage of Heat-producing Radioactive Waste.'' As announced by the BMU, these safety requirements are to bring up to the state of the art the safety criteria of 1983. Over a couple of years, efforts had been made to adapt the criteria to the internationally accepted standard as demanded by the Advisory Committees on Reactor Safeguards (RSK) and Radiation Protection (SSK). The main changes made by the BMU are the introduction of a phased procedure in building repositories. A phased plans approval procedure under the Atomic Energy Act has been foreseen by the Ministry for this purpose. In addition, the draft provides for the introduction of a risk-based goal of protection. To ensure retrievability of the waste, the casks are to have a demonstrated service life of 500 years. The BMU draft safety requirements are unable to bring the safety criteria of 1983 up to the current state of the art. Here are the key points of criticism: - A risk-based goal of protection is introduced. The yardstick to be applied is to be defined in a guideline yet to be elaborated. As a consequence, the draft lacks substance. - As in licensing of nuclear facilities, the licensing procedure provides for a phased plans approval procedure for exploration. This analogy does not exist, as exploration is not the first phase of the plant to be built but a measure which is a precondition for obtaining a permit for construction and operation. - The information contained in the draft indicates that, contrary to international recommendations, it tightens the goal of protection by more than one order of magnitude. - The requirements to be met by the casks because of retrievability impose constraints on solutions optimized for safety in emplacement technology. - The risk-based approach is not mature and is

  19. Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This ''Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement'' (HSW EIS) covers three primary aspects of waste management at Hanford--waste treatment, storage, and disposal. It also addresses four kinds of solid waste--low-level waste (LLW), mixed (radioactive and chemically hazardous) low-level waste (MLLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). It fundamentally asks the question: how should we manage the waste we have now and will have in the future? This EIS analyzes the impacts of the LLW, MLLW, TRU waste, and ILAW we currently have in storage, will generate, or expect to receive at Hanford. The HSW EIS is intended to help us determine what specific facilities we will continue to use, modify, or construct to treat, store, and dispose of these wastes (Figure S.1). Because radioactive and chemically hazardous waste management is a complex, technical, and difficult subject, we have made every effort to minimize the use of acronyms (making an exception for our four waste types listed above), use more commonly understood words, and provide the ''big picture'' in this summary. An acronym list, glossary of terms, and conversions for units of measure are provided in a readers guide in Volume 1 of this EIS

  20. Draft Technical Position Subtask 1.1: waste package performance after repository closure. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Schweitzer, D.G.

    1983-08-01

    This document provides guidance to the DOE on the issues and information necessary for the NRC to evaluate waste package performance after repository closure. Minimal performance objectives of the waste package are required by proposed 10 CFR 60. This Draft Technical Position describes the various options available to the DOE for compliance and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various choices. Examples are discussed dealing with demonstrability, predictability and reasonable assurance. The types of performance are considered. The document summarizes presently identified high priority issues needed to evaluate waste package performance after repository closure. 20 references, 7 tables

  1. Advanced mixed waste treatment project draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The AMWTP DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with four alternatives related to the construction and operation of a proposed waste treatment facility at the INEEL. Four alternatives were analyzed: The No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action, the Non-Thermal Treatment Alternative, and the Treatment and Storage Alternative. The proposed AMWTP facility would treat low-level mixed waste, alpha-contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste in preparation for disposal. Transuranic waste would be disposed of at the Waste isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Low-level mixed waste would be disposed of at an approval disposal facility depending on decisions to be based on DOE's Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socio-economics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, INEEL services, and environmental justice were included in the assessment. The AMWTP DEIS identifies as the Preferred Alternative the Proposed Action, which is the construction and operation of the AMWTP facility

  2. Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Plan: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.A.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Under the direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created within the DOE by direction of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), the mission of the Salt Repository Project (SRP) is to provide for the development of a candidate salt repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent reactor fuel in a manner that fully protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. In consideration of the program needs and requirements discussed above, the SRP has decided to develop and issue this SRP Waste Package Program Plan. This document is intended to outline how the SRP plans to develop the waste package design and to show, with reasonable assurance, that the developed design will satisfy applicable requirements/performance objectives. 44 refs., 16 figs., 16 tabs

  3. Polymer Energy-Turning waste into energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radosevich, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Polymer Energy system is an award-winning, innovative, proprietary process to convert waste plastics to renewable energy. Plastics play a very important role in our daily lives. Throughout the world the demand of plastic, particularly plastic packaging, continues to rapidly grow. Previous waste management methods such as landfill disposal, incineration and recycling have failed to provide opportunities for the complete reuse of plastic waste. The Polymer Energy uses a process called catalytic pyrolysis to efficiently convert plastics to crude oil. The system provides an integrated plastic waste processing system which offers an alternative to landfill disposal, incineration and recycling - while also being a viable, economical and environmentally responsible waste management solution. The Polymer Energy system is modular in design. A single module can produce up to 775 litres of crude oil for every tone of typical plastic waste processed. System capacity can range from 200 tons to 400 tons of plastic wastes processed per month. Overall plant design capacity can be easily scaled up by adding additional modules. The output crude oil is high-grade and can be further processed in a refinery or used to power low-rpm machines such as electric generation turbines. The technology has won several industry awards, including the prestigious 2006 European Environment Press Award for innovative waste management solutions. (Author)

  4. From Solid Waste to Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisely, F. E.; And Others

    A project designed to convert solid waste to energy is explained in this paper. In April, 1972, an investor-owned utility began to burn municipal solid waste as fuel for the direct production of electric power. This unique venture was a cooperative effort between the City of St. Louis, Missouri, and the Union Electric Company, with financial…

  5. Energy from biomass and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides a review of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Energy Demonstration Programme in the sector of Energy from biomass and waste, and examines the current status of the energy technologies associated with the sector, in relation to projects supported under the Programme, those included under various national programmes and by reference to the published literature. Detailed overviews of five sub-categories represented in the Energy from biomass and waste sector are presented to illustrate their relative significance in terms of estimated energy potential, technological and economic status and the nature of future research, development and demonstration needs. Finally the potential role of the biomass and waste energy technologies in meeting the energy needs of the developing world is discussed. 33 refs; 2 figs; 11 tabs

  6. Waste, energy and employment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucek, V; Bryer, L

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of municipal waste collection and disposal systems in London, Paris and Munich. A number of common factors can be observed. Reduction in growth rate of waste, rationalisation of waste collection, disposal costs and wages. Political problems of wages regulation. Unemployment problems. In France unstilled workers are trained so that they can take on a number of different tasks. In the Federal Republic of Germany emphasis is placed on cost effectiveness in particular through rationalisation. In Great Britain organisational problems are tackled in more detail. More attention should be drawn to the exchange of technology and know-how between the countries. Statistical data are summarized.

  7. National radioactive waste repository draft EIS. 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Most Australians benefit either directly or indirectly from the medical, industrial and scientific use of radioactive materials. This use produces a small amount of radioactive waste, including low level and short-lived intermediate level radioactive waste such as lightly contaminated soil, plastic, paper, laboratory equipment, smoke detectors, exit signs and gauges.This waste is temporarily stored at more than 100 urban and rural locations around Australia, much of it in buildings that were neither designed nor located for the long-term storage of radioactive material and that are nearing or have reached capacity. Storage locations include hospitals, research institutions, and industry and government stores. Storing such waste in many locations in non-purpose built facilities potentially poses greater risk to the environment and people than disposing of the material in a national, purpose-built repository where the material can be safely managed and monitored. The objectives of the national repository are to: 1. strengthen Australia's radioactive waste management arrangements by promoting the safe and environmentally sound management of low level and short-lived intermediate level radioactive waste 2. provide safe containment of these wastes until the radioactivity has decayed to background levels. To meet these objectives, it is proposed to construct a national near-surface repository at either the preferred site on the Woomera Prohibited Area (WPA) or either of the two nearby alternative sites. The facility is not intended for the disposal of radioactive ores from mining. A national store for long-lived intermediate level waste will not be co-located with the national repository, and would be subject to a separate environmental assessment process.One preferred and two alternative sites have been selected for the national repository, following an extensive site selection process. All three sites are located in northern South Australia in a region known as central

  8. Solid waste as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenski, Slave

    2004-01-01

    The solid wastes as sources of heat and electrical energy were analysed. Typical structure of solid waste and organic products from: municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes and agricultural wastes for some developed countries are presented. Some dates of agricultural wastes for R. Macedonia are presented. The structure and percentage of organic products and energy content of solid wastes are estimated. The quantity of heat from solid wastes depending of the waste mass is presented. The heat quantity of some solid wastes component and the mixed municipal waste is presented. (Original)

  9. Draft environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received on the draft EA. The Yucca Mountain site is located in the Great Basin, one of five distinct geohydrologic settings that are being considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Furthermore, having performed a comparative evaluation of the five sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Yucca Mountain site is one of three sites preferred for site characterization

  10. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  11. Draft of a Fourth Act amending the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The bill comprises regulations concerning 1. the handling over and treatment of radioactive waste as well as its final storage under federal adminstration (article 87, section 3, sentence 1 Basic Law), 2. authorizations regarding the issuing of statuatory orders supplementing and extending sections 11 and 12 of the Atomic Energy Act, particulary in aim of the rationalization of licensing and the carrying-out of governmental supervision, 3. supplementing penal provisions. (LN) [de

  12. Financing waste to energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, A.

    1991-01-01

    Waste-to-energy projects are going ahead in the U.K., they are being project financed and they will make a valuable contribution to environmentally acceptable waste disposal and clean energy within the U.K. Starting from the premise that project sponsors must compete for funds therefore behoves the project sponsor to adapt his proposal to the needs of the investor rather than the other way around. Some of the major potential suppliers of funds are briefly surveyed. It is concluded that waste-to-energy projects do not fit easily into the business plans of venture capital companies, pension funds and banks. Projects must be reworked so that a more favourable opportunity can be offered to potential funders. Ways of achieving this through improved economics and reductions in risk and uncertainty are examined. (author)

  13. Decentralized Energy from Waste Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Antizar-Ladislao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last five years or so, biofuels have been given notable consideration worldwide as an alternative to fossil fuels, due to their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by partial replacement of oil as a transport fuel. The production of biofuels using a sustainable approach, should consider local production of biofuels, obtained from local feedstocks and adapted to the socio-economical and environmental characteristics of the particular region where they are developed. Thus, decentralized energy from waste systems will exploit local biomass to optimize their production and consumption. Waste streams such as agricultural and wood residues, municipal solid waste, vegetable oils, and algae residues can all be integrated in energy from waste systems. An integral optimization of decentralized energy from waste systems should not be based on the optimization of each single process, but the overall optimization of the whole process. This is by obtaining optimal energy and environmental benefits, as well as collateral beneficial co-products such as soil fertilizers which will result in a higher food crop production and carbon dioxide fixation which will abate climate change.

  14. Decentralized energy from waste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antizar-Ladislao, B.; Turrion-Gomez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    In the last five years or so, biofuels have been given notable consideration worldwide as an alternative to fossil fuels, due to their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by partial replacement of oil as a transport fuel. The production of biofuels using a sustainable approach, should consider local production of biofuels, obtained from local feedstocks and adapted to the socio-economical and environmental characteristics of the particular region where they are developed. Thus, decentralized energy from waste systems will exploit local biomass to optimize their production and consumption. Waste streams such as agricultural and wood residues, municipal solid waste, vegetable oils, and algae residues can all be integrated in energy from waste systems. An integral optimization of decentralized energy from waste systems should not be based on the optimization of each single process, but the overall optimization of the whole process. This is by obtaining optimal energy and environmental benefits, as well as collateral beneficial co-products such as soil fertilizers which will result in a higher food crop production and carbon dioxide fixation which will abate climate change. (author)

  15. Conserving energy by eliminating waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, N. H.

    1979-07-01

    Some ways in which energy is wasted in industry are discussed and the losses involved are quantified. Reference is made to a particular loss in annealing furnaces; wasted energy in factory and lighting systems; heat generated by motors and lighting and by such processes as welding; unlagged hot pipework and most hot processes; and poor building envelope features. It is concluded that an industry should declare its intention of conservation at the highest possible level, identify conservation as a manufacturing target, and invest the responsibility in people for whom it is a full-time activity. (MCW)

  16. Comments made by the Syndicate of renewable energies on the draft of orientation law about energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the proposals of modifications and the comments made by the French syndicate of renewable energies (SER) about the draft of energy law proposed by the government in November 2003. The document is presented as 3 columns with the original text of the law, the modifications proposed by the SER and their observations. The comments of the SER concern only the promotion of development and use of renewable energy sources, the energy saving certificates and the development of bio-fuels. (J.S.)

  17. Energy from biomass and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faaij, A.P.C.

    1997-01-01

    Chapter 2 deals with the characteristics and current availability of biomass residues and waste streams in the Dutch context and evaluates to what extent they are suited for conversion to energy, in particular by means of gasification. In Chapter 3 the technical and economic aspects of gasification of both wastes and clean biomass for electricity production are investigated. The performance of the system is evaluated by means of ASPEN plus modelling. Performance is simulated for a wide range of potential biofuels to assess the sensitivity of the system to the fuel composition. An economic evaluation is made based on component data and on a chain analysis that includes the costs of the biofuels and logistics. Chapter 4 evaluates the final waste treatment system in the Netherlands. It investigates to what extent changes in waste production and the implementation of new waste treatment technologies can atfect the energy production and final waste treatment costs. Chapter 5 focuses on long-range developments with respect to land use in the Netherlands. Chapter 6 addresses costs and benefits of the biomass fuel cycle and focuses especially on the external costs of biomass-based electricity production. A comparison is made with coal-based electricity production. Various methods are used to quantify those costs. Both environmental externalities (such as emissions) and indirect socio-economic effects are analysed. Attention will be given to uncertainties in the outcomes and the implications of the results for the economic feasibility of the production of electricity trom biomass in the Dutch context. refs

  18. Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab

  19. 75 FR 54177 - Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Tonopah Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Statement for the Tonopah Solar Energy Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project, Nye County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project, Nye County, Nevada, and by... considered, the BLM must receive written comments on the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project Draft EIS within...

  20. Draft 1988 mission plan amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This draft 1988 amendment to the Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose is to inform the Congress of the DOE's plans for implementing the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-203) for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. This document is being submitted in draft form to Federal agencies, states, previously affected Indian Tribes, affected units of local government, and the public. After the consideration of comments, this amendment will be revised as appropriate and submitted to the Congress. 39 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ''Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,'' of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues

  2. Draft directive on the management of radioactive wastes based on deep geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission works on a legal framework to assure that all the member states apply the same standards in all the stages of the management of spent fuels and radioactive wastes till their definitive disposal. The draft propositions are the following. The standards to follow are those proposed by the IAEA. First, each member state has to set a national program dedicated to the management of radioactive wastes. This program will have to detail: the chosen solution, the description of the project, a time schedule, costs and financing. Secondly, the exportation of nuclear wastes for definitive disposal is not allowed unless the 2 countries have agreed to build a common nuclear waste disposal center. Thirdly, the population will have to be informed on the project and will have to take part in the decision process. Fourthly, the standards set by IAEA will be enforced by law. There is a broad consensus between scientists and international organizations like IAEA to consider that the disposal in deep geological layers of high-level radioactive wastes is the most adequate solution. (A.C.)

  3. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  4. Site characterization plan overview: reference repository location, Hanford Site, Washington: Consultation draft: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process for siting the nation's first geologic repository for radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the Hanford site in Benton County, Washington. As a step in the preparation of that plan, the DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Washington, the affected Indian Tribes - the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Nez Perce Indian Tribe, and the Yakima Indian Nation - and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Hanford site is one of three sites that the DOE currently plans to characterize;the other sites are the Deaf Smith County site in Texas and the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. After site characterization has been completed and its results evaluated, the DOE will identify from among the three characterized sites the site that is preferred for the repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consulation draft of the site characterization plan;it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with breif descriptions of the dispoal system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Hanford site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization

  5. Resource conservation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Volume I contains the following attachments for Module II: waste analysis plan; quality assurance program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experiment Waste Characterization Program(QAPP); WIPP Characterization Sampling and Analysis Guidance Manual (Plan)(SAP); and no migration Determination Requirement Summary (NMD)

  6. Nuclear energy from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The global energy demand is increasing. Sound forecasts indicate that by the year 2020 almost eight thousand million people will be living on our planet, and generating their demand for energy will require conversion of about 20 thousand million tonnes of coal equivalents a year. Against this background scenario, a new concept for energy generation elaborated by nuclear scientists at CERN attracts particular interest. The concept describing a new nuclear energy source and technology intends to meet the following principal requirements: create a new energy source that can be exploited in compliance with extremely stringent safety requirements; reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste; substantially reduce the size of required radwaste repositories; use easily available natural fuels that will not need isotopic separation; prevent the risk of proliferation of radioactive materials; process and reduce unwanted actinides as are generated by the operation of current breeder reactors; achieve high efficiency both in terms of technology and economics. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Waste to energy the carbon perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Waste to energy plants are key treatment facilities for municipal solid waste in Europe. The technology provides efficient volume reduction, mass reduction and hygienisation of the waste. However, the technology is highly disputed in some countries. It is crucial to understand the role of waste...

  8. Utilization of Wastes as an Alternative Energy Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-19

    Apr 19, 2013 ... converting solid waste to energy source, ranging from very simple systems of ... defined by modern systems of waste management, notably: -. Municipal Waste; Household Waste,. Commercial Waste and Demolition Waste.

  9. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  10. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included

  11. Energy from waste: a wholly acceptable waste-management solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porteous, A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the 'waste management hierarchy' and why it should be treated as a checklist and not a piece of unquestioning dogma. The role of energy from waste (EfW) is examined in depth to show that it is a rigorous and environmentally sound waste-management option which complements other components of the waste-management hierarchy and assists resource conservation. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Above Ground Storage Capability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the nation’s only approved repository for the disposal of defense related/defense generated transuranic (TRU) and mixed hazardous TRU waste (henceforth called TRU waste). The mission of the WIPP Project is to realize the safe disposal of TRU waste from TRU waste generator sites in the Department of Energy waste complex. The WIPP Project was authorized by Title II, Section 213(a) of Public Law 96-164 (U. S. Congress 1979). Congress designated the WIPP facility “for the express purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States exempted from regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).” The WIPP facility is operated by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Transuranic waste that is disposed in the WIPP facility is defined by Section 2(18) the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) (U. S. Congress, 1992) as: “waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for: (A) high-level radioactive waste; (B) waste that the Secretary has determined, with the concurrence of the Administrator, does not need the degree of isolation required by the disposal regulations; or (C) waste that the NRC has approved for disposal on a case-by-case basis in accordance with part 61 of title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).

  13. Resource conversation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Volume II contains attachments for Module II and Module III. Attachments for Module II are: part A permit application; examples of acceptable documentation; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant generator/storage site waste screening and acceptance audit program; inspection schedule and monitoring schedule; inspection log forms; personnel training course outlines; hazardous waste job position training requirements; contingency plan; closure plan; and procedures for establishing background for the underground units. One attachment, facility process information, is included for Module III. Remaining attachments for this module are in Volume III

  14. Energy from wastes and the private waste contracting industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this ongoing work is the utilisation of general non hazardous industrial and commercial waste as an energy or fuel source. Whereas much of the existing experience in energy from waste (EFW) is related to municipal solid wastes (MSW), there is very little direct experience with these other waste streams and the shortage of reliable information in this field is notoriously lacking. It is important to have a good understanding of the private waste contracting industry (pwci) in order to establish the conditions under which energy from waste technologies may play an economically and technically feasible role within that industry's development. The Non Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) has encouraged entrepreneurial interest through premium payments for electricity generated from renewable sources. (author)

  15. 77 FR 32621 - Developing Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects at Federal Facilities Using Private Capital Draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... consider comments and recommendations on the draft guidebook, which is available at: http://www1.eere... draft guidebook is available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/largereguide.pdf . DOE will... DATES section. More information on DOE's FEMP is available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp...

  16. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, Dirk; Ebert, William; Marra, James; Jubin, Robert; Vienna, John

    2008-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is designed to demonstrate that a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline set of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Specific waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and expected performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms. (authors)

  17. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombert, Dirk; Ebert, William; Marra, James; Jubin, Robert; Vienna, John [Idaho National laboratory, 2525 Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is designed to demonstrate that a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline set of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Specific waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and expected performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms. (authors)

  18. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

    2008-05-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

  19. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  20. Estimating heel retrieval costs for underground storage tank waste at Hanford. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 100 million gallons (∼400,000 m 3 ) of existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned radioactive waste stored in underground tanks can not be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW). The current plan for disposal of UST waste which can not be disposed of as LLW is immobilization as glass and permanent storage in an underground repository. Disposal of LLW generally can be done sub-surface at the point of origin. Consequently, LLW is significantly less expensive to dispose of than that requiring an underground repository. Due to the lower cost for LLW disposal, it is advantageous to separate the 100 million gallons of waste into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a large volume of LLW

  1. ALTENER. Strategic framework municipal solid waste. Waste for energy network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwant, K.W.; Van Halen, C.; Pfeiffer, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    General objective of European, national and regional waste for energy (WfE) policies is to support sustainable development. In each of the Altener WfE countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and UK) general waste management strategies have been implemented. Common aspects are waste management hierarchies and general objectives such as: (1) to reduce the amount of wastes; (2) to make the best use of the wastes that are produced; and (3) to choose waste management practices, which (4) minimise the risks of immediate and future environmental pollution and harm to human health. All WfE countries have defined an order of preference for waste handling, starting with prevention as most preferred option, through re-use and recycling, thermal treatment with energy-recovery to landfill as a least desired option. In all Altener WfE countries, waste management structures are in a phase of transformation. At least three general transition processes can be recognized to take place, which are of great importance for the waste for energy future of the Altener countries: (1) increased energy recovery from MSW; (2) increased separation of MSW for recycling and recovery; and (3) reorganization of landfills. Two groups of instruments to stimulate the use of waste to energy are distinguished: (1) instruments, aiming to create improved WfE solutions; and (2) instruments, aiming to create a WfE market. In this framework document an overview is given of today's WfE situation in 9 European countries, as well as up-to-date national waste and energy policies, including the available instruments and future goals

  2. Report of Task Force for review of nuclear waste management. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Some of the findings of the Task Force are: a majority of independent technical experts have concluded that high-level waste can be safely disposed in geological media, but validation of the specific technical choices will be an important element of the licensing process. Reprocessing is not required for the safe disposal of commercial spent fuel. Consideration should be given to an early demonstration of the geologic disposal of a limited number of spent fuel assemblies in the waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Spent Fuel Policy announced by President Carter in October 1977 must be integrated with the Waste Management Policy. The Task Force report highlights the importance of away from reactor storage that occurs between on-site storage of spent fuel at utilities and ultimate disposal. The target for initial operation in 1985 os a National Waste Repository for the permanent disposal of commercial high-level waste as spent fuel may not be met; this does not affect the early 1980s schedule for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The responsibility for the ultimate disposal for all forms of nuclear waste should be with the Federal Government and long-term waste disposal facilities should be subject to NRC licensing. The NEPA process is an essential part of the nuclear waste management program and Department of Energy efforts in this regard must be strengthened. Policy and program management responsibility for Waste Management should be raised to a higher level in the Department of Energy. There are substantial budgetary impacts of the Task Force recommendations and legislation would be required to carry out many of the suggested changes

  3. Resource conservation and recovery act draft hazardous waste facility permit: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Volume III contains attachments for Module III and Module IV. Module III attachments are: test bin design drawings; SWB/RCB design drawings; waste handling building secondary containment system drawings; and test bin flammable gas concentration control system drawings. Only one attachment for Module IV is included in this volume. The remaining attachments are in Volume IV

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility: Documentation of impact analysis for design alternatives presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to construct and operate a new Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF). The proposed DWTF would replace the existing Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities at LLNL. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the proposed DWTF and its alternatives. This report presents the assumptions, methodologies, and analyses used to estimate the waste flows, air emissions, ambient air quality impacts, and public health risks that are presented in the DEIS. Two DWTF design alternatives (Level I and Level II) have been designated as reasonable design alternatives considering available technologies, environmental regulations, and current and future LLNL waste generation. Both design alternatives would include new, separate radioactive and nonradioactive liquid waste treatment systems, a solidification unit, a new decontamination facility, storage and treatment facilities for reactive materials, a radioactive waste storage area, receiving and classification areas, and a uranium burn pan. The Level I design alternative would include a controlled-air incinerator system, while the Level II design alternative would include a rotary kiln incinerator system. 43 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs

  5. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  6. 76 FR 61735 - Incidental Take Permit; Auwahi Wind Energy Generation Facility, Maui, HI; Draft Habitat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R1-ES-2011-N161; 10120-1112-0000-F2] Incidental Take Permit; Auwahi Wind Energy Generation Facility, Maui, HI; Draft Habitat Conservation Plan and..., HI 96850. You may also send comments by facsimile to (808) 792-9580. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  7. Waste characterisation, determining the energy potential of waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in waste over time • Changes in population – Birth rates – Death rates –Migration • Changes in per capita generation – Socio-economic status – Degree of urbanisation – Household size • Recycling, composting and source reduction initiatives..., determining the energy potential of waste 25 November 2015 by Prof Suzan Oelofse Research Group Leader: Waste for Development Competency Area: Solutions for a Green Economy 2 WtE should consider Fitness for purpose • Feedstock...

  8. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 3: Appendix BIR Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (WTWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties, from across the US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system, into a series of ''waste profiles'' that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The majority of this document reports TRU waste inventories of DOE defense sites. An appendix is included which provides estimates of commercial TRU waste from the West Valley Demonstration Project. The WIPP baseline inventory is estimated using waste streams identified by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage sites, supplemented by information from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) and the 1994 Integrated Data Base (IDB). The sites provided and/or authorized all information in the Waste Stream Profiles except the EPA (hazardous waste) codes for the mixed inventories. These codes were taken from the MWIR (if a WTWBIR mixed waste stream was not in MWIR, the sites were consulted). The IDB was used to generate the WIPP radionuclide inventory. Each waste stream is defined in a waste stream profile and has been assigned a waste matrix code (WMC) by the DOE TRU waste generator/storage site. Waste stream profiles with WMCs that have similar physical and chemical properties can be combined into a waste matrix code group (WMCG), which is then documented in a site-specific waste profile for each TRU waste generator/storage site that contains waste streams in that particular WMCG

  9. Potential future waste-to-energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thorin, Eva; Guziana, Bozena; Song, Han; Jääskeläinen, Ari; Szpadt, Ryszard; Vasilic, Dejan; Ahrens, Thorsten; Anne, Olga; Lõõnik, Jaan

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses potential future systems for waste-to-energy production in the Baltic Sea Region, and especially for the project REMOWE partner regions, the County of Västmanland in Sweden, Northern Savo in Finland, Lower Silesia in Poland, western part of Lithuania and Estonia. The waste-to-energy systems planned for in the partner regions are combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) and solid recovered fuels from household and industry as well as anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge ...

  10. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  11. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Volume 1, Appendix F, Nevada Test Site and Oak Ridge Reservation Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    This volume addresses the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at two US Department of Energy sites, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These sites are being considered to provide a reasonable range of alternative settings at which future SNF management activities could be conducted. These locations are not currently involved in management of large quantities of SNF; NTS has none, and ORR has only small quantities. But NTS and ORR do offer experience and infrastructure for the handling, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and they do exemplify a broad spectrum of environmental parameters. This broad spectrum of environmental parameters will provide, a perspective on whether and how such location attributes may relate to potential environmental impacts. Consideration of these two sites will permit a programmatic decision to be based upon an assessment of the feasible options without bias, to the current storage sites. This volume is divided into four parts. Part One is the volume introduction. Part Two contains chapters one through five for the NTS, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Three contains chapters one through five for the ORR, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Four is summary information including the list of preparers, organizations contacted, acronyms, and abbreviations for both the NTS and the ORR. A Table of Contents, List of Figures, and List of Tables are included in parts Two, Three, and Four. This approach permitted the inclusion of both sites in one volume while maintaining consistent chapter numbering.

  12. Energy recovery from containerized waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, M.R.; Hansen, E.R.; Reese, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for achieving environmentally sound disposal of solid waste in an operating rotary kiln. It comprises: a heated, rotated cylinder containing in-process mineral material, the method comprising the steps of packaging the waste in containers and charging the containerized waste into the kiln to contact the mineral material at a point along the length of the kiln cylinder where the kiln gas temperature is sufficient to decompose volatile components of the waste released upon contact of the waste with the in-process mineral material

  13. Draft environmental impact statement. High-level waste repository site suitability criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of HLWRSSC is to present guidelines which will help in the development of safe waste management schemes. Current regulations require solidification of all high-level waste within 5 years of their generation and transfer to a Federal waste repository within 10 years. Development of the proposed HLWRSSC is part of the overall NRC program to close the ''back end'' of the commercial LWR fuel cycle. In this document, the need for the HLWRSSC is reviewed, and the national energy policy, the need for electrical energy, and the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. Considerations for HLWRSSC are presented, including the nature of the repository, important site-related factors, and radiological risk assessment methodology. Radiological and nonradiological environment impacts associated with the HLWRSSC are defined. Alternatives to the criteria are presented, and the cost-benefit-risk evaluation is reviewed

  14. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's draft report on an issues hierarchy and data needs for site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.; Fenster, D.F.; Ditmars, J.D.; Paddock, R.A.; Rote, D.M.; Hambley, D.F.; Seitz, M.G.; Hull, A.B.

    1986-12-01

    At the request of the Salt Repository Project (SRPO), Argonne National Laboratory conducted an independent peer review of a report by the Battelle Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation entitled ''Salt Repository Project Issues Hierarchy and Data Needs for Site Characterization (Draft).'' This report provided a logical structure for evaluating the outstanding questions (issues) related to selection and licensing of a site as a high-level waste repository. It also provided a first estimate of the information and data necessary to answer or resolve those questions. As such, this report is the first step in developing a strategy for site characterization. Microfiche copies of ''Draft Issues Hierarchy, Resolution Strategy, and Information Needs for Site Characterization and Environmental/Socioeconomic Evaluation - July, 1986'' and ''Issues Hierarchy and Data Needs for Site Characterization - February, 1985'' are included in the back pocket of this report

  15. Disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmude, J.

    1976-01-01

    Speech on the 18th March 1976 in the Bundestag by the parliamentary Secretary of State, Dr. Juergen Schmude, to substantiate the Federal government's draft to a Fourth Act amending the Atomic Energy Act. The draft deals mainly with the final storage of radioactive wastes and interrelated questions concerning waste treatment and waste collection, and with several ordinance empowerments in order to improve licensing and supervisory procedures. (orig./LN) [de

  16. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and recommendations on radioactive waste and transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Rawl, R.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publishes standards and recommendations on all aspects of nuclear safety in its Safety Series, which includes radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials. Safety Series documents may be adopted by a State into its national legal framework. Most of the States used the IAEA transport regulations (Safety Series No. 6) as a basis for their national regulation. The two highest ranking documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme, the Safety Fundamentals and the Safety Standard on the national waste management system, have been published. Both provide impetus into the waste management safety convention, a legally binding document for signatory states, which is being drafted. The already existing Convention on Nuclear Safety covers the management of radioactive waste at land-based civil nuclear power plants. (author) 1 fig., 18 refs

  18. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Paul H.; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas

  19. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Paul H., E-mail: paul.h.brunner@tuwien.ac.at; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  20. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  1. Draft plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant test phase: Performance assessment and operations demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The mission of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes resulting from United States defense programs. With the Construction Phase of the WIPP facility nearing completion, WIPP is ready to initiate the next phase in its development, the Test Phase. The purpose of the Test Phase is to collect the necessary scientific and operational data to support a determination whether to proceed to the Disposal Phase and thereby designate WIPP a demonstration facility for the disposal of TRU wastes. This decision to proceed to the Disposal Phase is scheduled for consideration by September 1994. Development of the WIPP facility is the responsibility of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), whose Albuquerque Operations Office has designated the WIPP Project Office as Project Manager. This document describes the two major programs to be conducted during the Test Phase of WIPP: (1) Performance Assessment for determination of compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency Standard and (2) Operations Demonstration for evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP facility. 42 refs., 38 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  3. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  4. Waste-to-energy: Dehalogenation of plastic-containing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yafei; Zhao, Rong; Wang, Junfeng; Chen, Xingming; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Mindong

    2016-03-01

    The dehalogenation measurements could be carried out with the decomposition of plastic wastes simultaneously or successively. This paper reviewed the progresses in dehalogenation followed by thermochemical conversion of plastic-containing wastes for clean energy production. The pre-treatment method of MCT or HTT can eliminate the halogen in plastic wastes. The additives such as alkali-based metal oxides (e.g., CaO, NaOH), iron powders and minerals (e.g., quartz) can work as reaction mediums and accelerators with the objective of enhancing the mechanochemical reaction. The dehalogenation of waste plastics could be achieved by co-grinding with sustainable additives such as bio-wastes (e.g., rice husk), recyclable minerals (e.g., red mud) via MCT for solid fuels production. Interestingly, the solid fuel properties (e.g., particle size) could be significantly improved by HTT in addition with lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, the halogenated compounds in downstream thermal process could be eliminated by using catalysts and adsorbents. Most dehalogenation of plastic wastes primarily focuses on the transformation of organic halogen into inorganic halogen in terms of halogen hydrides or salts. The integrated process of MCT or HTT with the catalytic thermal decomposition is a promising way for clean energy production. The low-cost additives (e.g., red mud) used in the pre-treatment by MCT or HTT lead to a considerable synergistic effects including catalytic effect contributing to the follow-up thermal decomposition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Draft of the 3. update of the energy programme of the Federal Government from 5th October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    On 4th November 1981 the Federal Government is expected to pass the third update of the energy programme of the Federal Government. The last drafts are being made within the Federal Ministries. 'Technologie-Nachrichten' has herewith published the most important passages from this 3rd update according to the draft of the Federal Government from 5th October 1981 which has been presented to the Nuclear Cabinet. The following texts are taken from this version. (orig./UA) [de

  6. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  7. Energy from waste: the western paques way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    In India, Western Paques India Limited, based at Pune, is offering expertise to harness municipal solid waste (MSW) and liquid effluent using continuous feed floating layer reactor process and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket process respectively to generate energy. The basic steps for the generation of power from above feedstock are: pretreatment of the wastes, anaerobic biodigestion of the waste in reactor for generating methane-rich fuel gas, consumption of fuel gas in IC engines for generating power, disposal/treatment of secondary effluent and/or inert matters, generating of manure. 2 figs

  8. Estimating wastes as energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, V.F.; Gale, L.G.; Burt, B.; Stallings, J.W.

    1980-07-01

    The use of agricultural residues as fuel in fluidized-bed burners is discussed. Laboratory tests which assess the suitability of organic residues for fluidized-bed combustion are described. Residues tested include corn wastes, olive and peach pits, tomato pomace and dried paper mill sludge. It was found that peach pits appeared to be an ideal fuel for fluidized-bed combustion and that the tests can detect and solve potential problems before construction of commercial-size burners.

  9. Energy requirements for waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svardal, K; Kroiss, H

    2011-01-01

    The actual mathematical models describing global climate closely link the detected increase in global temperature to anthropogenic activity. The only energy source we can rely on in a long perspective is solar irradiation which is in the order of 10,000 kW/inhabitant. The actual primary power consumption (mainly based on fossil resources) in the developed countries is in the range of 5 to 10 kW/inhabitant. The total power contained in our nutrition is in the range of 0.11 kW/inhabitant. The organic pollution of domestic waste water corresponds to approximately 0.018 kW/inhabitant. The nutrients contained in the waste water can also be converted into energy equivalents replacing market fertiliser production. This energy equivalent is in the range of 0.009 kW/inhabitant. Hence waste water will never be a relevant source of energy as long as our primary energy consumption is in the range of several kW/inhabitant. The annual mean primary power demand of conventional municipal waste water treatment with nutrient removal is in the range of 0.003-0.015 kW/inhabitant. In principle it is already possible to reduce this value for external energy supply to zero. Such plants should be connected to an electrical grid in order to keep investment costs low. Peak energy demand will be supported from the grid and surplus electric energy from the plant can be is fed to the grid. Zero 'carbon footprint' will not be affected by this solution. Energy minimisation must never negatively affect treatment efficiency because water quality conservation is more important for sustainable development than the possible reduction in energy demand. This argument is strongly supported by economical considerations as the fixed costs for waste water infrastructure are dominant.

  10. Energy from biomass and waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faaij, A.P.C.

    1997-01-01

    Biomass, a broad term for all organic matter of plants, trees and crops, is currently regarded as a renewable energy source which can contribute substantially to the world's energy supply in the future. Various scenarios for the development of energy supply and demand, such as compiled by the

  11. 77 FR 52754 - Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within Eight-State Planning Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ...-FF03E00000] Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within Eight-State Planning... our planning partners, intend to prepare the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation... decommissioning of wind energy facilities within all or portions of the eight-State planning area. Activities...

  12. 77 FR 60457 - Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within Eight-State Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ...-FF03E00000] Draft Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan Within Eight-State Planning... of comments pertaining to the development of the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat..., intend to prepare the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) under the...

  13. Evaluation of Waste-to-Energy Potential of Domestic Solid Wastes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    waste in the metropolis ends up on illegal waste dumpsites. The aim of this paper was to investigate the waste-to-energy potentials of domestic solid wastes in Benin metropolis, Nigeria using a three-phase study plan - study of current waste management activities, characterization of domestic solid waste and determination ...

  14. 77 FR 38789 - Notice of Availability of Draft Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... disposal facility, either the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at DOE's Nevada National Security... offsite LLW disposal facility, either the NNSS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site or the Waste... radioactive waste (HLW) and may be managed and disposed of offsite as low-level waste (LLW). DOE prepared the...

  15. Defense-Waste-Processing Faclity, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC: Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the SRP site. The SRP is a major US Department of Energy (DOE) installation for the production of nuclear materials for national defense. Approximately 83 x 10 3 m 3 (22 million gal) of HLW currently are stored in tanks at the SRP site. The proposed DWPF would process the liquid HLW generated by SRP operations into a stable form for ultimate disposal. This EIS assesses the effects of the proposed immobilization project on land use, air quality, water quality, ecological systems, health risk, cultural resources, endangered species, wetlands protection, resource depletion, and regional social and economic systems. The radiological and nonradiological risks of transporting the immobilized wastes are assessed. The environmental impacts of disposal alternatives have recently been evaluated in a previous EIS and are therefore only summarized in this EIS

  16. The Plasco Process for energy from waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryden, R.M. [Plasco Energy Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Plasco Energy Group (Plasco) has a patented process that provides a way of recycling products that are difficult or uneconomic for conventional recycle programs. This presentation included information on the Plasco PGP system that can process energy from waste. The specifications and benefits of the Plasco process were discussed, notably that no energy supplements such as coal or natural gas are required for the process. The amount of power consumed by households and in a Plasco plant were identified. The amounts of waste processed and converted by the Plasco plant were also provided along with sketches of Plasco's Ottawa demonstration facility and Plasco gasification converter. Last, the presentation addressed the cooperative solution involving several partners such as the city of Ottawa, province of Ontario and Plasco. The waste recycling opportunities for communities were also highlighted. 1 tab., figs.

  17. Renewable energy recovery through selected industrial wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchong

    Typically, industrial waste treatment costs a large amount of capital, and creates environmental concerns as well. A sound alternative for treating these industrial wastes is anaerobic digestion. This technique reduces environmental pollution, and recovers renewable energy from the organic fraction of those selected industrial wastes, mostly in the form of biogas (methane). By applying anaerobic technique, selected industrial wastes could be converted from cash negative materials into economic energy feed stocks. In this study, three kinds of industrial wastes (paper mill wastes, brown grease, and corn-ethanol thin stillage) were selected, their performance in the anaerobic digestion system was studied and their applicability was investigated as well. A pilot-scale system, including anaerobic section (homogenization, pre-digestion, and anaerobic digestion) and aerobic section (activated sludge) was applied to the selected waste streams. The investigation of selected waste streams was in a gradually progressive order. For paper mill effluents, since those effluents contain a large amount of recalcitrant or toxic compounds, the anaerobic-aerobic system was used to check its treatability, including organic removal efficiency, substrate utilization rate, and methane yield. The results showed the selected effluents were anaerobically treatable. For brown grease, as it is already well known as a treatable substrate, a high rate anaerobic digester were applied to check the economic effect of this substrate, including methane yield and substrate utilization rate. These data from pilot-scale experiment have the potential to be applied to full-scale plant. For thin stillage, anaerobic digestion system has been incorporated to the traditional ethanol making process as a gate-to-gate process. The performance of anaerobic digester was applied to the gate-to-gate life-cycle analysis to estimate the energy saving and industrial cost saving in a typical ethanol plant.

  18. Energy from waste. Vol. 2; Energie aus Abfall. Bd. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, K.J.; Beckmann, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the book under consideration, the thermal treatment in waste incinerators, in industrial power stations and in coal-fired power stations is in the foreground. Possibilities of gasification are described. The chapter 'Developments of thermal waste treatment' consists of the following chapter: (a) Maximal size of waste incineration plants (Johannes J.E. Martin); (b) Trends and highlights of the thermal waste treatment in Europe (Martin Brunner); (c) Utilization of waste heat from Vienna waste incinerators for the operation of a district cooling grid - Effects on the primary energy efficiency of district heating and district cooling in Vienna (Franz Schindelar, Alexander Wallisch); (d) Evolutionary plant development based on experiences (Hans-Peter Buechner); (e) Effects of increased chlorine freights at the cocombustion of secondary fuels at the site of the brown coal fired power station Jaenschwalde (Frank Mielke, Andreas Sparmann, Sven Kappa); (f) Refuse-fueled power stations and waste incinerators - different plant technology? (Hendrik Seeger); (g) Generation of fuel gas from high calorific wastes (Udo Hellwig, Michael Beyer); (h) Strength testing of steam vessels with increased testing pressure (Wolfgang Rossmaier). The chapter 'Energy efficiency of waste incinerators' consists the following contributions: (a) Evaluation of energy efficiency in plants of thermal waste treatment; (b) Scientific-technical and juridical rationality - a contradiction? Comments to the judgement o the VGH Baden-Wuerttemberg according to waste incineration (Bodo A. Baars and Adolf Nottrodt); (c) Determination of the energy efficiency in plants of thermal waste incineration - To the difficulties of equivalent values and calculation of the calorific value (Michael Beckmann, Reinhard Scholz). The chapter 'Optimization of the plant technology' contains the following contributions: (a) Stay a while - Considerations according to the first tank of thermal waste

  19. A Study on promotion of utilizing waste energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jae Ho [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    The utilization of waste energy occupying over 80% of alternative energy has been an important issue with the trend of large-sized waste incinerator. The object of this study is to seek the methods for the active application of waste energy, which is produced at the process of waste generation and disposal. It is expected to help energy saving, foreign currency saving and prevent environmental pollution by utilizing alternative energy actively. It should have basic information, related information for examining technical feasibility, and feasibility examination of the surroundings for developing the demand place. Moreover, it should enhance the energy saving by recommending use of waste energy with introducing recommendation system of installing waste energy collection system. It should also consider the support of the introduction of waste energy system as well as the aspect of regional energy policy. In addition, the development and distribution of applied technology for waste energy are needed. (author). 36 refs., 4 figs., 77 tabs.

  20. Circular economy and waste to energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, E. C.; Ragazzi, M.; Torretta, V.; Castagna, G.; Adami, L.; Cioca, L. I.

    2018-05-01

    Waste management in European Union has long being regulated by the 4Rs principle, i.e. reduction, reuse, recycling, recovery, with landfill disposal as the last option. This vision recently led the European Union (especially since 2015) to the introduction of virtuous goals based on the rejection of linear economy in favour of circular economy strongly founded on materials recovery. In this scenario, landfill disposal option will disappear, while energy recovery may appear controversial when not applied to biogas production from anaerobic digestion. The present work aims to analyse the effects that circular economy principles introduced in the European Union context will have on the thermochemical waste treatment plants design. Results demonstrate that indirect combustion (gasification + combustion) along with integrated vitrification of the non-combustible fraction of treated waste will have a more relevant role in the field of waste treatment than in the past, thanks to the compliance of this option with the principles of circular economy.

  1. Fiscal 1988 draft budget for nuclear energy up 1.9% to yen 369 billion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    AT the cabinet meeting held on December 28, the government approved the fiscal 1988 draft budget, with a general account of yen 56.6 trillion. The nuclear energy related budget is yen 181.124 billion from the general account and yen 186.098 billion from the special account for power sources development, totalling yen 367.222 billion, up 1.9% on the previous year. The largest appropriation goes to the Science and Technology Agency (STA) totaling yen 271 billion. The STA is promoting safety studies and R and D for extensive nuclear energy utilization but the budget shows a 0.7% decrease from the previous year, reflecting completion of the construction of JT-60, which is one of the Agency's major projects. MITI, with its budget of yen 91 billion will carry on policies related to the promotion of commercial nuclear power program as well as support for the industrialization program of the nuclear fuel cycle. Nuclear related budget of Ministry of Foreign Affairs is yen 2.8 billion, consisting mainly of IAEA subscriptions and contributions and OECD/NEA subscriptions. Besides these three government agencies, a large sum of yen 1.2 billion is allocated to the Okinawa Development Agency for the prevention and elimination of melon-flies in Kume Island and islands around Okinawa main island. The draft government budget will be submitted to the ordinary session of the Diet when it resumes towards the end of January. After deliberation in the Budget Committees of the House of Representatives and the House of Councilors, the draft budget will be put to the vote in the plenary session. Assuming that all proceeds smoothly, the budget is expected to be approved by the end of March without any major revision. (author)

  2. 76 FR 13605 - Notice of Availability of Draft Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Vitrification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... selected offsite low-level waste disposal facility, either the NNSS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management... in West Valley, New York, is waste incidental to reprocessing and thus is not high-level radioactive... evaluation pursuant to DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management. DOE is consulting with the Nuclear...

  3. Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites' compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site

  4. Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites` compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site.

  5. Waste Material Management: Energy and materials for industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This booklet describes DOE`s Waste Material Management (WMM) programs, which are designed to help tap the potential of waste materials. Four programs are described in general terms: Industrial Waste Reduction, Waste Utilization and Conversion, Energy from Municipal Waste, and Solar Industrial Applications.

  6. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  7. UK market for waste-to-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper four key questions relating to the UK market for waste-to-energy have been addressed. (1) What has happened in the market place over the last 20 years? (2) What are the driving forces behind the recent upsurge of interest? (3) What are the problems currently facing us? (4) What is the outlook likely to be for the future? (author)

  8. Different methods for waste to energy transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, J. de

    1998-01-01

    In the past 25 years, many technological developments have taken place in the thermal treatment of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). Apart from the initials goal of the technology (i.e., volume reduction and inertisation), flue gas emissions, solid residues, energy efficiency and economics became

  9. SOLAR ENERGY APPLICATION IN WASTE TREATMENT- A REVIEW

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review is an exposure on the various ways that solar energy can be harnessed for numerous waste treatment processes. Almost all forms of waste treatment require energy which is scarcely available considering the global energy crisis. The objective of this study is to enumerate the solar energy applications in waste ...

  10. Comments of the Wisconsin Radioactive Waste Review Board's Technical Advisory Council on the review draft of the north central regional geologic and environmental characterization reports, May 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This document contains a collection of official comments on a draft report characterizing the subsurface geology of an area of Wisconsin proposed for a high-level radioactive waste disposal site. Most comments identify passages requiring correction or question the interpretation of the data

  11. The waste-to-energy framework for integrated multi-waste utilization: Waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhabhandhu, Ampaitepin; Tezuka, Tetsuo [Energy Economics Laboratory, Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Energy generation by wastes is considered one method of waste management that has the benefit of energy recovery. From the waste-to-energy point of view, waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics have been considered good candidates for feedstocks for energy conversion due to their high heating values. Compared to the independent management of these three wastes, the idea of co-processing them in integration is expected to gain more benefit. The economies of scale and the synergy of co-processing these wastes results in higher quality and higher yield of the end products. In this study, we use cost-benefit analysis to evaluate the integrated management scenario of collecting the three wastes and converting them to energy. We report the total heat of combustion of pyrolytic oil at the maximum and minimum conversion rates, and conduct a sensitivity analysis in which the parameters of an increase of the electricity cost for operating the process and increase of the feedstock transportation cost are tested. We evaluate the effects of economy of scale in the case of integrated waste management. We compare four cases of waste-to-energy conversion with the business as usual (BAU) scenario, and our results show that the integrated co-processing of waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics is the most profitable from the viewpoints of energy yield and economics. (author)

  12. Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy Technologies by use of EnergyPLAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie

    Even when policies of waste prevention, re-use and recycling are prioritised, a fraction of waste will still be left which can be used for energy recovery. This report asks the question: How to utilise waste for energy in the best way seen from an energy system perspective? Eight different Waste......-to-Energy technologies are compared with a focus on fuel efficiency, CO2 reductions and costs. The comparison is made by conducting detailed energy system analyses of the present system as well as a potential future Danish energy system with a large share of combined heat and power and wind power. The study shows...... the potential of using waste for the production of transport fuels such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure and organic waste. It is also...

  13. Determining the amount of waste plastics in the feed of Austrian waste-to-energy facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzb?ck, Therese; Van Eygen, Emile; Rechberger, Helmut; Fellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Although thermal recovery of waste plastics is widely practiced in many European countries, reliable information on the amount of waste plastics in the feed of waste-to-energy plants is rare. In most cases the amount of plastics present in commingled waste, such as municipal solid waste, commercial, or industrial waste, is estimated based on a few waste sorting campaigns, which are of limited significance with regard to the characterisation of plastic flows. In the present study, an alternati...

  14. Contribution to draft generic environmental impact statement on commercial waste management: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This document concentrates on deep geologic isolation of wastes in bedded salt, granite, shale, and basalt with emphasis on wastes from three fuel cycles: reprocessing wastes from uranium and plutonium recycling, reprocessing wastes from uranium-only recycling, and spent unreprocessed fuel with no recycling. The analyses presented in this document are based on preconceptual repository designs. As the repository designs progress through future phases, refinements will occur which might modify some of these results. The 12 sections in the report are: introduction; selection and description of generic repository sites; LWR wastes to be isolated in geologic formations; description of waste isolation facilities; effluents from the waste isolation facility; assessment of environment impacts for various geographical locations of a waste isolation facility; environmental monitoring; decommissioning; mine decommissioning site restoration; deep geologic alternative actions; potential mechanisms of containment failure; and considerations relevant to provisional versus final storage

  15. A contractor report to the Department of Energy on environmental management baseline programs and integration opportunities (discussion draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) chartered a government contractor led effort to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives which meet the EM mission. The contractor team was challenged to ''think outside-the-box'' for solutions that cross traditional site boundaries and enable the programs to get the job done at an earlier date and at a lower cost. This report documents baseline programs current plans for material disposition and presents the opportunities for additional acceleration of cleanup and cost savings. A graphical depiction of the disposition of EM-owned waste and material from current state to final disposition is shown as disposition maps in Attachments 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. These disposition maps detail the material disposition at eleven major DOE sites as planned in the current discussion draft plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Maps reflecting material disposition at additional sites will be added in the future. Opportunities to further accelerate the cleanup of DOE-EM sites and reduce the overall cost of cleanup are depicted in the alternative disposition maps shown in Attachments 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. These integration opportunities bring nation-wide resources to bear on common problems facing the DOE sites

  16. Recovering energy and materials from hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-12-01

    The tannery industry faces growing environmental concerns because of the high hazardous metal content of its process waste. The formation, during the tanning process, of the highly toxic hexavalent chromium precludes the use of conventional thermal incineration processes. Borge Tannery in Norway, which processes 600 cattle hides per day, has solved the problem by using new PyroArc technology. The PyroArc waste processing plant can treat all of the tannery's production wastes, transforming them into useful products such as fuel gas and re-usable metal. The fuel gas consists mainly of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and nitrogen, and has a calorific value of about 4 MJ/Nm{sub 3}. About 65-70% of the energy content of the source material (waste or biomass) is recovered in the gas, and this is used to produce steam and/or electricity in a gas engine with a capacity of 580 kW. A further 20-25% of the initial energy content is recovered as heat or low-pressure steam. The plant is designed to be self-sufficient in energy (1.5 MW) and to meet the tannery's maximum requirements for hot water and steam. (UK)

  17. Plywood production wastes to energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubov, V. K.; Popov, A. N.

    2017-11-01

    Wood and by-products of its processing are a renewable energy source with carbon neutral and may be used in solving energy problems. ZAO «Arkhangelsk plywood factory» installed and put into operation the boiler with capacity of 22 MW (saturated steam of 1.2 MPa) to reduce the cost of thermal energy, the impact of environmental factors on stability of the company’s development and for reduction of harmful emissions into the environment. Fuel for boiler is the mixture consists of chip plywood, birch bark, wood sanding dust (WSD) and sawdust of the plywood processing. The components of the fuel mixture significantly differ in thermotechnical characteristics and technological parameters but especially in size composition. Particle dimensions in the fuel mixture differ by more than a thousand times which makes it «unique» and very difficult to ensure the effective and non-explosive use. WSD and sawdust from line of cutting of plywood are small fraction material and relate to IV group of explosion. Criterion of explosive for them has great values (КfWSD=10.85 Кfsaw=9.66). Boiler’s furnace equipped with reciprocating grate where implemented a three-stage scheme of combustion. For a comprehensive survey of the effectiveness of installed equipment was analyzed the design features of the boiler, defined the components of thermal balance, studied nitrogen oxide emissions, carbon and particulate matter with the determination of soot emissions. Amount of solid particles depending on their shape and size was analyzed.

  18. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the tank waste remediation system. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This appendix describes the current safety concerns associated with the tank waste and analyzes the potential accidents and associated potential health effects that could occur under the alternatives included in this Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)

  19. adaptation of plastic waste to energy development in lagos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Plastic wastes, Energy, Sustainable development, Environment, ... countries to be rationalising energy supply to their people. .... Managing waste in Lagos is may be a herculean task in ..... uncertainties in a life cycle perspective.

  20. 1998: BMBF expenditures for energy research. Draft of the departmental federal budget No. 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Departmental budget No. 30 in the 1998 draft federal budget covers the activities of the Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology (BMBF). Its level of DM 14 950 million represents a 0,9% increase from the funds earmarked for the current year of 1997. DM 70 million is to be spent on safety research for nuclear plants, and DM 228 million has been planned for decommissioning and demolition of nuclear experimental and demonstration plants. The operation of, and investments into, the research centers are funded to the tune of DM 1307 million and DM 339 million, respectively. Institutions of basic research will receive DM 434 million, and renewable energies, economical energy uses, conversion and combustion technologies will be funded in the amount of DM 238 million. (orig.) [de

  1. Energy from biomass and wastes: 1979 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klass, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The R and D activities in progress in the United States on the development of biomass and wastes as renewable energy sources have reached the point where all phases of the technology are under active investigation. Highlights of this effort are briefly reviewed from the standpoint of energy impact, funding, carbon dioxide build-up in the atmosphere, and biomass production and its conversion to energy and synthetic fuels. Special attention is given to alcohols because of the current interest in gasohol. Significant accomplishments were reported in 1979, and it is expected that commercial utilization of this information will begin to gather more momentum.

  2. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G.

    1994-09-01

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases

  3. Biogas Upgrading and Waste-to-Energy | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogas Upgrading and Waste-to-Energy Biogas Upgrading and Waste-to-Energy NREL's waste-to-energy research and development required for upgrading biogas to fuels and high-value co-products. Featured (2014) Biogas Potential in the United States, NREL Fact Sheet (2013) View all NREL biogas upgrading and

  4. Environmental issues and waste management in energy and minerals production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegulalp, T.M.; Kim, K.

    1992-01-01

    This book includes the following topics: water management in the minerals industry; management of radioactive wastes in the energy industry; the US high-level radioactive waste program; acid mine drainage; health risks from uranium mill tailings; alternate energy sources, such as hydrogen; superconductive magnetic energy storage; nuclear waste

  5. Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBeck, M.F.

    1981-03-27

    An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

  6. Nuclear, energy, environment, wastes, society - NEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the seven projects based on partnerships between several bodies, companies and agencies (CNRS, CEA, Areva, EDF, IRSN, ANDRA, BRGM) on research programmes on nuclear systems and scenarios, on resources (mines, processes, economy), on the processing and packaging of radioactive wastes, on the behaviour of materials for storage, on the impact of nuclear activities on the environment, on the relationship between nuclear, risks and society, and on materials for nuclear energy

  7. PACCOM: A nuclear waste packaging facility cost model: Draft technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippold, D.G.; Tzemos, S.; Smith, D.J.

    1985-05-01

    PACCOM is a computerized, parametric model used to estimate the capital, operating, and decommissioning costs of a variety of nuclear waste packaging facility configurations. The model is based upon a modular waste packaging facility concept from which functional components of the overall facility have been identified and their design and costs related to various parameters such as waste type, waste throughput, and the number of operational shifts employed. The model may be used to either estimate the cost of a particular waste packaging facility configuration or to explore the cost tradeoff between plant capital and labor. That is, one may use the model to search for the particular facility sizes and associated cost which when coupled with a particular number of shifts, and thus staffing level, leads to the lowest overall total cost. The functional components which the model considers include hot cells and their supporting facilities, transportation, cask handling facilities, transuranic waste handling facilities, and administrative facilities such as warehouses, security buildings, maintenance buildings, etc. The cost of each of these functional components is related either directly or indirectly to the various independent design parameters. Staffing by shift is reported into direct and indirect support labor. These staffing levels are in turn related to the waste type, waste throughput, etc. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  8. The use of urban wood waste as an energy resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakova, G. I.; Danilova, D. A.; Khasanov, R. R.

    2017-06-01

    The capabilities use of wood waste in the Ekaterinburg city, generated during the felling of trees and sanitation in the care of green plantations in the streets, parks, squares, forest parks was investigated in this study. In the cities at the moment, all the wood, that is removed from city streets turns into waste completely. Wood waste is brought to the landfill of solid household waste, and moreover sorting and evaluation of the quantitative composition of wood waste is not carried out. Several technical solutions that are used in different countries have been proposed for the energy use of wood waste: heat and electrical energy generation, liquid and solid biofuel production. An estimation of the energy potential of the city wood waste was made, for total and for produced heat and electrical energy based on modern engineering developments. According to our estimates total energy potential of wood waste in the city measure up more 340 thousand GJ per year.

  9. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  10. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules

  11. Site study plan for utilities and solid waste, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This site plan describes utilities and solid waste studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. After utilities and solid waste information needs derived from Federal, State, and local statutes and regulations and the project specifications are briefly described, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, and data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs to characterize electrical power, natural gas, communication, water, wastewater sludge, nonradiological solid waste, nonradiological hazardous waste, and low-level radiological waste. These programs include details for the collection of project needs, identification of utilities and solid waste disposal contractor capabilities, and verification of the obtained data. Utilities and solid waste field activities will begin approximately at the time of site access. Utilities and solid waste characterization will be completed within the first year of activity. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Minor component study for simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses (Draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Langowskim, M.H.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.; Vienna, J.D.; Smith, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Hanford Site single-shell tank (SSI) and double-shell tank (DSI) wastes are planned to be separated into low activity (or low-level waste, LLW) and high activity (or high-level waste, HLW) fractions, and to be vitrified for disposal. Formulation of HLW glass must comply with glass processibility and durability requirements, including constraints on melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, tendency for phase segregation on the molten glass surface, and chemical durability of the final waste form. A wide variety of HLW compositions are expected to be vitrified. In addition these wastes will likely vary in composition from current estimates. High concentrations of certain troublesome components, such as sulfate, phosphate, and chrome, raise concerns about their potential hinderance to the waste vitrification process. For example, phosphate segregation in the cold cap (the layer of feed on top of the glass melt) in a Joule-heated melter may inhibit the melting process (Bunnell, 1988). This has been reported during a pilot-scale ceramic melter run, PSCM-19, (Perez, 1985). Molten salt segregation of either sulfate or chromate is also hazardous to the waste vitrification process. Excessive (Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni) spinel crystal formation in molten glass can also be detrimental to melter operation

  13. Prediction of combustible waste generation and estimate of potential energy by applying waste to energy technologies in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jung, Hae-Young; Lee, Ki-Bae; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 total waste generation rate in Korea was 318,670 ton,day. In general waste generation rate shows rising trend since 2000. Wastes are composed of municipal waste 14.9 % industrial waste 34.1 % and construction waste 51.0 %. Treatment of wastes by recycling was 81.1 % landfill 11.1 % incineration 5.3 % and ocean dumping 2.4 %. National waste energy policies have been influenced by various factors such as environmental problem economy technology level (could be made energy), and so on. Korea has the worlds third dense population density environmental pollution load per unit land area is the highest in OECD countries caused due to the fast development in economy, industrialization and urbanization in recent. Also, land area per person is just 2,072 m 2 . Landfill capacity reaches the upper limit, industrial waste generation is increasing. Searching new-renewable energy is vital to substitute fossil fuel considering its increasing price. Korea is the world's 10th biggest energy consuming country and 97% of energy depends on importing. Korea aims to increases supply of new-renewable energy by 5% until the 2011. In this study, we computed the amount of combustible waste from municipality generated by the multiple regression analysis. The existing technologies for converting waste to energy were surveyed and the technologies under development or utilizing in future were also investigated. Based on the technology utilization, the amount of energy using waste to energy technology could be estimated in future. (author)

  14. Economic analysis of waste-to-energy industry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Gang; Jiang, Gui-Wu; Li, Ang; Wang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    The generation of municipal solid waste is further increasing in China with urbanization and improvement of living standards. The "12th five-year plan" period (2011-2015) promotes waste-to-energy technologies for the harmless disposal and recycling of municipal solid waste. Waste-to-energy plant plays an important role for reaching China's energy conservation and emission reduction targets. Industrial policies and market prospect of waste-to-energy industry are described. Technology, cost and benefit of waste-to-energy plant are also discussed. Based on an economic analysis of a waste-to-energy project in China (Return on Investment, Net Present Value, Internal Rate of Return, and Sensitivity Analysis) the paper makes the conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy systems analysis of waste to energy technologies by use of EnergyPLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenster, M.

    2009-04-15

    Even when policies of waste prevention, re-use and recycling are prioritised, a fraction of waste will still be left which can be used for energy recovery. This report asks the question: How to utilise waste for energy in the best way seen from an energy system perspective? Eight different Waste-to-Energy technologies are compared with a focus on fuel efficiency, CO{sub 2} reductions and costs. The comparison is made by conducting detailed energy system analyses of the present system as well as a potential future Danish energy system with a large share of combined heat and power and wind power. The study shows the potential of using waste for the production of transport fuels such as upgraded biogas and petrol made from syngas. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure and organic waste. It is also recommended to support research into gasification of waste without the addition of coal and biomass. Together, the two solutions may contribute to an alternate use of one third of the waste which is currently incinerated. The remaining fractions should still be incinerated with priority given to combined heat and power plants with high electrical efficiencies. (author)

  16. Energy waste and nuclear power growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Hippel, F.; Williams, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    The world's steady advance toward a plutonium economy is based on unnecessarily high projections of the future growth of nuclear power, in the United States, at least. These high projections of nuclear power growth are based in turn upon an assumed pattern of energy use which is economically wasteful and potentially dangerous both to the global environment and international stability. It is therefore of the utmost urgency that the United States develop an energy policy which encourages increased efficiency in energy use. Among other benefits, the authors believe that such a policy would slow the growth of nuclear power to the point where the plutonium recycle decision could be delayed for at least a decade in the United States. They also believe that such an example of ''technological abstinence'' by the world's leading economic power might well inspire similar decisions in other parts of the world. It could also allow time for the development of a safer evolutionary path for fission power

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase: Draft supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Purpose of this SEIS-II is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding DOE's proposed disposal operations at WIPP. To that end, SEIS-II was prepared to assess the potential impacts of continuing the phased development of WIPP as a geologic repository for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. SEIS-II evaluates a Proposed Action, three Action Alternatives, and two No Action Alternatives. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic Inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with implementation of the alternatives are discussed

  18. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Golder Associates draft test plan for in situ testing in an exploratory shaft in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambley, D.F.; Mraz, D.Z.; Unterberter, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents the peer review conducted by Argonne National Laboratory of a document entitled ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared for Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation by Golder Associates, Inc. In general, the peer review panelists found the test plan to be technically sound, although some deficiencies were identified. Recommendations for improving the test plan are presented in this review report. A microfiche copy of the following unpublished report is attached to the inside back cover of this report: ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared by Golder Associates, Inc., for Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio (March 1985)

  19. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the tank waste remediation system. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This document analyzes the potential environmental consequences related to the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) alternatives for management and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste. This waste is currently or projected to be stored in 177 underground storage tanks and approximately 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks, and the management and disposal of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules located at the Hanford Site. This document analyzes the following alternatives for remediating the tank waste: No Action, Long-Term Management, In Situ Fill and Cap, In Situ Vitrification, Ex Situ Intermediate Separations, Ex Situ No Separations, Ex Situ Extensive Separations, and Ex Situ/In Situ Combination. This document also addresses a Phased Implementation alternative (the DOE and Ecology preferred alternative for remediation of tank waste). Alternatives analyzed for the cesium and strontium capsules include: No Action, Onsite Disposal, Overpack and Ship, and Vitrify with Tank Waste. At this time, DOE and Ecology do not have a preferred alternative for the cesium and strontium capsules

  20. Assessing the full costs of water, liquid waste, energy and solid waste infrastructure in the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, D.

    2001-01-01

    This document presents a newly drafted growth strategy developed by the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) in British Columbia. It guides the sustainable growth, change and development of the region for the next 25 years and deals with air pollution, water quality, traffic congestion, affordable housing, employment, energy use, parks and green space. In particular, this case study develops a method to apply full cost accounting (FCA) to a growth strategy. FCA is the most appropriate way to approach a sustainable strategy because it considers economic, social and environmental issues. The study also includes the development of a software tool consisting of an ACCESS database and an ARCVIEW GIS file for compiling and analyzing detailed infrastructure profiles which can be used to assess the full costs of different growth scenarios. The following four issue categories of environmental and economic indicators of FVRD performance were addressed: solid waste, water and wastewater, energy, and infrastructure costs. Each issue category was then used to establish a set of 5 performance indicators that can be measured and assessed over time. These included solid waste, water consumption, wastewater, energy consumption and air emissions. The database and methodology developed for this project is suitable for other regions. The software can be viewed by contacting the Sheltair Group Resource Consultants Inc. in Vancouver

  1. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance....... Overall, the waste refinery provided global warming (GW) savings comparable with efficient incineration, MBT, and bioreactor landfilling technologies. The main environmental benefits from waste refining were a potential for improved phosphorus recovery (about 85%) and increased electricity production (by...

  2. Energy recovery from garden waste in a LCA perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naroznova, Irina; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    According to the common strategies regarding waste management and energy supply in EU countries, more efficient utilization of organic waste resources (including garden waste) with both nutrient and energy recovery is desired. Each of the most common treatments applied today – composting, direct...... use on land and incineration – only provides one of the two services. A technology ensuring both nutrient and energy utilization is anaerobic digestion (AD) that has become applicable for treatment of garden waste recently. In this study, life cycle assessment aimed to compare four garden waste...

  3. 1996: BMBF expenditures for energy resrearch. Draft of the departmental federal budget 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Departmental budget 30 of the 1996 draft federal budget covers the activities of the German Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research, and Technology (BMBF). The Ministry is the result of an amalgamation, in 1994, of the former Ministry for Education and Science (BMBW) and the former Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). For this reason, the total budget as indicated in the figures for 1995 and 1996 cannot be compared directly. The 1996 departmental budget No. 30 comprises a total of DM 15.62 (1995: 15.53) billion. Nuclear technology and nuclear research have desappeared almost completely as budgetary items and can be found only under the headings of Safety Research (DM 81/78 million) and Decommissioning (DM 259/232 million). A similar development was observed in recent years also with the change in names of German national research centers. However, this does not mean that the BMBF has completely withdrawn from nuclear research. These activities are now covered under more general items, such as 'Renewable Energies, Economical Use of Energy, Conversion and Combustion Technologies', for which expenditures of DM 290 (285) million have been earmarked in 1996. The BMBF makes available approx. DM 303 (290) million for investments into research centers, and approx. DM 1.32 (1.31) billion DM to cover their operating costs. The nuclear research share in these funds decreases steadily. DM 467 (472) million have been earmarked for basic research. (orig.) [de

  4. Evaluation of high-level waste vitrification feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant, FY 1994: Alternate flowsheets (DRAFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Merz, M.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Smith, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site will be pretreated to concentrate radioactive constituents and fed to the vitrification plant A flowsheet for feed preparation within the vitrification plant (based on the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) design) called for HCOOH addition during the feed preparation step to adjust rheology and glass redox conditions. However, the potential for generating H 2 and NH 3 during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Studies at the University of Georgia, under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL, have verified the catalytic role of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru), present in the waste, in the generation of H 2 and NH 3 . Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H 2 and NH 3 generation phenomenal Because H 2 and NH 3 may create hazardous conditions in the vessel vapor space and offgas system of a vitrification plant, reducing the H 2 generation rate and the NH 3 generation to the lowest possible levels consistent with desired melter feed characteristics is important. The Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 studies were conducted with simulated (non-radioactive), pre-treated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). Neutralized current acid waste is a high-level waste originating from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) plant that has been partially denitrated with sugar, neutralized with NaOH, and is presently stored in double-shell tanks. The non-radioactive simulant used for the present study includes all of the trace components found in the waste, or substitutes a chemically similar element for radioactive or very toxic species. The composition and simulant preparation steps were chosen to best simulate the chemical processing characteristics of the actual waste

  5. Transforming Argonne's waste management organization - the road to energy quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, T.A.; Sodaro, M.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Waste Management Department began its journey to excellence in 1990. The department was organized to provide for waste cleanup, waste handling, decontamination, and other services. The staff was principally workers and foremen with few professional staff. The department has transitioned into a highly effective organization that has competed for the President's Energy Quality Award. The department is currently staffed by 58 people, including professional staff and waste mechanics. The department began by recognizing and addressing the problems that existed: There was no formal waste safety program or waste reduction culture. Formal procedures did not cover all aspects of waste operations, waste handling procedures and acceptance criteria were out of date, and the Waste Management Department did not have a customer-centered culture. The department began a step by step program to improve the waste management organization

  6. 78 FR 65903 - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule and Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...; Orlando, Florida, on November 6; and Rockville, Maryland, on November 14. The December 9 meeting is a new.... ACTION: Rescheduling of public meetings. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has rescheduled the Waste Confidence public meetings it initially planned to hold in Perrysburg, Ohio, and...

  7. Food waste and the food-energy-water nexus: A review of food waste management alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, Kelly M; Reinhart, Debra; Hawkins, Christopher; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Wright, James

    2018-04-01

    Throughout the world, much food produced is wasted. The resource impact of producing wasted food is substantial; however, little is known about the energy and water consumed in managing food waste after it has been disposed. Herein, we characterize food waste within the Food-Energy-Water (FEW) nexus and parse the differential FEW effects of producing uneaten food and managing food loss and waste. We find that various food waste management options, such as waste prevention, landfilling, composting, anaerobic digestion, and incineration, present variable pathways for FEW impacts and opportunities. Furthermore, comprehensive sustainable management of food waste will involve varied mechanisms and actors at multiple levels of governance and at the level of individual consumers. To address the complex food waste problem, we therefore propose a "food-waste-systems" approach to optimize resources within the FEW nexus. Such a framework may be applied to devise strategies that, for instance, minimize the amount of edible food that is wasted, foster efficient use of energy and water in the food production process, and simultaneously reduce pollution externalities and create opportunities from recycled energy and nutrients. Characterization of FEW nexus impacts of wasted food, including descriptions of dynamic feedback behaviors, presents a significant research gap and a priority for future work. Large-scale decision making requires more complete understanding of food waste and its management within the FEW nexus, particularly regarding post-disposal impacts related to water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The draft on the act in the reorganisation of responsibility in nuclear waste management; Der Gesetzentwurf zur Neuordnung der Verantwortung in der kerntechnischen Entsorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetzke, Christian [CONLAR Consulting on Nuclear Law and Regulation, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The German Federal Cabinet passed the draft ''Act for the Reorganisation of Responsibility in Nuclear Waste Management''. The individual elements of the act shape an overall concept. The public sector, also assumes the interim storage of the waste in addition to the previous responsibility for final disposal of radioactive waste. Both tasks will be financed by a new public fund into which the operators pay their provisions. By paying an additional risk premium the operators can also exclude future margin requirements. This new concept is to be welcomed because it would lead to a structurally viable and sustainable solution for the final disposal of nuclear wastes, not withstanding many difficulties and partly uncertainties in detail.

  9. Military Wastes-to-Energy Applications,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    6 Residual) and Used Oil ( Automotive Crankcase Drainings) .......... ........................ 109 60 Properties of Coal: Bituminous, Subbituminous...facilities Physical/Chemical e Biomass removal from forest land may upset the Environment natural balance of terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric...ripout wastes (asbestos), sand- blasting wasts (organotin), and welding wastes (acetylene sludge); * Miscellaneous aircraft repair wastes -- brake

  10. The Ontario Energy Board`s draft standard supply service code: effects on air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, J.; Bjorkquist, S. [Ontario Clean Air Alliance, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-06-29

    The Ontario Clean Air Alliance (OCAA), a coalition of 67 organizations, takes issue with the Ontario Energy Board`s draft document `Standard Supply Service Code`, particularly sections 2.2.2. and 2.5.2 which they claim are not in the public interest unless the Ontario government implements the OCAA`s recommended emission caps. The alliance is of the view that without strict new environmental regulations the proposed Code would encourage the use of coal for electricity generation. Public health, the environment, consumer interests, job creation and promotion of a competitive electricity market would all be jeopardized by this development, the alliance states. The argument is supported by extensive reference to the Final Report of the Ontario Market Design Committee (MDC) which also emphasized the importance of combining the introduction of competition with appropriate environmental regulations, singling out the emission cap and trade program, and recommending that it be launched concurrently with the electricity market opening for competition. The view of the MDC was that public support for restructuring would not be forthcoming in the absence of regulatory measures to control power plant emissions. 25 refs.

  11. The use of wood waste for energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlopoulos, E.; Pavloudakis, F.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents some technical aspects and management issues of wood waste reuse end disposal. It refers to the Greek and European legislation which determines the framework for rational and environmental friendly practices for woos waste management. It refers also to the wood waste classification systems and the currently applied methods of wood waste disposal and reuse. Emphasis is given to the wood waste-to-energy conversion system, particularly to the pretreatment requirements, the combustion techniques, and the environmental constrains. Finally, the decision making process for the investments in the wood waste firing thermal units is discussed

  12. Draft South African wind energy technology platform: preliminary wind energy research and development framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The South African Wind Energy Technology Programme (SAWEP) Phase 1 aims to achieve two key strategic outputs that will guide South Africa on wind energy development. One of these outputs is the Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) which will play a...

  13. Radioactive-waste ocean dumping will have negligible enviromental impact. Conclusion of draft assessment of NSB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This draft report is the result of extensive studies based on the best available information in the field of oceanography, marine radiobiology and health physics. On various basic considerations, assessment was undertaken, and the following conclusion was reached. The quantity of radioactivity to be dumped at one time is assumed to be 500 Ci in the case of test dumping, and 10/sup 5/ Ci/year in the case of full-scale dumping. The conditions required for the dumping sea area are that the bottom water flow and upwelling amount are limited, and that the sea bottom is flat. The horizontal dispersion coefficient of 10/sup 7/ cm/sup 2//sec and the vertical dispersion coefficient of 2 x 10/sup 2/ cm/sup 2//sec are assumed. It is assumed that the radionuclides in the disposed package would leached out as soon as it reaches the sea bottom, and would not show any physicochemical behavior. Typycal radionuclides are classified into 5 groups in terms of their half lives, and their estimated concentrations at 1 km depth are tabulated. The maximum level of individual dose and the magnitude of population dose were assessed on the fishermen working in the dumping sea area, and the adults, children and infants who were expected to receive higher dose on account of the larger intake of fish products than average. The dose level given with the dose assessment model and various panamentors under the dumping conditions is much lower than natural radiation and the permissible level recommended by ICRP.

  14. Draft nuclear energy policy statement for DOE report to the International Energy Agency: long version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    US national energy policy recognizes that the continued development of commercial nuclear power in the United States is vital to US national security and energy stability since it is a significant domestic energy resource that is relatively free from international pressures. As of this writing (August 1989) the United States had 108 nuclear power reactors in commercial status. In January 1989 nuclear energy produced 46 billion KwH or 20% of total US electricity generated in contrast to 45 billion KwH (18.8%) produced in January 1988. The US Federal Government has been engaged in a variety of activities to ensure that nuclear energy remains a safe, economically competitive and environmentally acceptable option. Much of the federal effort in recent months has been devoted to developing initiatives designed to remove institutional and regulatory obstacles to the continued use of nuclear power as part of the US energy system. Within this context, the following paragraphs summarize the major features of the current status of the US nuclear energy program and policies

  15. Waste-to-energy permitting sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longwell, D.; Wegrecki, A.; Williams, D.

    1992-10-01

    Environmental issues, regulatory processes and approvals important in obtaining a permit to construct and/or operate a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility are identified and discussed. Environmental issues include: (1) air emission levels, their control and potential impacts, (2) ash leachability, treatment, and disposal, (3) potential health risks from emissions, and (4) other issues such as need/benefit and public perception of WTE. Laws, regulations and approvals that can affect project development are identified and listed, and potential regulatory trends are discussed. A general permit acquisition plan is also presented. An analysis of environmental and regulatory data obtained from the literature, regulatory agencies, and specific projects is presented. California and Massachusetts, both with regulations generally more stringent than federal regulations and considered environmentally conservative, were selected for detailed state regulatory review. Two project case histories (Commerce Refuse-to-Energy (RTE) Project in California and SEMASS WTE Project in Massachusetts) were selected to illustrate: (1) how regulations are actually applied to a project, (2) project-specific permit and operating conditions, and (3) project-specific environmental issues. Modern WTE plots employ state-of-the-art air emission control technologies and strategies to reduce air emission is to levels below regulatory requirements and to reduce estimated health risks to within EPA's acceptable risk range. WTE ash leachate can exhibit hazardous waste characteristics, primarily lead and cadmium. However, modern landfills utilize liners and leachate collection systems to prevent infiltration of leachate into the groundwater supply. Modern WTE plants employ dry systems and have zero process wastewater discharge

  16. Renewable energy source from pyrolysis of solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Kawser Jamil; Farid Nasir Ani

    2000-01-01

    Malaysia is blessed with a significant renewable energy resource base such as solar energy and biomass. To continue with its industrial development, Malaysia must manages energy supply its c prudently in order to avoid becoming an energy importer supply. Most significantly renewable energy from biomass such as rice husks, wood wastes, oil palm wastes, rubber wastes and other agricultural wastes. Beside rice and timber. Malaysia produces a huge amount of palm oil and natural rubber. These generate a significant amount of solid wastes in the forms of oil palm shell and rubber. These wastes are producing pollution and emission problems in Malaysia which is causing an environmental issue. Besides energy is not recovered efficiently from these waste resources. From the elemental composition and thermogravimetric studies of the wastes, it appeared that the wastes could be used as an alternative value-added source of energy. For this purpose a fast pyrolysis of 300 mi-n lone, and 50 mm diameter stainless-steel reactor was designed and fabricated. The grounded, sieved and dried solid feed particles underwent pyrolysis reactor at moderate temperature and were converted into pyrolytic oil, solid char and cas. Oil and char were collected while the cas was flared. The oil was characterised by GC-MS technique. Detailed analysis of the oil showed that there was no concentration of biologically active polycyclic aromatic species in the oil. The fuel properties of the derived oils were also analysed and compared to diesel fuel. (Author)

  17. Radioactive Waste as an Argument against Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of safe radioactive waste is commonly regarded as the Achilles Heel of nuclear energy production. To add strength to the 'unsolved' waste problem as an argument in favour of abandoning nuclear energy production, anti-nuclear groups systematically seek to discredit waste management projects and stand in the way of progress in this field. The paradox in this situation is that it is exactly in the field of waste management that nuclear energy production allows ecologically sound procedures to be followed. (author)

  18. High level nuclear waste repository in salt: Sealing systems status and planning report: Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This report documents the initial conceptual design studies for a repository sealing system for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The first step in the initial design studies was to review the current design level, termed schematic designs. This review identified practicality of construction and development of a design methodology as two key issues for the conceptual design. These two issues were then investigated during the initial design studies for seal system materials, seal placement, backfill emplacement, and a testing and monitoring plan. The results of these studies have been used to develop a program plan for completion of the sealing system conceptual design. 60 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs

  19. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  20. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  1. Utilization of Wastes as an Alternative Energy Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To meet the rising demand for energy and to address environmental concerns, a conversion from conventional energy systems to renewable resources is essential. For the sustainability of human civilization, an environmentally techno – economically feasible waste treatment method is very important to treat waste. Several ...

  2. Optimization of use of waste in the future energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenster, Marie; Meibom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Alternative uses of waste for energy production become increasingly interesting when considered from two perspectives, that of waste management and the energy system perspective. This paper presents the results of an enquiry into the use of waste in a future energy system. The analysis was performed using the energy system analysis model, Balmorel. The study is focused on Germany and the Nordic countries and demonstrates the optimization of both investments and production within the energy systems. The results present cost optimization excluding taxation concerning the use of waste for energy production in Denmark in a 2025 scenario with 48% renewable energy. Investments in a range of waste conversion technologies are facilitated, including waste incineration, co-combustion with coal, anaerobic digestion, and gasification. The most economically feasible solutions are found to be incineration of mixed waste, anaerobic digestion of organic waste, and gasification of part of the potential RDF (refuse derived fuel) for CHP (combined heat and power) production, while the remaining part is co-combusted with coal. Co-combustion mainly takes place in new coal-fired power plants, allowing investments to increase in comparison with a situation where only investments in waste incineration are allowed. -- Highlights: → The analysis is based on hourly chronological time steps, thereby taking dynamic properties of the energy system into account. → The system analyzed includes both the heat and the electricity market, which is important when analyzing e.g. CHP technologies. → The surrounding countries, which form part of the same electricity market, are included in the analysis. → New innovative Waste-to-Energy production plants have been modeled to allow for a more efficient and flexible use of waste. → The analysis includes economical optimization of operation and of investments in production and transmission of both electricity and heat.

  3. The Hidden Burden of Food Waste: The Double Energy Waste in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vittuari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The energy intensity of modern food systems represents a major issue in a scenario of decreasing oil resources and increasing population. Beside the use of renewable energy, an increased efficiency in food systems could contribute to reduce fossil fuels dependence. In this sense, food losses and waste (FLW have crucial consequences on the energy balance. Based on the concept of “embodied energy”, food wastage can be framed as a double waste of energy, both in terms of non-consumed food energy and the inputs used for production. Secondary data regarding direct and indirect energy inputs and FLW have been collected for the Italian food chain to estimate the embodied energy of food waste. Since in 2011 the production and distribution of food implied the use of 822 PJ and 18 Mt of food was discarded, 67 PJ of food energy and 100 PJ of embodied energy were wasted. These figures are equivalent to 12.2% of the total nutritional energy output and to 1.3% of the final energy use in Italy, respectively. The concept of double energy waste sheds new light on the intertwined relationship between energy and food security, suggesting that appropriate food waste reduction policies could result in a higher food production level and relevant energy savings.

  4. An innovative simulation tool for waste to energy generation opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Abderezzak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new world energy policies encourage the use of renewable energy sources with clean technologies, and abandon progressively the fossil fuel dependence. Another energy generation trend called commonly the “Waste-to-Energy” solution, uses organic waste as a response for two major problems: energy generation and waste management. Thanks to the anaerobic digestion, the organic waste can provide a biogas composed essentially from Carbone dioxide (CO2 and Methane (CH4. This work aims essentially to help students, researchers and even decision makers to consider the importance of biogas generation. The proposed tool is the last version of our previous tool which is enhanced and completed. It presents the potential to produce biogas of any shortlisted kind of waste, including also some energy valorization ways. A technical economical data are introduced for eventual feasibility studies.

  5. Economics of recovering energy from wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, I. J.

    1977-10-15

    It is estimated that New Zealand produces about 3200 t/day of refuse from the eight main centres. If it is assumed that the composition of this is intermediate between that of the US and the UK, then a calorific value of approximately 11.6 GJ/t is obtained, which indicates a potential of 37 TJ/day of energy is theoretically available from wastes. Some of the possible processes that could be used, and the yield of either energy or fuel that could be obtained from the assumed raw material are illustrated. It must be emphasized that before much further progress can be achieved in this area, a better knowledge of the amounts and composition of our refuse is necessary. This data is considered as an indication of the potential. The remainder of this paper consists of a preliminary economic assessment of processes that are in a reasonable state of development, i.e. to the stage where a demonstration plant would be built, or better. The currency used is the $US, 1975. Capital is considered to be amortized at 6% over 20 years. Labor has been estimated at an average of $7000. Land and site development is not included as this will vary immensely. However, it must be added that the fermentation processes are most likely to require considerably more land. All processes are costed for a 500 t/day plant, and cost estimations are from published or manufacturer's data, following the six tenths rule.

  6. Energy from agricultural animal wastes. Rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This technology status report discusses the production of animal wastes in the UK, and the environmental problems caused by direct use of the waste as fertilisers or disposal by landfilling. The effects of the moisture content of the waste on the choice of technology is examined, and the use of anaerobic digestion for wetter wastes to produce biogas and combustion of dryer wastes to produce heat, power and phosphate- and potash-rich ash are discussed. Market opportunities, and the economics and environmental impacts of both technologies are investigated

  7. Environmental assessment of energy production from waste and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide

    . To evaluate the environmental and energy performance of bioenergy and wasteto-energy systems life cycle assessment was used in this thesis. This was supported by other tools such as material, substance, energy flow analysis and energy system analysis. The primary objective of this research was to provide...... a consistent framework for the environmental assessment of innovative bioenergy and waste-to-energy systems including the integration of LCA with other tools (mentioned earlier). The focus was on the following aspects: - Evaluation of potential future energy scenarios for Denmark. This was doneby integrating...... assessing the environmental performance of the waste refinery, a detailed knowledge of the waste composition is recommendable as this determines the energy outputs and thereby the assessment results. The benefits offered by the waste refinery compared with incinerators and MBT plants are primarily related...

  8. Energy value of the hard waste in Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenski, Slave

    2004-01-01

    The base sources of solid waste, which have the most significant influence on total quantity is defined. Whole territory of R. of Macedonia is devoted in seven parts depending on the larger cities and balanced quantity of wastes. In spite of this territory definition, the quantity of solid waste in spite of source of appearing for this regions and the whole territory of Macedonia, is defined. The share of organic materials in the structure of solid waste is defined, beside that can be determine their energy value. By determined quantity of solid waste and their energy value, the capacity and the number of power plant for direct combustion which can be build in R. of Macedonia is determined. The heat energy that can be obtained from solid waste combustion during the year, for determined seven regions individually is calculated. (Author)

  9. Comparing Waste-to-Energy technologies by applying energy system analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie; Lund, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Even when policies of waste prevention, re-use and recycling are prioritised a fraction of waste will still be left which can be used for energy recovery. This article asks the question: How to utilise waste for energy in the best way seen from an energy system perspective? Eight different Waste......-to-Energy technologies are compared with a focus on fuel efficiency, CO2 reductions and costs. The comparison is carried out by conducting detailed energy system analyses of the present as well as a potential future Danish energy system with a large share of combined heat and power as well as wind power. The study shows...... potential of using waste for the production of transport fuels. Biogas and thermal gasification technologies are hence interesting alternatives to waste incineration and it is recommended to support the use of biogas based on manure and organic waste. It is also recommended to support research...

  10. Technical review of US Department of Energy draft area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Foth and Van Dyke and Associates Inc. was retained by the Stockbridge-Munsee Community to evaluate the DOE's screening process for selection of candidate areas in crystalline rock terranes, and critically review the geologic and environmental factors utilized by the DOE in selecting the NC-3 area as a potentially acceptable site (PAS). We have reviewed the DOE's Draft Area Recommendation Report (ARR) issued in January 1986, and prepared our comments. In addition, geologic and environmental data pertaining to the Stockbridge-Munsee community and vicinity that was not included in the Draft ARR is presented. 24 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Technical procedures for utilities and solid waste: Environmental Field Program, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The evaluation of environmental issues and concerns and the addressing of statutory requirements are fundamental parts in the characterization of the site in Deaf Smith County, Texas for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). To ensure that the environmental field program comprehensively addresses the issues and requirements of the project, a site study plan (SSP) has been prepared for Utilities and Solid Waste considerations. This technical procedure (TP) has been developed to implement the field program described in the Utilities and Solid Waste Site Study Plan. The purpose and scope of the Utilities and Solid Waste Technical Procedure is to develop and implement a data collection procedure to fulfill the data base needs of the Utilities and Solid Waste SSP. The procedure describes a method of obtaining, assessing and verifying the capabilities of the regional service utilities and disposal contractors. This data base can be used to identify a preferred service source for the engineering contractor. The technical procedure was produced under the guidelines established in Technical Administrative Procedure No. 1.0, Preparation, Review and Approval of Technical Procedures

  12. Determining the amount of waste plastics in the feed of Austrian waste-to-energy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzböck, Therese; Van Eygen, Emile; Rechberger, Helmut; Fellner, Johann

    2017-02-01

    Although thermal recovery of waste plastics is widely practiced in many European countries, reliable information on the amount of waste plastics in the feed of waste-to-energy plants is rare. In most cases the amount of plastics present in commingled waste, such as municipal solid waste, commercial, or industrial waste, is estimated based on a few waste sorting campaigns, which are of limited significance with regard to the characterisation of plastic flows. In the present study, an alternative approach, the so-called Balance Method, is used to determine the total amount of plastics thermally recovered in Austria's waste incineration facilities in 2014. The results indicate that the plastics content in the waste feed may vary considerably among different plants but also over time. Monthly averages determined range between 8 and 26 wt% of waste plastics. The study reveals an average waste plastics content in the feed of Austria's waste-to-energy plants of 16.5 wt%, which is considerably above findings from sorting campaigns conducted in Austria. In total, about 385 kt of waste plastics were thermally recovered in all Austrian waste-to-energy plants in 2014, which equals to 45 kg plastics cap -1 . In addition, the amount of plastics co-combusted in industrial plants yields a total thermal utilisation rate of 70 kg cap -1  a -1 for Austria. This is significantly above published rates, for example, in Germany reported rates for 2013 are in the range of only 40 kg of waste plastics combusted per capita.

  13. Waste-to-energy technologies and project implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Rogoff, Marc J

    2011-01-01

    This book covers in detail programs and technologies for converting traditionally landfilled solid wastes into energy through waste-to-energy projects. Modern Waste-to-Energy plants are being built around the world to reduce the levels of solid waste going into landfill sites and contribute to renewable energy and carbon reduction targets. The latest technologies have also reduced the pollution levels seen from early waste incineration plants by over 99 per cent. With case studies from around the world, Rogoff and Screve provide an insight into the different approaches taken to the planning and implementation of WTE. The second edition includes coverage of the latest technologies and practical engineering challenges as well as an exploration of the economic and regulatory context for the development of WTE.

  14. Community interviews task report: Working draft: BWIP [Basalt Waste Isolation Project] Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    The socioeconomic program for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) requires the collection of information about economic, social and cultural conditions, demographic, housing and settlement patterns, and the provision of public services and facilities in order to monitor and assess the impacts of the project on the study area. Much of the information needed by the socioeconomic program is compiled, maintained, and used by officials or staff members of local, regional, state, or tribal agencies or organizations. Because much of this information is prepared for internal use, the documents are often not published or advertised and it can be difficult for researchers to identify many obscure, yet useful, sources of information. In order to identify and gain access to this information, it is often most efficient to talk directly with officials and staff members of pertinent agencies or organizations who may have knowledge of these documents or who may have useful information themselves. Consequently, interviews in the study communities with persons knowledgeable about the socioeconomic or sociocultural characteristics of the area constitute an important source of data for the socioeconomic program. In addition to identifying various data sources, these interviews provide a mechanism for understanding and interpreting those data. Knowledge of specific local conditions is often necessary to correctly interpret quantitative data. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the objectives of the community interviews task and the general methods that will be used in conducting the community interviews. 3 refs

  15. Why energy from waste incineration is an essential component of environmentally responsible waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porteous, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the key factors involved in adopting energy from waste incineration (EfWI) as part of a waste management strategy. Incineration means all forms of controlled direct combustion of waste. 'Emerging' technologies, such as gasification, are, in the author's view, 5 to 10 years from proven commercial application. The strict combustion regimen employed and the emissions therefrom are detailed. It is shown that EfWI merits consideration as an integral part of an environmentally responsible and sustainable waste management strategy, where suitable quantities of waste are available

  16. The intended purpose of the draft amendment of the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, U.K.

    1994-01-01

    The seventh amendments to the Atomic Energy Act may become the most sweeping and significant reform the German atomic energy laws have undergone: the suggested amendment will transform the character of the Atomic Energy Act from its present nature of a nuclear licensing system into a technology management and control instrument. The function of the Atomic Energy Act so far is to deal with the consequences of an established technology and its known, ambivalent effects: aspects such as waste management and the technical and economic consequences implied n the decommissioning of nuclear installations play a far bigger role than planning, construction and operation of new installations. It is only consequent in this respect to abolish the 'promotional purpose' of the Act. This will mean, however, that the Federal Government relinquishes its responsibility for development and management of nuclear technology, handling it over to the private plant owners and operators. The responsibility that will remain with the Federal Government in connection with nuclear technology is linked with the Government's duty to provide for protection of the citizens. (HP) [de

  17. Joint optimisation of the future Danish waste and energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie; Pizarro, Amalia Rosa; Salvucci, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    in future scenarios with higher biomass consumption, where the average heat prices are higher. In both scenarios, biogas produced from organic waste is upgraded and fed into the natural gas grid and waste is incinerated rather than being centrally sorted in a material recovery facility.......In this article the impact of the future development of the energy system on the feasibility of waste treatment options is analysed. In the article two different optimization tools are used: a regional electricity model (Balmorel) and a national waste treatment and district heating model (Opti......Waste). When performing optimization by minimizing the socio-economic costs, into future energy systems with high wind power production, it proves feasible primarily to incinerate waste in large scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants, whereas more incineration takes place in decentralized CHP plants...

  18. 78 FR 29124 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Implementation of Energy, Water, and Solid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... public comment period. Copies of the Draft EIS are available at the following libraries: Alamogordo Public Library, El Paso Main Library, Irving Schwartz Branch Library, New Mexico State University Zuhl Library, Richard Burges Branch Library, Thomas Branigan Memorial Library, and University of Texas at El...

  19. Waste management program at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, P.C.F.; Chan, N.; Hawrelluk, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Waste Management Program establishes requirements for waste management activities at AECL sites in Canada. It ensures that activities involving planning for, handling, processing, transporting, storage and long-term management of wastes are performed in a manner that protects the workers, the public, and the environment, and are in compliance with applicable regulatory and licence requirements. The program translates applicable legal requirements into program requirements appropriate for AECL, and assists AECL management in implementing those requirements. The Waste Management Program was formally established at AECL in 2007 as one of the nuclear programs. The activities conducted in the first two years (2007 - 09) were mainly focused on program development. Currently the program is executing the waste management improvement initiatives based on the Waste Management Program Improvement Plan. During the program implementation, close collaboration between the Waste Management Program and other departments resulted in improved waste management performance at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). This included increased segregation of the waste at the source, reduction in waste generation, improved labeling and identification of waste packages, improved recyclables collection and initiating recycling of selected hazardous wastes. In accordance with pollution prevention, the quantities and degree of hazard of wastes requiring long-term management shall be minimized, following the principles of Prevent, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. The annual volume of solid waste generated is one of the key indicators for waste management performance. AECL has been successful in reduction of operational waste and diversion of materials for recycling at CRL. From 2007 to 2010, the annual volume of solid waste, including inactive and radioactive wastes, generated from routine operations at CRL decreased by 26%, and the annual amount of recyclables sent

  20. Waste management program at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.C.F.; Chan, N.; Hawrelluk, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Waste Management Program establishes requirements for waste management activities at AECL sites in Canada. It ensures that activities involving planning for, handling, processing, transporting, storage and long-term management of wastes are performed in a manner that protects the workers, the public, and the environment, and are in compliance with applicable regulatory and licence requirements. The program translates applicable legal requirements into program requirements appropriate for AECL, and assists AECL management in implementing those requirements. The Waste Management Program was formally established at AECL in 2007 as one of the nuclear programs. The activities conducted in the first two years (2007 - 09) were mainly focused on program development. Currently the program is executing the waste management improvement initiatives based on the Waste Management Program Improvement Plan. During the program implementation, close collaboration between the Waste Management Program and other departments resulted in improved waste management performance at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). This included increased segregation of the waste at the source, reduction in waste generation, improved labeling and identification of waste packages, improved recyclables collection and initiating recycling of selected hazardous wastes. In accordance with pollution prevention, the quantities and degree of hazard of wastes requiring long-term management shall be minimized, following the principles of Prevent, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. The annual volume of solid waste generated is one of the key indicators for waste management performance. AECL has been successful in reduction of operational waste and diversion of materials for recycling at CRL. From 2007 to 2010, the annual volume of solid waste, including inactive and radioactive wastes, generated from routine operations at CRL decreased by 26%, and the annual amount of recyclables sent

  1. Complex processing of rubber waste through energy recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Smelík

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the applied energy recovery solutions for complex processing of rubber waste for energy recovery. It deals specifically with the solution that could maximize possible use of all rubber waste and does not create no additional waste that disposal would be expensive and dangerous for the environment. The project is economically viable and energy self-sufficient. The outputs of the process could replace natural gas and crude oil products. The other part of the process is also the separation of metals, which can be returned to the metallurgical secondary production.

  2. Predicting the potential of energy from agricultural wastes in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arifah Bahar; Ahmad Mahir Razali; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the prediction of the potential of energy supply from agricultural wastes in Malaysia until the year 2005. The exponential smoothing method is used to predict the supply of energy from these resources. The prediction is based on four scenarios namely (a) business as usual, (b) increase in the plantation area by 1 % (c) increase in productivity by 1 % with no increase in plantation area and (d) decrease in plantation area of 1%. The agricultural wastes considered are from rubber, oil palm ,cocoa, paddy, coconut and pineapple resources. In Peninsular Malaysia, these resources include groundnut, sugar cane, and tapioca. Assuming an energy conversion of 30%, only three agricultural wastes can contribute as an energy supply i.e. oil palm, paddy and sugar cane wastes. The contribution of these resources to the demand of energy for Malaysia is 21% in the year 2000 and 17% in the year 2005. (Author)

  3. Food Waste to Energy: An Overview of Sustainable Approaches for Food Waste Management and Nutrient Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paritosh, Kunwar; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Yadav, Monika; Pareek, Nidhi; Chawade, Aakash; Vivekanand, Vivekanand

    2017-01-01

    Food wastage and its accumulation are becoming a critical problem around the globe due to continuous increase of the world population. The exponential growth in food waste is imposing serious threats to our society like environmental pollution, health risk, and scarcity of dumping land. There is an urgent need to take appropriate measures to reduce food waste burden by adopting standard management practices. Currently, various kinds of approaches are investigated in waste food processing and management for societal benefits and applications. Anaerobic digestion approach has appeared as one of the most ecofriendly and promising solutions for food wastes management, energy, and nutrient production, which can contribute to world's ever-increasing energy requirements. Here, we have briefly described and explored the different aspects of anaerobic biodegrading approaches for food waste, effects of cosubstrates, effect of environmental factors, contribution of microbial population, and available computational resources for food waste management researches.

  4. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil's Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University's non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building

  5. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-26

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil`s Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University`s non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building.

  6. Energy in Solid Waste: A Citizen Guide to Saving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citizens Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality.

    This booklet contains information for citizens on solid wastes. It discusses the possible energy available in combustible and noncombustible trash. It suggests how citizens can reduce waste at home through discriminating buying practices and through recycling and reuse of resources. Recommendations are given for community action along with state…

  7. Regional Energy Potential of Municipal Solid Waste in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    1997-01-01

    MSW energy recovery in Croatia by thermal treatment in waste and landfill gas plants, similar to some 1200 such plants operating worldwide, could reduce waste impact on health and environment, and simultaneously substitute approximate 300000 tonnes of imported hard coal. (author)

  8. Comparative Energy Values Of Sorghum Distillers Waste, Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A balance trial aimed at determining the energy values of Sorghum Distiller's Wastes (SDW), Maize cob (MC) and Shea butter Waste (SBW) for barrows was conducted using a 4 x 4 Latin square cross- over experimental design. While feed intake was influenced (P < 0.05) by the test feed ingredients, the weight gained was ...

  9. Assessment of the energy recovery potentials of solid waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otoigiakih

    The main attributes of waste as a fuel are water content, calorific value, and burnable content. The study was conducted to evaluate the energy recovery potential of solid waste generated in. Akosombo. A total of twelve (12) samples were collected from the township in December, 2012 (dry month) and May, 2013 (Wet ...

  10. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy has proposed a draft plan for investigating the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site to determine if it suitable for a waste repository. This fact sheet provides information on the status of DOE's and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's efforts to streamline what NRC expects will be the largest and most complex nuclear-licensing proceeding in history, including the development of an electronic information management system called the Licensing Support System

  11. Nuclear energy waste: space transportation and removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.E.

    1975-12-01

    A method for utilizing the decay heat of actinide wastes to power an electric thrust vehicle is proposed. The vehicle, launched by shuttle to earth orbit and to earth escape by a tug, obtains electrical power from the actinide waste heat by thermionic converters. The heavy gamma ray and neutron shielding which is necessary as a safety feature is removed in orbit and returned to earth for reuse. The problems associated with safety are dealt with in depth. A method for eliminating fission wastes via chemical propulsion is briefly discussed

  12. Waste management, energy generation, material recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The concept of process pyrolysis according to the system of low-temperature pyrolysis (up to 450 Cel) for the purpose of waste processing is described. This system not only uses the material value (raw materials) but also the processing value (energetic utilization of organic components). Three product groups are mentioned where process pyrolysis can be applied: 1. rubber-metall connecting, coated and non-coated components, 2. Compound materials like pc boards, used electronic devices, films, used cables and batteries, 3. organic waste and residues like foils, insulating material, lubricating, oil and grease, flooring. Importance of waste management is emphasized, economic aspects are illustrated.

  13. Polyolephine waste recycling as source of power energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisovski Štefan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyolephine waste (polyetilene, polypropilene is the main source of environmental pollution. Depolymerization of waste in reactor under atmospheric pressure yields hydrocarbon mixture C1-C34. In turn, combustion of C1-C7 fraction provides reactor temperature regime. The plant is automated and energetically highly efficient. Small electric power is required for operating the plant. The waste originating from depolymerazation does not pollute the environment. Fraction C7-C34 not only serves for commercial purposes but also as a power energy provider within the waste deploymerization plant.

  14. Optimization of use of waste in the future energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie; Meibom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of mixed waste, anaerobic digestion of organic waste, and gasification of part of the potential RDF (refuse derived fuel) for CHP (combined heat and power) production, while the remaining part is co-combusted with coal. Co-combustion mainly takes place in new coal-fired power plants, allowing investments...... production in Denmark in a 2025 scenario with 48% renewable energy. Investments in a range of waste conversion technologies are facilitated, including waste incineration, co-combustion with coal, anaerobic digestion, and gasification. The most economically feasible solutions are found to be incineration...

  15. Use of light agricultural waste as biomass for energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Along with solar energy light agricultural wastes form an important source of renewable energy. Sugar cane field trash (PACHAT) forms a large source of energy, totally wasted even today. This article covers the thinking on biomass as energy source in India from 1985 till today and describes the important developments. Agricultural waste is a widely distributed source and costly to collect and transport. Hence its mode of use, equipment required became site specific. Equipment for carbonization and gasification of pachat developed by the author are described. Utilisation of agricultural waste is still an open field and challenge to develop and perfect small and large devices directly for thermal use or power generation. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Co-Combustion of Animal Waste in a Commercial Waste-to-Energy BFB Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Moradian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Co-combustion of animal waste, in waste-to-energy boilers, is considered a method to produce both heat and power and to dispose of possibly infected animal wastes. This research conducted full-scale combustion tests to identify the impact of changed fuel composition on a fluidized-bed boiler. The impact was characterized by analyzing the deposit formation rate, deposit composition, ash composition, and emissions. Two combustion tests, denoted the reference case and animal waste case, were performed based on different fuel mixes. In the reference case, a normal solid waste fuel mix was combusted in the boiler, containing sorted industry and household waste. In the animal waste case, 20 wt% animal waste was added to the reference fuel mix. The collected samples, comprising sampling probe deposits, fuel mixes, bed ash, return sand, boiler ash, cyclone ash and filter ash, were analyzed using chemical fractionation, SEM-EDX and XRD. The results indicate decreased deposit formation due to animal waste co-combustion. SEM-EDX and chemical fractionation identified higher concentrations of P, Ca, S, and Cl in the bed materials in the animal waste case. Moreover, the risk of bed agglomeration was lower in the animal waste case and also a decreased rate of NOx and SO2 emissions were observed.

  17. Electric Energy production through Municipal solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agorio Comas, M.; Chediak Nunez, M.; Galan Prado, A.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective in this investment Project is to improve the integral management of urban solid waste in the city of Salto, Uruguay, obtaining favorable results for the environment and society, contributing moreover in Sustainable Development.First of all, it is recommended the remediation of the current Open air Municipal dumping site. Simultaneously with the Remediation process, a controlled dumping site with daily covers of the compacted solid waste has been designed, as a transition methodology with a lifetime of 3 years approximately.In addition to this, two sanitary landfills are designed wits29h a total lifetime of 7 years, for the operation after the controlled dumping site is closed. There is also a leachate treatment system to process the effluents of the landfills. In order to optimize the use of the landfills, is proposed the simultaneous implementation of a Separated Urban Solid Waste Collection System (SisRReVa). This consist in separating the Valuable Waste (VW) from wet or organic solid waste in origin (home, stores,etc)and collecting it separately.The VW are separated by type (paper, board, glass, plastic and metal) in a Valuable Waste Classification Plant. This plant is designed to process the VW generated in Salto and collected by the SisRReVa for about ten years from now on. (Author)

  18. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.; Swiger, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the national Department of Energy (DOE) program for managing hazardous waste. An overview of the DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), including its mission, organizational structure, and major program elements, is given. The paper focuses on the contractor support role assigned to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the establishment of the HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office (SCO). The major SCO programs are described, and the organization for managing the programs is discussed. The HAZWRAP SCO approaches to waste management planning and to technology research, development, and demonstration are presented. The role of the SCO in the DOE Environmental Restoration Program and the development of the DOE Waste Information network are reviewed. Also discussed is the DOE Work for Others Program, where waste management decentralized support, via interagency agreements between DOE and the Department of Defense and DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency, is provided for those sponsors planning remedial response actions. 2 refs

  19. Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

    1994-07-01

    This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

  20. Comments made by the Syndicate of renewable energies on the draft of orientation law about energies; Observations du Syndicat des energies renouvelables a l'avant-projet de loi d'orientation sur les energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the proposals of modifications and the comments made by the French syndicate of renewable energies (SER) about the draft of energy law proposed by the government in November 2003. The document is presented as 3 columns with the original text of the law, the modifications proposed by the SER and their observations. The comments of the SER concern only the promotion of development and use of renewable energy sources, the energy saving certificates and the development of bio-fuels. (J.S.)

  1. Managing radioactive waste issues and misunderstandings (radiation realities, energy comparison, waste strategies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    2001-01-01

    The technical specialist is confident that radioactive waste can be safely managed, but many in the public remain totally unconvinced. There are issues and deep-seated misunderstandings that drive public doubts. Currently, a growing concern with pollution from other industrial waste is enabling radioactive waste issues to be debated in a wider context that allows comparisons with other potentially hazardous waste, particularly from energy generation sources. Health effects and time period issues are not unique to radioactive waste. This paper concentrates on 3 topics. The first concerns radiation health effects where the real realities of radiation are covered. The large misunderstandings that exist about radiation and its health effects have led to an almost zero health impact regulatory policy. A policy which must be more fully understood and dealt with. The second topic deals with a few revealing comparisons about the various energy generation systems. Nuclear power's 10 thousand fold lower fuel requirements, compared with a comparable fossil fuelled plant, is a dominating factor decisively minimising environmental impacts. The third topic examines waste disposal strategies. Extraordinarily small radioactive waste quantities permit a confinement strategy for disposal as opposed to the more common dispersion strategy for most toxic waste. The small quantities coupled with radioactive decay, contrary to the public perception, make any potential hazard from both low and high level radioactive waste exceedingly small. (author)

  2. Waste management as provided for by the atomic energy law and the waste legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, U.; Brasser, T.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is subject to the Atomic Energy Act, whereas non-radioactive waste management is provided for by the waste legislation. This two-partite applicability of laws in the field of waste management originates from the treaties establishing the European Communities. The founder members of the European Community in 1957 concluded the Euratom Treaty for the purpose of creating a European framework for the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Based on this treaty, the European Community has been passing a number of directives and regulations aimed at providing protection of workers from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. EC law does not define any implementing provisions relating to the management of radioactive waste for instance, which is a task remaining within the competence of the national governments. (orig.) [de

  3. Efficiency of energy recovery from waste incineration, in the light of the new Waste Framework Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Mario; Motta, Astrid; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with a key issue related to municipal waste incineration, which is the efficiency of energy recovery. A strong driver for improving the energy performances of waste-to-energy plants is the recent Waste Framework Directive (Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on waste and repealing certain Directives), which allows high efficiency installations to benefit from a status of "recovery" rather than "disposal". The change in designation means a step up in the waste hierarchy, where the lowest level of priority is now restricted to landfilling and low efficiency wastes incineration. The so-called "R1 formula" reported in the Directive, which counts for both production of power and heat, is critically analyzed and correlated to the more scientific-based approach of exergy efficiency. The results obtained for waste-to-energy plants currently operating in Europe reveal some significant differences in their performance, mainly related to the average size and to the availability of a heat market (district heating). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solutions for energy recovery of animal waste from leather industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe; Pană, Constantin; Mihaescu, Lucian; Cernat, Alexandru; Negurescu, Niculae; Mocanu, Raluca; Negreanu, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Animal fats in blend with diesel fuel for energy valorification through combustion. • Animal waste from tanneries as fuel and for biogas production. • Experimental tests using animal fats as fuel for diesel engines. • Experimental tests modifying the characteristic parameters. - Abstract: Secondary products from food and leather industries are regarded as animal wastes. Conversion of these animal wastes into fuels represents an energy recovery solution not only because of their good combustion properties, but also from the viewpoint of supply stability. A tannery factory usually processes 60–70 t/month of crude leathers, resulting in 12–15 t/month of waste. Fats, which can be used as the input fuel for diesel engines (in crude state or as biodiesel), represent 10% of this animal waste, while the rest are proteins that can be used to generate biogas through anaerobic digestion. Herein, we analyse two approaches to the use of animal waste from tanneries: as fuel for diesel engines and for biogas generation for heat production. Diesel fuelling and fuelling by animal wastes are compared in terms of the engine performance and pollutant emissions. The effects of animal waste usage on the pollutant emissions level, exhaust gas temperature, indicated mean effective pressure, maximum pressure, and engine efficiency are analysed. The energy recovery technologies for animal waste, which are analysed in this work, can be easily implemented and can simultaneously solve the problem posed by animal wastes by using them as an alternative to fossil fuels. Animal fats can be considered an excellent alternative fuel for diesel engines without major constructive modifications.

  5. The Hidden Burden of Food Waste: The Double Energy Waste in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Vittuari; Fabio De Menna; Marco Pagani

    2016-01-01

    The energy intensity of modern food systems represents a major issue in a scenario of decreasing oil resources and increasing population. Beside the use of renewable energy, an increased efficiency in food systems could contribute to reduce fossil fuels dependence. In this sense, food losses and waste (FLW) have crucial consequences on the energy balance. Based on the concept of “embodied energy”, food wastage can be framed as a double waste of energy, both in terms of non-consumed food energ...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY SAVING IN WASTE RECYCLING USING SYSTEM DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio de Oliveira Simonetto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recycling is a topic of great importance in integrated waste management, evidence of this is verified in the National Policy of Solid Waste, decreed in 2010, where it is considered one of the priorities. In this article is presented a computer simulation model, since their development until its validation, which aims to support environmental managers in their decisions regarding the definition and / or maintenance of solid waste policies recycling, as well as evaluating the benefits of process in the environment (in this article we evaluated the energy savings. For the model development was considered: the rate of natural population growth (births and deaths, percentage of solid waste recycled (for each type of material, gravimetric composition of the material in the total waste generated, the amount of waste generated per inhabitant and energy savings caused by each distinct type of material. Through the model results generated, end users (environmental managers thereof may, for example, set incentives to reduce the total generation of solid waste, produce campaigns enhancing reuse and recycling and to assess the relative benefits of energy savings caused by recycling. Model validation was through analysis of future scenarios for a given municipality in southern Brazil. For modeling and system validation was used Vensim from Ventana Systems.

  7. Draft forecast of the final report for the comparison to 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.; Gomez, L.S.; Rechard, R.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to dispose of transuranic wastes, which have been generated by defense programs, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The WIPP Project will assess compliance with the requirements of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. This report forecasts the planned 1992 document, Comparison to 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). 130 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Nuclear waste problem: does new Europe need new nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P.; Dudnikov, A.; Subbotin, S.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear Energy for New Europe - what does it mean? New Europe - it means in first order joined Europe. And it is quite clear that also efforts in nuclear energy must be joined. What can be proposed as a target of joint efforts. Improvement of existing plants, technologies, materials? - Certainly, but it is performed already by designers and industry themselves. There exists a problem, which each state using nuclear energy faces alone. It is nuclear waste problem. Nowadays nuclear waste problem is not completely solved in any country. It seems reasonable for joining Europe to join efforts in solving this problem. A satisfactory solution would reduce a risk connected with nuclear waste. In addition to final disposal problem solution it is necessary to reduce total amount of nuclear waste, that means: reducing the rates of accumulation of long-lived dangerous radionuclides; reducing the existing amounts of these radionuclides by transmutation. These conditions can be satisfied in reasonable time by burning of minor actinides and, if possible, by transmutation of long-lived fission products. However we can use this strategy effectively if we will design and construct nuclear energy as a system of which components are united by nuclear fuel cycle as a system-forming factor. The existing structures and approaches may become insufficient for new Europe. Therefore among the initial steps in considering nuclear waste problem must be considering possible promising fuel cycles for European nuclear energy. So, does new Europe need new nuclear energy? It seems, yes. (author)

  9. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 2: Appendices, AAC, BECR, BH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    This report describes the conceptual design of a system the Department of Energy (DOE) may implement for compliance with the requirement to control access to the disposal site. In addition, this report addresses the scheduling process for control of inspection, maintenance, and periodic reporting related to Long Term Monitoring which addresses the monitoring of disposal system performance, environmental monitoring in accordance with the Consultation and Cooperation Agreement between the DOE and the state of New Mexico, and evaluation of testing activities related to the Permanent Marker System design. In addition to access control addressed by this report, the controlling or cleaning up of releases from the site is addressed in the Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan. The monitoring of parameters related to disposal system performance is addressed in the Long Term Monitoring Design Concept Description. Together, these three documents address the full range of active institutional controls planned after disposal of the TRU waste in the WIPP repository.

  10. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 2: Appendices, AAC, BECR, BH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a system the Department of Energy (DOE) may implement for compliance with the requirement to control access to the disposal site. In addition, this report addresses the scheduling process for control of inspection, maintenance, and periodic reporting related to Long Term Monitoring which addresses the monitoring of disposal system performance, environmental monitoring in accordance with the Consultation and Cooperation Agreement between the DOE and the state of New Mexico, and evaluation of testing activities related to the Permanent Marker System design. In addition to access control addressed by this report, the controlling or cleaning up of releases from the site is addressed in the Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan. The monitoring of parameters related to disposal system performance is addressed in the Long Term Monitoring Design Concept Description. Together, these three documents address the full range of active institutional controls planned after disposal of the TRU waste in the WIPP repository

  11. Effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge (WAS) solubilization and enzyme activity was investigated in this study. Experimental results showed that the increase of ultrasonic specific energy in the range of 0 - 90000 kJ/kg dried sludge (DS) benefited WAS particle size reduction and the solubilization ...

  12. The waste originating from nuclear energy peaceful applications and its management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1997-05-01

    This work presents the waste originating from nuclear energy and its management. It approaches the following main topics: nature and classification of the wastes; security requirements to the waste management; state of the art related to the wastes derivates of the uses of the nuclear energy; wastes in the fuel cycle; wastes of the industrial, medical and research and development applications; costs of the waste management

  13. Minutes from Department of Energy/Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program, research and development technology needs assessment review meeting for FY 1990, September 1989, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    On September 20--21, 1989, representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Operations Offices, DOE contractors, and the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program met in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to select and prioritize candidate waste problems in need of research and development. The information gained will be used in planning for future research and development tasks and in restructuring current research activities to address the priority needs. Consistent with the ongoing reevaluation of DOE's plans for environmental restoration and waste management, an attempt was made to relate the needs developed in this meeting to the needs expressed in the draft Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Plan. Operations Offices were represented either by DOE staff or by contractor delegates from the area. This document summarizes the results of the meeting and lists the priority waste problems established.

  14. System for manufacturing ash products and energy from refuse waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutin, G.L.; Mahoney, P.F.

    1996-01-04

    The present invention provides a system of manufacturing energy and ash products from solid waste. The system includes apparatus for receiving solid waste for processing, apparatus for shredding the received solid waste, apparatus for removing ferrous material from the shredded solid waste to create processed refuse fuel (PRF) and apparatus for efficiently combusting the PRF. A conveyor transfers the PRF to the combusting apparatus such that the density of the PRF is always controlled for continuous non-problematic flow. Apparatus for recovering residual combustion particulate from the combustion residual gases and for recovering solid ash residue provides the system with the ability to generate steam and electrical energy, and to recover for reuse and recycling valuable materials from the solid ash residue. (author) figs.

  15. Waste energy boosts tomato industry at distillery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McColl, J

    1989-04-01

    A trial project aimed at using waste hot water from the cooling process at a Scottish whisky distillery to heat a glasshouse for tomato production is described. Later developments have involved the installation of a waste heat boiler to make use of the heat from the still burner flue gases. Steam from the boiler is used within the distillery and to supplement the glasshouse system. The payback within the distillery industry has been excellent, but tomato production, though continuing, was adversely affected by severe cutbacks in distillery production in the early eighties. Recently further significant savings have been made in the distillery industry by the installation of a regenerative burner in one of the stills and thermo-compressors in the cooling tower condensers to produce low pressure steam which can be fed back into the system. (U.K.).

  16. Energy recycling of plastic and rubber wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, R.

    2003-01-01

    Major areas for applications of plastics and rubbers are building and construction, packaging, transportation, automobiles, furniture, house wares, appliances, electrical and electronics. Approximately 20% of all the plastics produced are utilized by the building and construction industry/sup (1-3)/. Categories of polymers mostly used in the above industries include poly (vinyl chloride), polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene phenolics, acrylics and urethanes. Tyres and tubes are almost exclusively made up of rubbers. One third of total consumption of plastics finds applications, like films, bottles and packaging, in food-products that have a maximum life-span of two years, after which these find way to waste dumps. As the polymer industry in Pakistan is set to grow very rapidly in the near future the increase in utilization of plastic products in synchronous with the advent of computers and information technology. About 0.60 Kg per capita of waste generated daily in Lahore /(7.14)/ contains considerable quantity of plastics. (AB)

  17. Thermoelectric energy harvesting for a solid waste processing toilet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, C. David; Baldasaro, Nicholas G.; Bulman, Gary E.; Stoner, Brian R.

    2014-06-01

    Over 2.5 billion people do not have access to safe and effective sanitation. Without a sanitary sewer infrastructure, self-contained modular systems can provide solutions for these people in the developing world and remote areas. Our team is building a better toilet that processes human waste into burnable fuel and disinfects the liquid waste. The toilet employs energy harvesting to produce electricity and does not require external electrical power or consumable materials. RTI has partnered with Colorado State University, Duke University, and Roca Sanitario under a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Reinvent the Toilet Challenge (RTTC) grant to develop an advanced stand-alone, self-sufficient toilet to effectively process solid and liquid waste. The system operates through the following steps: 1) Solid-liquid separation, 2) Solid waste drying and sizing, 3) Solid waste combustion, and 4) Liquid waste disinfection. Thermoelectric energy harvesting is a key component to the system and provides the electric power for autonomous operation. A portion of the exhaust heat is captured through finned heat-sinks and converted to electricity by thermoelectric (TE) devices to provide power for the electrochemical treatment of the liquid waste, pumps, blowers, combustion ignition, and controls.

  18. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste disposal concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, C.; Page, L.; Morreale, B.; Owens, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy manages its low-level waste (LLW), regulated by DOE Order 5820.2A by using an overall systems approach. This systems approach provides an improved and consistent management system for all DOE LLW waste, from generation to disposal. This paper outlines six basic disposal concepts used in the systems approach, discusses issues associated with each of the concepts, and outlines both present and future disposal concepts used at six DOE sites

  19. Handbook of solid waste disposal: materials and energy recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, J L; Heer, Jr, J E; Hagerty, D J

    1975-01-01

    Traditional and innovative solid waste disposal techniques and new developments in materials and energy recovery systems are analyzed. Each method is evaluated in terms of system methodology, controlling process parameters, and process requirements, by-products, economics, and case histories. Medium and high temperature incineration; wet pulping; landfill with leachate recirculation; the Hercules, Inc., system; USBM front-end and back-end systems; pyrolysis; waste heat utilization, the Combustion Power Unit-400; use of refuse as a supplementary fuel; and methane production from anaerobic fermentation systems are considered, as well as sanitary landfilling, incineration, and composting. European solid waste management techniques are evaluated for their applicability to the US.

  20. Environmental assessment of energy production from waste and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonini, D.

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the environmental and energy performance of bioenergy and waste-to-energy systems life cycle assessment was used in this thesis. This was supported by other tools such as material, substance, energy flow analysis and energy system analysis. The primary objective of this research was to provide a consistent framework for the environmental assessment of innovative bioenergy and waste-to-energy systems including the integration of LCA with other tools (mentioned earlier). The focus was on the following aspects: - Evaluation of potential future energy scenarios for Denmark. This was done by integrating the results of energy system analysis into life cycle assessment scenarios. - Identification of the criticalities of bioenergy systems, particularly in relation to land use changes. - Identification of potentials and criticalities associated with innovative waste refinery technologies. This was done by assessing a specific pilot-plant operated in Copenhagen, Denmark. The waste refining treatment was compared with a number of different state-of-the-art technologies such as incineration, mechanical-biological treatment and landfilling in bioreactor. The results highlighted that production of liquid and solid biofuels from energy crops should be limited when inducing indirect land use changes (iLUC). Solid biofuels for use in combined heat and power plants may perform better than liquid biofuels due to higher energy conversion efficiencies. The iLUC impacts stood out as the most important contributor to the induced GHG emissions within bioenergy systems. Although quantification of these impacts is associated with high uncertainty, an increasing number of studies are documenting the significance of the iLUC impacts in the bioenergy life cycle. With respect to municipal solid waste, state of the art incineration, MBT and waste refining (with associated energy and material recovery processes) may all provide important and comparable GHG emission savings. The waste

  1. South Florida embraces waste-to-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that some regions have prepared for these days of disposal shortage with comprehensive waste plans that include a strong WTE presence. Witness Broward County, Florida's program, 12 years in planning by public and private entities, Broward is the second most populated county in the state, with 1.3 million residents and a heavy tourist population, which, together, produce 1.6 million tons of waste annually. The disposal program includes Waste Management, Inc.'s expansion of a 400-acre Central Disposal Sanitary Landfill, the county's new 588-acre landfill, composting, and curbside pickup for recyclables. And, this south Florida plan would not be complete without the two brand new combustion plants. Clean Air and Water Acts notwithstanding, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation can induce standards stricter than the federal government's due to the sensitive South Florida ecology. Wheelabrator was prepared for all eventualities with its design which uses state-of-the-art scrubbers, bag houses, and monitoring to track and capture the trace amounts of lead, cadmium, and mercury, which end up in the ash. In fact, tests at other Wheelabrator facilities using similar technology showed that heavy metals in leachate from the residue showed up in concentrations as much as 200 times lower than the EPA criteria for toxicity

  2. Legal problems of waste treatment in German atomic energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaffelhuber, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The execution of the strategies of waste treatment and disposal calls for the laws and regulations on the obligations of the owners of equipments and facilities and of the state for securing safety and the final elimination of radioactive wastes, which are defined mainly in Article 9 of Atomgesetz and Section 2 (Article 44 - 48) of the order on protection from radiation. The owners of equipments and facilities of atomic energy technology shall limit the emission of radiation to about 6% of internationally permissible values, avoid uncontrolled emission without fail, inspect emission and submit reports yearly to government offices. The owners have attention obligations to utilize harmlessly produced radioactive residues and the expanded or dismantled parts of radioactive equipments or to eliminate orderly such things as radioactive wastes, only when such utilization is unable technically or economically, or not adequate under the protection aims of Atomgesetz. The possessors of radioactive wastes shall deliver the wastes to the accumulation places of provinces for intermediate storage, to the facilities of the Federal Republic for securing safety or final storage, or the facilities authorized by government offices for the elimination of radioactive wastes. Provinces shall install the accumulation places for the intermediate storage of radioactive wastes produced in their territories, and the Federal Republic shall set up the facilities for securing safety and the final elimination of radioactive wastes (Article 9, Atomgesetz). (Okada, K.)

  3. Department of Energy's process waste assessment graded approach methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pemberton, S.E.

    1994-03-01

    As the initial phase of the formal waste minimization program, the Department of Energy requires assessments of all its waste-generating operations. These assessments, called process waste assessments (PWAs), are a tool which helps achieve the pollution prevention goals. The DOE complex is comprised of numerous sites located in many different states. The facilities as a whole represent a tremendous diversity of technologies, processes, and activities. Due to this diversity, there are also a wide variety and number of waste streams generated. Many of these waste streams are small, intermittent, and not of consistent composition. The PWA graded approach methodology addresses these complexities and recognizes that processes vary in the quantity of pollution they generate, as well as in the perceived risk and associated hazards. Therefore, the graded approach was developed to provide a cost-effective and flexible methodology which allows individual sites to prioritize their local concerns and align their efforts with the resources allocated. This presentation will describe a project sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Waste Minimization Division, which developed a graded approach methodology for use throughout the DOE. This methodology was initiated in FY93 through a combined effort of the following DOE/Defense Program sites: Kansas City Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories. This presentation will describe the process waste assessment tool, benefits achieved through the completion of PWAs, DOE's graded approach methodology, and an update on the project's current status

  4. Waste incineration with production of clean and reliable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlas, Martin; Tous, Michal; Klimek, Petr; Bebar, Ladislav [Brno University of Technology, Department of Process and Environmental Engineering (UPEI VUT Brno), Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Discussion about utilization of waste for energy production (waste-to-energy, WTE) has moved on to next development phase. Waste fired power plants are discussed and investigated. These facilities focus on electricity production whereas heat supply is diminished and operations are not limited by insufficient heat demand. Present results of simulation prove that increase of net electrical efficiency above 20% for units processing 100 kt/year (the most common ones) is problematic and tightly bound with increased investments. Very low useful heat production in Rankine-cycle based cogeneration system with standard steam parameters leads to ineffective utilization of energy. This is documented in this article with the help of newly developed methodology based on primary energy savings evaluation. This approach is confronted with common method for energy recovery efficiency evaluation required by EU legislation (Energy Efficiency - R1 Criteria). New term highly-efficient WTE is proposed and condition under which is the incinerator classified as highly efficient are specified and analyzed. Once sole electricity production is compelled by limited local heat demand, application of non-conventional arrangements is highly beneficial to secure effective energy utilization. In the paper a system where municipal solid waste incinerator is integrated with combined gas-steam cycle is evaluated in the same manner. (orig.)

  5. Activities in department of energy hazardous and mixed waste defense waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    In January 1986, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP) created the Hazardous Waste and Remedial Actions Division within the Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management. The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) was assigned the responsibility for supporting DOE Headquarters (HQ) in planning nationally integrated activities for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act/Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (RCRA/CERCLA/SARA) compliance. In turn, ORO created the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Support Contractor Office (HAZWRAPSCO) to assist with the expanded lead assignment. The HAZWRAPSCO activities are currently supported by three distinct DOE-HQ funding elements: the Environmental Restoration Program, the Hazardous Waste Compliance Technology Program, and the Hazardous Waste Research and Development R and D Program. The Environmental Restoration Program is discussed in the paper, entitled The DOE Defense Program for Environmental Restoration

  6. Implementation of seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    In the fall of 1992, a draft of the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances was issued. The guidelines were prepared by the Tanks Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) and this task was sponsored by DOE, Environmental Management. The TSEP is comprised of a number of consultants known for their knowledge of seismic ground motion and expertise in the analysis of structures, systems and components subjected to seismic loads. The development of these guidelines was managed by staff from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Engineering Research and Applications Division, Department of Nuclear Energy. This paper describes the process used to incorporate the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the DOE High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances into the design criteria for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Project at the Hanford Site. This project will design and construct six new high-level waste tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. This paper also discusses the vehicles used to ensure compliance to these guidelines throughout Title 1 and Title 2 design phases of the project as well as the strategy used to ensure consistent and cost-effective application of the guidelines by the structural analysts. The paper includes lessons learned and provides recommendations for other tank design projects which might employ the TSEP guidelines

  7. Implementation of seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    In the fall of 1992, a draft of the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High-level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances was issued. The guidelines were prepared by the Tanks Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) and this task was sponsored by DOE, Environmental Management. The TSEP comprises a number of consultants known for their understanding of seismic ground motion and expertise in the analysis of structures, systems and components subjected to seismic loads. The development of these guidelines was managed by staff from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Engineering Research and Applications Division, Department of Nuclear Energy. This paper describes the process used to incorporate the Seismic Design and Evaluation guidelines for the DOE High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances into the design criteria for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Project at the Hanford Site. This project will design and construct six new high-level waste tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. This paper also discusses the vehicles used to ensure compliance to these guidelines throughout Title 1 and Title 2 design phases of the project as well as the strategy used to ensure consistent and cost-effective application of the guidelines by the structural analysts. The paper includes lessons learned and provides recommendations for other tank design projects that might employ the TSEP guidelines

  8. Waste-to-energy: Technical, economic and ecological point of views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassitto, L.

    1997-01-01

    Overwhelming waste-recycling should be considered more as a psychological than as a technological method to deal with wastes. The best waste disposal systems should actually grant mass or energy recovery from technical, economic and ecological point-of-views. Highest results seem to be granted by waste-to-energy technologies since energy content is the best preserved property after using materials

  9. Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

    2014-08-01

    This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

  10. CFD modeling and experience of waste-to-energy plant burning waste wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, B.; Yin, Chungen; Samec, N.

    2013-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is being increasingly used in industry for in-depth understanding of the fundamental mixing, combustion, heat transfer and pollutant formation in combustion processes and for design and optimization of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modeling...... the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides the appropriate inlet boundary condition for the freeboard 3D CFD simulation. The CFD analysis reveals the detailed mixing and combustion characteristics in the waste wood-fired furnace, pinpointing how to improve the design...

  11. Energy from waste by gasification; Energi ur avfall genom foergasning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padban, Nader; Nilsson, Torbjoern; Berge, Niklas [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    At present the investigation on alternative techniques to solve the problem with the growing amount of the wastes within European countries is a highly propitiated research area. The driving forces behind this priority are the current EU-legislations regarding the ban on landfill of combustible wastes and also the regulation on emission limits from waste treatment plants. The alternatives for waste treatment besides recycling are incineration, direct co-combustion and gasification. Co-combustion of waste with biomass can be considered a short-term solution for the problem but has the disadvantages of decreasing the capacity for clean fuels such as biomass and set demands on intensive modifications in the existing heat or heat and power plants. Waste gasification is an attractive alternative that can compete with incineration and co-combustion processes when the environmental and economical aspects are concerned. The product gas from a waste gasifier can be burned alone in conventional oil fired boilers or be co-fired with biomass in biomass plant. Fuel quality, gas cleaning system and questions related to ash treatment are the key parameters that must be considered in design and construction of a waste gasification process. Gasification of waste fractions that have limited contents of contaminants such as nitrogen, sulfur and chlorine will simplify the gas cleaning procedure and increase the competitiveness of the process. Heavy metals will be in captured in the fly ash if a gas filtering temperature below 200 deg C is applied. Activated carbon can be used as a sorbent for mercury, lime or alkali for capturing chlorine. For fuels with low Zn content a higher gas filtering temperature can be applied. Direct co-combustion or gasification/co-combustion of a fuel with low heating value affects two main parameters in the boiler: the adiabatic combustion temperature and the total capacity of the boiler. It is possible to co-fire: a) sorted MSW: 25%, b) sorted industrial

  12. Disposal facilities on land for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: draft principles for the protection of the human environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document gives the views of the authorising [United Kingdom] Departments under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960 about the principles which those Departments should follow in assessing proposals for land disposal facilities for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. It is based on relevant research findings and reports by international bodies; but has been prepared at this stage as a draft on which outside comments are sought, and is subject to revision in the light of those comments. That process of review will lead to the preparation and publication of a definitive statement of principles, which will be an important background document for public inquiries into proposals to develop sites for land disposal facilities. Headings are: authorisation of disposal; other legislation governing new disposal facilities; basic radiological requirements; general principles; information requirements. (author)

  13. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to section 3021(a) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). DOE has prepared this report for submission to EPA and the States in which DOE stores, generates, or treats mixed wastes. As required by the FFCA, this report contains: a national inventory of all mixed wastes in the DOE system that are currently stored or will be generated over the next five years, including waste stream name, description, EPA waste codes, basis for characterization (i.e., sampling and analysis or process knowledge), effect of radionuclides on treatment, quantity stored that is subject to the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) storage prohibition, quantity stored that is not subject to the LDRS, expected generation over the next five years, Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) used for developing the LDR requirements, and waste minimization activities; and a national inventory of mixed waste treatment capacities and technologies, including information such as the descriptions, capacities, and locations of all existing and proposed treatment facilities, explanations for not including certain existing facilities in capacity evaluations, information to support decisions on unavailability of treatment technologies for certain mixed wastes, and the planned technology development activities

  14. Assessing social and economic effects of perceived risk: Workshop summary: Draft: BWIP Repository Project. [Basalt Waste Isolation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealey, S.M.; Liebow, E.B. (eds.)

    1988-03-01

    The US Department of Energy sponsored a one-day workshop to discuss the complex dimensions of risk judgment formation and the assessment of social and economic effects of risk perceptions related to the permanent underground storage of highly radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power plants. Affected parties have publicly expressed concerns about potentially significant risk-related effects of this approach to waste management. A selective review of relevant literature in psychology, decision analysis, economics, sociology, and anthropology was completed, along with an examination of decision analysis techniques that might assist in developing suitable responses to public risk-related concerns. The workshop was organized as a forum in which a set of distinguished experts could exchange ideas and observations about the problems of characterizing the effects of risk judgments. Out of the exchange emerged the issues or themes of problems with probabilistic risk assessment techniques are evident; differences exist in the way experts and laypersons view risk, and this leads to higher levels of public concern than experts feel are justified; experts, risk managers, and decision-makers sometimes err in assessing risk and in dealing with the public; credibility and trust are important contributing factors in the formation of risk judgments; social and economic consequences of perceived risk should be properly anticipated; improvements can be made in informing the public about risk; the role of the public in risk assessment, risk management and decisions about risk should be reconsidered; and mitigation and compensation are central to resolving conflicts arising from divergent risk judgments. 1 tab.

  15. A review on technological options of waste to energy for effective management of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Samadder, S R

    2017-11-01

    Approximately one-fourth population across the world rely on traditional fuels (kerosene, natural gas, biomass residue, firewood, coal, animal dung, etc.) for domestic use despite significant socioeconomic and technological development. Fossil fuel reserves are being exploited at a very fast rate to meet the increasing energy demands, so there is a need to find alternative sources of energy before all the fossil fuel reserves are depleted. Waste to energy (WTE) can be considered as a potential alternative source of energy, which is economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The present study reviewed the current global scenario of WTE technological options (incineration, pyrolysis, gasification, anaerobic digestion, and landfilling with gas recovery) for effective energy recovery and the challenges faced by developed and developing countries. This review will provide a framework for evaluating WTE technological options based on case studies of developed and developing countries. Unsanitary landfilling is the most commonly practiced waste disposal option in the developing countries. However, developed countries have realised the potential of WTE technologies for effective municipal solid waste management (MSWM). This review will help the policy makers and the implementing authorities involved in MSWM to understand the current status, challenges and barriers for effective management of municipal solid waste. This review concluded WTE as a potential renewable source of energy, which will partly meet the energy demand and ensure effective MSWM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimal waste-to-energy strategy assisted by GIS For sustainable solid waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S T; Hashim, H; Lee, C T; Lim, J S; Kanniah, K D

    2014-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has become more complex and costly with the rapid socio-economic development and increased volume of waste. Planning a sustainable regional waste management strategy is a critical step for the decision maker. There is a great potential for MSW to be used for the generation of renewable energy through waste incineration or landfilling with gas capture system. However, due to high processing cost and cost of resource transportation and distribution throughout the waste collection station and power plant, MSW is mostly disposed in the landfill. This paper presents an optimization model incorporated with GIS data inputs for MSW management. The model can design the multi-period waste-to-energy (WTE) strategy to illustrate the economic potential and tradeoffs for MSW management under different scenarios. The model is capable of predicting the optimal generation, capacity, type of WTE conversion technology and location for the operation and construction of new WTE power plants to satisfy the increased energy demand by 2025 in the most profitable way. Iskandar Malaysia region was chosen as the model city for this study

  17. Optimal waste-to-energy strategy assisted by GIS For sustainable solid waste management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. T.; Hashim, H.

    2014-02-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has become more complex and costly with the rapid socio-economic development and increased volume of waste. Planning a sustainable regional waste management strategy is a critical step for the decision maker. There is a great potential for MSW to be used for the generation of renewable energy through waste incineration or landfilling with gas capture system. However, due to high processing cost and cost of resource transportation and distribution throughout the waste collection station and power plant, MSW is mostly disposed in the landfill. This paper presents an optimization model incorporated with GIS data inputs for MSW management. The model can design the multi-period waste-to-energy (WTE) strategy to illustrate the economic potential and tradeoffs for MSW management under different scenarios. The model is capable of predicting the optimal generation, capacity, type of WTE conversion technology and location for the operation and construction of new WTE power plants to satisfy the increased energy demand by 2025 in the most profitable way. Iskandar Malaysia region was chosen as the model city for this study.

  18. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the Commission's implementing regulations and its April 27, 1981 Statement of Policy, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This draft supplement updates the environmental evaluation of accident-generated water disposal alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the draft supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's recently submitted proposal for water disposition

  19. Decentralized energy conversion of biomass from Amstelland. The feasibility of decentralized use of energy from green wastes in the municipality Amstelveen and its environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, H.D.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the study on the title subject is to determine the enviro-technical and economical feasibility of decentralized biomass conversion as part of the green area and energy infrastructure of the region Amstelland, Netherlands. The parts of the study concern a regional inventory of green wastes in Amstelland, an energy demand analysis of conversion sites in the region, a logistic analysis, an evaluation of technical options (cogeneration, combustion, gasification), business economical analysis of the investments, determining the support and willingness to contribute and cooperate, and drafting a final report. Based on the results of the report decisions can be made whether or not the design and installation of a decentralized biomass conversion system should be elaborated in detail. 16 refs

  20. Experiences with waste incineration for energy production in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Janus; Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Møller Andersen, Frits

    The Bioenergy Department in SENER have requested assistance with planning for the deployment of bioenergy (Biomass, biogas and waste incineration) in Mexico and information on Danish experiences with developing policy initiatives promoting bioenergy. This introduction to the Danish experiences...... with waste incineration for energy production use is compiled as preparation for SENER’s potential visit to Denmark in 2014. This report was prepared 19 June, 2014 by COWI DTU System Analysis to Danish Energy Agency (DEA) as part of a frame contract agreement....

  1. Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, M; Meibom, P

    2010-12-01

    Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO(2) quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO(2) quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Buying less and wasting less food. Changes in household food energy purchases, energy intakes and energy density between 2007 and 2012 with and without adjustment for food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Stephen; Horgan, Graham W; Macdiarmid, Jennie I

    2017-05-01

    Consumers in the UK responded to the rapid increases in food prices between 2007 and 2009 partly by reducing the amount of food energy bought. Household food and drink waste has also decreased since 2007. The present study explored the combined effects of reductions in food purchases and waste on estimated food energy intakes and dietary energy density. The amount of food energy purchased per adult equivalent was calculated from Kantar Worldpanel household food and drink purchase data for 2007 and 2012. Food energy intakes were estimated by adjusting purchase data for food and drink waste, using waste factors specific to the two years and scaled for household size. Scotland. Households in Scotland (n 2657 in 2007; n 2841 in 2012). The amount of food energy purchased decreased between 2007 and 2012, from 8·6 to 8·2 MJ/adult equivalent per d (Pfood waste, estimated food energy intake was not significantly different (7·3 and 7·2 MJ/adult equivalent per d for 2007 and 2012, respectively; P=0·186). Energy density of foods purchased increased slightly from 700 to 706 kJ/100 g (P=0·010). While consumers in Scotland reduced the amount of food energy that they purchased between 2007 and 2012, this was balanced by reductions in household food and drink waste over the same time, resulting in no significant change in net estimated energy intake of foods brought into the home.

  3. A preliminary study of waste to energy potential of municipal solid waste in Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llanes, Junior Lorenzo; Kalogirou, Efstratios

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges that must be face by a growing society is its waste management. This is crucial in the particular case of developing countries like Cuba. Waste to energy is a well-established technology for municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment. The aim of this work was to estimate the energetic potential of MSW in the city of Havana. An average low heating value (LHV) of 7.35 MJ/kg was estimated by applying different models. From the mass and energy balances, the emissions and the energy recovered for electricity generation were determined. Two steam turbine configurations (back – pressure and condensing) were designed by a rigorous method and later simulated in Aspen Plus simulator. The results showed that for a feeding rate of 49.5 tonh-1 of MSW it was possible to generate 257 GWh per year with an overall plant efficiency of 25.4% in a four-stage turbine. (author)

  4. 10 CFR 51.74 - Distribution of draft environmental impact statement and supplement to draft environmental impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distribution of draft environmental impact statement and supplement to draft environmental impact statement; news releases. 51.74 Section 51.74 Energy NUCLEAR... Impact Statements § 51.74 Distribution of draft environmental impact statement and supplement to draft...

  5. Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie; Meibom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy...... production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments...... and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO2 quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste...

  6. Sustainable waste management: Waste to energy plant as an alternative to landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchiella, Federica; D’Adamo, Idiano; Gastaldi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • WTE plant is a reasonable and sustainable alternative technology to landfill. • A 150 kt plant in the only electrical configuration for Abruzzo region. • The percentage of energy recovery ranges from 21% to 25% in examined scenarios. • Financial Net Present Value is equal to 25.4 € per kiloton of treated waste. • The annual reduction of emissions is equal to 370 kgCO_2eq per ton of treated waste. - Abstract: The management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been identified as one of the global challenges that must be carefully faced in order to achieve sustainability goals. European Union (EU) has defined as Waste to Energy (WTE) technology is able to create synergies with EU energy and climate policy, without compromising the achievement of higher reuse and recycling rates. The methodology used in this paper is based on two levels. A strategy analysis defines the amount of waste to incinerate with energy recovery considering different approaches based on unsorted waste, landfilled waste and separated collection rate, respectively. Consequently, it is evaluated the sustainability of a WTE plant as an alternative to landfill for a specific area. Two indicators are used: the Reduction of the Emissions of equivalent Carbon Dioxide (ER_C_O_2_e_q) and Financial Net Present Value (FNPV). Furthermore, a social analysis is conducted through interviews to identify the most critical elements determining the aversion toward the WTE realization. The obtained results show the opportunity to realize a 150 kt plant in the only electrical configuration. In fact, the cogenerative configuration reaches better environmental performances, but it is not profitable for this size. Profits are equal to 25.4 € per kiloton of treated waste and 370 kgCO_2eq per ton of treated waste are avoided using a WTE plant as an alternative to landfill. In this way, the percentage of energy recovery ranges from 21% to 25% in examined scenarios and disposal waste is minimised

  7. Waste utilization in electric energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parate, N.S.; Harris, E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that electric energy is an integral element of today's economy and the standard quality of life. The availability of energy at an affordable cost has always been of basic concern because of the intimate relationship of energy to our societal development and progress. Coal and Uranium are the primary alternative energy sources for large electric power plants. Coal remains the dominant fuel for electric generation. The pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology has the potential of utilizing all types of coal, including coal with high ash, high sulphur, and high moisture content. Fluidized bed combustion is a firing technique which fulfills today's pollution control requirements without downstream flue gas cleaning plants like scrubbers, baghouses, and precipitators

  8. System analysis of energy utilization from waste - evaluation of energy, environment and economy. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Granath, Jessica; Frostell, Bjoern; Bjoerklund, Anna; Eriksson, Ola; Carlsson, Marcus

    1999-12-01

    Energy, environmental, and economic consequences of different management systems for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. In the systems analysis, different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of easily degradable organic waste, were studied and also compared to landfilling. In the study a computer model (ORWARE) based on LCA methodology was used. Case studies were performed for three different municipalities: Uppsala, Stockholm, and Aelvdalen. The following parameters were used for evaluating the different waste management options: consumption of energy resources, global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photo oxidant formation, heavy metal flows, financial economy and welfare economy, where welfare economy is the sum of financial economy and environmental economy. The study shows that reduced landfilling to the benefit of an increased use of energy and material from waste is positive from an environmental and energy as well as economic aspect. This is mainly due to the fact that the choice of waste management method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as production of district heating, electricity, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser. This means that landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, both because of the the environmental impact, and because of the low recovery of resources. Incineration should constitute a basis in the waste management systems of the three municipalities studied, even if the waste has to be transported to a regional facility. Once the waste is collected, longer regional transports are of little significance, as long as the transports are carried out in an efficient manner. Comparing materials recycling and incineration, and biological treatment and incineration, no unambiguous conclusions can be drawn. There are

  9. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 4: Appendix BIR Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report consists of the waste stream profile for the WIPP transuranic waste baseline inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The following assumptions/modifications were made by the WTWBIR team in developing the LL waste stream profiles: since only current volumes were provided by LL, the final form volumes were assumed to be the same as the current volumes; the WTWBIR team had to assign identification numbers (IDs) to those LL waste streams not given an identifier by the site, the assigned identification numbers are consistent with the site reported numbers; LL Final Waste Form Groups were modified to be consistent with the nomenclature used in the WTWBID, these changes included word and spelling changes, the assigned Final Waste Form Groups are consistent with the information provided by LL; the volumes for the year 1993 were changed from an annual rate of generation (m 3 /year) to a cumulative value (m 3 )

  10. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnley, Stephen; Phillips, Rhiannon; Coleman, Terry; Rampling, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. → For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. → For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. → For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  11. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  12. Development of a Novel Food Waste Collection Kiosk and Waste-to-Energy Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franchetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. generates more than 37 million metric tons of food waste each year, and over 95% of it is disposed of at U.S. landfills. This paper describes the development of a novel food waste collection kiosk and business model called “Greenbox” that will collect and store food waste from households and restaurants with incentives for user participation to spur food waste-to-energy production in a local community. Greenbox offers a low-cost collection point to divert food waste from landfills, reduce greenhouse gases from decomposition, and aid in generating cleaner energy. A functional prototype was successfully developed by a team of engineering students and a business model was created as part of a senior design capstone course. Each Greenbox unit has the potential to reduce 275 metric tons of food waste per year, remove 1320 kg of greenhouse gases, and create 470,000 liters of methane gas while providing a payback period of 4.2 years and a rate of return of 14.9%.

  13. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V and V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M and S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V and V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V and V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M and S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V and V into subcontinuum scale M and S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  14. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications. PMID:28788372

  15. To study the municipal solid waste as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Khan, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    The solid waste management is a very complicated specially when it must be environmental friendly. In the present life, power energy is being more expensive than ever before and human off spring is struggling td acquire cheap ways of getting energy. At the same time, he is facing another problem of waste disposal pollution in the environment, which is a by-product of his industries and population, and when it would be hazardous to life, it will be a more serious problem. In this study, an idea is made to use garbage as an alternate fuel and the analysis of ingredients is done to compare it with the usual fuel i.e. coal. On the other hand, municipal waste (garbage) disposal will be automatically solved. (author)

  16. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-10-31

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  17. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  18. System analysis of energy utilization from waste - evaluation of energy, environment and economy. Case study - Aelvdalen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Granath, Jessica; Frostell, Bjoern; Bjoerklund, Anna; Eriksson, Ola; Carlsson, Marcus

    1999-12-01

    Energy, environmental, and economic consequences of different management systems for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. In the systems analysis, different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of easily degradable organic waste, were studied and also compared to landfilling. In the study a computer model (ORWARE) based on LCA methodology was used. The following parameters were used for evaluating the different waste management options: consumption of energy resources, global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photo oxidant formation, heavy metal flows, financial economy and welfare economy, where welfare economy is the sum of financial economy and environmental economy. The study shows that reduced landfilling to the benefit of an increased use of energy and material from waste is positive from an environmental and energy as well as economic aspect. This is mainly due to the fact that the choice of waste management method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as production of district heating, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser. This means that landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, both because of the the environmental impact, and because of the low recovery of resources. Incineration should constitute a basis in the waste management system of Aelvdalen, even if the waste has to be transported to a regional facility. Once the waste is collected, longer regional transports are of little significance, as long as the transports are carried out in an efficient manner. Comparing materials recycling and incineration, and biological treatment and incineration, no unambiguous conclusions can be drawn. There are benefits and drawbacks associated with all these waste management options. Materials recycling of plastic containers is comparable to

  19. The draft Mission Plan Amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The draft Mission Plan Amendment provides an opportunity for States and Indian Tribes and other involved parties to participate in a process that no other nation affords its citizens. More than just a comment period on a Department of Energy document, the amendment that is to be submitted later this year will lay before Congress, the documentary basis on which to make decisions about the scope and timing of the high-level waste program in what Secretary Herrington has called a ''crossroads'' years. The Amendment will distill the view of the participants and also preset them to Congress as an integral part of the document. After four years of effort, the Nation is being afforded an opportunity to ask itself again whether the Act passed in 1982 is working and remains the best way to protect the public interest

  20. Radioactive waste management at the Peruvian Nuclear Energy Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallaupoma, M.

    1986-01-01

    A brief account of current radioactive liquid waste management practices at the Peruvian Nuclear Energy Institute (IPEN), is presented. The storage and disposal systems and facilities to be provided at the future Peruvian Nuclear Research Centre (CNIP) at Huarangal, 40 km to the North of Lima, are described. (Author) [pt

  1. Energy supply waste water treatment plant West Brabant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poldervaart, A; Schouten, G J

    1983-09-01

    For the energy supply for the waste water treatment plant (rwzi-Bath) of the Hoogheemraadschap West-Brabant three energy sources are used: biogas of the digesters, natural gas and electricity delivered by the PZEM. For a good balance between heat/power demand and production a heat/power plant is installed. By using this system a high efficiency for the use of energy will be obtained. To save energy the oxygen concentration in the aerationtanks is automatically controlled by means of regulating the position of the air supply control valves and the capacity and number of the turbocompressors. For the oxygen controlsystem a Siemens PLC is used.

  2. Utilizing waste heat. Energy recovery options for trade and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, W

    1988-08-01

    The article shows options for efficient and low-cost thermal energy recovery. Heat recovery involves a number of problems, e.g. the type of waste heat, the uses of the energy recovered, and the best way of utilizing it. There is no generally applicable way of solving these problems. Some practical examples are presented. Economically efficient solutions require detailed technical knowledge as well as a good portion of creativity and imagination. (BR).

  3. Estimation of laid energy in a γ radioactive wastes barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechitoua, B.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose is to reproduce the results of a study realised at the Cea Grenoble ((DTA/CEREM/DEM) with the MCNPP4B code and an internal DAM code. The calculations concern the estimation of the percentage of the energy transferred to the organic matters contained in gamma radioactive wastes casks. After the checking it is estimated with the calculations codes the percentages of energy laid in more realistic configurations. (N.C.)

  4. System analysis of energy utilization from waste - evaluation of energy, environment and economy. Case study - Uppsala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Granath, Jessica; Frostell, Bjoern; Bjoerklund, Anna; Eriksson, Ola; Carlsson, Marcus

    1999-12-01

    Energy, environmental, and economic consequences of different management systems for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. In the systems analysis, different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of easily degradable organic waste, were studied and also compared to landfilling. In the study a computer model (ORWARE) based on LCA methodology was used. The following parameters were used for evaluating the different waste management options: consumption of energy resources, global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photo oxidant formation, heavy metal flows, financial economy and welfare economy, where welfare economy is the sum of financial economy and environmental economy. The study shows that reduced landfilling to the benefit of an increased use of energy and material from waste is positive from an environmental and energy as well as economic aspect. This is mainly due to the fact that the choice of waste management method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as production of district heating, electricity, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser. This means that landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, both because of the the environmental impact, and because of the low recovery of resources. Incineration should constitute a basis in the waste management system of Uppsala. Once the waste is collected, longer regional transports are of little significance, as long as the transports are carried out in an efficient manner. Comparing materials recycling and incineration, and biological treatment and incineration, no unambiguous conclusions can be drawn. There are benefits and drawbacks associated with all these waste management options. Materials recycling of plastic containers is comparable to incineration from a welfare economic aspect, but gives

  5. Energy from biomass and wastes 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klass, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This proceedings is contains 63 papers on the utilization of biomass as an energy source and as a source for materials. The specific topics discussed include: environmental issues, biomass production, biomass pretreatment and processing, chemicals and other products from biomass, fuel ethanol, thermal liquefaction, thermal gasification, combustion and power generation, and national programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  6. Waste energy driven air conditioning system (WEDACS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, R.H.L.; Boot, M.D.; Luijten, C.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the port injected Spark Ignition (SI) engine, the single greatest part load efficiency reducing factor are energy losses over the throttle valve. The need for this throttle valve arises from the fact that engine power is controlled by the amount of air in the cylinders, since combustion occurs

  7. Energy-wasting hunt is back

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, J.

    2005-01-01

    With the rise of automotive and heating fuel retail prices, energy saving policy is back again. Car drivers are purchasing less fuel and the government has announced some incentive measures for the improvement of the thermal insulation of residential and office buildings. Short paper. (J.S.)

  8. MEMS-Based Waste Vibrational Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    MEMS energy- harvesting device. Although PZT is used more prevalently due to its higher piezoelectric coefficient and dielectric constant, AlN has...7 1. Lead Zirconium Titanate ( PZT ) .........................................................7 2. Aluminum...Laboratory PiezoMUMPS Piezoelectric Multi-User MEMS Processes PZT Lead Zirconate Titanate SEM Scanning Electron Microscopy SiO2 Silicon

  9. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.; Lucerna, J.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development

  10. 76 FR 11506 - Fisheries and Habitat Conservation and Migratory Birds Programs; Draft Land-Based Wind Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ...] RIN 1018-AX45 Fisheries and Habitat Conservation and Migratory Birds Programs; Draft Land-Based Wind... Impacts from Wind Turbines (Interim Guidance). As stated in the notice, the comment period on the draft... Minimizing Wildlife Impacts from Wind Turbines. We expect to issue final Guidelines for public use after...

  11. Brief draft on surface and subsurface storage of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes. Spent fuels synthesis file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, C.; Jaecki, P.

    2002-01-01

    This document makes a synthesis of the results of two brief draft studies performed in 2002 about the surface and subsurface storage of spent fuels. These studies stress on the long duration aspect of the disposal: feasibility of a secular disposal facility, potential risks and safety level of such a facility, estimation of the initial investment and of operation and maintenance costs. The main points of the specifications and the input data are presented first, and then the subsurface and surface draft studies are described. Content: specifications (imposed design principles and options, dry corrosion, input data); subsurface storage (description and design options, thermal dimensioning and ventilation, geotechnical stability of the facility, subsurface water management, dry corrosion, infrastructure durability, safety, monitoring, security and physical protection, technical-economical aspects, case of Mox fuel, case of glass packages); surface storage (description and design options, thermal dimensioning and ventilation, mechanical dimensioning of the facility, dry corrosion, infrastructure durability, safety, monitoring, security and physical protection, technical-economical aspects, case of Mox fuel, case of glass packages); conclusions and perspectives. (J.S.)

  12. Draft site characterization analysis of the site characterization report for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, Hanford, Washington Site. Main report and Appendices A through D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    On November 12, 1982, the US Department of Energy submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission the Site Characterization Report for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (DOE/RL 82-3). The Basalt Waste Isolation Project is located on DOE's Hanford Reservation in the State of Washington. NUREG-0960 contains the detailed analysis, by the NRC staff, of the site characterization report. Supporting technical material is contained in Appendices A through W

  13. Oxidation and waste-to-energy output of aluminium waste packaging during incineration: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Félix A; Román, Carlos Pérez; García-Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the oxidation behaviour and waste-to-energy output of different semi-rigid and flexible aluminium packagings when incinerated at 850°C in an air atmosphere enriched with 6% oxygen, in the laboratory setting. The physical properties of the different packagings were determined, including their metallic aluminium contents. The ash contents of their combustion products were determined according to standard BS ISO 1171:2010. The net calorific value, the required energy, and the calorific gain associated with each packaging type were determined following standard BS EN 13431:2004. Packagings with an aluminium lamina thickness of >50μm did not fully oxidise. During incineration, the weight-for-weight waste-to-energy output of the packagings with thick aluminium lamina was lower than that of packagings with thin lamina. The calorific gain depended on the degree of oxidation of the metallic aluminium, but was greater than zero for all the packagings studied. Waste aluminium may therefore be said to act as an energy source in municipal solid waste incineration systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 54669 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed RES Americas Moapa Solar Energy Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed RES Americas Moapa Solar Energy Center, Clark County, Nevada... environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the proposed RES Americas Moapa Solar Energy Center on the Moapa River... Progress and on the following Web site: www.MoapaSolarEnergyCenterEIS.com . In order to be fully considered...

  15. A waste to energy plant for an industrial districts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floreani, M.; Meneghetti, A.; Nardin, G.; Rocco, A.

    2001-01-01

    Industrial districts show characteristics that can be exploited by developing plant solutions studied for their special configuration and not simply extended from single unit models. In the paper a waste-to-energy plant for the chair industrial district in Friuli Venezia Giulia (North Eastern Italy) is described. It has been designed directly involving the University of Udine and can be considered an example of how technology innovation can be promoted by universities, especially in the case of small firms which have limited R and D resources. It is shown how industrial refuse becomes a chance of competitive advantage for the whole district due to its energy recovery in a plant unique for the type of waste processed. Input, combustion, energy recovery and cleaning sections are described in details, underlining innovative approaches and solutions [it

  16. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  17. Draft European resolution on energy transition within the European Union. Nr 597

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, Thierry

    2018-01-01

    After references to European and international directives or agreements, this document aims at drawing up new flexible rules to promote energy transition within the EU. It therefore states the French National Assembly opinion on issues related to the reduction of European greenhouse emissions, the revision of the Carbon Emissions Trading Scheme, rules concerning the sharing of the burden to reduce these emissions in sectors not covered by the ETS, the revision of rules concerning energy efficiency and the energy performance of buildings, the revision of rules concerning renewable energies, the revision of rules in the electric power sector, the governance of the Union of energy, the revision of rules concerning the Agency of the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, the consideration of social impacts of energy transition, the Brexit, and the Paris agreement

  18. System analysis of energy utilization from waste - evaluation of energy, environment and economy. Case study - Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Granath, Jessica; Frostell, Bjoern; Bjoerklund, Anna; Eriksson, Ola; Carlsson, Marcus

    1999-12-01

    Energy, environmental, and economic consequences of different management systems for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. In the systems analysis, different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion) of easily degradable organic waste, were studied and also compared to landfilling. In the study a computer model (ORWARE) based on LCA methodology was used. The following parameters were used for evaluating the different waste management options: consumption of energy resources, global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photo oxidant formation, heavy metal flows, financial economy and welfare economy, where welfare economy is the sum of financial economy and environmental economy. The study shows that reduced landfilling to the benefit of an increased use of energy and material from the waste is positive, from an environmental and energy as well as economic aspect. This is mainly due to the fact that the choice of waste management method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as production of district heating, electricity, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser. This means that landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, both because of the the environmental impact, and because of the low recovery of resources. Incineration should constitute a basis in the waste management system of Stockholm. Once the waste is collected, longer regional transports are of little significance, as long as the transports are carried out in an efficient manner. Comparing materials recycling and incineration, and biological treatment and incineration, no unambiguous conclusions can be drawn. There are benefits and drawbacks associated with all these waste management options. Materials recycling of plastic containers is comparable to incineration from a welfare economic aspect, but gives less

  19. New renewable source of energy from municipal solid waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Zaman, Ashiquz; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    Renewable energy plays an important role in the supply of energy. When energy sources are used, the demand for fossil fuels is reduced. Emissions from the evaporation and combustion of these traditional fossil fuels contributing to a range of environmental and health problems, causing poor air quality, and emitting greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Alternative fuel created from domestic sources has been proposed as a solution to these problems and many alternative fuels are being developed based on solar, wind and biomass. Natural State Research has developed different alternative hydrocarbon fuel produced from abundant waste plastic materials.

  20. Alternatives - talk about energy differently. Radioactive waste a societal issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ''Alternatives'' is an information magazine proposed by the Areva Group, a world nuclear energy leader. It is devoted to the public information on topics of the Group activities. This issue deals with the fusion technology, the strengths and weaknesses of interconnected networks, the undersea tidal power farms, the danish paradox which has the highest levels of CO 2 emissions despite the use of wind energy, the international community renewed commitment to renewable energy, the hydrogen, the low speed wind turbines and the future miniature fuel cells. A special interest is given to the radioactive wastes management. (A.L.B.)

  1. Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

    2011-08-01

    This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

  2. Greenhouse effect reduction and energy recovery from waste landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, Lidia [Dipartimento di Energetica ' Sergio Stecco' , Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: lidia.lombardi@pin.unifi.it; Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica ' Sergio Stecco' , Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita degli Studi di Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Waste management systems are a non-negligible source of greenhouse gases. In particular, methane and carbon dioxide emissions occur in landfills due to the breakdown of biodegradable carbon compounds operated on by anaerobic bacteria. The conventional possibilities of reducing the greenhouse effect (GHE) from waste landfilling consists in landfill gas (LFG) flaring or combustion with energy recovery in reciprocating engines. These conventional treatments are compared with three innovative possibilities: the direct LFG feeding to a fuel cell (FC); the production of a hydrogen-rich gas, by means of steam reforming and CO{sub 2} capture, to feed a stationary FC; the production of a hydrogen-rich gas, by means of steam reforming and CO{sub 2} capture, to feed a vehicle FC. The comparison is carried out from an environmental point of view, calculating the specific production of GHE per unit mass of waste disposed in landfill equipped with the different considered technologies.

  3. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

  4. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requiremenrs of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs

  5. Radioactive waste management in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report drafted by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) deals with the basic principles and the main stages of radioactive waste management. The review more precisely focuses on what relates to environment protection, safety assessment, financing, social issues, public concerns and international co-operation. An annex finally summarises the radioactive waste management programs that are implemented in 15 of the NEA countries. (TEC). figs

  6. Waste-to-energy, municipal solid waste treatment, and best available technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenfeng; Ren, Jingzheng; Goodsite, Michael Evan

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become an urgently important task of many countries. This objective of this study is to present a novel group multi-attribute decision analysis method for prioritizing the MSW treatment alternatives based on the interval-valued fuzzy set theory...... (DEMATEL) method was developed to determine the weights of the evaluation criteria by considering the independent relationships among these criteria. The multi-actor interval-valued fuzzy grey relational analysis was developed to rank the waste-to-energy scenarios. Four alternative processes for MSW...

  7. Market forces in municipal and industrial waste-to-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makansi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The market for municipal and industrial waste-to-energy can be characterized simply as currently soft with continued excellent long-term prospects. But as in all markets large and small, niche opportunities exist now which can be profitable with proper definition and strategy. Economics of several projects have proven marginal, cost overruns are common, and revenue projections are sometimes overstates. Also contributing to poorer economics of late are lower prices for the electric power produced from these plants. New environmental restrictions are adding 10-15% to the capital costs of a given project. On the industrial front, the strength of waste-fuel firing continues to be evident for independent power production. Important fuel-niche markets have sprung up over the last decade including petroleum coke, coal-mining wastes, hospital or redbag wastes, biomass, used tires, and so on. Another fuel niche is hazardous waste incineration. In the municipal arena, realism has not yet hit the recycling and source reduction enthusiasts. Only 25-35% recycling is considered practical by experts. There are also limits to how often material can be recycled. Finally, in spite of the best efforts of the population to control the amount of refuse generated and to recycle that which is, population and economic growth may overtake any new sense of environmental responsibility. And, yes, the additional refuse still has to go somewhere exclamation point The best somewhere option continues to be a waste-to-energy plant. Current market opportunities and two other market forces (international activities and the role of US utilities) are discussed

  8. Management of transuranium-contaminated solid wastes from the Department of Energy nuclear materials production and R and D programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perge, A.F.; Trice, V.G. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This plan has been extracted from a master plan that covers management of all types of wastes for which the Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility. The overall plan has not received approval as policy for the new DOE which came into being in October 1977. Thus, we have to label it as a draft plan, even though our programs, as operating today, are being carried forward in conformance with most of it. Several of our assumptions are controversial and may be modified before the plan is approved. The points we will cover are: A. Goals, B. Scope, C. Assumptions, D. Strategy, E. Specific Objectives, F. Current Activities, and G. Milestones and Schedule. The last point, Milestones and Schedule, was not covered at the meeting. However, it is included here in the proceedings

  9. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE's commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex

  10. Increase in energy efficiency of use of vegetable waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safin, R. R.; Safiullina, A. K.; Nazipova, F. V.

    2017-10-01

    Wastes of woodworking which are exposed to granulation for equalization of humidity, dispersion and also for increase in energy efficiency are the most widespread types of alternative fuel in Russia. Besides, one of the effective methods of the increase in calorific capability of granulates now is the preliminary torrefaction of wood waste - heat treatment without air oxygen access. However this technology is rather researched in detail only in relation to wood particles, while pellets from wastes of agricultural productions are also popular in the market in recent years. The possibility of the increase of the efficiency of production of pellets from sunflower pod by torrefaction is considered in this article, and the analysis of their characteristics in comparison with wood pellets is carried out. It is established that the process of heat treatment of waste of sunflower production is similar to torrefaction of wood raw materials in many respects; therefore, the equipment with similar characteristics can be used. According to the received results on pellet’s properties it is established that hygroscopicity and swelling of samples of fuel granules from sunflower pod considerably decreases with the increase in temperature of treatment that simplifies requirements for their storage and transportation. Besides, it is defined that torrefaction of the granulated fuel from sunflower pod does not yield in calorific properties to the similar fuel granules made of wood sawdust. Thus feasibility of use of heat treatment in production of fuel granules from waste of vegetable raw materials is proved.

  11. Energy efficiency of substance and energy recovery of selected waste fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Klaus; Bahr, Tobias; Bidlingmaier, Werner; Springer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the ecological impact of resource exploitation, the EU calls for sustainable options to increase the efficiency and productivity of the utilization of natural resources. This target can only be achieved by considering resource recovery from waste comprehensively. However, waste management measures have to be investigated critically and all aspects of substance-related recycling and energy recovery have to be carefully balanced. This article compares recovery methods for selected waste fractions with regard to their energy efficiency. Whether material recycling or energy recovery is the most energy efficient solution, is a question of particular relevance with regard to the following waste fractions: paper and cardboard, plastics and biowaste and also indirectly metals. For the described material categories material recycling has advantages compared to energy recovery. In accordance with the improved energy efficiency of substance opposed to energy recovery, substance-related recycling causes lower emissions of green house gases. For the fractions paper and cardboard, plastics, biowaste and metals it becomes apparent, that intensification of the separate collection systems in combination with a more intensive use of sorting technologies can increase the extent of material recycling. Collection and sorting systems must be coordinated. The objective of the overall system must be to achieve an optimum of the highest possible recovery rates in combination with a high quality of recyclables. The energy efficiency of substance related recycling of biowaste can be increased by intensifying the use of anaerobic technologies. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the overall system, the energy efficiencies of energy recovery plants must be increased so that the waste unsuitable for substance recycling is recycled or treated with the highest possible energy yield.

  12. Energy efficiency of substance and energy recovery of selected waste fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Klaus; Bahr, Tobias; Bidlingmaier, Werner; Springer, Christian

    2011-04-01

    In order to reduce the ecological impact of resource exploitation, the EU calls for sustainable options to increase the efficiency and productivity of the utilization of natural resources. This target can only be achieved by considering resource recovery from waste comprehensively. However, waste management measures have to be investigated critically and all aspects of substance-related recycling and energy recovery have to be carefully balanced. This article compares recovery methods for selected waste fractions with regard to their energy efficiency. Whether material recycling or energy recovery is the most energy efficient solution, is a question of particular relevance with regard to the following waste fractions: paper and cardboard, plastics and biowaste and also indirectly metals. For the described material categories material recycling has advantages compared to energy recovery. In accordance with the improved energy efficiency of substance opposed to energy recovery, substance-related recycling causes lower emissions of green house gases. For the fractions paper and cardboard, plastics, biowaste and metals it becomes apparent, that intensification of the separate collection systems in combination with a more intensive use of sorting technologies can increase the extent of material recycling. Collection and sorting systems must be coordinated. The objective of the overall system must be to achieve an optimum of the highest possible recovery rates in combination with a high quality of recyclables. The energy efficiency of substance related recycling of biowaste can be increased by intensifying the use of anaerobic technologies. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the overall system, the energy efficiencies of energy recovery plants must be increased so that the waste unsuitable for substance recycling is recycled or treated with the highest possible energy yield. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Waste Reduction Workshop 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The sixth of a series of waste reduction workshops was held at the Airport Hilton Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia, on February 6--7, 1991. These workshops are held under the auspices of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The focus of this workshop was the review of guidance and the status of conducting process waste assessments (PWAs). Other highlights of the workshop were the status of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Pollution Prevention Program, and presentations on budgeting for waste reduction and the impact of the toxic release inventory (TRI) reporting requirements on pollution prevention activities. Concurrent sessions on the second day included case studies of the experiences at various sites on the subjects of recycling, incentives, source reduction, volume and toxicity reduction, and material procurement. The impact of new state laws on waste reduction efforts at Oak Ridge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Hanford were also reviewed by representatives from those sites. These workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization (WMIN) plans and programs, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste, transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, office waste, and sanitary wastes. Topics of discussion within workshops encompass a wide range of subjects, including any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvement, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration is also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and disposal

  14. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  15. USA: energy policy and spent fuel and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The new US administration under President Bush has shifted political weights in the country's energy policy. The policy pursued by the Clinton administration, which had been focused strongly on energy efficiency and environmental protection, will be revoked in a number of points, and the focus instead will now be on economics and continuity of supply, also against the backdrop of the current power supply crisis in California. However, it is more likely that fossil-fired generating capacity will be expanded or added than new nuclear generating capacity. As far as the policy of managing radioactive waste is concerned, no fast and fundamental changes are expected. Low-level waste arising in medicine, research, industry, and nuclear power plants will be stored in a number of shallow ground burial facilities also involving more than one federal state. The Yucca Mountain repository project will be advanced with a higher budget, and WIPP (Waste Isolation Plant) in the state of New Mexico has been in operation since 1998. Plans for the management of spent fuel elements include interim stores called ISFSIs (Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations) both near and independent of nuclear power sites. Nineteen sites have been licensed, another eighteen are ready to be licensed. In addition, also international spent fuel and nuclear waste management approaches are being discussed in the United States which, inter alia, are meant to offer comprehensive solutions to countries running only a small number of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  16. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  17. Energy from Waste and Biomass - ALTENER Conference held in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Inge

    1999-01-01

    On November 9-10, 1998 ALTENER Conference Energy from Waste and Biomass took place in the hotel Pirita, Tallinn, Estonia. The Conference was organized by the Swedish National Energy Administration in co-operation with the FEMOPET Estonia and the South Jutland University Centre, Biomass Institute (Denmark). The main topics of the Conference were: collecting biogas from landfall, biogas from municipal sewage treatment, biogas from animal manure, waste heat, biomass from the pulp industry and the sawmill, biomass from forestry, biomass for local and district heating. More than 200 delegates from 14 countries participated in this event. A poster exhibition and two study tours to Paeaeskuela Landfill Plant and Jueri Boiler House were organised too. (author)

  18. Gov'tal FY 1987 draft budget for N-energy set at 360 billion yen, up 0.8 %

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The governmental draft budget for nuclear energy was approved on December 30. The total provided is 360,222 million yen, an increase of 0.8 % over the previous year. This is made up of general account, 183,308 million yen (1.4 % down) and special account for power resources development (related only to nuclear power) 175,914 million yen (up 3.2 %). The amount from the general account is reduced for the first time in three years. This decrease is due mainly to completion of the energy break-even plasma testing device for nuclear fusion research. The special account primarily represents the tax for promoting power source development, a kind of special purpose tax from the electric power companies, based on generated electricity, and from this, subsidies are paid to local municipalities for promotion of siting for power sources and for the cost of survey and research on the development of oil alternative power sources. The special account for power resources development consists of the power sources siting account, 68,114 million yen (up 4.5 %) and the power sources diversification account, 108,800 million yen (up 2.4 %). Nuclear energy budgets sought by the Science and Technology Agency, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and other government agencies are shown in Table. STA and MITI have both requested slightly less than in the preceding year from the general accout, but both asked for higher amounts from the special account than in the preceding year. The high rise in the amount sougt by other agencies is attributed to the increase in the cost of eradication of melon flies. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Waste energy recovery in the industry in the ECE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In the ECE region industry accounts for about 44 per cent of total final energy consumption, 50-55 per cent of which is ''lost''. Since the early 1970s the efficiency of energy use has improved by 5 or 6 percentage points. The potential for further cost-effective savings is estimated at 10 to 20 percentage points, depending on the type of industrial activity, kind of waste energy, availability of outlets, investment strategies, awareness of the significantly improved technical possibilities and degree of co-operation between energy specialists and production engineers, equipment manufacturers, and industrial sectors at the national and international levels. The present publication argues the case for secondary energy recovery (SER) by end-users and international co-operation in technical, economic, environmental and methodological fields. It is based on data compiled by the secretariat of the Economic Commission for Europe on 1 June 1984 and given general distribution. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Brazilian waste potential: energy, environmental, social and economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.B.; Rosa, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy that could be produced from solid wastes in Brazil tops 50 TWh. Equivalent to some 17% of the nation's total power consumption at costs that are competitive with more traditional options, this would also reduce greenhouse gases emissions. Moreover, managing wastes for energy generation purposes could well open up thousands of jobs for unskilled workers. Related to power generation and conservation, energy use requires discussions on the feasibility of each energy supply option, and comparison between alternatives available on the market. Power conservation is compared to projects implemented by the Federal Government, while power generation is rated against thermo-power plants fired by natural gas running on a combined cycle system. Although the operating costs of selective garbage collection for energy generation are higher than current levels, the net operating revenues of this scheme reach some US$ 4 billion/year. This underpins the feasibility of garbage management being underwritten by energy uses and avoided environmental costs. The suggested optimization of the technical, economic, social and environmental sustainability of the expansion of Brazil's power sector consists of compatibilizing the use of fossil and renewable fuels, which is particularly relevant for hybrid thermo-power plants with null account on greenhouse gases emissions

  1. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat

  2. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ primary /100 MJ input waste. • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ primary /100 MJ input waste , in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS

  3. User guide - COE calculation tool for wave energy converters. Draft version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Chozas, J.; Kofoed, J.P. [Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Denmark); Helstrup Jensen, N.E. [Energinet.dk, Fredericia (Denmark)

    2013-08-15

    Aalborg University together with Energinet.dk and Julia F. Chozas Consulting Engineer, have released a freely available online spreadsheet to evaluate the Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) for wave energy projects. The open-access tool calculates the LCOE based on the power production of a Wave Energy Converter (WEC) at a particular location. Production data may derive from laboratory testing, numerical modelling or from sea trials. The tool has been developed as a transparent and simple model that evaluates WEC's economic feasibility in a range of locations, while scaling WEC's features to the selected site. (Author)

  4. Department of Energy Waste Information Network: Hazardous and mixed waste data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Information Network (WIN) was developed through the efforts of the DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Support Office (SO) to meet the programmatic information needs of the Director, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. WIN's key objective is to provide DOE Headquarters (HQ), DOE Operations Offices, and their contractors with an information management tool to support environmental restoration and waste management activities and to promote technology transfer across the DOE complex. WIN has evolved in various stages of growth driven by continued identification of user needs. The current system provides seven key features: technical information systems, bulletin boards, data file transfer, on-line conferencing, formal concurrence system, electronic messaging, and integrated spreadsheet/graphics. WIN is based on Digital Equipment Corporation;s (DEC) VAXcluster platform and is currently supporting nearly 1,000 users. An interactive menu system, DEC's ALL-IN-1 (1), provides easy access to all applications. WIN's many features are designed to provide the DOE waste management community with a repository of information management tools that are accessible, functional, and efficient. The type of tool required depends on the task to be performed, and WIN is equipped to serve many different needs. Each component of the system is evaluated for effectiveness for a particular purpose, ease of use, and quality of operation. The system is fully supported by project managers, systems analysts, and user assistance technicians to ensure subscribers of continued, uninterrupted service. 1 ref

  5. Review of the performance assessment in the WIPP draft compliance application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.L.

    1996-01-01

    On March 31, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) filed a draft compliance certification application (DCCA) with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to show the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's compliance with the USEPA's environmental standards for disposal of high-level and transuranic waste. Demonstration of compliance is by a performance assessment. This paper is an early review of the performance assessment in the draft application, by the Environmental Evaluation Group, an oversight group. The performance assessment in the draft application is incomplete. Not all relevant scenarios have been analyzed. The calculation of potential consequences often does not use experimental data but rather estimates by workers developing additional data. The final compliance application, scheduled for October 1996, needs to consider additional scenarios, and be fully based on experimental data

  6. Molt salts reactors capacity for wastes incineration and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.; Nuttin, A.

    2005-01-01

    The molten salt reactors present many advantages in the framework of the IV generation systems development for the energy production and/or the wastes incineration. After a recall of the main studies realized on the molten salt reactors, this document presents the new concepts and the identified research axis: the MSRE project and experience, the incinerators concepts, the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  7. A very high energy imaging for radioactive wastes processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Pettier, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The X imaging occurs at a lot of steps of the radioactive wastes processing: selection for conditioning, physical characterization with a view to radiological characterization, quality control of the product before storage, transport or disposal. Size and volume of the objects considered here necessitate to work with very high energy systems. Here is shown, through some examples, in which conditions this X imaging is carried out as well as the contribution of the obtained images. (O.M.)

  8. Thirty years nuclear energy. 240,000 years of nuclear waste. Why Greenpeace campaigns against nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teule, R.

    2004-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the arguments that Greenpeace has against nuclear energy, and why this environmental organization campaigns against the processing of nuclear waste and transportation of Dutch nuclear waste to France [nl

  9. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  10. The energy Review: the revision of british the energy policy and the radioactive wastes: the report of Committee on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoudi, M.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the british energy policy, in which the nuclear power has a real part. The report details: the reduction of the carbon emission by the energy conservation and the clean energies, the energy safety, the impacts of the Energy Review, the technology part to reach these objectives and some reactions. The second part is devoted to the radioactive wastes and a presentation of the report Committee on Radioactive Wastes. (A.L.B.)

  11. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  12. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed

  13. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  14. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  15. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  16. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  17. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs

  18. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  19. Biogas : Animal Waste That Can be Alternative Energy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Haryati

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is a renewable energy which can be used as alternative fuel to replace fossil fuel such as oil and natural gas . Recently, diversification on the use of energy has increasingly become an important issue because the oil sources are depleting . Utilization of agricultural wastes for biogas production can minimize the consumption of commercial energy source such as kerosene as well as the use of firewood . Biogas is generated by the process of organic material digestion by certain anaerobe bacteria activity in aerobic digester . Anaerobic digestion process is basically carried out in three steps i.e. hydrolysis, acidogenic and metanogenic . Digestion process needs certain condition such as C : N ratio, temperature, acidity and also digester design . Most anaerobic digestions perform best at 32 - 35°C or at 50 - 55°C, and pH 6 .8 - 8 . At these temperatures, the digestion process essentially converts organic matter in the present of water into gaseous energy . Generally, biogas consists of methane about 60 - 70% and yield about 1,000 British Thermal Unit/ft 3 or 252 Kcal/0.028 m3 when burned . In several developing countries, as well as in Europe and the United States, biogas has been commonly used as a subtitute environmental friendly energy . Meanwhile, potentially Indonesia has abundant potential of biomass waste, however biogas has not been used maximally .

  20. National waste management infrastructure in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darko, E.O.; Fletcher, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive materials have been used in Ghana for more than four decades. Radioactive waste generated from their applications in various fields has been managed without adequate infrastructure and any legal framework to control and regulate them. The expanded use of nuclear facilities and radiation sources in Ghana with the concomitant exposure to human population necessitates effective infrastructure to deal with the increasing problems of waste. The Ghana Atomic Energy Act 204 (1963) and the Radiation Protection Instrument LI 1559 (1993) made inadequate provision for the management of waste. With the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act, PNDCL 308, a radioactive waste management centre has been established to take care of all waste in the country. To achieve the set objectives for an effective waste management regime, a waste management regulation has been drafted and relevant codes of practice are being developed to guide generators of waste, operators of waste management facilities and the regulatory authority. (author)

  1. Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report. Volume 2. Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-07-01

    The appendices present the analytical basis for the analysis of solar total energy (STE) systems. A regional-climate model and a building-load requirements model are developed, along with fuel-price scenarios. Life-cycle costs are compared for conventional-utility, total energy, and STE systems. Thermal STE system design trade-offs are performed and thermal STE system performance is determined. The sensitivity of STE competitiveness to fuel prices is examined. The selection of the photovoltaic array is briefly discussed. The institutional-sector decision processes are analyzed. Hypothetical regional back-up rates and electrical-energy costs are calculated. The algorithms and equations used in operating the market model are given, and a general methodology is developed for projecting the size of the market for STE systems and applied to each of 8 institutional subsectors. (LEW)

  2. Energy-information dissemination into the real-estate industry. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isakson, H.R.

    1979-06-01

    A description is presented of a set of nine slide/tape programs and two sets of overhead transparencies that were developed to accompany earlier designed curriculum for real estate professionals. The present project includes the development of standardized implementation procedures for use by energy extension service offices and an instructor's manual designed to integrate use of the slide/tape programs and overhead transparencies with the textbook, Making the Most of Energy in Real Estate, which was developed earlier. (MCW)

  3. North American energy relationships : clean energy and climate action : a North American collaboration : draft paper for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, D.

    2009-12-01

    This paper discussed energy and climate policies and programs aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in North America. The aim of the study was to determine how energy production and use will impact policy responses to climate change and the development of clean energy technologies. Energy sectors in Canada, the United States and Mexico were outlined, and the relationships between the different countries and their energy systems were discussed. Energy policy drivers and infrastructure in each of the 3 countries were also discussed. The influence of energy security on energy trading, clean energy technology, and climate change policy was also investigated in order to identify barriers to future cooperation between the countries. Emerging areas of cooperation were outlined. Potential climate policy scenarios were reviewed, and the implications of a more highly integrated North American energy and climate policy were discussed. The study indicated that increased linkages between the Canadian and United States systems are likely in the future. 62 refs., 11 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. Waste to energy plant operation under the influence of market and legislation conditioned changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomic, Tihomir; Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Pfeifer, Antun

    2017-01-01

    , waste-to-energy plants need to be adapted to market operation. This influence is tracked by the gate-fee volatility. The operation of the waste-to-energy plant on electricity markets is simulated by using EnergyPLAN and heat market is simulated in Matlab, based on hourly marginal costs. The results have......In this paper, gate-fee changes of the waste-to-energy plants are investigated in the conditions set by European Union legislation and by the introduction of the new heat market. Waste management and sustainable energy supply are core issues of sustainable development of regions, especially urban...... areas. These two energy flows logically come together in the combined heat and power facility by waste incineration. However, the implementation of new legislation influences quantity and quality of municipal waste and operation of waste-to-energy systems. Once the legislation requirements are met...

  5. Hot dry rock geothermal energy for U.S. electric utilities. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    In order to bring an electric utility component into the study of hot dry rock geothermal energy called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), EPRI organized a one-day conference in Philadelphia on January 14,1993. The conference was planned as the first day of a two-day sequence, by coordinating with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These two federal agencies were charged under EPAct with the development of a report on the potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy production in the US, especially the eastern US. The USGS was given lead responsibility for a report to be done in association with DOE. The EPRI conference emphasized first the status of technology development and testing in the U.S. and abroad, i.e., in western Europe, Russia and Japan. The conference went on to address the extent of knowledge regarding the resource base in the US, especially in the eastern half of the country, and then to address some practical business aspects of organizing projects or industries that could bring these resources into use, either for thermal applications or for electric power generation.

  6. Planning for a program design for energy environmental analysis. Final report, draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, J; Saaty, T; Blair, P; Ma, F; Buneman, P

    1976-04-01

    The objective of the work reported here is to assist BER/ERDA in program planning with respect to a regional assessment study program for energy environmental analysis. The focus of the work was to examine the use of operational gaming fof regional assessment studies. Specific concerns were gaming applications (1) in regional assessment or management and direction of regional assessments; (2) for achieving a higher level of public understanding of environmental, health, and safety problems of energy; (3) with respect to the supply of adequately trained manpower for energy; (4) with respect to computational requirements; and (5) with respect to current state-of-the-art in computer simulation. In order to investigate these concerns and examine the feasibility of using operational gaming in a regional assessment study program, a Regional Energy Environment Game (REEG) was designed and implemented on an IBM 370/168 digital computer employing APL (A Programming Language). The applicability of interactive operational gaming has been demonstrated by the REEG as applied to a region consisting of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia.

  7. Progress and Lessons Learned in Transuranic Waste Disposition at The Department of Energy's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Mousseau; S.C. Raish; F.M. Russo

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and operated by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC(BBWI) It describes the results to date in meeting the 6,000-cubic-meter Idaho Settlement Agreement milestone that was due December 31, 2005. The paper further describes lessons that have been learned from the project in the area of transuranic (TRU) waste processing and waste certification. Information contained within this paper would be beneficial to others who manage TRU waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

  8. Reclamation of landfills and dumps of municipal solid waste in a energy efficient waste management system: methodology and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Tatyana; Melnichuk, Aleksandr; Klimenko, Kseniya; Vitvitskaya, Valentina; Popovych, Valentina; Dunaieva, Ielizaveta; Terleev, Vitaly; Nikonorov, Aleksandr; Togo, Issa; Volkova, Yulia; Mirschel, Wilfried; Garmanov, Vitaly

    2017-10-01

    The article considers the methodological and practical aspects of reclamation of landfills and dumps of municipal solid waste in a waste management system. The general tendencies of system development in the context of elements of the international concept of waste hierarchy are analyzed. Statistics of the formation and burial of domestic waste indicate a strategic non-alternative to the rejection of landfill technologies in favor of environmentally, energy efficient and economically expedient ways of utilization of municipal waste as a world trend. Practical approaches to the study of territories on which there are dumps and landfills are considered to justify the design solutions for reclamation.

  9. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gelman, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tomberlin, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bain, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

  10. De Minimis waste impacts analysis methodology. IMPACTS - BRC user's guide and methodology for radioactive wastes below regulatory concern. Draft report for comment. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstom, J.M.; Goode, D.J.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes the methodology and computer program used by NRC to evaluate radiological impacts associated with petitions to have specific slightly contaminated radioactive waste streams designated as ''below regulatory concern.'' These wastes could be treated and disposed of at facilities which are not licensed for low-level radioactive waste management. The IMPACTS-BRC computer program is implemented on IBM-PC microcomputers using the FORTRAN programming language. Radiological impacts (doses) are estimated for several pathways including direct gamma radiation exposure, worker inhalation and exposure, offsite atmospheric and water releases, and intruder exposures. Annual impacts are calculated for the maximum individual, critical groups, and general population. The treatment and disposal options include onsite incineration, incineration at municipal and hazardous waste facilities, and disposal at sanitary landfills and hazardous waste landfills. Modifications to the program (from Volume 1) are primarily for microcomputer compatibility and to provide information needed to evaluate the petitions. Default environmental and facility parameters are developed representing conservative assumptions about site selection and operational procedures. In particular, the parameters of the groundwater pathway model are modified to represent more conservative assumptions than the original model (Volume 1)

  11. Public perception on nuclear energy and radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Vinicius V.M.; Mourao, Rogerio P.; Fleming, Peter M.; Soares, Wellington A.; Braga, Leticia T.P.; Santos, Rosana A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The final destination of the waste generated in a nuclear power plant remains a big challenge. The question is not only the radiation emitted by the sources, in some cases for many years, but also the public acceptance of this theme. In many countries where a nuclear waste storage facility has to be built, the local population of the chosen site did not accept it at first, and the whole process had to restart including this variable. In the past, the population opinion was considered not relevant but several international experiences showed that in fact it can not be forgotten. Statistical data show that a significant fraction of the population of the world has many concerns about nuclear energy and its potential impacts. Although many experts state that it has environmental advantages, such as the absence of greenhouse gases emissions, the subject is still the target of never ending discussions. But it is a concrete fact that the sector is growing in many countries. The objective of this article is to summarize several experiences in many countries associated with nuclear energy, mainly those ones that involve nuclear storage facilities, and its acceptance by the public. This task can help CNEN in the studies associated with the RMBN project - Repository for Radioactive Waste with Low and Medium Levels of Radiation. (author)

  12. Energy potential from municipal solid waste in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivapalan Kathirvale; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia). Incineration and Renewable Energy Center; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Abdul Halim Samsuddin [University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia). Faculty of Engineering

    2004-04-01

    The average amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated in Malaysia is 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day and has increased to 1.7 kg/person/day in major cities. This paper highlights the MSW characteristics for the city of Kuala Lumpur. Currently, the waste management approach being employed is landfill, but due to rapid development and lack of space for new landfills, big cities in Malaysia are switching to incineration. A simple evaluation was conducted to establish the amount of energy that would be recovered based on the characteristics of the MSW if it were to be incinerated. From the characterization exercise, the main components of the Malaysian MSW were found to be food, paper and plastic, which made up almost 80% of the waste by weight. The average moisture content of the MSW was about 55%, making incineration a challenging task. The calorific value of the Malaysian MSW ranged between 1500 and 2600 kcal/kg. However, the energy potential from an incineration plant operating based on 1500 ton of MSW/day with an average calorific value of 2200 kcal/kg is assessed to be at 640 kW/day. (author)

  13. Energy use in the marine transportation industry. Task I. Industry summary. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-11

    Task 1 of an energy study of ship transportation systems to identify the various operating or service sectors of the marine transportation industry and determine the numbers and types of vessels, their operating characteristics and energy consumption, is presented. The analysis includes all powered water-borne craft with the exception of those owned or operated by a government and fixed offshore production platforms. The approach is described. The broad sectors covered are: the ocean shipping, the Great Lakes, the coastal shipping, offshore, inland waterways, and the fishing and miscellaneous sectors. Recreational boats are covered. Information in the appendices covers marine fuel consumption calculations, essential trade routes, conversion factors, and merchant vessels of the US. (MCW)

  14. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report

  15. Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

  16. Spatial issues when optimising waste treatment and energy systems – A Danish Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarro Alonso, Amalia Rosa; Münster, Marie; Petrovic, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the challenge of including geographical information related to waste resources, energy demands and production plants, and transport options in the optimization of waste management. It analyses how waste may serve as an energy source through thermal conversion and anaerobic di...

  17. Energy recovery from waste processing; La recuperation de l'energie issue du traitement des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevot, H.

    2000-07-15

    This report discusses the feasibility of energy production by waste reprocessing. After an analysis of the situation, the different steps of the methane and gas production, are detailed. Many scenari of energy efficiency are compared. The report proposes also solutions to enhance the treatment units of energy production. Propositions are discussed around five main axis: the energy improvement and the product improvement, the safety and the public health, the compensation by economical tools of the greenhouse effect impacts, the competition equilibrium between energy produced by the wastes and other energy forms and the decrease of the processing cost of wastes producing energy. (A.L.B.)

  18. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management waste reduction workshop 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The fourth of a series of waste minimization/reduction workshops was held at the Sheridan Grand Hotel in Tampa, Florida, on February 6--7, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This workshop provided a forum for waste minimization/reduction planning, including waste minimization assessments. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level, transuranic (TRU), low-level (LLW), hazardous, and mixed. Topics of discussion within workshops encompassed a wide range of subjects. Subjects included any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvement, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration was also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and disposal. 1 tab

  19. Use of some industrial waste as energy storage media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayeb, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Solar energy is stored using different solid storage materials, both chemical and metallic industrial wastes. The materials tested in the present study are paraffin wax, copper slag, aluminium slag, iron slag, cast iron slag and copper chips. Solar energy is stored in these materials and energy ia then recovered with water stream at different flow rates and the storage capacity and period for different materials were compared. The same set of experiments is run on solid metallic materials mixed with wax. The results indicated that iron slag has the highest storage capacity followed by cast iron slag then aluminium slag and copper chips and copper slag. It is also noted that addition of paraffin wax to the solid metallic material improves its storage capacity and duration greatly. The storage efficiency of different units is calculated and compared. 5 figs

  20. Energy potential of municipal solid waste incineration in urban areas of China.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Ling

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the energy potential of municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Chinese cities from 1996 to 2020. In China, with improving the standard of living recently, the extreme increase of the municipal solid waste generation (MSWG)

  1. U.S. Department of Energy defense waste management program implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Program Implementation Plan describes the Department of Energy's current approach to managing its defense high-level, low-level, and transuranic radioactive waste. It documents implementation of the policies described in the 1983 Defense Waste Management Plan

  2. Integrated waste-to-energy conversion and waste transportation within island communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsigraiova, Zdena; Tavares, Gilberto; Semiao, Viriato; Carvalho, Maria de Graca

    2009-01-01

    Usually in islands both primary energy sources and drinking water are missing. Additionally, municipal solid waste (MSW) must be managed avoiding exclusive use of landfills, which limits sustainable development. Power generation from MSW incineration contributes significantly to replacing energy produced from fossil fuels and to reduce overall emissions. A solution based on thermodynamics, environmental and economic analyses and 3D-GIS modelling for the afore-mentioned problems for Cape Verde is proposed. This model integrates waste transportation optimisation and incineration with energy recovery combining production of heat and power (CHP), the heat being used for drinking water production. The results show that extraction condensing steam turbines are more suitable when power production is a priority (5.0 MW with 4000 m 3 /d of drinking water), whereas back-pressure turbines yield 5540-6650 m 3 /d of drinking water with an additional power production of 3.3-4.7 MW. The environmental and economic assessment performed shows the feasibility of the proposed CHP solution, which brings a considerable reduction in net air emissions (1.6 kt), including a significant decrease in the greenhouse gas emissions (131 ktCO 2 ), and that the revenue from energy sales ( Euro 15 million) has potential to balance the incineration cost. Moreover, when terrain relief is accounted for in the route optimisation for minimum fuel consumption, savings up to 11% are obtained.

  3. Draft postclosure permit application for Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oil Landform Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Oil Landfarm Hazardous-Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) is located approximately one and one-half miles west of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oil Landfarm HWDU consists of three disposal plots and along with the Bear Creek Burial Grounds and the S-3 Site comprise the Bear Creek Valley Waste Disposal Area (BCVWDA). The facility was used for the biological degradation of waste oil and machine coolants via landfarming, a process involving the application of waste oils and coolants to nutrient-adjusted soil during the dry months of the year (April to October). The Oil Landfarm HWDU has been closed as a hazardous-waste disposal unit and therefore will be subject to post-closure care. The closure plan for the Oil Landfarm HWDU is provided in Appendix A.1. A post-closure plan for the Oil Landfarm HWDU is presented in Appendix A.2. The purpose of this plan is to identify and describe the activities that will be performed during the post-closure care period. This plan will be implemented and will continue throughout the post-closure care period

  4. Characterisation of chemical composition and energy content of green waste and municipal solid waste from Greater Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hla, San Shwe; Roberts, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The development and deployment of thermochemical waste-to-energy systems requires an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of waste streams. Despite Australia's growing interest in gasification of waste streams, no data are available on their thermochemical properties. This work presents, for the first time, a characterisation of green waste and municipal solid waste in terms of chemistry and energy content. The study took place in Brisbane, the capital city of Queensland. The municipal solid waste was hand-sorted and classified into ten groups, including non-combustibles. The chemical properties of the combustible portion of municipal solid waste were measured directly and compared with calculations made based on their weight ratios in the overall municipal solid waste. The results obtained from both methods were in good agreement. The moisture content of green waste ranged from 29% to 46%. This variability - and the tendency for soil material to contaminate the samples - was the main contributor to the variation of samples' energy content, which ranged between 7.8 and 10.7MJ/kg. The total moisture content of food wastes and garden wastes was as high as 70% and 60%, respectively, while the total moisture content of non-packaging plastics was as low as 2.2%. The overall energy content (lower heating value on a wet basis, LHVwb) of the municipal solid waste was 7.9MJ/kg, which is well above the World Bank-recommended value for utilisation in thermochemical conversion processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy from waste in Europe: an analysis and comparison of the EU 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Manuel; Ragossnig, Arne

    2011-10-01

    This article focuses on analysing the development of waste-generated energy in the countries of the European Union (EU 27). Besides elaborating the relevant legal and political framework in the waste and energy sector as well as climate protection, the results from correlation analyses based on the databases of the energy statistics from Eurostat are discussed. The share of energy from waste is correlated with macro-economic, waste- and energy-sector-related data, which have been defined as potentially relevant for energy recovery from waste in the countries of the European Union. The results show that a single factor influencing the extent of waste-generated energy could not be isolated as it is being influenced not only by the state of economic development and the state of development of waste management systems in the respective countries but also by energy-sector-related factors and the individual priority settings in those countries. Nevertheless the main driving force for an increase in the utilization of waste for energy generation can be seen in the legal and political framework of the European Union leading to the consequence that market conditions influence the realization of waste management infrastructure for waste-generated energy.

  6. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  7. Production of renewable energy from biomass and waste materials using fluidized bed technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozainee, M.; Rashid, M.; Looi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Malaysian industries generate substantial amount of biomass and waste materials such as wastes from agricultural and wood based industries, sludge waste from waste-water treatment plants and solid waste from municipals. Incinerating these waste materials not only produces renewable energy, but also solving their disposal problems. Fluidized bed combustors are widely used for incinerating these biomass materials. The significant advantages of fluidized bed incineration include simple design, efficient, and ability to reduce air pollution emissions. This paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of producing the green energy from biomass materials using the fluidized bed technologies. (Author)

  8. Order of 7 November 1979 creating a National Radioactive Waste Management Agency within the Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The new Agency set up by this Decree succeeds the CEA Waste Management Bureau. It is responsible for long-term radioactive waste management operations and, in particular, the management of long-term waste repositories either directly or through third parties acting on its behalf. It is also in charge of designing and setting-up new long-term waste repositories, of preparing in consultation with waste producers, specifications for waste storage and conditioning prior to disposal, of contributing to research and work on long-term waste management processes. The Agency will be consulted on R and D programmes as well as on draft regulations on radioactive waste management. (NEA) [fr

  9. Bench-scale magnetic separation of Department of Energy wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegler, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    Criteria were developed for selection of candidate wastes for testing magnetic separation of uranium and/or other paramagnetic materials. A survey of Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous wastes was conducted to determine good candidates for bench-scale magnetic separation tests. Representatives of 21 DOE sites were contacted, and 11 materials were identified as potential candidates for magnetic separation. To date, seven samples have been obtained and tested for separability of uranium with a bench-scale magnetic assaying device. The samples tested have been obtained from the K-1401B and K-1401C ponds in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; from waste piles in Maywood, New Jersey; from North and South Ponds in Richland, Washington; and from magnesium fluoride drums in Fernald, Ohio. The magnetic device utilized in these tests can be used in an open-gradient mode with dry particulate or liquid-suspended materials. Uranium separation from magnesium fluoride has shown exceptionally good performance in both open- and high-gradient modes and could be an important application of the technology

  10. Interdisciplinary Student/Teacher Materials in Energy, the Environment, and the Economy: Energy and Transportation, Grade 3. Draft Copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    This publication is part of a series of instructional units produced by NSTA's Project for an Energy-Enriched Curriculum. This unit presents the variety of transportation modes and tries to assist students in understanding the effects of transportation on their world. The main concern of the unit is with fossil fuel consumption. The seven…

  11. Energy need, energy production, waste heat quantities - the present state and a look into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikarski, W.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities and methods to keep the waste heat low in our society so dependent on energy, are manifold and they affect many aspects of our economic and social life. A society which shows concern for its environment will not hesitate to explore all possible avenues and to realize them. Nevertheless, one has to start from the assumption that the energy consumption, which is closely connected with the standard of living, will increase in the near future. Thus, we have to reckon with more waste heat. Therefore, on a medium-term basis, the amount of waste heat we will be confronted with and its distribution in the environment is to be investigated carefully in order that on the one hand hydrosphere and atmosphere, the limit load of which is given, are not burdened in excess, and that on the other hand the media taking up waste heat are utilized in an optimal way (cooling management). On a long-term basis, the limits of waste heat discharge into water and atmosphere have to be determined carefully, something which can probably be done on the basis of climatological consequences. (orig.) [de

  12. 75 FR 77010 - Nextera Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Draft Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... waste is low-level radioactive waste which includes sludge, oily waste, bead resin, spent filters, and... Impact of Transportation of Fuel and Waste to and from One Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor..., wetlands, and open areas. Each of the two units at PBNP use Westinghouse pressurized water reactors...

  13. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 7: Appendix GCR Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    This report contains the second part of the geological characterization report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Both hydrology and geochemistry are evaluated. The following aspects of hydrology are discussed: surface hydrology; ground water hydrology; and hydrology drilling and testing. Hydrologic studies at the site and adjacent site areas have concentrated on defining the hydrogeology and associated salt dissolution phenomena. The geochemical aspects include a description of chemical properties of geologic media presently found in the surface and subsurface environments of southeastern New Mexico in general, and of the proposed WIPP withdrawal area in particular. The characterization does not consider any aspect of artificially-introduced material, temperature, pressure, or any other physico-chemical condition not native to the rocks of southeastern New Mexico.

  14. Development and Deployment of the Extended Reach Sluicing System (ERSS) for Retrieval of Hanford Single Shell Tank Waste. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Roger E.; Figley, Reed R.; Innes, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    A history of the evolution and the design development of Extended Reach Sluicer System (ERSS) is presented. Several challenges are described that had to be overcome to create a machine that went beyond the capabilities of prior generation sluicers to mobilize waste in Single Shell Tanks for pumping into Double Shell Tank receiver tanks. Off-the-shelf technology and traditional hydraulic fluid power systems were combined with the custom-engineered components to create the additional functionality of the ERSS, while still enabling it to fit within very tight entry envelope into the SST. Problems and challenges inevitably were encountered and overcome in ways that enhance the state of the art of fluid power applications in such constrained environments. Future enhancements to the ERSS design are explored for retrieval of tanks with different dimensions and internal obstacles

  15. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 7: Appendix GCR Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains the second part of the geological characterization report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Both hydrology and geochemistry are evaluated. The following aspects of hydrology are discussed: surface hydrology; ground water hydrology; and hydrology drilling and testing. Hydrologic studies at the site and adjacent site areas have concentrated on defining the hydrogeology and associated salt dissolution phenomena. The geochemical aspects include a description of chemical properties of geologic media presently found in the surface and subsurface environments of southeastern New Mexico in general, and of the proposed WIPP withdrawal area in particular. The characterization does not consider any aspect of artificially-introduced material, temperature, pressure, or any other physico-chemical condition not native to the rocks of southeastern New Mexico

  16. Energy from waste. Potentials and possibilities for usage; Energie aus Abfall. Potenziale und Nutzungsmoeglichkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, Rainer; Fritz, Thomas [Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst (HAWK), Goettingen (DE). Fachgebiet Nachhaltige Energie- und Umwelttechnik (NEUTec); Fricke, Klaus [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Abt. Abfall- und Ressourcenwirtschaft

    2009-05-15

    In the present article the results of appraisal for the determination of the theoretical potential of energy and the current secondary energy supply of waste streams, which are relevant for the power production in Germany are represented. To sum up, the following conclusions arise from the balance: The theoretical primary energy supply potential of the examined waste streams amounts from 540 to 650 PJ/a and corresponds from 3.9 to 4.6% of the total primary energy consumption in Germany. In consideration of the system-dependent efficiencies and steering of flow patterns for materials altogether approx. 53 PJ electricity and 104 PJ (used) heat were produced as secondary energy within the regarded ranges in the year 2006 in Germany. This corresponds approx. to 1.7% of the final energy consumption in Germany. The outcome of the evaluated energy data for 2006 is a middle energy efficiency of approx. 26.5% (approx. 8.9% electrically and approx. 17.6% thermally). Under technically optimized conditions the power efficiency can be raised possibly on approx. 37%, whereby the share of the final energy consumption in Germany would increase to 2,3%. (orig.)

  17. Exergo-Ecological Assessment of Waste to Energy Plants Supported by Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mendecka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hybridization of Waste to Energy (WtE plants with solar facilities can take competing energy technologies and make them complementary. However, realizing the benefits of the solar integration requires careful consideration of its efficiency. To analyse such systems from the point of view of resource efficiency, the pure energy analysis is not sufficient since the quality of particular energy carriers is not evaluated. This work applies the exergo-ecological analysis using the concepts of thermoecological cost (TEC and exergy cost for the performance evaluation of an integrated Solar-Waste to Energy plant scheme, where solar energy is used for steam superheating. Different plant layouts, considering several design steam parameters as well as different solar system configurations, in terms of area of heliostats and size of the thermal storage tank, were studied. The results for the solar integrated plant scheme were compared with the scenarios where superheating is performed fully by a non-renewable energy source. The presented results of exergy cost analysis indicate that the most favorable system is the one supported by non-renewable energy. Such an analysis does not consider the advantage of the use of renewable energy sources. By extending the system boundary to the level of natural resource and applying the thermoecological cost analysis, an opposite result was obtained.

  18. Waste to energy plant-air pollution monitoring and reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullowney, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    We can't eat it. We can't wear it. We are running out of places to bury it. We can't export it. We can't stop making it. Garbage seems to be, by volume at least, our biggest national product. These facts are driving more and more industries and municipalities to construct waste to energy plants. Following the adage that when you get lemons, make lemonade, municipalities have been burning their garbage to produce steam and electricity. Communities, fearful that what they have produced may be toxic to them when burned, have enacted stringent air pollution control and monitoring regulations. The federal government has enacted regulations under the Clean Air Act 43 CFR Part 60 which regulate the emission limits monitoring and reporting requirements of waste energy plants. The most important of these regulations was enacted on December 16, 1987 and June 26, 1987, regulating particulate, SO 2 and NO x emissions. This paper reports that these regulations also tie in to various other EPA regulations and requirements. The most important of these to air pollution monitoring is Appendix F, Quality Assurance. However, these regulations are only minimum requirements -- individual states further strengthen their bite by requiring lower emissions limits and the monitoring of additional parameters such as H 2 S, HCl, NH 2 , CO, CO 2 and moisture. These monitoring limits and reporting requirements are currently being negotiated on a case by case basis in most instances

  19. Waste Biomass Based Energy Supply Chain Network Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Güneş Yıldız

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing dependence on fossil fuels, alleviating environmental impacts and ensuring sustainable economic growth are among the most promising aspects of utilizing renewable energy resources. Biomass is a major renewable energy resource that has the potential for creating sustainable energy systems that are critical in terms of social welfare. Utilization of biomass for bioenergy production is an efficient alternative for meeting rising energy demands, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and thus alleviating climate change. A supply chain for such an energy source is crucial for assisting deliverance of a competitive end product to end-user markets. Considering the existing constraints, a mixed integer linear programming (MILP model for waste biomass based supply chain was proposed in this study for economic performance optimization. Performance of the proposed modelling approach was demonstrated with a real life application study realized in İstanbul. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were conducted which would serve as a foresight for efficient management of the supply chain as a whole

  20. Solid waste as renewable source of energy. Current and future possibility in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taqiy Eddine, Boukelia; Salah, Mecibah Med [Mentouri Univ., Constantine (Algeria). Mechanical Dept.

    2012-11-01

    Algeria has created a green momentum by launching an ambitious program to develop renewable energies and promote energy efficiency. Solid waste is one of most important sources of biomass potential in Algeria, which can be used as renewable energy sources. With economic development and the evolution of population, the quantity of solid waste is increasing rapidly in Algeria; according to the National Cadastre for Solid Waste Generation, the overall generation of municipal solid waste was more than 10.3 million tons per year, and the amount of industrial solid waste, including non-hazardous and inert industrial waste was 2,547,000 tons per year, with a stock quantity of 4,483,500 tons. The hazardous waste generated amounts to 325,100 tons per year; the quantities of waste in stock and awaiting a disposal solution amount to 2,008,500 tons. Healthcare waste reaches to 125,000 tons per year. The management of solid waste and its valorization is based on the understanding of solid waste composition by its categories and physicochemical characteristics. Elimination is the solution applied to 97% of waste produced in Algeria. Wastes are disposed in the following ways: open dumps (57%), burned in the open air in public dumps or municipal uncontrolled ones (30%), and controlled dumps and landfill (10%). On the other side, the quantities destined for recovery are too low: only 2% for recycling and 1% for composting. Waste to energy is very attractive option for elimination solid waste with energy recovery. In this paper, we give an overview for this technology, including its conversion options and its useful products (such as electricity, heat and transportation fuel), and waste to energy-related environmental issues and its challenges. (orig.)

  1. Solid waste as an alternative energy source and a means of solving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents practical ways of generating energy from solid waste as a means of solving the problem of solid waste disposal which is confronting the major cities in Nigeria and also providing alternative energy source to supplement the high cost and fast depleting conventional sources of energy. It also discussed the ...

  2. Renewable Energy Production from DoD Installation Solid Wastes by Anaerobic Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ENGINEERING GUIDANCE REPORT Renewable Energy Production from DoD Installation Solid Wastes by Anaerobic Digestion ESTCP Project ER-200933 JUNE...Defense. Page Intentionally Left Blank Renewable Energy Production From DoD Installation Solid Wastes by Anaerobic Digestion ii June 2016 REPORT...3. DATES COVERED (2009 – 2016) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Renewable Energy Production from DoD Installation Solid Wastes by Anaerobic Digestion 5a

  3. Hazardous waste database: Waste management policy implications for the US Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Policastro, A.J.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Koebnick, B.; Dovel, M.; Stoll, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The hazardous waste risk assessment modeling (HaWRAM) database is being developed to analyze the risk from treatment technology operations and potential transportation accidents associated with the hazardous waste management alternatives. These alternatives are being assessed in the Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). To support the risk analysis, the current database contains complexwide detailed information on hazardous waste shipments from 45 Department of Energy installations during FY 1992. The database is currently being supplemented with newly acquired data. This enhancement will improve database information on operational hazardous waste generation rates, and the level and type of current on-site treatment at Department of Energy installations

  4. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical-biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical-biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3-9.5%, 1-18% and 1-8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full

  5. Supplemental report on population estimates for Hanford high-level defense waste draft programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yandon, K.E.; Landstrom, D.K.

    1980-06-01

    Current and revised population projections based on those previously published in the document Population Distribution in 90-mile Radius of Hanford Meteorological Station and Projections to Year 2300 by Compass Sector and 10 Mile Radii are presented. In addition, there was a need to extend the population estimates out to 1000 and 10,000 years into the future to permit estimation of population radiation doses from accidents affecting the Hanford Facilities directly related to the defense high-level waste disposal alternatives. The methodology used in making the estimates is presented along with the detailed population matrix data required for performing the dose calculations. Although the near-term overall population projections are probably reasonably correct, no claim is made for the accuracy of the detailed data within each individual sector. Long-term estimates are made using reasonable assumptions about the growth potential and possibilities in the Hanford area. No claim of accuracy of these figures is made since they are so highly dependent on actions and conditions that are not predictable. For example, if a major climate change were to occur, the entire Hanford area might be uninhabited at 10,000 years in the future. To provide conservative dose estimates, it was assumed that the Hanford population will experience reasonable and continuous growth throughout the 10,000 year period

  6. An assessment of biomass as an energy source: the case of energy from waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Alexi; Elliott, David

    2002-01-01

    Given that biomass plays a part in a complex natural cycle of decay and re-growth, providing the feedstock for a variety of often slow and subtle natural cycles, there are clearly limits to how much can be burnt without undermining key biological processes. This paper focuses on energy from waste, since, we argue, waste combustion is one of the more problematic options in terms of environmental sustainability, and we attempt to make a preliminary life cycle assessment of its impact. This suggests that the overall impact will depend not just on the total amount of wastes combusted, but also on their specific organic qualities, and on their role if they had not been diverted, in particular their role in maintaining soil quality. Given that soil plays a significant part in the process of carbon sequestration, we argue that consideration should be given to the concept of conservation of organic potentials. (Author)

  7. 11{sup th} and 12{sup th} draft laws amending the Atomic Energy Act; Die Gesetzentwuerfe zur elften und zwoelften Aenderung des Atomgesetzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-11-15

    On September 28, 2010, the German Federal Government adopted the energy concept and, in addition, 2 draft amendments to the Atomic Energy Act to assist the coalition groups in the wording. The coalition groups tabled the 2 drafts in the Federal Parliament the same day. The subject of the 11{sup th} amending law is the extended plant life of nuclear power plants, that of the 12{sup th} amending law, the transposition into national law of the EURATOM Safety Directive of June 2009, the re-introduction of expropriation provisions about final storage, and the duty of operators to enhance the safety of existing nuclear power plants. The Federal Government's energy concept contains this statement about nuclear power: An extension for a limited period of time of the plant life of existing nuclear power plants makes a key contribution to ensuring, for an interim period of time, the three energy policy goals of climate protection, economy, and security of supply in Germany. It eases the way into the era of renewable energies, especially by its controlling effect on the price of electricity and by reducing greenhouse gas emissions related to power production.'' The amendment to the Atomic Energy Act, which does not require the consent of the Federal Council, extends the operating life of nuclear power plants by an average of 12 years. The EURATOM Safety Directive must be transposed into national law by July 22, 2011. The draft of a 12{sup th} amendment to the Atomic Energy Act submitted to this end, which also requires no consent of the Federal Council, bases its reasoning on the fact that most of the important requirements in the Directive had already been taken care of in Germany. Under the 12{sup th} amendment to the Atomic Energy Act, the expropriation regulations deemed to be necessary for repository storage, which had been introduced in the 1998 amendment to the Atomic Energy Act and abolished by the opt-out amendment of 2002, are to be reinstated. (orig.)

  8. Prioritization of proposed waste management construction projects for the Waste Management program within the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    A prioritization process is used to evaluate and rank proposed construction projects within the Department of Energy's Waste Management program. The process is used to determine which projects should proceed with conceptual design activities. The proposed construction projects are evaluated against a set of criteria which reflect Waste Management priorities. A management review team ranks and scores the projects thereby generating a prioritized list of projects. Despite decreasing budgets and changing political climates, the process has been a successful decision-aiding tool for selecting construction projects to carry out the Waste Management mission within the Department of Energy

  9. Energy and emissions benefits of renewable energy derived from municipal solid waste: Analysis of a low carbon scenario in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Sie Ting; Hashim, Haslenda; Lim, Jeng Shiun; Ho, Wai Shin; Lee, Chew Tin; Yan, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Feasibility study on the energy and GHG emission reduction for WtE strategies for municipal solid waste (MSW) in Malaysia. • Greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from WtE strategies analysed using IPCC guideline. • Scenario analysis by comparison of different WtE strategies. • Impact of moisture content of MSW towards energy potential and GHG emission reduction. - Abstract: Ineffective waste management that involves dumping of waste in landfills may degrade valuable land resources and emit methane gas (CH 4 ), a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The incineration of waste also emits polluted chemicals such as dioxin and particle. Therefore, from a solid waste management perspective, both landfilling and incineration practices pose challenges to the development of a green and sustainable future. Waste-to-energy (WtE) has become a promising strategy catering to these issues because the utilisation of waste reduces the amount of landfilled waste (overcoming land resource issues) while increasing renewable energy production. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the energy and carbon reduction potential in Malaysia for various WtE strategies for municipal solid waste (MSW). The material properties of the MSW, its energy conversion potential and subsequent greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions are analysed based on the chemical compositions and biogenic carbon fractions of the waste. The GHG emission reduction potential is also calculated by considering fossil fuel displacement and CH 4 avoidance from landfilling. In this paper, five different scenarios are analysed with results indicating a integration of landfill gas (LFG) recovery systems and waste incinerator as the major and minor WtE strategies shows the highest economical benefit with optimal GHG mitigation and energy potential. Sensitivity analysis on the effect of moisture content of MSW towards energy potential and GHG emissions are performed. These evaluations of Wt

  10. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 8: Appendices HYDRO, IRD, LTM, NUTS, PAR, PMR, QAPD, RBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    Geohydrologic data have been collected in the Los Medanos area at the US Department of Energy`s proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico since 1975 as part of a study evaluating the feasibility of storing defense-associated nuclear wastes within the bedded salt of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Drilling and hydrologic testing have identified three principal water-bearing zones above the Salado Formation and one below that could potentially transport wastes to the biosphere if the proposed facility were breached. The zones above the Salado are the contact between the Rustler and Salado Formations and the Culebra and Magenta Dolomite Members of the Rustler Formation of Permian age. The zone below the Salado Formation consists of channel sandstones in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Determinations of hydraulic gradients, directions of flow, and hydraulic properties were hindered because of the negligible permeability of the water-bearing zones. Special techniques in drilling, well completion, and hydraulic testing have been developed to determine the hydrologic characteristics of these water-producing zones.

  11. Optimising waste treatment and energy systems - focusing on spatial and temporal issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarro Alonso, Amalia Rosa; Münster, Marie; Ravn, H.

    The aim of the TOPWASTE project is to evaluate current and future optimal treatment of waste fractions in terms of economy and the environment, with a focus on recycling versus Waste-to-Energy technologies. After optimization of the waste management system, results must be analysed so...

  12. Modeling Pumped Thermal Energy Storage with Waste Heat Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarr, Miles L. Lindsey

    This work introduces a new concept for a utility scale combined energy storage and generation system. The proposed design utilizes a pumped thermal energy storage (PTES) system, which also utilizes waste heat leaving a natural gas peaker plant. This system creates a low cost utility-scale energy storage system by leveraging this dual-functionality. This dissertation first presents a review of previous work in PTES as well as the details of the proposed integrated bottoming and energy storage system. A time-domain system model was developed in Mathworks R2016a Simscape and Simulink software to analyze this system. Validation of both the fluid state model and the thermal energy storage model are provided. The experimental results showed the average error in cumulative fluid energy between simulation and measurement was +/- 0.3% per hour. Comparison to a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model showed heat transfer. The system model was used to conduct sensitivity analysis, baseline performance, and levelized cost of energy of a recently proposed Pumped Thermal Energy Storage and Bottoming System (Bot-PTES) that uses ammonia as the working fluid. This analysis focused on the effects of hot thermal storage utilization, system pressure, and evaporator/condenser size on the system performance. This work presents the estimated performance for a proposed baseline Bot-PTES. Results of this analysis showed that all selected parameters had significant effects on efficiency, with the evaporator/condenser size having the largest effect over the selected ranges. Results for the baseline case showed stand-alone energy storage efficiencies between 51 and 66% for varying power levels and charge states, and a stand-alone bottoming efficiency of 24%. The resulting efficiencies for this case were low compared to competing technologies; however, the dual-functionality of the Bot-PTES enables it to have higher capacity factor, leading to 91-197/MWh levelized cost of energy compared to 262

  13. 1992 developments in Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manger, R.

    1993-01-01

    The draft legislation amending the German Atomic Energy Act existing since the autumn of 1992 clearly focuses of the back end of the fuel cycle. Spent fuel and waste management is to be opened up, privatized, and paid for. Opening spent fuel and waste management supplement the former priority given to the utilization of radioactive residues by an equivalent option, i.e. the orderly disposal of such waste which, at present, is permitted only under very limited conditions. The draft still needs to be harmonized with other ministries. (orig.) [de

  14. Waste-to-energy plants - a solution for a cleaner future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Waste-to-energy plants reduce the municipal solid waste volume by about 80% and convert it into residue. The residue quality naturally depends on the burned waste quality and also on the combustion parameters. Hence, tighter control of the plant can improve the residue quality. The generated combustion energy is regarded as renewable energy and is typically used to feed a turbine to generate electricity. Waste-to-energy furnaces react slowly on changing waste charge, so they are not used for peak load generation. The generated electrical power is a plant by product and is sold as base load generation. Usually the waste is burned on a grate which limits the plant size to about 160,000 tons of waste per year or 20 tons of waste per hour or about 28 MW. More recent technology utilizes fluidized bed combustion, which allows larger plant sizes up to 50 MW. Due to the unknown waste composition and stringent environmental standards involved, waste-to-energy plants employ sophisticated flue gas cleaning devices for emission control. ABB's Performance Monitoring continuously compares actual plant and equipment performance to expected performance. This includes the on-line calculation of the waste calorific heat allowing operator decision support and automated control system responses. Dedicated reports offer detailed data on operations, maintenance and emissions to plant management staff. ABB combustion optimization solutions use model based predictive control techniques to reliably find the most suitable set-points for improving the heat rate and reducing emissions like NO x . (author)

  15. Thermal treatment technology study and data base for Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillins, R.L.; Steverson, E.M.; Balo, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a wide variety of waste streams that must be treated to meet various regulations before final disposal. One category of technologies for treating many of these waste streams is thermal treatment. A study of known thermal treatment technologies was conducted to aid DOE in the development of strategies to meet its waste management needs. The study was specifically addressed to mixed waste, but it is also applicable to hazardous and radioactive wastes. The data collected in the study, along with other waste management data, are being included in a comprehensive data base that DOE is developing. 3 refs., 1 fig

  16. Microwave energy for post-calcination treatment of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.J.; Berreth, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel reprocessing require treatment for effective long-term storage. Heating by microwave energy is explored in processing of two possible waste forms: (1) drying of a pelleted form of calcined waste; and (2) vitrification of calcined waste. It is shown that residence times for these processes can be greatly reduced when using microwave energy rather than conventional heating sources, without affecting product properties. Compounds in the waste and in the glass frit additives couple very well with the 2.45 GHz microwave field so that no special microwave absorbers are necessary

  17. Discovering the energy, economic and environmental potentials of urban wastes: An input–output model for a metropolis case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Junnian; Yang, Wei; Li, Zhaoling; Higano, Yoshiro; Wang, Xian’en

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A waste-to-energy system is constructed incorporating various urban wastes and technologies. • Waste-to-energy industries are formed and introduced into current socioeconomic system. • A novel input–output simulation model is developed and applied to a metropolis. • Complete energy, economic and environmental potentials of urban wastes are discovered. - Abstract: Tremendous amounts of wastes are generated in urban areas due to accelerating industrialization and urbanization. The current unreasonable waste disposal patterns and potential energy value of urban wastes necessitates the promotion of waste-to-energy implementation. This study is intent on discovering the complete energy, economic and environmental potentials of urban wastes taking municipal solid wastes, waste oil, organic wastewater and livestock manure into consideration. A waste-to-energy system is constructed incorporating these wastes and five waste-to-energy technologies. A novel input–output simulation model is developed and applied to a metropolis to introduce the waste-to-energy system into the current socioeconomic system and form five waste-to-energy industries. The trends in waste generation and energy recovery potential, economic benefits and greenhouse gas mitigation contribution for the study area are estimated and explored from 2011 to 2025. By 2025, biodiesel production and power generation could amount to 72.11 thousand t and 1.59 billion kW h respectively. Due to the highest energy recovery and the most subsidies, the organic wastewater biogas industry has the highest output and net profit, followed by the waste incineration power generation industry. In total 17.97 million t (carbon dioxide-equivalent) accumulative greenhouse gas emission could be mitigated. The organic wastewater biogas industry and waste incineration power generation industry are more advantageous for the study area in terms of better energy, economic and environmental performances. The

  18. Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE`s waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE`s mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters.

  19. Review of site recommendation process in Draft Environmental Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, H.; Longo, T.; Burton, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    In December 1984, the US Department of Energy (DOE) published Draft Environmental Assessments (EAs) on nine potentially acceptable nuclear waste repository sites. Five sites in the states of Mississippi, Nevada, Texas, Utah, and Washington were proposed in the Draft EAs for nomination under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act as suitable for further detailed study (site characterization). The Nevada, Texas, and Washington sites were further proposed for recommendation to the President as preferred for site characterization. This paper reviews the process that DOE used in selecting the three sites proposed for site characterization. The process is consistent with DOE's implementation guidelines for selecting repository sites, and proceeds in three steps. First, the sites are ranked in order of preference for each of twenty technical guidelines based on information in the Draft EAs. The second step combines the individual guideline rankings into postclosure and preclosure guideline group rankings, and, finally, into an overall ranking. In the third step, the sensitivity of the choice of the three preferred sites is examined for a range of guideline weightings

  20. Energy-saving method for technogenic waste processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayandy Dikhanbaev

    Full Text Available Dumps of a mining-metallurgical complex of post-Soviet Republics have accumulated a huge amount of technogenic waste products. Out of them, Kazakhstan alone has preserved about 20 billion tons. In the field of technogenic waste treatment, there is still no technical solution that leads it to be a profitable process. Recent global trends prompted scientists to focus on developing energy-saving and a highly efficient melting unit that can significantly reduce specific fuel consumption. This paper reports, the development of a new technological method-smelt layer of inversion phase. The introducing method is characterized by a combination of ideal stirring and ideal displacement regimes. Using the method of affine modelling, recalculation of pilot plant's test results on industrial sample has been obtained. Experiments show that in comparison with bubbling and boiling layers of smelt, the degree of zinc recovery increases in the layer of inversion phase. That indicates the reduction of the possibility of new formation of zinc silicates and ferrites from recombined molecules of ZnO, SiO2, and Fe2O3. Calculations show that in industrial samples of the pilot plant, the consumption of natural gas has reduced approximately by two times in comparison with fuming-furnace. The specific fuel consumption has reduced by approximately four times in comparison with Waelz-kiln.

  1. Energy-saving method for technogenic waste processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikhanbaev, Bayandy; Dikhanbaev, Aristan Bayandievich

    2017-01-01

    Dumps of a mining-metallurgical complex of post-Soviet Republics have accumulated a huge amount of technogenic waste products. Out of them, Kazakhstan alone has preserved about 20 billion tons. In the field of technogenic waste treatment, there is still no technical solution that leads it to be a profitable process. Recent global trends prompted scientists to focus on developing energy-saving and a highly efficient melting unit that can significantly reduce specific fuel consumption. This paper reports, the development of a new technological method—smelt layer of inversion phase. The introducing method is characterized by a combination of ideal stirring and ideal displacement regimes. Using the method of affine modelling, recalculation of pilot plant’s test results on industrial sample has been obtained. Experiments show that in comparison with bubbling and boiling layers of smelt, the degree of zinc recovery increases in the layer of inversion phase. That indicates the reduction of the possibility of new formation of zinc silicates and ferrites from recombined molecules of ZnO, SiO2, and Fe2O3. Calculations show that in industrial samples of the pilot plant, the consumption of natural gas has reduced approximately by two times in comparison with fuming-furnace. The specific fuel consumption has reduced by approximately four times in comparison with Waelz-kiln. PMID:29281646

  2. Strategic principles workshops: Discussion drafts and workshop notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste-Management in the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of this nation's spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. Although embodied in the Federal repository program that began with studies in the late 1950s, this mission was explicitly established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and reaffirmed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. To fulfill our mission, we are developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposal deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for monitored retrievable storage, and a system for transporting the waste. This discussion draft was developed to help involve parties affected by or interested in the waste-management program in the formulation of the basic principles on which the program will be based. It reviews existing objectives, policies, and strategic principles under which the system is currently being developed. Then discussed are issues of strategic importance for which additional strategic principles may be needed. For these issues in particular, views from affected and interested parties is solicited, but comments regarding alternative approaches to the issues presented as well as suggestions for additional issues will also be welcome. Finally, background information on the waste-management program pertinent to the issues discussion is presented

  3. Strategic principles workshops: Discussion drafts and workshop notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste-Management in the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of this nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. Although embodied in the Federal repository program that began with studies in the late 1950s, this mission was explicitly established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and reaffirmed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. To fulfill our mission, we are developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposal deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for monitored retrievable storage, and a system for transporting the waste. This discussion draft was developed to help involve parties affected by or interested in the waste-management program in the formulation of the basic principles on which the program will be based. It reviews existing objectives, policies, and strategic principles under which the system is currently being developed. Then discussed are issues of strategic importance for which additional strategic principles may be needed. For these issues in particular, views from affected and interested parties is solicited, but comments regarding alternative approaches to the issues presented as well as suggestions for additional issues will also be welcome. Finally, background information on the waste-management program pertinent to the issues discussion is presented.

  4. Development of treatment technologies of the processing of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Berry, J.B.; Coyle, G.J. Jr.; Lurk, P.; Wolf, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Waste contaminated with chemically hazardous and radioactive species is defined as mixed waste. Significant technology development has been conducted for separate treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste, but technology development addressing mixed-waste treatment has been limited. In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to mixed-waste technology development, the Office of Technology Development of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The program is identifying and evaluating treatment technologies to treat present and estimated future mixed wastes at DOE sites. The status of the technical initiatives in chemical/physical treatment, waste destruction/stabilization technology, off-gas treatment, and final waste form production/assessment is described in this paper

  5. Identification and characterization of Department of Energy special-case radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kudera, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies and characterizes Department of Energy (DOE) special-case radioactive wastes. Included in this paper are descriptions of the special-case waste categories and their volumes and curie contents, as well as discussions of potential methods for management of these special-case wastes. Work on extensive inventories of DOE-titled special-case waste are still in progress. 1 tab

  6. Energy from wastes and biomass. Energie uit afval en biomassa; Energiebesparing of -produktie bij verwerkingsprocessen van afval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Steeg, W [DHV Raadgevend Ingenieursbureau BV, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    1990-02-01

    Possibilities are studied to arrive at energy profits by processing wastes and biomass. Energy conservation by prevention and reuse as well as energy production by combustion or fermentation of wastes and biomass are considered. Energy profits at this moment amount to 48 PJ, less than 2% of the Dutch energy requirements. Estimated is 91 PJ in the year 2000. Governmental policies to promote prevention and reuse as well as increased efficiency may lift this number to 169 PJ. Growing biomass for energy production can increase energy profits to 333 PJ. Estimated for 2010 is 676 PJ. 11 refs., 8 tabs., 4 ills.

  7. Developing a Decision Support Tool for Waste to Energy Calculations Using Energy Return on Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    began with. There are multiple methods to accomplish this process, from the standard V- models to complex waterfall methods, but ultimately each...required data and data sources. The team conducted stakeholder analysis and functional decomposition of the requisite model before constructing its...decomposition of the requisite model before constructing its additional module to the tool. This study shows the viability of waste-to-energy technologies to

  8. Comparative study of different waste biomass for energy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motghare, Kalyani A; Rathod, Ajit P; Wasewar, Kailas L; Labhsetwar, Nitin K

    2016-01-01

    Biomass is available in many varieties, consisting of crops as well as its residues from agriculture, forestry, and the agro-industry. These different biomass find their way as freely available fuel in rural areas but are also responsible for air pollution. Emissions from such solid fuel combustion to indoor, regional and global air pollution largely depend on fuel types, combustion device, fuel properties, fuel moisture, amount of air supply for combustion and also on climatic conditions. In both economic and environment point of view, gasification constitutes an attractive alternative for the use of biomass as a fuel, than the combustion process. A large number of studies have been reported on a variety of biomass and agriculture residues for their possible use as renewable fuels. Considering the area specific agriculture residues and biomass availability and related transportation cost, it is important to explore various local biomass for their suitability as a fuel. Maharashtra (India) is the mainstay for the agriculture and therefore, produces a significant amount of waste biomass. The aim of the present research work is to analyze different local biomass wastes for their proximate analysis and calorific value to assess their potential as fuel. The biomass explored include cotton waste, leaf, soybean waste, wheat straw, rice straw, coconut coir, forest residues, etc. mainly due to their abundance. The calorific value and the proximate analysis of the different components of the biomass helped in assessing its potential for utilization in different industries. It is observed that ash content of these biomass species is quite low, while the volatile matter content is high as compared to Indian Coal. This may be appropriate for briquetting and thus can be used as a domestic fuel in biomass based gasifier cook stoves. Utilizing these biomass species as fuel in improved cook-stove and domestic gasifier cook-stoves would be a perspective step in the rural energy and

  9. The wasted energy: A metric to set up appropriate targets in our path towards fully renewable energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinagre Díaz, Juan José; Wilby, Mark Richard; Rodríguez González, Ana Belén

    2015-01-01

    By 2020 Europe has to increase its energy efficiency and share of renewables in 20%. However, even accomplishing these challenging objectives Europe will be effectively wasting energy as we demonstrate in this paper. In our way towards a fully renewable scenario, we need at least to stop wasting energy in order to guarantee the energy supply needed for growth and comfort. We waste energy when we employ more primary energy than the final energy we ultimately use and this excess cannot be reutilized. In this paper we propose the WE (wasted energy) as a novel metric to measure the performance of energy systems and set up appropriate targets. The WE incorporates information about energy efficiency and renewable sources. Unlike European legislation, the WE considers them in an integrated way. This approach will help Member States to exploit their intrinsic capabilities and design their optimum strategy to reach their objectives. Using the information in Eurostat, we calculate the WE of Member States in EU-28 and their evolution. We also analyze illustrative examples to highlight strategies to reduce the WE, study the connection between economic development and WE, and provide a tool to diagnose the potential of improvement of an energy system. - Highlights: • Even achieving the 2020 objectives, Europe will still be wasting energy. • We need to reduce wasted energy in our way towards 100% renewable energy systems. • The WE (wasted energy) integrates efficiency and renewable in a single target. • We provide the empirical WE of Member States in EU-28 and their evolution. • Finally we highlight best practices of real energy systems.

  10. Waste-to-energy advanced cycles and new design concepts for efficient power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of state-of-the-art technologies for energy conversion from waste, as well as a much-needed guide to new and advanced strategies to increase Waste-to-Energy (WTE) plant efficiency. Beginning with an overview of municipal solid waste production and disposal, basic concepts related to Waste-To-Energy conversion processes are described, highlighting the most relevant aspects impacting the thermodynamic efficiency of WTE power plants. The pervasive influences of main steam cycle parameters and plant configurations on WTE efficiency are detailed and quantified. Advanc

  11. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 8: Appendices HYDRO, IRD, LTM, NUTS, PAR, PMR, QAPD, RBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Geohydrologic data have been collected in the Los Medanos area at the US Department of Energy's proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico since 1975 as part of a study evaluating the feasibility of storing defense-associated nuclear wastes within the bedded salt of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Drilling and hydrologic testing have identified three principal water-bearing zones above the Salado Formation and one below that could potentially transport wastes to the biosphere if the proposed facility were breached. The zones above the Salado are the contact between the Rustler and Salado Formations and the Culebra and Magenta Dolomite Members of the Rustler Formation of Permian age. The zone below the Salado Formation consists of channel sandstones in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Determinations of hydraulic gradients, directions of flow, and hydraulic properties were hindered because of the negligible permeability of the water-bearing zones. Special techniques in drilling, well completion, and hydraulic testing have been developed to determine the hydrologic characteristics of these water-producing zones

  12. OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] mission plan amendment with comments on the draft amendment and responses to the comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) published in June 1985 the Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. That document was to provide an informational basis sufficient to permit informed decisions to be made in carrying out the program. DOE recognized that the Mission Plan would be revised. The first such revision is this amendment, which has been prepared to apprise the Congress of significant recent achievements in the waste-management program, the revised schedule for the first repository, and the intent to postpone site-specific work for the second repository and plans for continuing the technology-development program for the second repository. Included are the DOE's submittal to the Congress of a proposal for the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) as an integral part of the waste-management system and aspects of the consultation-and-cooperation interactions between the DOE and affected states and Indian tribes. The amendment presents the DOE's considered and informed judgments, based on its actual experience in administering these programs, of the preferred courses and schedules for the national program. 104 refs., 7 tabs

  13. Toward a sustainable waste management system: a comprehensive assessment of thermal and electric energy recovery from waste incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvia, Monica; Cosmi, Carmelina; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Macchiato, Maria [Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Napoli (Italy); Mangiamele, Lucia [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria e Fisica dell Ambiente; Pietrapertosa, Filomena [Univ. di Napoli Federico II, (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche

    2002-12-01

    Energy-environmental planning must join normative, environmental and socio-economic features to obtain effective strategies aimed to a sustainable development. Therefore a comprehensive methodology for the analysis and the optimisation of the anthropogenic activities system configuration, can usefully support decision-makers in the definition of harmonised sector plans, joining waste management issues with resource use problems and exploiting energy and materials feedback among supply and demand sectors. In this paper we present an innovative application of the Advanced Local Energy Environmental Planning methodology (ALEP), aimed to the definition of optimal waste management strategies which comply with comprehensive as well as sectorial issues.

  14. Identification and characterization of Department of Energy special-case radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kudera, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies and characterizes Department of Energy (DOE) special-case radioactive wastes. Included in this paper are descriptions of the special-case waste categories and their volumes and curie contents, as well as discussions of potential methods for management of these special-case wastes. Work on extensive inventories of DOE-titled special-case waste are still in progress. All radioactive waste is characterized to determine its waste category. Some wastes may have characteristics of more than one of the major waste types. These characteristics may prevent such wastes from being managed as typical high-level, low-level, or transuranic waste. DOE has termed these wastes special-case wastes. Special-case wastes may require special management and disposal schemes. Because of these special considerations, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) required the identification of all existing and potential DOE-owned special case waste to determine future management planning and funding requirements. The inventory effort includes all commercially held, DOE-owned radioactive materials

  15. Waste management as the central task of nuclear energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.

    1977-01-01

    A survey article deals with the tasks of the different steps of waste disposal, the amounts of fuel elements and waste obtained and the role of reprocessing in waste management, the intermediate storage of fuel elements and the alternative reprocessing or direct ultimate storage of fuel elements. The present state of the art of large-scale waste management in West Germany, is briefly outlined including responsibilities. (HPH) [de

  16. Pyrolysis process of agricultural waste using CO2 for waste management, energy recovery, and biochar fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jechan; Yang, Xiao; Cho, Seong-Heon; Kim, Jae-Kon; Lee, Sang Soo; Tsang, Daniel C.W.; Ok, Yong Sik; Kwon, Eilhann E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 reacts with VOCs enhancing syngas generation from pyrolysis of biomass. • CO 2 reduces tar formation by expediting thermal cracking of VOCs. • Properties of biochar can be easily modified using CO 2 as a pyrolysis agent. • A detailed mass balance for pyrolysis of red pepper stalk was provided. • Energy saving can be expected in pyrolysis of biomass using CO 2 . - Abstract: This study focused on the mechanistic understanding of CO 2 in pyrolysis process of agricultural waste to achieve waste management, energy recovery, and biochar fabrication. In order to scrutinize the genuine role of CO 2 in the biomass pyrolysis, all pyrogenic products such as syngas, pyrolytic oil (i.e., tar), and biochar generated from pyrolysis of red pepper stalk in N 2 and CO 2 were characterized. Thermo-gravimetric analysis confirmed that during the thermolysis of red pepper stalk, the magnitude of exothermic reaction in CO 2 from 220 to 400 °C was substantially different from that in N 2 , resulting in the different extents of carbonization. The physico-chemical properties of biochar produced in CO 2 were varied compared to biochar produced in N 2 . For example, the surface area of biochar produced in CO 2 was increased from 32.46 to 109.15 m 2 g −1 . This study validates the role of CO 2 not only as expediting agent for the thermal cracking of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) but also as reacting agent with VOCs. This genuine influence of CO 2 in pyrolysis of red pepper stalk led to enhanced generation of syngas, which consequently reduced tar production because VOCs evolving from devolatilization of biomass served as substrates for syngas via reaction between CO 2 and VOCs. The enhanced generation of CO reached up to 3000 and 6000% at 600 and 690 °C, respectively, whereas 33.8% tar reduction in CO 2 was identified at 600 °C.

  17. 2004 Power marketing program draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This is volume 3 of a draft environmental impact statement from the Western Power Administration's Sierra Nevada Region. Information is included on the following topics: statutory and legal framework; Sierra Nevada region customer groups and economic regions; renewable technology cost information matrix; hydrological assumptions; recreation resources along river reaches and the delta; archaeological and historical aspects; power resources in PROSYM; air quality regulatory structure; energy generation for PROSYM cases; overall power costs for utility, agriculture, and other customers; socioeconomic impacts in specific economic regions; projected air resource impacts; and land use, water quality, and solid waste impact factors

  18. Report on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste - Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    By letter of 13 May 2003 the Council consulted Parliament, pursuant to Articles 31 and 32 of the EURATOM Treaty, on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste (COM(2003) 32 - 2003/0022(CNS)). At the sitting of 15 May 2003 the President of Parliament announced that he had referred the proposal to the Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy as the committee responsible and the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy for its opinion (C5-0229/2003). The Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy appointed Alejo Vidal-Quadras Roca Rapporteur at its meeting of 22 May 2003. The committee considered the Commission proposal and draft report at its meetings of 9 July, 9 September, 6 October, 3 November and 27 November 2003. At the last meeting it adopted the draft legislative resolution by 36 votes to 7, with 2 abstentions. The opinion of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy is attached. The report was tabled on 1 December 2003

  19. A Computer Program for Modeling the Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragasen Pillay

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a tool for the analysis of conversion of organic waste into energy. The tool is a program that uses waste characterization parameters and mass flow rates at each stage of the waste treatment process to predict the given products. The specific waste treatment process analysed in this paper is anaerobic digestion. The different waste treatment stages of the anaerobic digestion process are: conditioning of input waste, secondary treatment, drying of sludge, conditioning of digestate, treatment of digestate, storage of liquid and solid effluent, disposal of liquid and solid effluents, purification, utilization and storage of combustible gas. The program uses mass balance equations to compute the amount of CH4, NH3, CO2 and H2S produced from anaerobic digestion of organic waste, and hence the energy available. Case studies are also presented.

  20. Life cycle assessment modelling of waste-to-energy incineration in Spain and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margallo, M; Aldaco, R; Irabien, A; Carrillo, V; Fischer, M; Bala, A; Fullana, P

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, waste management systems have been evaluated using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. A main shortcoming of prior studies was the focus on a mixture of waste with different characteristics. The estimation of emissions and consumptions associated with each waste fraction in these studies presented allocation problems. Waste-to-energy (WTE) incineration is a clear example in which municipal solid waste (MSW), comprising many types of materials, is processed to produce several outputs. This paper investigates an approach to better understand incineration processes in Spain and Portugal by applying a multi-input/output allocation model. The application of this model enabled predictions of WTE inputs and outputs, including the consumption of ancillary materials and combustibles, air emissions, solid wastes, and the energy produced during the combustion of each waste fraction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Characterization and inventories of nuclear materials and wastes for possible future energy scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    Awareness of the total materials inventory and materials balance associated with differing methods for energy generation is part of present day concerns associated with disparate areas that include atmospheric emissions, resource utilization, health effects, and both current and long term hazards and risks. Nuclear energy, for a number of decades, has been the recipient of significant scrutiny concerning the materials and wastes it generates, particularly in the context of long term solutions to such issues. This paper examines the nuclear materials and waste generation for nuclear energy scenarios spanning the coming century. The paper also briefly addresses wastes (in the form of emissions) from other energy sources and examines requirements associated with backend energy system materials management. Possible future requirements pertaining to CO 2 management are found to place conditions upon waste management generally similar to those for nuclear waste. One example of material flows for the case of coal generation of electricity coupled with carbon sequestration is also given

  2. Prospective framework for collection and exploitation of waste cooking oil as feedstock for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhabhandhu, Ampaitepin; Tezuka, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    From the viewpoint of waste-to-energy, waste cooking oil is one of the attractive and available recycled feedstocks, apart from agricultural residues. The generation of energy from waste cooking oil is considered as an effective technique for waste management, as well as a beneficial form of energy recovery. Two alternative systems and a conventional system of waste cooking oil collection and conversion are evaluated by the cost benefit analysis in order to find a suitable method for waste-to-energy conversion. The results show that the collection of waste cooking oil with waste lubricating oil (System II) a useful alternative to the management of waste cooking oil (B/C > 1). The total heat produced by the combustion of pyrolytic oil at maximum and minimum conversion rates is also determined. The separate collection of waste cooking oil, subjected to chemical pre-treatment prior to introduction in a pyrolysis reactor (System III), is considered an undesirable option (B/C < 1) due to the cost of the chemicals involved. Although the exclusion of chemical pre-treatment makes System III a desirable option, the total amount of heat of combustion generated is less. The increased electricity cost required for the process has no effect on the benefit-cost ratio of System II. However, System III, excluding chemical pre-treatment, becomes an unprofitable alternative when the electricity cost reaches 100% of the fixed capital cost at the minimum conversion rate.

  3. Biomass waste-to-energy valorisation technologies: a review case for banana processing in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumisiriza, Robert; Hawumba, Joseph Funa; Okure, Mackay; Hensel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Uganda's banana industry is heavily impeded by the lack of cheap, reliable and sustainable energy mainly needed for processing of banana fruit into pulp and subsequent drying into chips before milling into banana flour that has several uses in the bakery industry, among others. Uganda has one of the lowest electricity access levels, estimated at only 2-3% in rural areas where most of the banana growing is located. In addition, most banana farmers have limited financial capacity to access modern solar energy technologies that can generate sufficient energy for industrial processing. Besides energy scarcity and unreliability, banana production, marketing and industrial processing generate large quantities of organic wastes that are disposed of majorly by unregulated dumping in places such as swamps, thereby forming huge putrefying biomass that emit green house gases (methane and carbon dioxide). On the other hand, the energy content of banana waste, if harnessed through appropriate waste-to-energy technologies, would not only solve the energy requirement for processing of banana pulp, but would also offer an additional benefit of avoiding fossil fuels through the use of renewable energy. The potential waste-to-energy technologies that can be used in valorisation of banana waste can be grouped into three: Thermal (Direct combustion and Incineration), Thermo-chemical (Torrefaction, Plasma treatment, Gasification and Pyrolysis) and Biochemical (Composting, Ethanol fermentation and Anaerobic Digestion). However, due to high moisture content of banana waste, direct application of either thermal or thermo-chemical waste-to-energy technologies is challenging. Although, supercritical water gasification does not require drying of feedstock beforehand and can be a promising thermo-chemical technology for gasification of wet biomass such as banana waste, it is an expensive technology that may not be adopted by banana farmers in Uganda. Biochemical conversion technologies are

  4. Life cycle assessments of energy from solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnveden, Goeran; Johansson, Jessica; Lind, Per; Moberg, Aasa [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology/Natural Resoruces Management Inst.]|[Defence Research Establishment, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Defence Analysis

    2000-09-01

    The overall aim of the present study is to evaluate different strategies for treatment of solid waste based on a life-cycle perspective. Important goals are to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods for treatment of solid waste, and to identify critical factors in the systems, including the background systems, which may significantly influence the results. Included in the study are landfilling, incineration, recycling, digestion and composting. The waste fractions considered are the combustible and recyclable or compostable fractions of municipal solid waste. The methodology used is Life Cycle Assessment. The results can be used for policy decisions as well as strategic decisions on waste management systems.

  5. Energy and nutrient recovery from anaerobic treatment of organic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Christian-Dominik

    The objective of the research was to develop a complete systems design and predictive model framework of a series of linked processes capable of providing treatment of landfill leachate while simultaneously recovering nutrients and bioenergy from the waste inputs. This proposed process includes an "Ammonia Recovery Process" (ARP) consisting of: (1) ammonia de-sorption requiring leachate pH adjustment with lime or sodium hydroxide addition followed by, (2) ammonia re-absorption into a 6-molar sulfuric acid spray-tower followed by, (3) biological activated sludge treatment of soluble organic residuals (BOD) followed by, (4) high-rate algal post-treatment and finally, (5) an optional anaerobic digestion process for algal and bacterial biomass, and/or supplemental waste fermentation providing the potential for additional nutrient and energy recovery. In addition, the value provided by the waste treatment function of the overall processes, each of the sub-processes would provide valuable co-products offering potential GHG credit through direct fossil-fuel replacement, or replacement of products requiring fossil fuels. These valuable co-products include, (1) ammonium sulfate fertilizer, (2) bacterial biomass, (3) algal biomass providing, high-protein feeds and oils for biodiesel production and, (4) methane bio-fuels. Laboratory and pilot reactors were constructed and operated, providing data supporting the quantification and modeling of the ARP. Growth parameters, and stoichiometric coefficients were determined, allowing for design of the leachate activated sludge treatment sub-component. Laboratory and pilot algal reactors were constructed and operated, and provided data that supported the determination of leachate organic/inorganic-nitrogen ratio, and loading rates, allowing optimum performance of high-rate algal post-treatment. A modular and expandable computer program was developed, which provided a systems model framework capable of predicting individual component

  6. Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy's anticipated mixed waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE's waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE's mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters

  7. US Department of Energy acceptance of commercial transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Bennett, W.S.; Brown, C.M.

    1980-02-01

    Contaminated transuranic wastes generated as a result of non-defense activities have been disposed of by shallow land burial at a commercially operated (NECO) facility located on the Hanford federal reservation, which is licensed by the State of Washington and by the NRC. About 15,000 ft 3 of commercial TRU waste have been generated each year, but generation for the next three years could triple due to decontamination and decommissioning scheduled to start in 1980. Disposal at other commercial burial sites has been precluded due to sites closing or prohibitions on acceptance of transuranic wastes. The State of Washington recently modified the NECO-Hanford operating license, effective February 29, 1980, to provide that radioactive wastes contaminated with transuranics in excess of 10 nCi/g will not be accepted for disposal. Consistent with the state policy, the NRC amended the NECO special nuclear material license so that Pu in excess of 10n Ci/g cannot be accepted after February 29, 1980. As a result, NRC requested DOE to examine the feasibility of accepting these wastes at a DOE operated site. TRU wastes accepted by the DOE would be placed in retrievable storage in accordance with DOE policy which requires retrievable storage of transuranic wastes pending final disposition in a geologic repository. DOE transuranic wastes are stored at six major DOE sites: INEL, Hanford, LASL, NTS, ORNL, and SRP. A specific site for receiving commercial TRU waste has not yet been selected. Shipments to DOE-Hanford would cause the least disruption to past practices. Commercial TRU wastes would be subject to waste form and packaging criteria established by the DOE. The waste generators would be expected to incur all applicable costs for DOE to take ownership of the waste, and provide storage, processing, and repository disposal. The 1980 charge to generators for DOE acceptance of commercial TRU waste is $147 per cubic foot

  8. Overview of mixed waste issues at the Department of Energy defense installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezga, L.J.; Eisenhower, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the /open quotes/double hazard/close quotes/ associated with these waste materials, the ability to manage these mixed wastes has been somewhat limited. The unavailability of acceptable and proven treatment and/or disposal systems has forced the Department of Energy (DOE) installations to place these materials in storage. The limited capacity of permitted storage areas and the desire to move forward in the overall waste management cycle have placed an increased emphasis on the need to develop treatment/disposal technologies for mixed wastes. Programs have been initiated by contractors who operate the DOE installations to provide the technical basis for selecting technologies to render these wastes nonhazardous through treatment by destroying the hazardous constituent, to separate the hazardous constituents from the radioactive constituents, to treat the wastes and place them in a form that will meet EPA requirements to be classified as nonhazardous, and to provide facilities for the disposal of wastes which cannot be changed into a nonhazardous form. These wastes include a variety of materials such as chlorinated solvents and waste oils contaminated with uranium or fission products, liquid scintillation wastes, and sludges from wastewater treatment plants contaminated with uranium or fission products. By volume, the largest mixed waste streams are the contaminated wastewater treatment sludges. Plans for the management of the major categories of mixed waste are presented below. More detailed information on plans for specific waste streams is presented in the paper

  9. An assessment of thermal destruction technologies for application to Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    A study of known operational and emerging thermal treatment technologies was conducted for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development (OTD) through the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP). This study addressed thermal treatment of mixed wastes (MWs), for which the most comprehensive set of waste has been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the details and results of the technology assessments and comparisons between technologies. This volume (Volume 2) contains the comprehensive data collected on each technology, including descriptions, process and cost data, comments on advantages and deficiencies, types of waste treatable and by-products of these wastes, and reference information. 2 figs

  10. Improved energy efficiency in juice production through waste heat recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.-O.; Elfgren, E.; Westerlund, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A heating system at a juice production was investigated and improved. • Different impacts of drying cycle improvements at the energy usage were explored. • The total heat use for drying could thereby be decreased with 52%. • The results point out a significant decrease of heat consumption with low investment costs. - Abstract: Berry juice concentrate is produced by pressing berries and heating up the juice. The by-products are berry skins and seeds in a press cake. Traditionally, these by-products have been composted, but due to their valuable nutrients, it could be profitable to sell them instead. The skins and seeds need to be separated and dried to a moisture content of less than 10 %wt (on dry basis) in order to avoid fermentation. A berry juice plant in the north of Sweden has been studied in order to increase the energy and resource efficiency, with special focus on the drying system. This was done by means of process integration with mass and energy balance, theory from thermodynamics and psychrometry along with measurements of the juice plant. Our study indicates that the drying system could be operated at full capacity without any external heat supply using waste heat supplied from the juice plant. This would be achieved by increasing the efficiency of the dryer by recirculation of the drying air and by heat supply from the flue gases of the industrial boiler. The recirculation would decrease the need of heat in the dryer with about 52%. The total heat use for the plant could thereby be decreased from 1262 kW to 1145 kW. The improvements could be done without compromising the production quality

  11. Solid waste management in Greece and potential for waste-to-energy; Die Abfallwirtschaft und das Waste-to-Energy Potenzial in Griechenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalogirou, Efstratios [WTERT Greece - SYNERGIA, A.I.T., Attica (Greece); Manolis, Klados [INTRAKAT, Attica (Greece); Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Themelis, Nickolas J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Earth Engineering Center; Karagiannidis, Avraam [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Germany). Lab. of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering

    2011-05-15

    In Greece the daily production of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is estimated to be 15,000 tones, which means roughly 5.4 million tons per year, from which 77 % is deposited in Landfills, while 23 % is recycled and composted. The European Union Legislation for Sanitary Landfills (1999/31/EC), imposes the decrease of biodegradable waste that are deposit to sanitary landfills; thus WTE methods of MSW is one of the best, in terms of affordability in a competitive world and environmental friendly, proposed solutions. Waste-to-Energy methods produce steam and/or electricity. Also, the weight of MSW is reduced up to 70-80 % and the volume up to 90 %, and finally the land area requirements are very small. Our proposal for the WTE technology implementation in Greece is the construction of MSW WTE plants in all major cities operating with an annual capacity of 200.000-400.000 tones. The required land area will be only 4-7 hectares. The basic income of such plants is the gate fee, varying from 50 to 80 Euro/ton. The second income comes from selling of the produced electricity to the Public Power Corporation for 87.85 Euro/MWh (referring to the biodegradable fraction of MSW), according to the new Greek law for renewable energy sources (L. 3851/2010). Additional income comes from the recovered metals of the bottom ash. Furthermore, there is a considerable prospect for state subsidy of the whole investment, according to the Greek Development Law. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of alternatives for a second-generation transportation system for Department of Energy transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) waste storage sites will ship their contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) beginning FY 1989. The CH-TRU waste will be shipped in the Transuranic Package Transported (TRUPACT-I), a new packaging being developed by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque/Transportation Technology Center. Some of the DOE TRU waste, however, might be unsuitable for shipment in TRUPACT-I, and is designated special-shipped (SS) TRU waste. The purposes of this study were to: (1) identify the quantity and characteristics of SS-TRU waste stored and generated at DOE facilities; (2) identify alternatives for managing the SS-TRU waste; and (3) make overall recommendations for managing the SS-TRU waste. Data on quantity and characteristics were gathered through coordinating visits to the sites and extracting information from each site's records. Representatives of DOE organizations and contractors set objectives for managing the SS-TRU waste. Alternative shipping systems were then identified for CH SS-TRU waste and RH SS-TRU waste. Evaluations of these alternatives considered how well they would satisfy each objective, and associated potential problems. The study recommends delaying the decision on how best to transport the CH SS-TRU waste to WIPP until the amount of SS-TRU processed waste in heavy drums is known. These conditions and choices are presented: a relatively small number of processed, heavy drums could be shipped most economically via TRUPACT-I, mixed with lighter drums of unprocessed waste. If a large number of heavy drums is to be shipped, a shorter and narrower version of TRUPACT-I would be preferred alternative. The Defense High-Level Waste cask is the recommended alternative system for shipping RH SS-TRU waste. 12 references, 15 figures, 22 tables

  13. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebilcox, G. J.; Lundberg, W. L.

    1981-03-01

    The canning segment of the food processing industry is a major energy user within that industry. Most of its energy demand is met by hot water and steam and those fluids, in addition to product cooling water, eventually flow from the processes as warm waste water. To minimize the possibility of product contamination, a large percentage of that waste water is sent directly to factory drains and sewer systems without being recycled and in many cases the thermal energy contained by the waste streams also goes unreclaimed and is lost from further use. Waste heat recovery in canning facilities can be performed economically using systems that employ thermal energy storage (TES). A project was proposed in which a demonstration waste heat recovery system, including a TES feature, would be designed, installed and operated.

  14. Associations of Dietary Protein and Energy Intakes With Protein-Energy Wasting Syndrome in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Wei, Guo; Chen, Xiaorui; Boucher, Robert; Kiani, Rabia; Raj, Dominic; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom; Murtaugh, Maureen A

    2017-09-01

    The associations of dietary protein and/or energy intakes with protein or energy wasting in patients on maintenance hemodialysis are controversial. We examined these in the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study. In 1487 participants in the HEMO Study, baseline dietary protein intake (grams per kilogram per day) and dietary energy intake (kilocalories per kilograms per day) were related to the presence of the protein-energy wasting (PEW) syndrome at month 12 (defined as the presence of at least 1 criteria in 2 of the 3 categories of low serum chemistry, low body mass, and low muscle mass) in logistic regression models. In additional separate models, protein intake estimated from equilibrated normalized protein catabolic rate (enPCR) was also related to the PEW syndrome. Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of baseline dietary protein intake was paradoxically associated with increased risk of the PEW syndrome at month 12 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.79-6.05). This relationship was completely attenuated (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 0.88-2.06) with adjustment for baseline body weight, which suggested mathematical coupling. Results were similar for dietary energy intake. Compared with the lowest quartile of baseline enPCR, the highest quartile was not associated with the PEW syndrome at 12 months (OR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.54-1.12). These data do not support the use of dietary protein intake or dietary energy intake criteria in the definition of the PEW syndrome in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  15. Nuclear waste: Department of Energy's Transuranic Waste Disposal Plan needs revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Transuranic waste consists of discarded tools, rags, machinery, paper, sheet metal, and glass containing man-made radioactive elements that can be dangerous if inhaled, ingested, or absorbed into the body through an open wound. GAO found that the Defense Waste Management Plan does not provide the Congress with complete inventory and cost data or details on environmental and safety issues related to the permanent disposal of TRU waste; the Plan's $2.8 billion costs are understated by at least $300 million. Further, it does not include costs for disposing of buried waste, contaminated soil, and TRU waste that may not be accepted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Lastly, the Plan provides no details on the environmental and safety issues related to the permanent disposal of TRU waste, nor does it discuss the types of or timing for environmental analyses needed before WIPP starts operating

  16. Characteristics of transuranic waste at Department of Energy sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.T.; Wilkinson, F.J. III.

    1983-05-01

    This document reports data and information on TRU waste from all DOE generating and storage sites. The geographical location of the sites is shown graphically. There are four major sections in this document. The first three cover the TRU waste groups known as Newly Generated, Stored, and Buried Wastes. Subsections are included under Newly Generated and Stored on contact-handled and remote-handled waste. These classifications of waste are defined, and the current or expected totals of each are given. Figure 1.3 shows the total amount of Buried and Stored TRU waste. Preparation of this document began in 1981, and most of the data are as of December 31, 1980. In a few cases data were reported to December 31, 1981, and these have been noted. The projections in the Newly Generated section were made, for the most part, at the end of 1981

  17. Guideline on action plans and strategies to mobilize waste-to-energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loonik, J.; Saarepera, R.; Kaeger, M. [and others

    2012-12-15

    This report presents some results of the REMOWE project and sets guidelines for regional policy makers, SME's and the general public as well for more deep realization of waste-to-energy policy principles in action. The overall objective of the project is, on regional levels, to contribute to a decreased negative effect on the environment by reduction of carbon dioxide emission by creating a balance between energy consumption and sustainable use of renewable energy sources (waste-to-energy cycle). Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions and use of renewable energy sources are broad areas and this project will focus on energy resources from waste and actions to facilitate implementation of energy efficient technology in the Baltic Sea region within the waste-to-energy area. The focus is to utilise waste from cities, farming and industry for energy purposes in an efficient way. The project seeks to facilitate the implementation of sustainable systems for waste-to-energy in the Baltic Sea region and specifically, in a first step, in the project partner regions. The project's duration is 12/2009-12/2012. This report is structured into 8 chapters, which are further divided into subchapters if needed. Relevant data about current situation about waste generation and management in partner regions of REMOWE project are described in Chapter 1. There are guidelines on action plan and strategies for regional policy makers, SME's and the general public to mobilize waste to energy production in Chapter 2. Beside guidelines, this report contains references to basic political acts of waste and energy management of EU and best practices of implementation them in regional level (Chapter 3). The focus of Chapters 4 and 5 is on energetic potential of waste and technologies for utilisation of waste for energy purposes. During the project period in each of partner region innovation processes were realised and innovation ides evaluated, basic results are collected into

  18. Draft Mission Plan Amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has prepared this document to report plans for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, whose mission is to manage and dispose of the nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment. The Congress established this program through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Specifically, the Congress directed us to isolate these wastes in geologic repositories constructed in suitable rock formations deep beneath the surface of the earth. In the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the Congress mandated that only one repository was to be developed at present and that only the Yucca Mountain candidate site in Nevada was to be characterized at this time. The Amendments Act also authorized the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. After a reassessment in 1989, the Secretary of Energy restructured the program, focusing the repository effort scientific evaluations of the Yucca Mountain candidate site, deciding to proceed with the development of an MRS facility, and strengthening the management of the program. 48 refs., 32 figs.

  19. Socio-technical systems analysis of waste to energy from municipal solid waste in developing economies: a case for Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyamu Hope O.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste generation is an inevitable by-product of human activity, and it is on the rise due to rapid urbanisation, industrialisation, increased wealth and population. The composition of municipal solid waste (MSW in developed and developing economies differ, especially with the organic fraction. Research shows that the food waste stream of MSW in developing countries is over 50%. The case study for this investigation, Nigeria, has minimal formal recycling or resource recovery programs. The average composition of waste from previous research in the country is between 50–70% putrescible and 30–50% non-putrescible, presenting significant resource recovery potential in composting and biogas production. Waste-to-energy (WtE is an important waste management solution that has been successfully implemented and operated in most developed economies. This contribution reports the conditions that would be of interest before WtE potentials of MSW is harnessed, in an efficient waste management process in a developing economy like Nigeria. The investigation presents a set of socio-technical parameters and transition strategy model that would inform a productive MSW management and resource recovery, in which WtE can be part of the solution. This model will find application in the understanding of the interactions between the socio-economic, technical and environmental system, to promote sustainable resource recovery programs in developing economies, among which is WtE.

  20. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  1. 10 CFR 51.80 - Draft environmental impact statement-materials license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Draft environmental impact statement-materials license. 51...-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Draft Environmental Impact Statements-Materials Licenses § 51.80 Draft environmental impact statement—materials license. (a) The NRC staff will either prepare a draft environmental...

  2. 10 CFR 51.73 - Request for comments on draft environmental impact statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Request for comments on draft environmental impact...-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Environmental Impact Statements § 51.73 Request for comments on draft environmental impact statement. Each draft environmental impact statement and each supplement to a draft...

  3. 10 CFR 51.81 - Distribution of draft environmental impact statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distribution of draft environmental impact statement. 51...-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Draft Environmental Impact Statements-Materials Licenses § 51.81 Distribution of draft environmental impact statement. Copies of the draft environmental impact statement and...

  4. 10 CFR 51.86 - Distribution of draft environmental impact statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distribution of draft environmental impact statement. 51...-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Draft Environmental Impact Statements-Rulemaking § 51.86 Distribution of draft environmental impact statement. Copies of the draft environmental impact statement and any...

  5. Draft Transportaion Business Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for establishing a transportation system to support shipment of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste to repositories and storage facilities developed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). An element that assists in fulfilling that responsibility is a business plan for acquiring and operating a transportation system. The Draft Transportation Business Plan is an interim step in the process of procuring the transportation system. It sets the context for business strategy decisions by providing pertinent background information, describing the legislation and policies governing transportation under the NWPA, and with establishing the transportation system. It also serves as an instrument for initiating communication between OCRWM and other interested parties. Included in the docuument are strategies for procuring shipping casks and transportation support services. Additionally, in the spirit of the NWPA directive to utilize the private sector to the maximum extent possible, opportunities for business ventures are obvious throughout the system development cycle

  6. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste

  7. Current Program for the management of U.S. Department of Energy transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, T.

    1994-01-01

    The existing inventory of TRU waste can be divided into tow distinct components: (1) retrievably stored TRU waste and (2) buried TRU waste. The distinction between open-quotes storedclose quotes and open-quotes buriedclose quotes TRU waste was established in 1970 when the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) determined that TRU-contaminated waste, when disposed, should have more effective isolation from the environment than the confinement provided by burial in pits and trenches covered with soil. Buried TRU (and contaminated soils surrounding buried TRU) are the results of disposal operations carried out at DOE sites prior to the 1970 decision. The inventory of buried TRU is 190,600 m 3 . This waste is the responsibility of the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). All TRU waste generated since 1970 has been placed in storage at six DOE sites. This storage was designed with a lifetime expected to be 20 years. The waste is stored in retrievable form for eventual shipment and disposal at a geologic repository. Currently, TRU waste is contained in a variety of packaging, including metal drums and wooden and metal boxes, and stored in earth-mounded berms, concrete culverts, or other facilities. At the end of 1991, there were approximately 64,000 m 3 of retrievably stored TRU waste. With the WIPP facility not becoming operational until the year 2000 or later, the DOE must effectively manage this waste in other manners. The issues regarding the management of TRU wastes is described

  8. Development of treatment technologies for the processing of US Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Berry, J.B.; Coyle, G.J.; Lurk, P.W.; Wolf, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Waste contaminated with chemically hazardous and radioactive species is defined as mixed waste. Significant technology development has been conducted for separate treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste, but technology development addressing mixed-waste treatment has been limited. Management of mixed waste requires treatment which must meet the standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency for the specific hazardous constituents while also providing adequate control of the radionuclides. Technology has not been developed, demonstrated, or tested to produce a low-risk final waste form specifically for mixed waste. Throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, mixed waste is a problem because definitive treatment standards have not been established and few disposal facilities are available. Treatment capability and capacity are also limited. Site-specific solutions to the management of mixed waste have been initiated; however, site-specific programs result in duplication of technology development between various sites. Significant progress is being made in developing technology for mixed waste under the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The status of the technical initiatives in chemical/physical treatment, destruction/stabilization technology, off-gas treatment, and final waste form production/assessment is described in this paper

  9. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

  10. Municipal wastes and landfield gases utilization - renewable resource of energy and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuburovic, M.; Jovovic, A.

    2002-01-01

    Urbanization and industrialization, have been fundamental causes of environmental pollution (of water, air and land) which the cities were unable to handle. There is already enough evidence of the fact that the role of technology in environmental matters is moving in two important directions: sustainable development, dealing primary with global problems, and preventive technology, designed to reduce the environmental effects of processes, operations, and products. Treatment plants for industrial and municipal wastes, emission controls for incinerators, and safe landfills for waste disposal were developed to control air, water, and land pollution. Now, this 'end-of-pipe' treatment technologies are still the way of environmental protection philosophy, particularly in the developing countries. New environmental standards demand more and more rigorous preventive environmental protection technologies, therefore further development of industrial production requires the rational use of natural sources of raw materials and energy. Production and the use of goods with the minimum municipal and industrial wastes and the development of recycling technology provided closed cycle of materials. Main principles for the development and exploitation of the technology with the minimum or without waste materials and energy are: the use of renewable sources of material and energy, maximum use of waste materials and waste energy, waste minimisation and reduction of energy losses in the production, development of new industrial processes operating with minimum material and energy losses in products exploitation period and after that, and the responsible use of natural sources, products and energy in the field of industry and consumption. (author)

  11. Municipal Solid Waste Management and its Energy Potential in Roorkee City, Uttarakhand, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Tabish; Kulkarni, Kishore

    2016-03-01

    Energy plays a vital role in the development of any country. With rapid economic growth and multifold urbanization, India faces the problem of municipal solid waste management and disposal. This problem can be mitigate through adoption of environment friendly technologies for treatment and processing of waste before it is disposed off. Currently, urban and industrial wastes throughout India receive partial treatment before its final disposal, except in few exceptional cases. This practice leads to severe environmental pollution problems including major threat to human health. There is an absolute need to provide adequate waste collection and treatment before its disposal. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is getting importance in recent years. The MSW management involves collection, transportation, handling and conversion to energy by biological and thermal routes. Based on the energy potential available, the energy conversion through biogas production using available waste is being carried out. Waste-to-energy is now a clean, renewable, sustainable source of energy. The estimation of energy content of MSW in Roorkee city is discussed in this paper. Furthermore this paper also takes into account the benefits of carbon credits.

  12. APPLICATIONS OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE TO WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, W. L.; Christenson, James A.

    1979-07-31

    A project is discussed in which the possibilities for economical waste heat recovery and utilization in the food industry were examined. Waste heat availability and applications surveys were performed at two manufacturing plants engaged in low temperature (freezing) and high temperature (cooking, sterilizing, etc.) food processing. The surveys indicate usable waste heat is available in significant quantities which could be applied to existing, on-site energy demands resulting in sizable reductions in factory fuel and energy usage. At the high temperature plant, the energy demands involve the heating of fresh water for boiler make-up, for the food processes and for the daily clean-up operation. Clean-up poses an opportunity for thermal energy storage since waste heat is produced during the one or two production shifts of each working day while the major clean-up effort does not occur until food production ends. At the frozen food facility, the clean-up water application again exists and, in addition, refrigeration waste heat could also be applied to warm the soil beneath the ground floor freezer space. Systems to recover and apply waste heat in these situations were developed conceptually and thermal/economic performance predictions were obtained. The results of those studies indicate the economics of waste heat recovery can be attractive for facilities with high energy demand levels. Small factories, however, with relatively low energy demands may find the economics marginal although, percentagewise, the fuel and energy savings are appreciable.

  13. CAPE-OPEN simulation of waste-to-energy technologies for urban cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadou, Christina; Martinopoulos, Georgios

    2018-01-01

    Uncontrolled waste disposal and unsustainable waste management not only damage the environment, but also affect human health. In most urban areas, municipal solid waste production is constantly increasing following the everlasting increase in energy consumption. Technologies aim to exploit wastes in order to recover energy, decrease the depletion rate of fossil fuels, and reduce waste disposal. In this paper, the annual amount of municipal solid waste disposed in the greater metropolitan area of Thessaloniki is taken into consideration, in order to size and model a combined heat and power facility for energy recovery. From the various waste-to-energy technologies available, a fluidised bed combustion boiler combined heat and power plant was selected and modelled through the use of COCO, a CAPE-OPEN simulation software, to estimate the amount of electrical and thermal energy that could be generated for different boiler pressures. Although average efficiency was similar in all cases, providing almost 15% of Thessaloniki's energy needs, a great variation in the electricity to thermal energy ratio was observed.

  14. Energy use and recovery in waste management and implications for accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Thomas; Ekvall, T.

    2009-01-01

    The energy system plays an essential role in accounting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste management systems and waste technologies. This paper focuses on energy use and energy recovery in waste management and outlines how these aspects should be addressed consistently in a GHG perspec...

  15. Food waste-to-energy conversion technologies: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Kaushik, Rajni; Parshetti, Ganesh K; Mahmood, Russell; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-04-01

    Food waste represents a significantly fraction of municipal solid waste. Proper management and recycling of huge volumes of food waste are required to reduce its environmental burdens and to minimize risks to human health. Food waste is indeed an untapped resource with great potential for energy production. Utilization of food waste for energy conversion currently represents a challenge due to various reasons. These include its inherent heterogeneously variable compositions, high moisture contents and low calorific value, which constitute an impediment for the development of robust, large scale, and efficient industrial processes. Although a considerable amount of research has been carried out on the conversion of food waste to renewable energy, there is a lack of comprehensive and systematic reviews of the published literature. The present review synthesizes the current knowledge available in the use of technologies for food-waste-to-energy conversion involving biological (e.g. anaerobic digestion and fermentation), thermal and thermochemical technologies (e.g. incineration, pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal oxidation). The competitive advantages of these technologies as well as the challenges associated with them are discussed. In addition, the future directions for more effective utilization of food waste for renewable energy generation are suggested from an interdisciplinary perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan

  17. Energy, economic and environmental (3E) analysis of waste-to-energy (WTE) strategies for municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Sie Ting; Ho, Wai Shin; Hashim, Haslenda; Lee, Chew Tin; Taib, Mohd Rozainee; Ho, Chin Siong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3E impact of WTE derived from MSW were performed. • MSW treatment technologies significantly effects the economic and environmental benefits of WTE. • Different scenarios are conducted based on the waste projections and production. • Comprehensive discussion on the trade-off of both incineration and anaerobic digestion for MSWM. - Abstract: The utilisation of municipal solid waste (MSW) for energy production has been implemented globally for many decades. Malaysia, however, is still highly dependent on landfills for MSW management. Because of the concern for greenhouse gases (GHG) emission and the scarcity of land, Malaysia has an urgent need for a better waste management strategy. This study aims to evaluate the energy, economic and environmental (3E) impact of waste-to-energy (WTE) for municipal solid waste management. An existing landfill in Malaysia is selected as the case study for consideration to adopt the advanced WTE technologies including the landfill gas recovery system (LFGRS), incineration, anaerobic digestion (AD), and gasification. The study presented an interactive comparison of different WTE scenarios and followed by further discussion on waste incineration and AD as the two potential WTE options in Malaysia. The 3E assessment reveals incineration as the superior technology choice when the production of electricity and heat were considered; however, AD is found to be more favourable under the consideration of electricity production only

  18. Public perception on nuclear energy and radioactive waste - The second opinion poll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Stela; Covreag Ilinca

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 ANDRAD started the second national opinion poll which had the purpose to identify the support of Romanian citizen for energy production by nuclear power stations, which is perceived as a less expensive energy, that could reduces the oil dependence of our country. The questionnaire consisted in 22 questions aiming to assess: the level of information about radioactive waste, the actual knowledge about radioactive waste management, the support and the opinion on nuclear energy, the public attitude regarding radioactive waste disposal, the trust in information sources and the public involvement in the decision-making process. (authors)

  19. Low-level waste research and development activities of the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barainca, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the technical activities of the Department of Energy's Defense and Nuclear Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Programs (LLWPs). Although each Program was established with a different purpose, the technologies developed and demonstrated by each are transferable for use in both the commercial and DOE sectors. This paper presents an overview of the technical activities being pursued through both the Defense and Nuclear Energy LLWP's. These technologies have been placed in the following categories; Criteria and Standards, Systems Analysis, Information and Technology Transfer, Waste Treatment and Wast Form, Improved Near Surface Disposal, Greater Confinement Disposal, Corrective Measures, and Monitoring

  20. Optimal utilization of waste-to-energy in an LCA perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy production from two types of municipal solid waste was evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA): (1) mixed high calorific waste suitable for production of solid recovered fuels (SRF) and (2) source separated organic waste. For SRF, co-combustion was compared with mass burn incineration....... For organic waste, anaerobic digestion (AD) was compared with mass burn incineration. In the case of mass burn incineration, incineration with and without energy recovery was modelled. Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion was evaluated for use both as transportation fuel and for heat and power production....... All relevant consequences for energy and resource consumptions, emissions to air, water and soil, upstream processes and downstream processes were included in the LCA. Energy substitutions were considered with respect to two different energy systems: a present-day Danish system based on fossil fuels...

  1. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass, and food w...

  2. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the hazardous waste remedial actions program (HAZWRAP) which manages approximately 200 hazardous waste projects. These projects include preliminary assessments, site inspections, and remedial investigation/feasibility studies. The author describes the procedures HAZWRAP follows to ensure quality. The discussion covers the quality assurance aspects of project management, project planning, site characterization, document control and technical teamwork

  3. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  4. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables

  5. Energy recovery from municipal solid wastes in Italy: Actual study and perspective for future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetti, N.; Ciampa, F.; De Cecco, C.

    1992-01-01

    Materials and energy recovery from municipal solid wastes (MSW) and assimilable waste, and their re-use is one of strong points of current regulations and tendencies, both at the national and at community level in Europe. In Italy, the interest in energy recovery from renewable sources has been encouraged by energy-savings law which included financial incentives for thermal plant building if low grade fuels such as MSW were employed. New electric power prices imposed by Italian Electric Power Authority, ENEL, encourage energy recovery from waste burners. This paper aims to point out the present state of energy recovery from wastes in Italy, trends and prospects to satisfy, with new plants, the need for waste thermal destruction and part of the demand for energy in the different Italian regions: only about 10% of MSW are burned and just a small percentage of the estimated amount of recoverable energy (2 MTOE/y) is recuperated. Different technological cycles are discussed: incineration of untreated wastes and energy recovery; incineration (or gasification) of RDF (refuse derived fuels) and heat-electricity co-generation; burning of RDF in industrial plants, in addition to other fuels

  6. 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office and serves as cooperator of the 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, the storage unit addressed in this permit application. At the time of submission of this portion of the Hanford Facility. Dangerous Waste Permit Application covering the 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, many issues identified in comments to the draft Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit remain unresolved. This permit application reflects the positions taken by the US Department of Energy, Company on the draft Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit and may not be read to conflict with those comments. The 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Revision 0) consists of both a Part A and Part B permit application. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this unit, including the Part A revision currently in effect, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B Checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987). The 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application contains information current as of March 1, 1992

  7. Radioactive solid waste inventories at United States Department of Energy burial and storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1987-06-01

    Radioactive solid waste inventories are given for United States Department of Energy (DOE) burial and storage sites. These data are obtained from the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) and reflect the inventories as of the end of the calendar year 1986. 4 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    cell research, development, and demonstration. Along with the general program overview, Dr. Satyapal highlighted the vast amount of biogas resources...Page ii DOD-DOE Workshop Summary on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells List of Tables Table 1. Comparison by Generator Type: Based on 40...Table 2. Typical Composition of Biogas from Various Waste Streams ....................................................... 8 Table D-1

  9. Prospective application of municipal solid wastes for energy production in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Sandra; Monteiro, Eliseu; Silva, Valter; Rouboa, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and disposal is a major urban environment issue in the world today. MSW management solutions have to be technologically feasible, legally and socially acceptable and environmentally and financially sustainable. European policy is pushing for a rational management of natural resources; a promising technological perspective today is waste valorisation, a process that involves sorting at the source, combined with material recycling and waste-to-energy conversion. In this paper, we analyze the evolution of the Portuguese MSW management system, criticize the environmental policy issues for MSW management in Portugal and identify weak points in the criteria used for the technologies selection. Portugal is facing multiple problems with MSW management and is attempting to tackle them by passing legislation in order to improve the performance of waste management systems. At the technological level, gasification increasingly presents as an efficient and viable alternative to incineration. Gasification is a waste-to-energy conversion scheme that offers an attractive solution to both waste disposal and energy problems. Waste gasification by plasma has been validated but the economic viability of this technology must be proven before to be accepted by the industry. - Highlights: • MSW collection and disposal are a major problem of urban environment. • Portugal is facing multiple problems and improving the MSW management system. • Gasification offers the most attractive solution to both waste disposal and energy problems. • Plasma gasification seems to be validated but the economic viability must be proven

  10. Role of nuclear energy and the importance of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamans, R.C. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The energy policy of the USA is briefly summarized as an introduction to a consideration of the options involved in the management of wastes from the LWR fuel cycle. The factors considered in the management of the wastes from the point of occurence to the final disposal are discussed

  11. U.S. Department of Energy, defense waste management program implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that the program implementation plan describes the Department of Energy's current approach to managing its defense high-level, low-level, and transuranic radioactive waste. It documents implementation of the policies described in the 1983 Defense Waste Management Plan

  12. Butanol production from food waste: a novel process for producing sustainable energy and reducing environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient utilization of food waste for fuel and chemical production can positively influence both the energy and environmental sustainability. In these studies we investigated use of food waste to produce butanol by Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 40.5 g/L of glucose (initia...

  13. Draft Mission Plan Amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Department of Energy's Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has prepared this document to report plans for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, whose mission is to manage and dispose of the nation's spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and of workers and the quality of the environment. The Congress established this program through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Specifically, the Congress directed us to isolate these wastes in geologic repositories constructed in suitable rock formations deep beneath the surface of the earth. In the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the Congress mandated that only one repository was to be developed at present and that only the Yucca Mountain candidate site in Nevada was to be characterized at this time. The Amendments Act also authorized the construction of a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and established the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. After a reassessment in 1989, the Secretary of Energy restructured the program, focusing the repository effort scientific evaluations of the Yucca Mountain candidate site, deciding to proceed with the development of an MRS facility, and strengthening the management of the program. 48 refs., 32 figs

  14. An assessment of thermal destruction technologies for application to Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    As evidenced by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, the Department is committing to a long-range waste management program. A category of waste that represents a sizable portion of the total DOE waste picture and also presents significant complications in management is waste that contains both hazardous and radioactive components. This category of wastes, referred to as mixed waste (MW), is present at all but a few of the Department's sites. The presence of radioactive constituents in this waste category implies that it be managed, like radioactive-only wastes, on DOE-owned property. Thermal treatment of MW's offers a variety of benefits in the final disposition of the waste. One obvious benefit is volume reduction of the waste if it contains organics because most of the organics are converted to gases and water, leaving only the inert material or ash. Another benefit is the destruction of hazardous materials by thermal conversion to simple, nonhazardous gases water. A third benefit, for some thermal technologies, is that the thermal process yields a process residue that meets disposal requirements for both hazardous and radioactive constituents without further processing. 2 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Report of the colloquium: the management of energy resources in Europe: what can be done with ''Euro-wastes''?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzari, M.

    2003-01-01

    The 12. colloquium of the young members of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN) brought together about 200 young French and foreign professionals, experts and students. The subject of the colloquium was the European energy choices and the problem of wastes production. This article summarizes the content of the conferences given on December 9 about the management of energy and wastes: status of world energy resources and consumption; fossil fuel reserves; status of development of renewable energy sources; the economical and environmental efficiency of nuclear energy; the wastes generated by the energy activities in general and by the nuclear energy in particular: the Swedish approach of the nuclear waste management problem, the Russian nuclear wastes, the management of municipal wastes in Belgium; the bio-energies (combustion, fermentation, gasification); and the future prospects of the evolution of energy sources. (J.S.)

  16. Optimization of waste to energy routes through biochemical and thermochemical treatment options of municipal solid waste in Hyderabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korai, Muhammad Safar; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Uqaili, Muhammad Aslam

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Existing practice of municipal solid waste management of Hyderabad city, Pakistan have been analyzed. • Development of scenarios on basis of nature of waste components for optimizing waste to energy route. • Analyzing the biochemical and thermochemical potential of MSW through various scenarios. • Evaluation of various treatment technologies under scenarios to optimize waste to energy route. - Abstract: Improper disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) has created many environmental problems in Pakistan and the country is facing energy shortages as well. The present study evaluates the biochemical and thermochemical treatment options of MSW in order to address both the endemic environmental challenges and in part the energy shortage. According to the nature of waste components, a number of scenarios were developed to optimize the waste to energy (WTE) routes. The evaluation of treatment options has been performed by mathematical equations using the special characteristics of MSW. The power generation potential (PGP) of biochemical (anaerobic digestion) has been observed in the range of 5.9–11.3 kW/ton day under various scenarios. The PGP of Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), Mass Burn Incinerator (MBI), Gasification/Pyrolysis (Gasi./Pyro.) and Plasma Arc Gasification (PAG) have been found to be in the range of 2.7–118.6 kW/ton day, 3.8–164.7 kW/ton day, 4.2–184.5 kW/ton day and 5.2–224 kW/ton day, respectively. The highest values of biochemical and all thermochemical technologies have been obtained through the use of scenarios including the putrescible components (PCs) of MSW such as food and yard wastes, and the non-biodegradable components (NBCs) of MSW such as plastic, rubber, leather, textile and wood respectively. Therefore, routes which include these components are the optimized WTE routes for maximum PGP by biochemical and thermochemical treatments of MSW. The findings of study lead to recommend that socio-economic and environmental

  17. Global nuclear waste repository proposal highlights Australia's nuclear energy vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The Pangea proposal is disscused and considered relevant to Australia. A five-year research program by the company has identified Australia and Argentina as having the appropriate geological, economic and democratic credentials for such a deep repository, with Australia being favoured. A deep repository would be located where the geology has been stable for several hundred million years, so that there need not be total reliance on a robust engineered barrier system to keep the waste securely isolated for thousands of years. It would be a commercial undertaking and would have dedicated port and rail infrastructure. It would take spent fuel and other wastes from commercial reactors, and possibly also waste from weapons disposal programs. Clearly, while the primary ethical and legal principle is that each country is entirely responsible for its own waste, including nuclear waste (polluter pays etc), the big question is whether the concept of an international waste repository is acceptable ethically. Political and economic questions are secondary to this. By taking a fresh look at the reasons for the difficulties which have faced most national repository programs, and discarding the preconception that each country must develop its own disposal facilities, it is possible to define a class of simple, superior high isolation sites which may provide a multi-national basis for solving the nuclear waste disposal problem. The relatively small volumes of high-level wastes or spent fuel which arise from nuclear power production make shared repositories a feasible proposition. For small countries, the economies of scale which can be achieved make the concept attractive. For all countries, objective consideration of the relative merits of national and multi-national solutions is a prudent part of planning the management of long-lived radioactive wastes

  18. Disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic and tank wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 3. Appendices M-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of final disposal actions for high-level, transuranic and tank wastes located at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, and into the construction, operation and decommissioning of waste treatment facilities that may be required in implementing waste disposal alternatives. Specifically evaluated are a Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Transportable Grout Facility, and a Waste Receiving and Packaging Facility. Also an evaluation is presented to assist in determining whether any additional action should be taken in terms of long-term environmental protection for waste that was disposed of at Hanford prior to 1970 as low-level waste (before the transuranic waste category was established by the AEC) but which might fall into that category if generated today. The alternatives considered in this EIS are: (1) in-place stabilization and disposal, where waste is left in place but is isolated by protective and natural barriers; (2) geologic disposal, where most of the waste (to the extent practicable) is exhumed, treated, segregated, packaged and disposed of in a deep geologic repository; waste classified as high-level would be disposed of in a commercial repository developed pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act; transuranic waste would be disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico; (3) reference alternative, where some classes of waste are disposed of in geologic repositories and other classes of waste are disposed of by in-place stabilization and disposal; and (4) a ''no disposal'' action alternative (continued storage)

  19. Disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic and tank wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2. Appendices A-L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of final disposal actions for high-level, transuranic and tank wastes located at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, and into the construction, operation and decommissioning of waste treatment facilities that may be required in implementing waste disposal alternatives. Specifically evaluated are a Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Transportable Grout Facility, and a Waste Receiving and Packaging Facility. Also an evaluation is presented to assist in determining whether any additional action should be taken in terms of long-term environmental protection for waste that was disposed of at Hanford prior to 1970 as low-level waste (before the transuranic waste category was established by the AEC) but which might fall into that category if generated today. The alternatives considered in this EIS are: (1) in-place stabilization and disposal, where waste is left in place but is isolated by protective and natural barriers; (2) geologic disposal, where most of the waste (to the extent practicable) is exhumed, treated, segregated, packaged and disposed of in a deep geologic repository; waste classified as high-level would be disposed of in a commercial repository developed pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act; transuranic waste would be disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico; (3) reference alternative, where some classes of waste are disposed of in geologic repositories and other classes of waste are disposed of by in-place stabilization and disposal; and (4) a ''no disposal'' action alternative (continued storage)

  20. Waste to Energy : The Waste Incineration Directive and its Implementation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duman, Murat; Boels, Luciaan

    2007-01-01

    Essent operates a coal-fired power plant, called AC-9, in Geertruidenberg. A gasifier connected to AC-9 thermally treats waste wood through gasification. The waste wood Essent used is demolition and construction wood, the so-called B-wood. The gas produced through gasification is fed into the