WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy deposition processes

  1. Energy-enhanced atomic layer deposition : offering more processing freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potts, S.E.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a popular deposition technique comprising two or more sequential, self-limiting surface reactions, which make up an ALD cycle. Energy-enhanced ALD is an evolution of traditional thermal ALD methods, whereby energy is supplied to a gas in situ in order to convert a

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the characteristics of tool steel deposited by the directed energy deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Lee, Min-Gyu; Cho, Yong-Jae; Sung, Ji Hyun; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Kon; Choi, Yong-Jin; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-01-01

    The directed energy deposition process has been mainly applied to re-work and the restoration of damaged steel. Differences in material properties between the base and the newly deposited materials are unavoidable, which may affect the mechanical properties and durability of the part. We investigated the effect of heat treatment on the characteristics of tool steel deposited by the DED process. We prepared general tool steel materials of H13 and D2 that were deposited onto heat-treated substrates of H13 and D2, respectively, using a direct metal tooling process. The hardness and microstructure of the deposited steel before and after heat treatment were investigated. The hardness of the deposited H13 steel was higher than that of wrought H13 steel substrate, while that of the deposited D2 was lower than that of wrought D2. The evolution of the microstructures by deposition and heat treatment varied depending on the materials. In particular, the microstructure of the deposited D2 steel after heat treatment consisted of fine carbides in tempered martensite and it is expected that the deposited D2 steel will have isotropic properties and high hardness after heat treatment.

  3. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  4. Radiation effects on oxide glasses: Importance of energy deposition and relaxation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, Anamul-Haq

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear waste glass matrices during their disposal will be subjected to self-irradiation by beta and alpha decays. Beta emitting radionuclides due to their short half life time will be the dominant radiation source only during first few hundred years of the disposal, whereas the alpha decays constitute a long term radiation source. Due to intense beta decay and associated gamma rays, the glass matrices can attain temperatures up to 300 C during state 1. The temperature during stage 2 will mainly be defined by the repository conditions. The present work focused on studying the response of various glasses (borosilicate glasses of nuclear waste interest and amorphous silica) to electron irradiation (to understand the response of the pristine glasses to beta decays), single ion beam irradiations with light and heavy ions over a wide stopping power and fluence range (to study the response of the pristine glasses as a function of the electronic and nuclear energy loss so as to establish the necessary conditions for simulating the alpha and recoil nuclei damage), sequential electron-ion irradiations (to understand the impact of the intense beta decay damage during stage 1 on subsequent alpha decay during stage 2, and double ion beam sequential and simultaneous irradiations (to understand the interaction of the alpha particles with recoil nuclei pre-damaged glass and vice versa). The pristine and irradiated samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, micro and nano indentation, AFM, interferometry and ToF-SIMS. Apart from the experimental work, Inelastic Thermal Spike Model (iTSM) for ion track formation was extended to borosilicate glasses to study the possibility of ion track formation in nuclear waste glass matrices. The model was used to study the impact of matrix temperature and stored energy on the ion track threshold, which is otherwise difficult to study experimentally. During electron irradiation, the response of the glasses was found to

  5. Physical Processes and Applications of the Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition (MRED) Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Warren, Kevin M.; Sierawski, Brian D.; King, Michael P.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Auden, Elizabeth C.

    2015-08-01

    MRED is a Python-language scriptable computer application that simulates radiation transport. It is the computational engine for the on-line tool CRÈME-MC. MRED is based on c++ code from Geant4 with additional Fortran components to simulate electron transport and nuclear reactions with high precision. We provide a detailed description of the structure of MRED and the implementation of the simulation of physical processes used to simulate radiation effects in electronic devices and circuits. Extensive discussion and references are provided that illustrate the validation of models used to implement specific simulations of relevant physical processes. Several applications of MRED are summarized that demonstrate its ability to predict and describe basic physical phenomena associated with irradiation of electronic circuits and devices. These include effects from single particle radiation (including both direct ionization and indirect ionization effects), dose enhancement effects, and displacement damage effects. MRED simulations have also helped to identify new single event upset mechanisms not previously observed by experiment, but since confirmed, including upsets due to muons and energetic electrons.

  6. Advances in energy deposition theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    In light of the fields of radiation protection and dosimetric problems in medicine, advances in the area of microscopic target related studies are discussed. Energy deposition is discussed with emphasis upon track structures of electrons and heavy charged particles and track computer calculations

  7. A review: deposition and resuspension processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    A review chapter was written on deposition and resuspension processes for the forthcoming Department of Energy publication, Atmospheric Sciences and Power Production, edited by D. Randerson. The chapter includes eleven tables and thirteen figures summarizing data from 241 references. The conclusions of that review chapter are given

  8. Energy deposition in NSRR test fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Tanzawa, Tomio; Kitano, Teruaki; Okazaki, Shuji

    1978-02-01

    Interpretation of fuel performance data collected during inpile testing in the NSRR requires a knowledge of the energy deposition or enthalpy increase in each sample tested. The report describes the results of absolute measurement of fission products and contents of uranium in irradiated test fuels which were performed to determine the energy deposition. (auth.)

  9. High-energy high-rate pulsed-power processing of materials by powder consolidation and by railgun deposition. Technical report (Final), 10 April 1985-10 February 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Weldon, W.F.

    1987-03-31

    This exploratory research program was initiated to investigate the potential of using pulse power sources for powder consolidation, deposition and other high-energy high-rate processing. The characteristics of the high-energy-high-rate (1MJ/s) powder consolidation using megampere current pulses from a homopolar generator, were defined. Molybdenum Alloy TZM, a nickel-based metallic glass, copper/graphite composites, and P/M aluminum alloy X7091 were investigated. The powder-consolidation process produced high densification rates. Density values of 80% to 99% could be obtained with subsecond high-temperature exposure. Specific energy input and applied pressure were controlling process parameters. Time temperature transformation (TTT) concepts underpin a fundamental understanding of pulsed power processing. Inherent control of energy input, and time-to-peak processing temperature developed to be held to short times. Deposition experiments were conducted using an exploding-foil device (EFD) providing an armature feed to railgun mounted in a vacuum chamber. The material to be deposited - in plasma, gas, liquid, or solid state - was accelerated electromagnetically in the railgun and deposited on a substrate. Deposits of a wide variety of single- and multi-specie materials were produced on several types of substrates. In a series of ancillary experiments, pulsed-skin-effect heating and self quenching of metallic conductors was discovered to be a new means of surface modification by high-energy high-rate-processing.

  10. Uranium ore deposits: geology and processing implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyk, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    There are fifteen accepted types of uranium ore deposits and at least forty subtypes readily identified around the world. Each deposit type has a unique set of geological characteristics which may also result in unique processing implications. Primary uranium production in the past decade has predominantly come from only a few of these deposit types including: unconformity, sandstone, calcrete, intrusive, breccia complex and volcanic ones. Processing implications can vary widely between and within the different geological models. Some key characteristics of uranium deposits that may have processing implications include: ore grade, uranium and gangue mineralogy, ore hardness, porosity, uranium mineral morphology and carbon content. Processing difficulties may occur as a result of one or more of these characteristics. In order to meet future uranium demand, it is imperative that innovative processing approaches and new technological advances be developed in order that many of the marginally economic traditional and uneconomic non-traditional uranium ore deposits can be exploited. (author)

  11. Study of energy deposition in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, V. De La; Abgrall, P.; Sebille, F.; Haddad, F.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of energy deposition mechanisms in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies is presented. Theoretical simulations are performed in the framework of the semi-classical Landau-Vlasov model. They emphasize the influence of the initial non-equilibrium conditions, and the connection with the incident energy is discussed. Characteristic times involved in the energy thermalization process and finite size effects are analyzed. (authors) 20 refs., 4 figs

  12. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry

  13. Energy deposition by delta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigand, F.C.; Braby, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations for proton tracks were extended to projectile with more complex electronic structures which add additional delta ray production processes. An experimental apparatus was used to detect gas gain and resolution for H 2+ and 3 He ++

  14. Process energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, V.

    1993-01-01

    In Chapter 2 process energy cost analysis for chemical processing is treated in a general way, independent of the specific form of energy and power production. Especially, energy data collection and data treatment, energy accounting (metering, balance setting), specific energy input, and utility energy costs and prices are discussed. (R.P.) 14 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs

  15. Earth Surface Processes, Landforms and Sediment Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, John; Demicco, Robert

    Earth surface processes, landforms and sediment deposits are intimately related - involving erosion of rocks, generation of sediment, and transport and deposition of sediment through various Earth surface environments. These processes, and the landforms and deposits that they generate, have a fundamental bearing on engineering, environmental and public safety issues; on recovery of economic resources; and on our understanding of Earth history. This unique textbook brings together the traditional disciplines of sedimentology and geomorphology to explain Earth surface processes, landforms and sediment deposits in a comprehensive and integrated way. It is the ideal resource for a two-semester course in sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, and Earth surface processes from the intermediate undergraduate to beginning graduate level. The book is also accompanied by a website hosting illustrations and material on field and laboratory methods for measuring, describing and analyzing Earth surface processes, landforms and sediments.

  16. Simulation of the fluctuations of energy and charge deposited during e-beam exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.; Grachev, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    The stochastic nature of an energy and charge deposition process is examined using a model based on discrete loss approximation (DLA). Deposited energy deviations computed using the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) and DLA are compared. It is shown that CSDA underestimates fluctuations in deposited energy

  17. Thermal energy storage in granular deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratuszny, Paweł

    2017-10-01

    Energy storage technology is crucial for the development of the use of renewable energy sources. This is a substantial constraint, however it can, to some extent, be solved by storing energy in its various forms: electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal. This article presents the results of research in thermal properties of granular deposits. Correlation between temperature changes in the stores over a period of time and their physical properties has been studied. The results of the research have practical application in designing thermal stores based on bulk materials and ground deposits. Furthermore, the research results are significant for regeneration of the lower ground sources for heat pumps and provide data for designing ground heat exchangers for ventilation systems.

  18. Calorimetric sensors for energy deposition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenbrunner, J.; Cooper, R.; Morgan, G.

    1998-01-01

    A calorimetric sensor with several novel design features has been developed. These sensors will provide an accurate sampling of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A small, solid slug (volume = 0.347 cc) of target material is suspended by kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. The slug is in thermal contact with a low-mass, calibrated, 100-kΩ thermistor. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug is calculated from the rate of temperature rise of the slug. The authors have chosen slugs composed of Pb, Al, and LiAl

  19. Plasma-polymerized perfluoro(methylcyclohexane) coating on ethylene propylene diene elastomer surface: Effect of plasma processing condition on the deposition kinetics, morphology and surface energy of the film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, N.D.; Dutta, N.K.; Choudhury, N. Roy

    2005-01-01

    Plasma polymerization of perfluoro (methylcyclohexane) was carried out under cold plasma process operated at 13.56 MHz to deposit pore-free, uniform, ultra-thin film on an ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) substrate in a view to modify the surface characteristics. The plasma fluoropolymeric films were formed at different plasma treatment times (from 20 s to 16 min), applied powers (20 to 100 W) and precursor flow rates to produce high quality films in a controllable yet tunable fashion. Scanning electron microscopy was employed successfully to characterize the evolution of the morphological feature in the film and also to determine the thickness of the coating. The surface energy of the film was determined by sessile drop method using different solvents as probe liquids. It is observed that a pore-free homogeneous plasma polymer thin film is formed within 20 s of treatment time, however, the morphology of the film depends on the plasma processing conditions, such as plasma power, precursor flow rate and deposition time. With increased time and power at a constant flow rate, the morphology of the film progressively changes from flat smooth to globular and rough. The kinetics and activation energy of the plasma polymer film deposition process were also estimated. The surface energy of the EPDM substrate decreased dramatically with plasma coating, however, it appears to be independent of the treatment time

  20. Process maps for plasma spray. Part II: Deposition and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XIANGYANG, JIANG; MATEJICEK, JIRI; KULKARNI, ANAND; HERMAN, HERBERT; SAMPATH, SANJAY; GILMORE, DELWYN L.; NEISER A, RICHARD Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This is the second paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of the study is the fundamental understanding of the plasma-particle interaction, droplet/substrate interaction, deposit formation dynamics and microstructure development as well as the deposit property. The outcome is science-based relationships, which can be used to link processing to performance. Molybdenum splats and coatings produced at 3 plasma conditions and three substrate temperatures were characterized. It was found that there is a strong mechanical/thermal interaction between droplet and substrate, which builds up the coatings/substrate adhesion. Hardness, thermal conductivity, and modulus increase, while oxygen content and porosity decrease with increasing particle velocity. Increasing deposition temperature resulted in dramatic improvement in coating thermal conductivity and hardness as well as increase in coating oxygen content. Indentation reveals improved fracture resistance for the coatings prepared at higher deposition temperature. Residual stress was significantly affected by deposition temperature, although not significant by particle energy within the investigated parameter range. Coatings prepared at high deposition temperature with high-energy particles suffered considerably less damage in wear tests. Possible mechanisms behind these changes are discussed within the context of relational maps which are under development

  1. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roman; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Cerutti, Francesco; Langner, Andy; Tomás, Rogelio; Cruz-Alaniz, Emilia; Dalena, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  2. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Martin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  3. Process energy reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowthian, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    Process Energy Reduction (PER) is a demand-side energy reduction approach which complements and often supplants other traditional energy reduction methods such as conservation and heat recovery. Because the application of PER is less obvious than the traditional methods, it takes some time to learn the steps as well as practice to become proficient in its use. However, the benefit is significant, often far outweighing the traditional energy reduction approaches. Furthermore, the method usually results in a better process having less waste and pollution along with improved yields, increased capacity, and lower operating costs

  4. Optimization design of energy deposition on single expansion ramp nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shengjun; Yan, Chao; Wang, Xiaoyong; Qin, Yupei; Ye, Zhifei

    2017-11-01

    Optimization design has been widely used in the aerodynamic design process of scramjets. The single expansion ramp nozzle is an important component for scramjets to produces most of thrust force. A new concept of increasing the aerodynamics of the scramjet nozzle with energy deposition is presented. The essence of the method is to create a heated region in the inner flow field of the scramjet nozzle. In the current study, the two-dimensional coupled implicit compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Menter's shear stress transport turbulence model have been applied to numerically simulate the flow fields of the single expansion ramp nozzle with and without energy deposition. The numerical results show that the proposal of energy deposition can be an effective method to increase force characteristics of the scramjet nozzle, the thrust coefficient CT increase by 6.94% and lift coefficient CN decrease by 26.89%. Further, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm coupled with the Radial Basis Function neural network surrogate model has been employed to determine optimum location and density of the energy deposition. The thrust coefficient CT and lift coefficient CN are selected as objective functions, and the sampling points are obtained numerically by using a Latin hypercube design method. The optimized thrust coefficient CT further increase by 1.94%, meanwhile, the optimized lift coefficient CN further decrease by 15.02% respectively. At the same time, the optimized performances are in good and reasonable agreement with the numerical predictions. The findings suggest that scramjet nozzle design and performance can benefit from the application of energy deposition.

  5. Theoretical modelling of carbon deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.R.; Norfolk, D.J.; Skinner, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Work based on capsule experiments in the BNL Gamma Facility, aimed at elucidating the chemistry involved in the formation of carbonaceous deposit on CAGR fuel pin surfaces is described. Using a data-base derived from capsule experiments together with literature values for the kinetics of the fundamental reactions, a chemical model of the gas-phase processes has been developed. This model successfully reproduces the capsule results, whilst preliminary application to the WAGR coolant circuit indicates the likely concentration profiles of various radical species within the fuel channels. (author)

  6. X-ray amplifier energy deposition scaling with channeled propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial control of the energy deposited for excitation of an x-ray amplifier plays an important role in the fundamental scaling relationship between the required energy, the gain and the wavelength. New results concerning the ability to establish confined modes of propagation of sort pulse radiation of sufficiently high intensity in plasmas lead to a sharply reduced need for the total energy deposited, since the concentration of deposited power can be very efficiently organized

  7. Microcrystalline silicon deposition: Process stability and process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donker, M.N. van den; Kilper, T.; Grunsky, D.; Rech, B.; Houben, L.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de

    2007-01-01

    Applying in situ process diagnostics, we identified several process drifts occurring in the parallel plate plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H). These process drifts are powder formation (visible from diminishing dc-bias and changing spatial emission profile on a time scale of 10 0 s), transient SiH 4 depletion (visible from a decreasing SiH emission intensity on a time scale of 10 2 s), plasma heating (visible from an increasing substrate temperature on a time scale of 10 3 s) and a still puzzling long-term drift (visible from a decreasing SiH emission intensity on a time scale of 10 4 s). The effect of these drifts on the crystalline volume fraction in the deposited films is investigated by selected area electron diffraction and depth-profiled Raman spectroscopy. An example shows how the transient depletion and long-term drift can be prevented by suitable process control. Solar cells deposited using this process control show enhanced performance. Options for process control of plasma heating and powder formation are discussed

  8. Directed-energy process technology efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of directed-energy process technology for solar cells was presented. This technology is defined as directing energy or mass to specific areas on solar cells to produce a desired effect in contrast to exposing a cell to a thermal or mass flow environment. Some of these second generation processing techniques are: ion implantation; microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition; rapid thermal processing; and the use of lasers for cutting, assisting in metallization, assisting in deposition, and drive-in of liquid dopants. Advantages of directed energy techniques are: surface heating resulting in the bulk of the cell material being cooler and unchanged; better process control yields; better junction profiles, junction depths, and metal sintering; lower energy consumption during processing and smaller factory space requirements. These advantages should result in higher-efficiency cells at lower costs. The results of the numerous contracted efforts were presented as well as the application potentials of these new technologies.

  9. Electron energy deposition in the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vampola, A.L.; Gorney, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of locally precipating 36- to 317-keV electrons obtained by instrumentation on the S3-2 satellite are used to calculate energy deposition profiles as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude. In the 70- to 90-km altitude, mid-latitude ionization due to these precipitating energetic electrons can be comparable to that due to direct solar H Lyman α. At night, the electrons produce ionization more than an order of magnitude greater than that expected from scattered H Lyman α. Maximum precipitation rates in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly are of the order of 10 -2 erg/cm 2 s with a spectrum of form j(E) = 1.34 x 10 5 E/sup -2.27/ (keV). Southern hemisphere precipitation dominates that in the north for 1.1< L<6 except for regions of low local surface field in the northern hemisphere. Above L = 6, local time effects dominate: i.e., longitudinal effects due to the asymmetric magnetic field which are strong features below L = 6 disappear and are replaced by high-latitude precipitation events which are local time features

  10. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  11. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, A.; Piriz, A.R.; Tahir, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω

  12. Enhanced energy deposition symmetry by hot electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.; Mack, J.; Stover, E.; VanHulsteyn, D.; McCall, G.; Hauer, A.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electrons produced by resonance absorption carry the CO 2 laser energy absorbed in a laser fusion pellet. The symmetrization that can be achieved by lateral transport of the hot electrons as they deposit their energy is discussed. A K/sub α/ experiment shows a surprising symmetrization of energy deposition achieved by adding a thin layer of plastic to a copper sphere. Efforts to numerically model this effect are described

  13. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  14. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. The data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  15. Science of mineral deposits and economics of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackowsky, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    The availability of fossile energy carriers is investigated with regard to raw material reserves and their know deposits, by means of output and consumption. According to the author's opinion its discussion should have a priority over all discussions concerning energy crisis, energy supply and environmental protection. The author also touches the high measure of political problems beside the geoscientifical and technological problems of raw material supply. He briefly points to the general situation on the energy market with the help of data on stocks and consumption as given by the 10th International Energy Conference 1977 at Istambul and eventually deals with topics on mineral deposits science and uranium production. (HK) [de

  16. Scaling of energy deposition in fast ignition targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Dale R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the scaling to ignition of the energy deposition of laser generated electrons in compressed fast ignition cores. Relevant cores have densities of several hundred g/cm 3 , with a few keV initial temperature. As the laser intensities increase approaching ignition systems, on the order of a few 10 21 W/cm 2 , the hot electron energies expected to approach 100MeV. Most certainly anomalous processes must play a role in the energy transfer, but the exact nature of these processes, as well as a practical way to model them, remain open issues. Traditional PIC explicit methods are limited to low densities on current and anticipated computing platforms, so the study of relevant parameter ranges has received so far little attention. We use LSP to examine a relativistic electron beam (presumed generated from a laser plasma interaction) of legislated energy and angular distribution is injected into a 3D block of compressed DT. Collective effects will determine the stopping, most likely driven by magnetic field filamentation. The scaling of the stopping as a function of block density and temperature, as well as hot electron current and laser intensity is presented. Sub-grid models may be profitably used and degenerate effects included in the solution of this problem.

  17. Energy deposition profile on ISOLDE Beam Dumps by FLUKA simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, V

    2014-01-01

    In this report an estimation of the energy deposited on the current ISOLDE beam dumps obtained by means of FLUKA simulation code is presented. This is done for both ones GPS and HRS. Some estimations of temperature raise are given based on the assumption of adiabatic increase from energy deposited by the impinging protons. However, the results obtained here in relation to temperature are only a rough estimate. They are meant to be further studied through thermomechanical simulations using the energyprofiles hereby obtained.

  18. Evolution of energy deposition processes in anthracene single crystal from photochemistry to radiation chemistry under excitation with synchrotron radiation from 3 to 700 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Jin, Zhaohui; Shimoyama, Iwao; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Ueno, Madoka; Kishigami, Yoichi; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahito; Kaneko, Fusae; Nishimagi, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Absolute values of quantum yield Φ(hν) of singlet exciton formation in anthracene single crystals were measured as a function of photon energy hν, with the usage of synchrotron radiation (SR) in 3-700 eV region. Values of Φ(hν) were found to increase linearly for hν≥75 eV. For hν≤40 eV, values of Φ(hν) gave a wealth of structures and are not linear to hν. Because number of secondary electrons produced by radiation is thought to increase in proportional to the incident photon energy, it is natural to conclude that the radiation chemistry effect becomes dominant above 75 eV. On the other hand, values of Φ(hν) showed response due to resonance rather than linear dependence with hν, which implies that the photochemical effect is dominant below 40 eV

  19. Deposit control in process cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, B.

    1981-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient heat transfer in cooling water systems, it is essential to control the fouling of heat exchanger surfaces. Solubilities of scale forming salts, their growth into crystals, and the nature of the surfaces play important roles in the deposition phenomenon. Condensed phosphates, organic polymers and compounds like phosphates are effective in controlling deposition of scale forming salts. The surface active agents inhibit crystal growth and modify the crystals of the scale forming salts, and thus prevent deposition of dense, uniformly structured crystalline mass on the heat transfer surface. Understanding the mechanism of biofouling is essential to control it by surface active agents. Certain measures taken in the plant, such as back flushing, to control scaling, sometimes may not be effective and can be detrimental to the system itself. (author)

  20. Microbial processes in banded iron formation deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    , remains unresolved. Evidence of an anoxic Earth with only localized oxic areas until the Great Oxidation Event ca 2·45 to 2·32 Ga makes the investigation of O2-independent mechanisms for banded iron formation deposition relevant. Recent studies have explored the long-standing proposition that Archean......Banded iron formations have been studied for decades, particularly regarding their potential as archives of the Precambrian environment. In spite of this effort, the mechanism of their deposition and, specifically, the role that microbes played in the precipitation of banded iron formation minerals...... banded iron formations may have been formed, and diagenetically modified, by anaerobic microbial metabolisms. These efforts encompass a wide array of approaches including isotope, ecophysiological and phylogeny studies, molecular and mineral marker analysis, and sedimentological reconstructions. Herein...

  1. Materials testing using laser energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, W.W.; Calder, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A convenient method for determining the elastic constants of materials has been devised using the energy from a Q-switched neodymium-glass laser. Stress waves are induced in materials having circular rod or rectangular bar geometries by the absorption of energy from the laser. The wave transit times through the material are recorded with a piezoelectric transducer. Both dilatation and shear wave velocities are determined in a single test using an ultrasonic technique and these velocities are used to calculate the elastic constants of the material. A comparison of the constants determined for ten common engineering materials using this method is made with constants derived using the conventional ultrasonic pulse technique and agreement is shown to be about one percent in most cases. Effects of material geometry are discussed and surface damage to the material caused by laser energy absorption is shown

  2. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  3. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  4. Particle dry deposition to water surfaces: Processes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, S.C.; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    flux to coastal waters, atmosphere-surface exchange represents a significant component of the total flux and may be particularly critical during the summertime when both the riverine input and ambient nutrient concentrations are often at a minimum. In this chapter, we present an overview...... of the physical and chemical processes which dictate the quantity (and direction) of atmosphere-surface fluxes of trace chemicals to (and above) water surfaces with particular emphasis on the role of particles. Dry deposition (transfer to the surface in the absence of precipitation) of particles is determined...... efforts to simulate and measure fluxes close to the coastline. These arise in part from the complexity of atmospheric flow in this region where energy and chemical fluxes are highly inhomogeneous in space and time and thermally generated atmospheric circulations are commonplace. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science...

  5. The energy deposition of slowing down particles in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.; Williams, M.M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Energy deposition by atomic particles in adjacent semi-infinite, amorphous media is described using the forward form of the Boltzmann transport equation. A transport approximation to the scattering kernel, developed elsewhere, incorporating realistic energy transfer is employed to assess the validity of the commonly used isotropic-scattering and straight-ahead approximations. Results are presented for integral energy deposition rates due to a plane, isotropic and monoenergetic source in one half-space for a range of mass ratios between 0.1 and 5.0. Integral profiles for infinite and semi-infinite media are considered and the influence of reflection for different mass ratios is evaluated. The dissimilar scattering properties of the two media induce a discontinuity at the interface in the energy deposition rate the magnitude of which is sensitive to the source position relative to the interface. A comprehensive evaluation of the total energy deposited in the source free medium is presented for a range of mass ratios and source positions. An interesting minimum occurs for off-interface source locations as a function of the source-medium mass ratio, the position of which varies with the source position but is insensitive to the other mass ratio. As a special case, energy reflection and escape coefficients for semi-infinite media are obtained which demonstrates that the effect of a vacuum interface is insignificant for deep source locations except for large mass ratios when reflection becomes dominant. (author)

  6. Improvement of a microwave ECR plasma source for the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongchen; Zhang Huafang; Peng Liping; Jiang Yanli; Ma Guojia

    2004-01-01

    The Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (PIII and D) process has many advantages over the pure plasma immersion ion implantation or deposition. It can compensate for or eliminate the disadvantages of the shallow modification layer (for PIII) and increase the bond strength of the coating (of deposition). For this purpose, a new type of microwave plasma source used in the PIII and D process was developed, composed of a vacuum bend wave guide and a special magnetic circuit, so that the coupling window was protected from being deposited with a coating and bombarded by high-energy particles. So the life of the window is increased. To enhance the bonding between the coating and substrate a new biasing voltage is applied to the work piece so that the implantation and deposition (or hybrid process) can be completed in one vacuum cycle

  7. Mechanical characteristics of a tool steel layer deposited by using direct energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gyeong Yun; Shin, Gwang Yong; Lee, Eun Mi; Shim, Do Sik; Lee, Ki Yong; Yoon, Hi-Seak; Kim, Myoung Ho

    2017-07-01

    This study focuses on the mechanical characteristics of layered tool steel deposited using direct energy deposition (DED) technology. In the DED technique, a laser beam bonds injected metal powder and a thin layer of substrate via melting. In this study, AISI D2 substrate was hardfaced with AISI H13 and M2 metal powders for mechanical testing. The mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of each specimen were investigated via microstructure observation and hardness, wear, and impact tests. The obtained characteristics were compared with those of heat-treated tool steel. The microstructures of the H13- and M2-deposited specimens show fine cellular-dendrite solidification structures due to melting and subsequent rapid cooling. Moreover, the cellular grains of the deposited M2 layer were smaller than those of the H13 structure. The hardness and wear resistance were most improved in the M2-deposited specimen, yet the H13-deposited specimen had higher fracture toughness than the M2-deposited specimen and heat-treated D2.

  8. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-01-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s -1 . Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  9. Deposition of metallic nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes via a fast evaporation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Guoqiang; Xing Yangchuan

    2006-01-01

    A new technique was developed for the deposition of colloidal metal nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes. It involves fast evaporation of a suspension containing sonochemically functionalized carbon nanotubes and colloidal nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that metallic nanoparticles with different sizes and concentrations can be deposited on the carbon nanotubes with only a few agglomerates. The technique does not seem to be limited by what the nanoparticles are, and therefore would be applicable to the deposition of other nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes. PtPd and CoPt 3 alloy nanoparticles were used to demonstrate the deposition process. It was found that the surfactants used to disperse the nanoparticles can hinder the nanoparticle deposition. When the nanoparticles were washed with ethanol, they could be well deposited on the carbon nanotubes. The obtained carbon nanotube supported metal nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry

  10. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in tokamak is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions. (orig.)

  11. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1984-07-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillstions and disruptions in tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions. (author)

  12. The energy-deposition model. Electron loss of heavy ions in collisions with neutral atoms at low and intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevelko, V.P.; Litsarev, M.S.; Kato, D.; Tawara, H.

    2010-09-01

    Single- and multiple-electron loss processes in collisions of heavy many-electron ions (positive and negative) in collisions with neutral atoms at low and intermediate energies are considered using the energy-deposition model. The DEPOSIT computer code, created earlier to calculate electron-loss cross sections at high projectile energies, is extended for low and intermediate energies. A description of a new version of DEPOSIT code is given, and the limits of validity for collision velocity in the model are discussed. Calculated electron-loss cross sections for heavy ions and atoms (N + , Ar + , Xe + , U + , U 28+ , W, W + , Ge - , Au - ), colliding with neutral atoms (He, Ne, Ar, W) are compared with available experimental and theoretical data at energies E > 10 keV/u. It is found that in most cases the agreement between experimental data and the present model is within a factor of 2. Combining results obtained by the DEPOSIT code at low and intermediate energies with those by the LOSS-R code at high energies (relativistic Born approximation), recommended electron-loss cross sections in a wide range of collision energy are presented. (author)

  13. Modeling of gas flow and deposition profile in HWCVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflug, Andreas; Höfer, Markus; Harig, Tino; Armgardt, Markus; Britze, Chris; Siemers, Michael; Melzig, Thomas; Schäfer, Lothar

    2015-11-30

    Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is a powerful technology for deposition of high quality films on large area, where drawbacks of plasma based technology such as defect generation by ion bombardment and high equipment costs are omitted. While processes for diamond coatings using H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} as precursor have been investigated in detail since 1990 and have been transferred to industry, research also focuses on silicon based coatings with H{sub 2}, SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} as process gases. HWCVD of silicon based coatings is a promising alternative for state-of-the-art radiofrequency-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors. The film formation in HWCVD results from an interaction of several concurrent chemical reactions such as gas phase chemistry, film deposition, abstraction of surplus hydrogen bonds and etching by atomic hydrogen. Since there is no easy relation between process parameters and resulting deposition profiles, substantial experimental effort is required to optimize the process for a given film specification and the desired film uniformity. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms and to enable an efficient way of process optimization, simulation methods come into play. While diamond deposition occurs at pressures in the range of several kPa HWCVD deposition of Si based coatings operates at pressures in the 0.1–30 Pa range. In this pressure regime, particle based simulation methods focused on solving the Boltzmann equation are computationally feasible. In comparison to computational fluid dynamics this yields improved accuracy even near small gaps or orifices, where characteristic geometric dimensions approach the order of the mean free path of gas molecules. At Fraunhofer IST, a parallel implementation of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method extended by a reactive wall chemistry model is developed. To demonstrate the feasibility of three-dimensional simulation of HWCVD processes

  14. Films deposited from reactive sputtering of aluminum acetylacetonate under low energy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglin, Felipe Augusto Darriba; Prado, Eduardo Silva; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano, E-mail: elidiane@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Plasmas Tecnologicos; Caseli, Luciano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Ambientais, Quimicas e Farmaceuticas; Silva, Tiago Fiorini da; Tabacniks, Manfredo Harri [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2017-07-15

    Films were deposited from aluminum acetylacetonate (Al(acac)3 ) using a methodology involving reactive sputtering and low energy ion bombardment. The plasma was generated by the application of radiofrequency power to the powder containing electrode and simultaneously, negative pulses were supplied to the electrode where the substrates were attached. It was investigated the effect of the duty cycle of the pulses (Δ) on the properties of the coatings. Association of ion bombardment to the deposition process increased film thickness, structure reticulation and organic content. Ions from the deposition environment were implanted at the film-air interface or underneath it. Morphology and topography were altered depending on Δ. Considering the enhancement of Δ, it affected the flux of ions reaching the depositing interface and then the deposition rate, H content, crosslinking degree and surface microstructure. Alumina groups were detected in the infrared spectra, whereas the precipitation of amorphous alumina was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. (author)

  15. Micromorphology of modern tills in southwestern Spitsbergen – insights into depositional and post-depositional processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skolasińska Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Textural properties and microstructures are commonly used properties in the analysis of Pleistocene and older glacial deposits. However, contemporary glacial deposits are seldom studied, particularly in the context of post-depositional changes. This paper presents the results of a micromorphological study of recently deposited tills in the marginal zones of Hansbreen and Torellbreen, glaciers in southwestern Spitsbergen. The main objectives of this study were to compare modern tills deposited in subglacial and supraglacial conditions, as well as tills that were freshly released from ice with those laid down several decades ago. The investigated tills are primarily composed of large clasts of metamorphic rocks and represent coarse-grained, matrix-supported diamictons. The tills reveal several characteristic features for ductile (e.g. turbate structures and brittle (e.g. lineations, microshears deformations, which have been considered to be indicative of subglacial conditions. In supraglacial tills, the same structures are common as in the subglacial deposits, which points to the preservation of the primary features, though the sediment was transferred up to the glacier surface due to basal ice layer deformation and redeposited as slumps, or to formation of similar structures due to short-distance sediment re-deposition by mass flows. This study revealed that it might not be possible to distinguish subglacial and supraglacial tills on the basis of micromorphology if the latter are derived from a subglacial position. The only noted difference was the presence of iron oxide cementation zones and carbonate dissolution features in supraglacial tills. These features were found in tills that were deposited at least a few years ago and are interpreted to be induced by early post-depositional processes involving porewater/sediment interactions.

  16. Nanocomposite oxide thin films grown by pulsed energy beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, M.; Petitmangin, A.; Hebert, C.; Seiler, W.

    2011-01-01

    Highly non-stoichiometric indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were grown by pulsed energy beam deposition (pulsed laser deposition-PLD and pulsed electron beam deposition-PED) under low oxygen pressure. The analysis of the structure and electrical transport properties showed that ITO films with a large oxygen deficiency (more than 20%) are nanocomposite films with metallic (In, Sn) clusters embedded in a stoichiometric and crystalline oxide matrix. The presence of the metallic clusters induces specific transport properties, i.e. a metallic conductivity via percolation with a superconducting transition at low temperature (about 6 K) and the melting and freezing of the In-Sn clusters in the room temperature to 450 K range evidenced by large changes in resistivity and a hysteresis cycle. By controlling the oxygen deficiency and temperature during the growth, the transport and optical properties of the nanocomposite oxide films could be tuned from metallic-like to insulating and from transparent to absorbing films.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  18. Biochemical processes of oligotrophic peat deposits of Vasyugan Mire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Sergeeva, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of peat and mire ecosystems functioning and their rational use is the main problem of biosphere study. This problem also refers to forecasting of biosphere changes results which are global and anthropogenic. According to many scientists' research the portion of mires in earth carbon balance is about 15% of world's stock. The aim of this study is to investigate biochemical processes in oligotrophic deposits in North-eastern part of Vasyugan Mire. The investigations were made on the territory of scientific-research ground (56˚ 03´ and 56˚ 57´ NL, 82˚ 22´ and 82˚ 42´ EL). It is situated between two rivers Bakchar and Iksa (in outskirts of the village Polynyanka, Bakchar region, Tomsk oblast). Evolution of investigated mire massif began with the domination of eutrophic phytocenosis - Filicinae, then sedge. Later transfer into oligotrophic phase was accompanied by formation of meter high-moor peat deposit. The age of three-meter peat deposit reaches four thousand years. Biochemical processes of carbon cycle cover the whole peat deposit, but the process activity and its direction in different layers are defined by genesis and duration of peat formation. So, the number of cellulose-fermenting aerobes in researched peat deposits ranges from 16.8 to 75.5 million CFU/g, and anaerobic bacteria from 9.6 to 48.6 million CFU/g. The high number of aerobes is characteristic for high water levels, organizing by raised bog peats. Their number decreases along the profile in 1.7 - 2 times. The number of microflora in peat deposit is defined by the position in the landscape profile (different geneses), by the depth, by hydrothermic conditions of years and individual months. But microflora activity shows along all depth of peat deposit. We found the same in the process of studying of micromycete complex structure. There was revealed either active component micromycete complex - mycelium, or inert one - spores in a meter layer of peat deposit. If mushrooms

  19. Characteristics of toroidal energy deposition asymmetries in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Neuhauser, J.; Leuterer, F.; Mueller, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    Large toroidal and poloidal asymmetries with characteristics which are sensitively dependent on q a , the vertical position of the plasma, and the type of additional heating are observed in the energy flow to the ASDEX divertor target plates. The largest asymmetries and total energy depositions are observed during lower hybrid wave injection experiments with approximately 50% of the input energy going to the combined divertor targets and shields. A maximum localized energy density loading of 10 MJ/m 2 is typical under these conditions. Measurements of the asymmetries are consistent with a model in which magnetic islands and ergodicity due to intrinsic magnetic perturbations dominate the energy transpot across the primary magnetic separatrix. The results emphasize the essential role of resonant magnetic perturbations in determining the performance of tokamaks and demonstrate that non-axisymmetric effects caused by small perturbations become increasingly important in determining the transport properties as the injected power is increased. (orig.)

  20. Nanostructured Electrodes Via Electrostatic Spray Deposition for Energy Storage System

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, C.

    2014-10-02

    Energy storage systems such as Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors are extremely important in today’s society, and have been widely used as the energy and power sources for portable electronics, electrical vehicles and hybrid electrical vehicles. A lot of research has focused on improving their performance; however, many crucial challenges need to be addressed to obtain high performance electrode materials for further applications. Recently, the electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) technique has attracted great interest to satisfy the goals. Due to its many advantages, the ESD technique shows promising prospects compared to other conventional deposition techniques. In this paper, our recent research outcomes related to the ESD derived anodes for Li-ion batteries and other applications is summarized and discussed.

  1. TLD gamma-ray energy deposition measurements in the zero energy fast reactor ZEBRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knipe, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    A recent study of gamma-ray energy deposition was carried out in the Zebra reactor at AEE Winfrith during a collaborative programme between the UKAEA and PNC of Japan. The programme was given the title MOZART. This paper describes the TLD experiments in the MOZART MZB assembly and discusses the technique and various corrections necessary to relate the measured quantity to the calculated energy deposition

  2. Energy and the laundry process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, W.P.

    1980-04-01

    Energy usage in the residential laundry process is discussed. The various parts of the washing and drying cycles and areas where energy is being wasted or where its usage can be optimized are analyzed. The application of R and D to these areas will result in energy savings. The work was centered on standard and large-size automatic washers and dryers, as compact, portable, and manual models comprise a small part of the market. However, the principles discussed apply to them also. Data from many sources were used to compile this report. Most sources show very good general agreement so far as energy consumption and usage patterns are concerned. The results suggest that improved and/or integrated controls utilizing modern electronics can indeed help conserve energy. A better understanding by the consumer of the factors involved in the laundry process can also lead to the purchase and wise use of that laundry equipment which best suits the individual needs.

  3. Deposition of polymeric perfluored thin films in proton ionic membranes by plasma processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, Peter Lubomir; Mousinho, Ana Paula; Ordonez, Nelson; Silva Zambom, Luis da; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues

    2007-01-01

    In this work the surfaces of polymeric membranes based on Nafion (proton conducting material), used in proton exchange membranes fuel cells (PEMFC) had been modified by plasma deposition of perfluored polymers, in order to improve its functioning in systems of energy generation (fuel cells). The deposition increases the chemical resistance of the proton ionic polymers without losing the electrical properties. The processing of the membranes also reduces the permeability of the membranes to the alcohols (methanol and ethanol), thus preventing poisoning of the fuel cell. The processing of the membranes of Nafion was carried through in a system of plasma deposition using a mixture of CF 4 and H 2 gases. The plasma processing was made mainly to increase the chemical resistance and result in hydrophobic surfaces. The Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) technique supplies a spectrum with information about the CF n bond formation. Through the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) technique it was possible to verify the deposition rate of the polymeric layer. The plasma process with composition of 60% of CF 4 and 40% of H 2 presented the best deposition rate. By the spectrum analysis for the optimized configuration, it was possible to verify that the film deposition occurred with a thickness of 90 nm, and fluorine concentration was nearly 30%. Voltammetry made possible to verify that the fluorination increases the membranes chemical resistance, improving the stability of Nafion, becoming an attractive process for construction of fuel cells

  4. Powder Flux Regulation in the Laser Material Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizubieta, Jon Iñaki; Wegener, Maximiliam; Arntz, Kristian; Lamikiz, Aitzol; Ruiz, Jose Exequiel

    In the present research work a powder flux regulation system has been designed, developed and validated with the aim of improving the Laser Material Deposition (LMD) process. In this process, the amount of deposited material per substrate surface unit area depends on the real feed rate of the nozzle. Therefore, a regulation system based on a solenoid valve has been installed at the nozzle entrance in order to control the powder flux. The powder flux control has been performed based on the machine real feed rate, which is compared with the programmed feed rate. An instantaneous velocity error is calculated and the powder flow is controlled as a function of this variation using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals. Thereby, in zones where the Laser Material Deposition machine reduces the feed rate due to a trajectory change, powder accumulation can be avoided and the generated clads would present a homogeneous shape.

  5. Ion - beam assisted process in the physical deposition of organic thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimov, D; Spassova, E; Assa, J; Danev, G [Acad. J .Malinowski Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl.109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgiev, A, E-mail: dean@clf.bas.b [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-04-01

    A novel method was developed for physical deposition of thin polyimide layers by applying an argon plasma assisted process. The influence was investigated of the plasma on the combined molecular flux of the two thermally evaporated precursors - oxydianiline and pyromellitic dianhydride. The effects observed on the properties of the deposited films are explained with the increased energy of the precursor molecules resulting from the ion-molecular collisions. As could be expected, molecules with higher energy possess higher mobility and thus determine the modification of the films structure and their electrical properties.

  6. A new thin film deposition process by cathodic plasma electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulmier, T.; Kiriakos, E.; Bell, J.; Fredericks, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A new technique, called atmospheric pressure plasma deposition (APPD), has been developed since a few years for the deposition of carbon and DLC, Titanium or Silicon films on metal and metal alloys substrates. A high voltage (2kV) is applied in a liquid electrolytic solution between an anode and a cathode, both electrodes being cylindrical: a glow discharge is then produced and confined at the vicinity of the cathode. The physic of the plasma in the electrolytic solution near the cathode is very different form the other techniques of plasma deposition since the pressure is here close to the atmospheric pressure. We describe here the different physico-chemical processes occurring during the process. In this cathodic process, the anodic area is significantly larger than the cathode area. In a first step, the electrolytic solution is heated by Joule effect induced by the high voltage between the electrodes. Due to the high current density, the vaporization of the solution occurs near the cathode: a large amount of bubbles are produced which are stabilized at the electrode by hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces, forming a vapour sheath. The electric field and voltage drop are then concentrated in this gas envelope, inducing the ionization of the gas and the ignition of a glow discharge at the surface of the material. This plasma induces the formation of ionized and reactive species which diffuse and are accelerated toward the cathode. These excited species are the precursors for the formation of the deposition material. At the same time, the glow discharge interacts with the electrolyte solution inducing also ionization, convection and polymerization processes in the liquid: the solution is therefore a second source of the deposition material. A wide range of films have been deposited with a thickness up to 10 micrometers. These films have been analyzed by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The electrolytic solution has been characterized by GC-MS and the

  7. Fossil fuel energy resources of Ethiopia: Coal deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolela, Ahmed [Department of Petroleum Operations, Ministry of Mines and Energy, Kotebe Branch Office, P. O. Box-486, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2007-11-22

    The gravity of Ethiopian energy problem has initiated studies to explore various energy resources in Ethiopia, one among this is the exploration for coal resources. Studies confirmed the presence of coal deposits in the country. The coal-bearing sediments are distributed in the Inter-Trappean and Pre-Trap volcanic geological settings, and deposited in fluvio-lacustrine and paludal environments in grabens and half-grabens formed by a NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE fault systems. Most significant coal deposits are found in the Inter-Trappean geological setting. The coal and coal-bearing sediments reach a maximum thickness of 4 m and 300 m, respectively. The best coal deposits were hosted in sandstone-coal-shale and mudstone-coal-shale facies. The coal formations of Ethiopia are quite unique in that they are neither comparable to the coal measures of the Permo-Carboniferous Karroo Formation nor to the Late Devonian-Carboniferous of North America or Northwestern Europe. Proximate analysis and calorific value data indicated that the Ethiopian coals fall under lignite to high volatile bituminous coal, and genetically are classified under humic, sapropelic and mixed coal. Vitrinite reflectance studies confirmed 0.3-0.64% Ro values for the studied coals. Palynology studies confirmed that the Ethiopian coal-bearing sediments range in age from Eocene to Miocene. A total of about 297 Mt of coal reserve registered in the country. The coal reserve of the country can be considered as an important alternative source of energy. (author)

  8. Application of laser assisted cold spraying process for metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) process is a hybrid technique that uses laser and cold spray to deposit solid powders on metal substrates. For bonding to occur, the particle velocities must be supersonic which are achieved by entraining...

  9. Processes of preparation, deposition and analysis of thermionic emissive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romao, B.M. Verdelli; Muraro Junior, A.; Tessaroto, L.A.B.; Takahashi, J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper shows the results of the optimization of the process of preparation and deposition of thermionic emissive substances that are used in the oxide-cathodes which are utilized in the gun of the IEAv linear electron accelerator. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Effects of acid deposition on microbial processes in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by microorganisms are not adversely affected by the acidification of natural waters to the same extent as are the life cycles of higher organisms. Basic processes, e.g., primary production and organic matter decomposition, are not slowed in moderately acidified systems and do not generally decline above a pH of 5. More specifically, the individual components of the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles are, with few exceptions, also acid resistant. The influence of acid deposition on microbial processes is more often stimulation of nitrogen and sulfur cycling, often leading to alkalinity production, which mitigates the effect of strong acid deposition. Bacterial sulfate reduction and denitrification in sediments are two of the major processes that can be stimulated by sulfate and nitrate deposition, respectively, and result in ANC (acid-neutralizing capacity) generation. One of the negative effects of acid deposition is increased mobilization and bioaccumulation of some metals. Bacteria appear to play an important role, especially in mercury cycling, with acidification leading to increased bacterial methylation of mercury and subsequent bioaccumulation in higher organisms

  11. Predictive modeling capabilities from incident powder and laser to mechanical properties for laser directed energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yung C.; Bailey, Neil; Katinas, Christopher; Tan, Wenda

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of vertically integrated comprehensive predictive modeling capabilities for directed energy deposition processes, which have been developed at Purdue University. The overall predictive models consist of vertically integrated several modules, including powder flow model, molten pool model, microstructure prediction model and residual stress model, which can be used for predicting mechanical properties of additively manufactured parts by directed energy deposition processes with blown powder as well as other additive manufacturing processes. Critical governing equations of each model and how various modules are connected are illustrated. Various illustrative results along with corresponding experimental validation results are presented to illustrate the capabilities and fidelity of the models. The good correlations with experimental results prove the integrated models can be used to design the metal additive manufacturing processes and predict the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties.

  12. Predictive modeling capabilities from incident powder and laser to mechanical properties for laser directed energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yung C.; Bailey, Neil; Katinas, Christopher; Tan, Wenda

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of vertically integrated comprehensive predictive modeling capabilities for directed energy deposition processes, which have been developed at Purdue University. The overall predictive models consist of vertically integrated several modules, including powder flow model, molten pool model, microstructure prediction model and residual stress model, which can be used for predicting mechanical properties of additively manufactured parts by directed energy deposition processes with blown powder as well as other additive manufacturing processes. Critical governing equations of each model and how various modules are connected are illustrated. Various illustrative results along with corresponding experimental validation results are presented to illustrate the capabilities and fidelity of the models. The good correlations with experimental results prove the integrated models can be used to design the metal additive manufacturing processes and predict the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties.

  13. Process Industry and Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Over a period of two years the NAP's Special Interest Group Energy (SIG-E) has dedicated itself to studying the way in which the process industry and its supply chain has been dealing with energy as a theme. In the past it was strongly believed that many opportunities were left unused and that different forms of cooperation inside the chain should contribute to accelerated improvement of energy efficiency in the process industry. Sixteen companies that are actively involved in the entire value chain have scrutinised their daily situation wondering how to operate more successfully. With approximately one quarter of total energy consumption the Dutch process industry is a major player in reaching national energy and climate objectives by 2020. The objective (improve energy efficiency by 2% annually) is as ambitious as that 'business as usual' is insufficient. A drastic change in how matters are approached is thus essential. The question is how to proceed? By analysing energy projects, in-depth interviews with decision makers in the industry, through literature searches and by organising lectures inside and outside the sector, SlG-E has been able to develop a true picture of the mechanisms concerning energy-related investments. Two major points of interest have been energy-oriented tendering (demand side) and the market introduction of innovations (supply side). The main problems of 'how to do more in the energy domain' is: (a) the process industry is insufficiently familiar with the capabilities of the supply chain, and (b) the supply chain is insufficiently aware of the questions that exist in the process industry. Therefore, the links in the value chain understand each other poorly. The answer to this problem is compound and consists of more interaction between the process industry and the supply chain (machine constructors, engineering firms and consultancies, education and research). As for the process industry: (a) Make improved energy

  14. Investigating energy deposition within cell populations using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Patricia A K; Thomson, Rowan M

    2018-06-27

    In this work, we develop multicellular models of healthy and cancerous human soft tissues, which are used to investigate energy deposition in subcellular targets, quantify the microdosimetric spread in a population of cells, and determine how these results depend on model details. Monte Carlo (MC) tissue models combining varying levels of detail on different length scales are developed: microscopically-detailed regions of interest (>1500 explicitly-modelled cells) are embedded in bulk tissue phantoms irradiated by photons (20 keV to 1.25 MeV). Specific energy (z; energy imparted per unit mass) is scored in nuclei and cytoplasm compartments using the EGSnrc user-code egs_chamber; specific energy mean, <z>, standard deviation, σz, and distribution, f(z,D), are calculated for a variety of macroscopic doses, D. MC-calculated f(z,D) are compared with normal distributions having the same mean and standard deviation. For mGy doses, there is considerable variation in energy deposition (microdosimetric spread) throughout a cell population: e.g., for 30 keV photons irradiating melanoma with 7.5 μm cell radius and 3 μm nuclear radius, σz/<z> for nuclear targets is 170%, and the fraction of nuclei receiving no energy deposition, fz=0, is 0.31 for a dose of 10 mGy. If cobalt-60 photons are considered instead, then σz/<z> decreases to 84%, and fz=0 decreases to 0.036. These results correspond to randomly arranged cells with cell/nucleus sizes randomly sampled from a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 1 μm. If cells are arranged in a hexagonal lattice and cell/nucleus sizes are uniform throughout the population, then σz/<z> decreases to 106% and 68% for 30 keV and cobalt-60,respectively; fz=0

  15. Process and machinery description of equipment for deposition of canisters in medium-long deposition holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbantner, P.

    2001-08-01

    In this report twelve methods are presented to deposit a canister with spent nuclear fuel in a horizontal hole, several canisters per hole (MLH). These methods are part of the KBS-3 system. They have been developed successively, after an analysis of weak points and strong points in previously described methods. In conformance with the guidelines for Project JADE, a choices of system has been considered during the development work. This is whether canister and bentonite buffer should be deposited 'in parts', i.e. at different occasions, but shortly after each other or 'in a package', i.e. together in a single package. The other choice in the guidelines for the JADE project, whether the canister should be placed in a radiation shield or not during transport in the secondary tunnels, was not relevant to MLR. The basic technical problem is depositing heavy objects, the canister and the buffer components, in an horizontal hole which is approximately 200 m deep. Two methods for depositing of the bentonite barrier and the canisters in separate processes have been studied. For depositing of the bentonite barrier and the canister 'in a package', four alternative techniques have been studied: a metallic sleeve around the package, a loading scoop that is rotated, a fork carriage and rails. The repeated transports in a hole, a consequence of depositing several canisters in the same hole, could lead to the rock being crushed. The mutual impact of machines, load and rock wall has therefore been particularly considered. In several methods, the use of a gangway has been proposed (steel plates or layer of ice). A failure mode and effect analysis has been performed for one of the twelve methods. When comparing with a method to deposit one canister per hole using the same technique, the need for equipment and resources is far larger for this MLH method if incidents should occur during depositing. The development work reported here has not yet yielded a definitive method for placing

  16. Recent Development of Advanced Electrode Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2016-10-01

    Electrode materials play a decisive role in almost all electrochemical energy storage devices, determining their overall performance. Proper selection, design and fabrication of electrode materials have thus been regarded as one of the most critical steps in achieving high electrochemical energy storage performance. As an advanced nanotechnology for thin films and surfaces with conformal interfacial features and well controllable deposition thickness, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been successfully developed for deposition and surface modification of electrode materials, where there are considerable issues of interfacial and surface chemistry at atomic and nanometer scale. In addition, ALD has shown great potential in construction of novel nanostructured active materials that otherwise can be hardly obtained by other processing techniques, such as those solution-based processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. This review focuses on the recent development of ALD for the design and delivery of advanced electrode materials in electrochemical energy storage devices, where typical examples will be highlighted and analyzed, and the merits and challenges of ALD for applications in energy storage will also be discussed.

  17. Evaluation of energy deposition by 153Sm in small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cury, M.I.C.; Siqueira, P.T.D.; Yoriyaz, H.; Coelho, P.R.P.; Da Silva, M.A.; Okazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: This work presents evaluations of the absorbed dose by 'in vitro' blood cultures when mixed with 153 Sm solutions of different concentrations. Although 153 Sm is used as radiopharmaceutical mainly due to its beta emission, which is short-range radiation, it also emits gamma radiation which has a longer-range penetration. Therefore it turns to be a difficult task to determine the absorbed dose by small samples where the infinite approximation is no longer valid. Materials and Methods: MCNP-4C (Monte Carlo N - Particle transport code) has been used to perform the evaluations. It is not a deterministic code that calculates the value of a specific quantity solving the physical equations involved in the problem, but a virtual experiment where the events related to the problems are simulated and the concerned quantities are tallied. MCNP also stands out by its possibilities to specify geometrically any problem. However, these features, among others, turns MCNP in a time consuming code. The simulated problem consists of a cylindrical plastic tube with 1.5 cm internal diameter and 0.1cm thickness. It also has 2.0 cm height conic bottom end, so that the represented sample has 4.0 ml ( consisted by 1 ml of blood and 3 ml culture medium). To evaluate the energy deposition in the blood culture in each 153 Sm decay, the problem has been divided in 3 steps to account to the β- emissions (which has a continuum spectrum), gammas and conversion and Auger electrons emissions. Afterwards each emission contribution was weighted and summed to present the final value. Besides this radiation 'fragmentation', simulations were performed for many different amounts of 153 Sm solution added to the sample. These amounts cover a range from 1μl to 0.5 ml. Results: The average energy per disintegration of 153 Sm is 331 keV [1]. Gammas account for 63 keV and β-, conversion and Auger electrons account for 268 keV. The simulations performed showed an average energy deposition of 260 ke

  18. Energy consumption in fermentation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, P

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present publication is to limit energy used to aerate the anaerobic fermentation processes. In yeast production the aeration process consumes the greatest part of the total energy required. A mathematical model, based on literature data, is presented for a yeast fermenter. the effect of various aeration and raw product strategies can be calculated. Simulation of yeast fermentation proves it to be independent of oxygen transport. However interaction between flow conditions and biological kinetics (glucose effect) is a limiting factor. With many feeding point the use of enegy for aeration (mixing) can be reduced to 1/3 of the present one.

  19. Monte Carlo calculation of the energy deposited in the KASCADE GRANDE detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    The energy deposited by protons, electrons and positrons in the KASCADE GRANDE detectors is calculated with a simple and fast Monte Carlo method. The KASCADE GRANDE experiment (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany), based on an array of plastic scintillation detectors, has the aim to study the energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays around and above the 'knee' region of the spectrum. The reconstruction of the primary spectrum is achieved by comparing the data collected by the detectors with simulations of the development of the extensive air shower initiated by the primary particle combined with detailed simulations of the detector response. The simulation of the air shower development is carried out with the CORSIKA Monte Carlo code. The output file produced by CORSIKA is further processed with a program that estimates the energy deposited in the detectors by the particles of the shower. The standard method to calculate the energy deposit in the detectors is based on the Geant package from the CERN library. A new method that calculates the energy deposit by fitting the Geant based distributions with simpler functions is proposed in this work. In comparison with the method based on the Geant package this method is substantially faster. The time saving is important because the number of particles involved is large. (author)

  20. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  1. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs

  2. Internal energy deposition with silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Shai; Hua, Yimin; Boday, Dylan J.; Somogyi, Arpad; Wysocki, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2009-06-01

    The use of silicon nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) is a new appealing matrix-less approach for the selective and sensitive mass spectrometry of small molecules in MALDI instruments. Chemically modified silicon nanoparticles (30 nm) were previously found to require very low laser fluence in order to induce efficient LDI, which raised the question of internal energy deposition processes in that system. Here we report a comparative study of internal energy deposition from silicon nanoparticles to previously explored benzylpyridinium (BP) model compounds during LDI experiments. The internal energy deposition in silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) with different fluorinated linear chain modifiers (decyl, hexyl and propyl) was compared to LDI from untreated silicon nanoparticles and from the organic matrix, [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). The energy deposition to internal vibrational modes was evaluated by molecular ion survival curves and indicated that the ions produced by SPALDI have an internal energy threshold of 2.8-3.7 eV. This is slightly lower than the internal energy induced using the organic CHCA matrix, with similar molecular survival curves as previously reported for LDI off silicon nanowires. However, the internal energy associated with desorption/ionization from the silicon nanoparticles is significantly lower than that reported for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The measured survival yields in SPALDI gradually decrease with increasing laser fluence, contrary to reported results for silicon nanowires. The effect of modification of the silicon particle surface with semifluorinated linear chain silanes, including fluorinated decyl (C10), fluorinated hexyl (C6) and fluorinated propyl (C3) was explored too. The internal energy deposited increased with a decrease in the length of the modifier alkyl chain. Unmodified silicon particles exhibited the highest analyte internal energy

  3. Electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane and dichlorosilacyclohexane: the role of dissociative ionization and dissociative electron attachment in the deposition process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragesh Kumar T P

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present first experiments on electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane (SCH and dichlorosilacyclohexane (DCSCH under a focused high-energy electron beam (FEBID. We compare the deposition dynamics observed when growing pillars of high aspect ratio from these compounds and we compare the proximity effect observed for these compounds. The two precursors show similar behaviour with regards to fragmentation through dissociative ionization in the gas phase under single-collision conditions. However, while DCSCH shows appreciable cross sections with regards to dissociative electron attachment, SCH is inert with respect to this process. We discuss our deposition experiments in context of the efficiency of these different electron-induced fragmentation processes. With regards to the deposition dynamics, we observe a substantially faster growth from DCSCH and a higher saturation diameter when growing pillars with high aspect ratio. However, both compounds show similar behaviour with regards to the proximity effect. With regards to the composition of the deposits, we observe that the C/Si ratio is similar for both compounds and in both cases close to the initial molecular stoichiometry. The oxygen content in the DCSCH deposits is about double that of the SCH deposits. Only marginal chlorine is observed in the deposits of from DCSCH. We discuss these observations in context of potential approaches for Si deposition.

  4. Energy storage and deposition in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    X-ray pictures of a solar flare taken with the S-056 X-ray telescope aboard Skylab are interpreted in terms of flare energy deposition and storage. The close similarity between calculated magnetic-field lines and the overall structure of the X-ray core is shown to suggest that the flare occurred in an entire arcade of loops. It is found that different X-ray features brightened sequentially as the flare evolved, indicating that some triggering disturbance moved from one side to the other in the flare core. A propagation velocity of 180 to 280 km/s is computed, and it is proposed that the geometry of the loop arcade strongly influenced the propagation of the triggering disturbance as well as the storage and site of the subsequent energy deposition. Some possible physical causes for the sequential X-ray brightening are examined, and a magnetosonic wave is suggested as the triggering disturbance. 'Correct' conditions for energy release are considered

  5. Atmospheric Energy Deposition Modeling and Inference for Varied Meteoroid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; Stokan, Edward; Brown, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Asteroids populations are highly diverse, ranging from coherent monoliths to loosely-bound rubble piles with a broad range of material and compositional properties. These different structures and properties could significantly affect how an asteroid breaks up and deposits energy in the atmosphere, and how much ground damage may occur from resulting blast waves. We have previously developed a fragment-cloud model (FCM) for assessing the atmospheric breakup and energy deposition of asteroids striking Earth. The approach represents ranges of breakup characteristics by combining progressive fragmentation with releases of variable fractions of debris and larger discrete fragments. In this work, we have extended the FCM to also represent asteroids with varied initial structures, such as rubble piles or fractured bodies. We have used the extended FCM to model the Chelyabinsk, Benesov, Kosice, and Tagish Lake meteors, and have obtained excellent matches to energy deposition profiles derived from their light curves. These matches provide validation for the FCM approach, help guide further model refinements, and enable inferences about pre-entry structure and breakup behavior. Results highlight differences in the amount of small debris vs. discrete fragments in matching the various flare characteristics of each meteor. The Chelyabinsk flares were best represented using relatively high debris fractions, while Kosice and Benesov cases were more notably driven by their discrete fragmentation characteristics, perhaps indicating more cohesive initial structures. Tagish Lake exhibited a combination of these characteristics, with lower-debris fragmentation at high altitudes followed by sudden disintegration into small debris in the lower flares. Results from all cases also suggest that lower ablation coefficients and debris spread rates may be more appropriate for the way in which debris clouds are represented in FCM, offering an avenue for future model refinement.

  6. Advances in the electro-spark deposition coating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.; Sheldon, G.L.

    1986-04-01

    Electro-spark deposition (ESD) is a pulsed-arc micro-welding process using short-duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit an electrode material on a metallic substrate. It is one of the few methods available by which a fused, metallurgically bonded coating can be applied with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperatures. The short duration of the electrical pulse allows an extremely rapid solidification of the deposited material and results in an exceptionally fine-grained, homogenous coating that approaches (and with some materials, actually is) an amorphous structure. This structure is believed to contribute to the good tribological and corrosion performance observed for hardsurfacing materials used in the demanding environments of high temperatures, liquid metals, and neutron irradiation. A brief historical review of the process is provided, followed by descriptions of the present state-of-the-art and of the performance and applications of electro-spark deposition coatings in liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactors

  7. Measurement of energy deposition near heavy ion tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Brady, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Rapkin, M.

    1985-01-01

    In November of 1982 work was begun in collaboration with Columbia University and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to use microdosimetric methods to measure energy deposition of heavy ions produced at LBL's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. Last year the authors reported preliminary results indicating that secondary charged particle equilibrium was probably obtained using this experimental setup, but that there seemed to be poor spatial resolution in the solid state position-sensitive detector. Further analysis of the measurements taken in August 1983 shows that because of this electronic noise in the position-sensitive detector, only the 56 Fe data yielded useful microdosimetric spectra

  8. Superhydrophobic nanostructured ZnO thin films on aluminum alloy substrates by electrophoretic deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ying; Sarkar, D.K., E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca; Chen, X-Grant

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabrication of superhydrophobic ZnO thin films surfaces by electrophoretic deposition process on aluminum substrates. • Effect of bath temperature on the physical and superhydrophobic properties of thin films. • The water contact angle of 155° ± 3 with roll off property has been observed on the film that was grown at bath temperatures of 50 °C. • The activation energy for electrophoretic deposition of SA-functionalized ZnO nanoparticle is calculated to be 0.50 eV. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic thin films have been fabricated on aluminum alloy substrates by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process using stearic acid (SA) functionalized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles suspension in alcohols at varying bath temperatures. The deposited thin films have been characterized using both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy and it is found that the films contain low surface energy zinc stearate and ZnO nanoparticles. It is also observed that the atomic percentage of Zn and O, roughness and water contact angle of the thin films increase with the increase of the deposited bath temperature. Furthermore, the thin film deposited at 50 °C, having a roughness of 4.54 ± 0.23 μm, shows superhydrophobic properties providing a water contact angle of 155 ± 3° with rolling off properties. Also, the activation energy of electrophoretic deposition of stearic-acid-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles is calculated to be 0.5 eV.

  9. Stopping and energy deposition of hadrons in target nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1983-01-01

    In an analysis of pion-xenon nucleus collisions at 2.34-9 GeV/c momentum events are identified in which incident pions were completely stopped and deposited their energy in target nucleus. Probability of appearance of such ''stopped'' events among any-type pion-xenon collision events depends on the incident pion momentum and is: approximately 0.15 at 2.34 GeV/c, approximately 0.02 at 3.5 GeV/c, and approximately 0 at higher momenta. Formula expressing probability of appearance of the ''stopped'' events is derived. Range-energy relation in nuclear matter for pions and protons is given

  10. Electromagnetic energy and food processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudgett, R.

    1988-01-01

    The use of electromagnetic energy in food processing is reviewed with respect to food safety, nutritional quality, and organoleptic quality. The effects of nonionizing radiation sources such as microwave and radio-frequency energy and ionizing radiation sources, e.g. radioactive cobalt-60 and caesium-137, on the inactivation of microbes and nutrients are compared with those of conventional heating processes both in terms of their kinetic behavior and their mechanisms of interaction with foods. The kinetics of microwave and conventional thermal inactivation are considered for a generalized nth-order model based on time and temperature conditions. However, thermal inactivation effects are often modeled by 1 st-order kinetics. Microbial and nutrient inactivation by ionizing sources are considered for a 1 st-order model based on radiation dose. Both thermal and radiation resistance concepts are reviewed and some typical values of radiation resistance are given for sensitive vegetative bacterial cells, yeasts, and molds and for resistant bacterial spores and viruses. Nonionizing microwave energy sources are increasingly used in home and industrial food processing and are well-accepted by the American public. But, despite recent Food and Drug Administration approval of low and intermediate ionizing radiation dose levels for grains and other plant products and the fact that irradiated foods are sold in more than 20 countries of the world, public fears in the U.S. about nuclear energy may limit the role of ionizing radiation in food processing and preservation and may also limit the use of nuclear fuels as an alternate source of electrical energy. (33 refs.)

  11. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  12. The feasibility of boron containing phosphors in thermal neutron image plates, in particular the systems M sub 2 B sub 5 O sub 9 X : Eu sup 2 sup + (M=Ca, Sr, Ba; X=Cl, Br). Part I: simulation of the energy deposition process

    CERN Document Server

    Knitel, M J; Dorenbos, P; Eijk, C W E; Berezovskaya, I V; Dotsenko, V

    2000-01-01

    A thermal neutron image plate (IP) consisting of a mixture of BaFBr : Eu sup 2 sup + and Gd sub 2 O sub 3 (IP-Gd) is compared with an alternative plate consisting of M sub 2 B sub 5 O sub 9 X : Eu sup 2 sup + (M=Ca, Sr, Ba; X=Cl,Br) (IP-B). In particular, the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of both plates is considered. Monte Carlo simulations of the energy deposition process after the absorption of a neutron show that the variance of the energy deposition in the IP-Gd affects the DQE to a large extent. Because of this, the average number of photoelectrons detected per incident neutron, , has to be only 1.3 for the haloborates to obtain an IP-B with a higher DQE value than the maximum possible with a IP-Gd.

  13. Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Wright, H.A.; Turner, J.E.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Monte Carlo electron transport computer code is used to study in detail the slowing down of electrons and all of their secondaries with initial energies up to 1.5 MeV in liquid water. The probability distributions for the number of ionizations and for the energy deposited in cubical volume elements from electron tracks in the water are analyzed. Both the electron energies and the sizes of the cubical cells are varied. Results are shown for electron energies between 100 eV and 10 keV and for cell sizes between 40 A and 1500 A. Good general agreement is found with results presented by Paretzke at the last symposium. The code can be used to obtain other basic distributions of importance in microdosimetry. As an example, microdosimetric single-event spectra for 500-eV electrons are computed in cubes with edges that range in size from 40 A to 200 A. The importance of correlations is shown explicitly in a comparison of secondary electrons produced by 60 Co and 50-keV photons

  14. Nuclear energy and process heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating and several industrial applications. Although only About 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a

  15. Nuclear energy and process heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozier, K.S.

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating and several industrial applications. Although only About 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a determined

  16. Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaiesh, Ali R.; Garwin, Edward L.

    1989-01-03

    A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

  17. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM DEPOSITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Kamen, M.D.

    1958-10-14

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from UCl/sub 4/ deposits formed on calutrons. Such deposits are removed from the calutron parts by an aqueous wash solution which then contains the uranium values in addition to the following impurities: Ni, Cu, Fe, and Cr. This impurity bearing wash solution is treated with an oxidizing agent, and the oxidized solution is then treated with ammonia in order to precipitate the uranium as ammonium diuranate. The metal impurities of iron and chromium, which form insoluble hydroxides, are precipitated along with the uranium values. The precipitate is separated from the solution, dissolved in acid, and the solution again treated with ammonia and ammonium carbonate, which results in the precipitation of the metal impurities as hydroxides while the uranium values remain in solution.

  18. Modelling of the energy density deposition profiles of ultrashort laser pulses focused in optical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, F; Lavertu, P-L; Bigaouette, N; Moore, F; Brunette, I; Giguere, D; Kieffer, J-C; Olivie, G; Ozaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in dense optical media is investigated theoretically by solving numerically the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the maximum energy density deposition as a function of the pulse energy presents a well-defined threshold that increases with the pulse duration. As a consequence of plasma defocusing, the maximum energy density deposition is generally smaller and the size of the energy deposition zone is generally larger for shorter pulses. Nevertheless, significant values of the energy density deposition can be obtained near threshold, i.e., at lower energy than for longer pulses

  19. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan

    2015-06-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface. The individual particulate dynamics under the combined action of particle collisions, fluid-particle interactions, particle-surface contact and adhesive interactions is simulated, and aggregated to obtain global system behavior. A model for deposition which incorporates the effect of surface energy, impact velocity and particle size, is developed. The fluid-particle interaction is modeled using appropriate spray nozzle gas velocity distributions and a one-way coupling between the phases. It is found that the particle response times and the release velocity distribution of particles have a combined effect on inter-particle collisions during the flow along the spray. It is also found that resolution of the particulate collisions close to the target surface plays an important role in characterizing the trends in the deposit pattern. Analysis of the deposit pattern using metrics defined from the particle distribution on the target surface is provided to characterize the deposition efficiency, deposit size, and scatter due to collisions.

  20. Synergistic energy conversion process using nuclear energy and fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Masao

    2007-01-01

    Because primary energies such as fossil fuels, nuclear energy and renewable energy are limited in quantity of supply, it is necessary to use available energies effectively for the increase of energy demand that is inevitable this century while keeping environment in good condition. For this purpose, an efficient synergistic energy conversion process using nuclear energy and fossil fuels together converted to energy carriers such are electricity, hydrogen, and synthetic fuels seems to be effective. Synergistic energy conversion processes containing nuclear energy were surveyed and effects of these processes on resource saving and the CO 2 emission reduction were discussed. (T.T.)

  1. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, μ, to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio μ ab /μ as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author)

  2. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, Igor L.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Tropin, Igor S.

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options. (authors)

  3. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  4. Energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during laser and electron beam irradiation of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.W.; Aziz, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The fundamentals of energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during energy deposition from lasers and electron beams is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the deposition of energy from pulsed sources (10 to 100 ns pulse duration time) in order to achieve high heating and cooling rates (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/C/s) in the near surface region. The response of both metals and semiconductors to pulsed energy deposition is considered. Guidelines are presented for the choice of energy source, wavelength, and pulse duration time.

  5. Smooth germanium nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei1977@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhao, H.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tan, W. [Henkel Huawei Electronics Co. Ltd., Lian' yungang, Jiangsu 222006 (China); Yu, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Chen, Y.W. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Fan, C.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhang, Qian-Feng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Smooth germanium nanowires were prepared using Ge and GeO{sub 2} as the starting materials and Cu sheet as the substrate by a simple hydrothermal deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the germanium nanowires are smooth and straight with uniform diameter of about 150 nm in average and tens of micrometers in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum of the germanium nanowires display that the germanium nanowires are mainly composed of cubic diamond phase. PL spectrum shows a strong blue light emission at 441 nm. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  6. Smooth germanium nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.; Zhao, H.S.; Tan, W.; Yu, H.Y.; Chen, Y.W.; Fan, C.G.; Zhang, Qian-Feng

    2009-01-01

    Smooth germanium nanowires were prepared using Ge and GeO 2 as the starting materials and Cu sheet as the substrate by a simple hydrothermal deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the germanium nanowires are smooth and straight with uniform diameter of about 150 nm in average and tens of micrometers in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum of the germanium nanowires display that the germanium nanowires are mainly composed of cubic diamond phase. PL spectrum shows a strong blue light emission at 441 nm. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  7. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  8. Characterization of space radiation environment in terms of the energy deposition in functionally important volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Metting, N.F.; Wilson, W.E.; Ratcliffe, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Since the damage which initiates detrimental effects occurs in a small site (semiconductor junctions, or biological cell nuclei), these differences in spatial distribution of ionization maybe the relevant factor controlling the effectiveness of different radiations. Again, when the appropriate cross section data are available Monte Carlo methods can be used to simulate the positions of all ionizations and excitations produced by a typical charged particle. This calculated track structure must interact with the biological or electronic entity in which it occurs to produce the effect. However, we do not know the mechanisms of this interaction and thus cannot specify which characteristics of the charged particle track are responsible for the relevant damage. From track structure we can obtain the spectrum of energy deposition in small volumes which may be relevant to the processes of concern. This has lead to a new approach to dosimetry, one which emphasizes the stochastic nature of energy deposition in small sites, known as microdosimetry. 6 refs., 4 figs

  9. Evaluation of Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, WY, Processing Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Sam [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dam, Wiliam [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) began reassessing the former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site area for potential contaminant sources impacting groundwater. A flood in 2010 along the Little Wind River resulted in increases in groundwater contamination (DOE 2013).This investigation is a small part of continued efforts by DOE and other stakeholders to update human health and ecological risk assessments, to make a comprehensive examination of all exposure pathways to ensure that the site remains protective through established institutional controls. During field inspections at the Riverton Site in 2013, a white evaporitic mineral deposit was identified along the bank of the Little Wind River within the discharge zone of the groundwater contamination plume. In December 2013, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel collected a sample for analysis by X-ray fluorescence (Figure 1 shows the type of material sampled). The sample had a uranium concentration of approximately 64 to 73 parts per million. Although the uranium in this mineral deposit is within the expected range for evaporatic minerals in the western United States (SRNL 2014), DOE determined that additional assessment of the mineral deposit was warranted. In response to the initial collection and analysis of a sample of the mineral deposit, DOE developed a work plan (Work Plan to Sample Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site [DOE 2014]) to further define the extent of these mineral deposits and the concentration of the associated contaminants (Appendix A). The work plan addressed field reconnaissance, mapping, sampling, and the assessment of risk associated with the mineral deposits adjacent to the Little Wind River.

  10. Reduced thermal budget processing of Y-Ba-Cu-O films by rapid isothermal processing assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Sinha, S.; Hsu, N.J.; Ng, J.T.C.; Chou, P.; Thakur, R.P.S.; Narayan, J.

    1991-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has the potential of emerging as a viable technique to fabricate ribbons, tapes, coated wires, and the deposition of films of high-temperature superconductors, and related materials. As a reduced thermal budget processing technique, rapid isothermal processing (RIP) based on incoherent radiation as the source of energy can be usefully coupled to conventional MOCVD. In this paper we report on the deposition and characterization of high quality superconducting thin films of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) on yttrium stabilized zirconia substrates by RIP assisted MOCVD. Using O 2 gas as the source of oxygen, YBCO films deposited initially at 600 degree C for 1 min and at 745 degree C for 25 min followed by deposition at 780 degree C for 45 s are primarily c-axis oriented and zero resistance is observed at 89--90 K. The zero magnetic field current density at 53 and 77 K are 1.2x10 6 and 3x10 5 A/cm 2 , respectively. By using a mixture of N 2 O and O 2 as the oxygen source substrate temperature was further reduced in the deposition of YBCO films. The films deposited initially at 600 degree C for 1 min and than at 720 degree C for 30 min are c-axis oriented and with zero resistance being observed at 91 K. The zero magnetic field current densities at 53 and 77 K are 3.4x10 6 and 1.2x10 6 A/cm 2 , respectively. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest value of critical current density, J c for films deposited by MOCVD at a substrate temperature as low as 720 degree C. It is envisioned that high energy photons from the incoherent light source and the use of a mixture of N 2 O and O 2 as the oxygen source, assist chemical reactions and lower overall thermal budget for processing of these films

  11. Ion implantation range and energy deposition codes COREL, RASE4, and DAMG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1977-07-01

    The FORTRAN codes COREL, RASE4 and DAMG2 can be used to calculate quantities associated with ion implantation range and energy deposition distributions within an amorphous target, or for ions incident far from low index directions and planes in crystalline targets. RASE4 calculates the projected range, R/sub p/, the root mean square spread in the projected range, ΔR/sub p/, and the root mean square spread of the distribution perpendicular to the projected range ΔR/sub perpendicular to/. These parameters are calculated as a function of incident ion energy, E, and the instantaneous energy of the ion, E'. They are sufficient to determine the three dimensional spatial distribution of the ions in the target in the Gaussian approximation when the depth distribution is independent of the lateral distribution. RASE4 can perform these calculations for targets having up to four different component atomic species. The code COREL is a short, economical version of RASE4 which calculates the range and straggling variables for E' = 0. Its primary use in the present package is to provide the average range and straggling variables for recoiling target atoms which are created by the incident ion. This information is used by RASE4 in calculating the redistribution of deposited energy by the target atom recoils. The code DAMG2 uses the output from RASE4 to calculate the depth distribution of energy deposition into either atomic processes or electronic processes. With other input DAMG2 can be used to calculate the depth distribution of any energy dependent interaction between the incident ions and target atoms. This report documents the basic theory behind COREL, RASE4 and DAMG2, including a description of codes, listings, and complete instructions for using the codes, and their limitations

  12. A Metallurgical Investigation of the Direct Energy Deposition Surface Repair of Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marya, Manuel; Singh, Virendra; Hascoet, Jean-Yves; Marya, Surendar

    2018-02-01

    Among additive manufacturing (AM) processes, the direct energy deposition (DED) by laser is explored to establish its applicability for the repair of ferrous alloys such as UNS G41400 low-alloy steel, UNS S41000 martensitic stainless steel, UNS S17400 precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steel, and UNS S32750 super-duplex stainless steel. Unlike plating, thermal spray, and conventional cladding weld, DED laser powder deposition offers potential advantages, e.g., thin deposits, limited dilutions, narrow heat-affected zones (HAZ), potentially improved surface properties. In this investigation, all AM deposits were completed with an IREPA CLAD™ system using a powder feed of UNS N06625, an alloy largely selected for its outstanding corrosion resistance. This investigation first addresses topological aspects of AM deposits (including visual imperfections) before focusing on changes in microstructure, microhardness, chemical composition across AM deposits and base materials. It has been established that dense, uniform, hard ( 300 HVN), crack-free UNS N06625-compliant AM deposits of fine dendritic microstructures are reliably produced. However, except for the UNS S32750 steel, a significant martensitic hardening was observed in the HAZs of UNS G41400 ( 650 HVN), UNS S41000 ( 500 HVN), and UNS S17400 ( 370 HVN). In summary, this investigation demonstrates that the DED laser repair of ferrous parts with UNS N06625 may restore damaged surfaces, but it also calls for cautions and complementary investigations for alloys experiencing a high HAZ hardening, for which industry standard recommendations are exceeded and lead to an increased risk of delayed cracking in corrosive environments.

  13. Research on Glass Frit Deposition Based on the Electrospray Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifang Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the electrospray technology is used to easily deposit the glass frit into patterns at a micro-scale level. First, far-field electrospray process was carried out with a mixture of glass frit in the presence of ethanol. A uniform, smooth, and dense glass frit film was obtained, verifying that the electrospray technology was feasible. Then, the distance between the nozzle and the substrate was reduced to 2 mm to carry out near-field electrospray. The experimental process was improved by setting the range of the feed rate of the substrate to match both the concentration and the flow rate of the solution. Spray diameter could be less at the voltage of 2 kV, in which the glass frit film was expected to reach the minimum line width. A uniform glass frit film with a line width within the range of 400–500 μm was prepared when the speed of the substrate was 25 mm/s. It indicates that electrospray is an efficient technique for the patterned deposition of glass frit in wafer-level hermetic encapsulation.

  14. Modeling the energy deposition in the Aurora KrF laser amplifier chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comly, J.C.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Greene, D.P.; Hanson, D.E.; Krohn, B.J.; McCown, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations model the energy depositions by highly energetic electron beams into the cavities of the four KrF laser amplifiers in the Aurora chain. Deposited energy density distributions are presented and studied as functions of e-beam energy and gas pressure. Results are useful for analyzing small signal gain (SSG) measurements and optimizing deposition in future experiments. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''

  16. Energy deposition model for low-energy electrons (10-10 000 eV) in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldan, A.; Perez, J.M.; Williart, A.; Blanco, F.; Garcia, G.

    2004-01-01

    An energy deposition model for electrons in air that can be useful in microdosimetric applications is presented in this study. The model is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the single electron scattering processes that can take place with the molecular constituents of the air in the energy range 10-10 000 eV. The input parameters for this procedure have been the electron scattering cross sections, both differential and integral. These parameters were calculated using a model potential method which describes the electron scattering with the molecular constituent of air. The reliability of the calculated integral cross section values has been evaluated by comparison with direct total electron scattering cross-section measurements performed by us in a transmission beam experiment. Experimental energy loss spectra for electrons in air have been used as probability distribution functions to define the electron energy loss in single collision events. The resulting model has been applied to simulate the electron transport through a gas cell containing air at different pressures and the results have been compared with those observed in the experiments. Finally, as an example of its applicability to dosimetric issues, the energy deposition of 10 000 eV by means of successive collisions in a free air chamber has been simulated

  17. Surface free energy of TiC layers deposited by electrophoretic deposition (EPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Mohammad Reza; Sanjabi, Sohrab

    2018-01-01

    In this study porous structure coatings of bare TiC (i.e. 20 nm, 0.7 µm and 5/45 µm) and core-shell structures of TiC/NiP synthesized through electroless plating were deposited by EPD. Room temperature surface free energy (i.e. γs) of TiC and TiC/NiP coatings were determined via measuring contact angles of distilled water and diiodemethane liquids. The effect of Ni-P shell on spreading behavior of pure copper on porous EPD structures was also investigated by high temperature wetting experiments. According to the results existence of a Ni-P layer around the TiC particles has led to roughness (i.e. at least 0.1 µm), and porosity mean length (i.e. at least 1 µm) increase. This might be related to various sizes of TiC agglomerates formed during electroless plating. It has been observed that room temperature γs changed from 44.49 to 54.12 mJ.m-2 as a consequence of particle size enlargement for TiC. The highest and lowest (67.25 and 44.49 mJ.m-2) γs were measured for TiC nanoparticles which showed 1.5 times increase in surface free energy after being plated with Ni-P. It was also observed that plating Ni-P altered non-spreading (θs > 100 o) behavior of TiC to full-spreading ((θs 0o)) which can be useful for preparation of hard coatings by infiltration sintering phenomenon. Zeta potential of EPD suspensions, morphology, phase structure and topography of as-EPD layers were investigated through Zetasizer, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) instruments respectively.

  18. Dynamic energy spectrum and energy deposition in solid target by intense pulsed ion beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yu; Xiao-Yun Le; Zheng Liu; Jie Shen; Yu I.Isakova; Hao-Wen Zhong; Jie Zhang; Sha Yan; Gao-Long Zhang; Xiao-Fu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    A method for analyzing the dynamic energy spectrum of intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) was proposed.Its influence on beam energy deposition in metal target was studied with IPIB produced by two types of magnetically insulated diodes (MID).The emission of IPIB was described with space charge limitation model,and the dynamic energy spectrum was further analyzed with time-of-flight method.IPIBs generated by pulsed accelerators of BIPPAB-450 (active MID) and TEMP-4M (passive MID) were studied.The dynamic energy spectrum was used to deduce the power density distribution of IPIB in the target with Monte Carlo simulation and infrared imaging diagnostics.The effect on the distribution and evolution of thermal field induced by the characteristics of IPIB dynamic energy spectrum was discussed.

  19. Deposits on heat exchanging surfaces, causes in the bleaching process and countermeasures; Belaeggningar paa vaermevaexlare, orsaker i blekprocessen och aatgaerder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjurstroem, Henrik [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Staahl, Charlotte; Widell, Lars [AaF-Celpap AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Energy conservation in process industry implies to a large extent recovery of heat (or cold) from a process stream and its utilization for another process stream. The savings of energy that can be achieved depend on the process streams, but also on the efficiency of the heat exchange. A small driving temperature difference is a condition for an extensive recovery and a satisfactory preservation of its quality, i.e. its temperature. As process streams contain compounds or components that can precipitate and form deposits on heat exchanging surfaces, the recovery of heat is degraded. In the pulp and paper industry, two trends combine to increase the extent of fouling: a larger degree of closure for the process and a change in pH-profile caused by a switch to elementary chlorine free bleaching. In this study, the occurrence of deposits has been investigated for the mills that produce mechanical pulp and for the fiber line in mills producing chemical pulp. Deposits on the evaporator surfaces are treated in a parallel study. Except for some plants, deposits are not an important problem today. That does not mean that there has not been any problem or that problems will not occur. The origin of deposits lies in the chemistry of the process, but deposits have consequences for the thermal energy management. A list of possible actions in order to avoid deposits or to mitigate their consequences has been dressed in this report. They should be considered with the following order of priority: avoiding that the compounds that may form deposits enter at all the process, section 6.1; avoiding that these compounds form a deposit once they have entered the process, section 6.2; cleaning if nothing else helps or costs too much, section 6.3. Some of these methods are well known or are conventional changes in the processes. Some of these methods are less well proven or less well documented. In a longer time perspective, the kidney technology that is being developed could contribute to

  20. Mining and processing of uranium deposits in Salamanca, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Jaen, J.P.; Otero, J.; Serrano, J.R.; Membrillera, J.R.; Josa, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In July, 1974, Empresa Nacional del Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA), took the decision to mine uranium in the province of Salamanca, based on geological and processing studies carried out by the Junta de Energia Nuclear (JEN). The milling plant was designed by JEN and assembled by ENUSA, and operations were begun on 22 May, 1975. The orebody, FE-1, is composed of slate of Cambrain age and the fissures are filled by primary minerals. Secondary minerals are impregnated in the zone affected by the hydrostatic level. The orebody is of the stockwork type in which carbonaceous matter has acted as a reducing agent. The average grade of the ore is 0.09% U 3 O 8 at a cutoff grade of 0.02% U 3 O 8 : the deposit is therefore among the lowest-grade deposits that are currently mined. Annual production is 1 200 000 t of rock, of which 200 000 t is ore-bearing. The milling plant uses a static heap-leaching method, followed by solvent extraction (tertiary amines) and precipitation by ammonia. Joint studies by JEN and ENUSA have led to the introduction of modifications that have increased the production capacity from 75 to 112 t U 3 O 8 per annum with no significant alteration in the initial planned investment. The total recovery after processing is 75% of the U 3 O 8 contained in the ore. Approximately 100 people are employed in the overall operation. ENUSA has decided to expand operations in Salamanca with the construction of a new milling plant (technological aid by JEN), which will be capable of processing 825 000 t of ore per year, with an annual production of 500 t U 3 O 8 . The new plant is expected to begin operations in 1979. (author)

  1. Evaluation of effective energy deposition in test fuel during power burst experiment in NSRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Inabe, Teruo

    1982-01-01

    In an inpile experiment to study the fuel behavior under reactivity-initiated accident conditions, it is of great importance to understand the time-dependent characteristics of the energy deposited in the test fuel by burst power. The evaluation of the time-dependent energy deposition requires the knowledge of the fission rates and energy deposition per fission in the test fuel, both as a function of time. In the present work, the authors attempted to evaluate the relative fission rate change in the test fuel subjected to the power burst testing in the NSRR through the measurements and analyses of the fission power changes in the NSRR. Utilizing a micro fission chamber and a conventional larger fission chamber, they successfully measured the reactor fission power change ranging over a dozen of decades in magnitude and a thousand seconds in time. The measured power transient agreed quite well with calculated results. In addition, the time-dependent energy deposition per fission in the test fuel including the energy contribution from the driver core was analytically evaluated. The analyses indicate that the energy of about 175 MeV/fission is promptly deposited in the test fuel and that the additional energy of about 11 MeV is deposited afterwards. Finally the fractions of energy deposited in the test fuel until various times after power burst were determined by coupling the time-dependent relative fissions and energy deposition per fission in the test fuel. The prompt energy deposition ranges from about 50 to 80% of the total energy deposition for the reactivity insertion between 1.5 and 4.7 $, and the remaining is the delayed energy deposition. (author)

  2. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, S., E-mail: smatsui@gpi.ac.jp; Mori, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Nonaka, T.; Hattori, T.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Haraguchi, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchiyama, K.; Ishikawa, M. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Electron Tube Division, 314-5 Shimokanzo, Iwata, Shizuoka 438-0193 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management.

  3. Intelligent process control of fiber chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John Gregory

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a widely used process for the application of thin films. In this case, CVD is being used to apply a thin film interface coating to single crystal monofilament sapphire (Alsb2Osb3) fibers for use in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC's). The hot-wall reactor operates at near atmospheric pressure which is maintained using a venturi pump system. Inert gas seals obviate the need for a sealed system. A liquid precursor delivery system has been implemented to provide precise stoichiometry control. Neural networks have been implemented to create real-time process description models trained using data generated based on a Navier-Stokes finite difference model of the process. Automation of the process to include full computer control and data logging capability is also presented. In situ sensors including a quadrupole mass spectrometer, thermocouples, laser scanner, and Raman spectrometer have been implemented to determine the gas phase reactants and coating quality. A fuzzy logic controller has been developed to regulate either the gas phase or the in situ temperature of the reactor using oxygen flow rate as an actuator. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of various samples are shown. A hierarchical control structure upon which the control structure is based is also presented.

  4. 2D modeling of direct laser metal deposition process using a finite particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anedaf, T.; Abbès, B.; Abbès, F.; Li, Y. M.

    2018-05-01

    Direct laser metal deposition is one of the material additive manufacturing processes used to produce complex metallic parts. A thorough understanding of the underlying physical phenomena is required to obtain a high-quality parts. In this work, a mathematical model is presented to simulate the coaxial laser direct deposition process tacking into account of mass addition, heat transfer, and fluid flow with free surface and melting. The fluid flow in the melt pool together with mass and energy balances are solved using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software NOGRID-points, based on the meshless Finite Pointset Method (FPM). The basis of the computations is a point cloud, which represents the continuum fluid domain. Each finite point carries all fluid information (density, velocity, pressure and temperature). The dynamic shape of the molten zone is explicitly described by the point cloud. The proposed model is used to simulate a single layer cladding.

  5. The penetration, diffusion and energy deposition of high-energy photon in layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhengming, Luo; Chengjun, Gou; Laub, Wolfram

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory for calculating the transport of high-energy photons and their secondary charged particles. We call this new algorithm characteristic line method, which is completely analytic. Using this new method we can not only accurately calculate the transport behavior of energetic photons, but also precisely describes the transport behavior and energy deposition of secondary electrons, photoelectrons, Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. Its calculation efficiency is much higher than the Monte Carlo method's. The theory can be directly applied to layered media situation and obtain a pencil-beam-modeled solution. Therefore, it may be applied to clinical applications for radiation therapy

  6. First Investigations on the Energy Deposited in a D0 early separation scheme Dipole for the LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hoa, C

    2007-01-01

    This note gives the first results of energy deposition calculation on a simplified model for an early scheme separation dipole D0, located at 3.5 m from the IP. The Monte Carlo code FLUKA version 2006.3 has been used for modelling the multi-particle interactions and energy transport. After a short introduction to particle interaction with matter and power deposition processes, the FLUKA modelling is described with bench marked power deposition calculation on the TAS, the absorber located in front of the triplet quadrupoles. The power deposition results for the D0 early scheme are then discussed in details, with the averaged and peak power density, and the variations of the total heat load in the dipole with the longitudinal position and with the aperture diameter.

  7. Geopressured aquifers - utilization of the energy potential of the Endorf thermal water deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, S; Hantelmann, G v

    1984-01-01

    The Endorf thermal water deposit (Rupel, 4229 to 4264 m) belongs to the type of ''geopressured aquifers''. The overall aim of the project is to exploit the energy stored in the deposit in the form of thermal brine (temperature: 115/sup 0/C) and natural gas (96% methane). In this first report on the project state, an overview on prehistory is followed by a description of the currently implemented test programme and its subsequent evaluation which aim at obtaining more exact knowledge concerning the present deposit conditions and, while doing so, indications of the energy content of the deposit in order to determine the energy potential theoretically exploitable at the well head.

  8. Shaping thin film growth and microstructure pathways via plasma and deposition energy: a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Han, Jeon Geon; Kersten, Holger

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the science and engineering of thin films using plasma assisted deposition methods with controlled growth and microstructure is a key issue in modern nanotechnology, impacting both fundamental research and technological applications. Different plasma parameters like electrons, ions, radical species and neutrals play a critical role in nucleation and growth and the corresponding film microstructure as well as plasma-induced surface chemistry. The film microstructure is also closely associated with deposition energy which is controlled by electrons, ions, radical species and activated neutrals. The integrated studies on the fundamental physical properties that govern the plasmas seek to determine their structure and modification capabilities under specific experimental conditions. There is a requirement for identification, determination, and quantification of the surface activity of the species in the plasma. Here, we report a detailed study of hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon (c-Si:H) processes to investigate the evolution of plasma parameters using a theoretical model. The deposition processes undertaken using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method are characterized by a reactive mixture of hydrogen and silane. Later, various contributions of energy fluxes on the substrate are considered and modeled to investigate their role in the growth of the microstructure of the deposited film. Numerous plasma diagnostic tools are used to compare the experimental data with the theoretical results. The film growth and microstructure are evaluated in light of deposition energy flux under different operating conditions.

  9. Effect of Laser Power and Gas Flow Rate on Properties of Directed Energy Deposition of Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.

    2018-03-01

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) process belongs to the directed energy deposition class of additive manufacturing processes. It is an important manufacturing technology with lots of potentials especially for the automobile and aerospace industries. The laser metal deposition process is fairly new, and the process is very sensitive to the processing parameters. There is a high level of interactions among these process parameters. The surface finish of part produced using the laser metal deposition process is dependent on the processing parameters. Also, the economy of the LMD process depends largely on steps taken to eliminate or reduce the need for secondary finishing operations. In this study, the influence of laser power and gas flow rate on the microstructure, microhardness and surface finish produced during the laser metal deposition of Ti6Al4V was investigated. The laser power was varied between 1.8 kW and 3.0 kW, while the gas flow rate was varied between 2 l/min and 4 l/min. The microstructure was studied under an optical microscope, the microhardness was studied using a Metkon microhardness indenter, while the surface roughness was studied using a Jenoptik stylus surface analyzer. The results showed that better surface finish was produced at a laser power of 3.0 kW and a gas flow rate of 4 l/min.

  10. Thermal energy management process experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  11. Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Handford, C.

    1990-08-01

    Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level sauna on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to differences in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to ˜60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

  12. Comparison between calculation and measurement of energy deposited by 800 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The High Energy Transport Code, HETC, was obtained from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and altered as necessary to run on a CDC 7600 using the LTSS software in use at LLNL. HETC was then used to obtain calculated estimates of energy deposited, for comparison with a series of benchmark experiments done by LLNL. These experiments used proton beams of various energies incident on well-defined composite targets in good geometry. In this report, two aspects of the comparison between calculated and experimental energy depositions from an 800 MeV proton beam are discussed. Both aspects involve the fact that workers at SAI had previously used their version of HETC to calculate this experiment and reported their comparison with the measured data. The first aspect addressed is that their calculated data and LLNL calculations do not agree, suggesting an error in the conversion process from the RSIC code. The second aspect is not independent of the first, but is of sufficient importance to merit separate emphasis. It is that the SAI calculations agree well with experiments at the detector plate located some distance from the shower plate, whereas the LLNL calculations show a clearcut discrepancy there in comparison with the experiment. A contract was let in January 1980 by LLNL with SAI in order to obtain full details on the two cited aspects of the comparison between calculated and experimental energy depositions from an 800 MeV proton beam. The ensuing discussion is based on the final report of that contracted work

  13. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  14. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time (∼1 micros to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, 137 Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired

  15. Effects of Energy Deposition Characteristics on Localised Forced Ignition of Homogeneous Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipal Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the characteristic width of the energy deposition profile and the duration of energy deposition by the ignitor on localised forced ignition of stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures have been analysed using simplified chemistry three-dimensional compressible Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS for different values of root-mean-square turbulent velocity fluctuation. The localised forced ignition is modelled using a source term in the energy transport equation, which deposits energy in a Gaussian manner from the centre of the ignitor over a stipulated period of time. It has been shown that the width of ignition energy deposition and the duration over which ignition energy is deposited have significant influences on the success of ignition and subsequent flame propagation. An increase in the width of ignition energy deposition (duration of energy deposition for a given amount of ignition energy has been found to have a detrimental effect on the ignition event, which may ultimately lead to misfire. Moreover, an increase in u′ gives rise to augmented heat transfer rate from the hot gas kernel, which in turn leads to a reduction in the extent of overall burning for both stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures but the detrimental effects of high values of u′ on localised ignition are particularly prevalent for fuel-lean mixtures.

  16. Macro controlling of copper oxide deposition processes and spray mode by using home-made fully computerized spray pyrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, Mohammed Sh.; Chiad, Bahaa T.; Shafeeq, Omer Sh.

    2017-09-01

    Thin Films of Copper Oxide (CuO) absorption layer have been deposited using home-made Fully Computerized Spray Pyrolysis Deposition system FCSPD on glass substrates, at the nozzle to substrate distance equal to 20,35 cm, and computerized spray mode (continues spray, macro-control spray). The substrate temperature has been kept at 450 °c with the optional user can enter temperature tolerance values ± 5 °C. Also that fixed molar concentration of 0.1 M, and 2D platform speed or deposition platform speed of 4mm/s. more than 1000 instruction program code, and specific design of graphical user interface GUI to fully control the deposition process and real-time monitoring and controlling the deposition temperature at every 200 ms. The changing in the temperature has been recorded during deposition processes, in addition to all deposition parameters. The films have been characterized to evaluate the thermal distribution over the X, Y movable hot plate, the structure and optical energy gap, thermal and temperature distribution exhibited a good and uniform distribution over 20 cm2 hot plate area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature and can be assigned to monoclinic CuO structure. Optical band gap varies from 1.5-1.66 eV depending on deposition parameter.

  17. Cumulative percent energy deposition of photon beam incident on different targets, simulated by Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandic, A.; Jevremovic, T.; Boreli, F.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation (without secondary radiation) of the standard photon interactions (Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair protection) for the complex slab's geometry is used in numerical code ACCA. A typical ACCA run will yield: (a) transmission of primary photon radiation differential in energy, (b) the spectrum of energy deposited in the target as a function of position and (c) the cumulative percent energy deposition as a function of position. A cumulative percent energy deposition of photon monoenergetic beam incident on simplest and complexity tissue slab and Fe slab are presented in this paper. (author). 5 refs.; 2 figs

  18. Measurement and Simulation of the Variation in Proton-Induced Energy Deposition in Large Silicon Diode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Christina L.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The proton induced charge deposition in a well characterized silicon P-i-N focal plane array is analyzed with Monte Carlo based simulations. These simulations include all physical processes, together with pile up, to accurately describe the experimental data. Simulation results reveal important high energy events not easily detected through experiment due to low statistics. The effects of each physical mechanism on the device response is shown for a single proton energy as well as a full proton space flux.

  19. On the role of energy deposition in triggering SEGR in power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selva, L.E.; Swift, G.M.; Taylor, W.A.; Edmonds, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Single event gate rupture (SEGR) was studied using three types of power MOSFET devices with ions having incident linear energy transfers (LETs) in silicon from 26 to 82 MeV·cm 2 /mg. Results are: (1) consistent with Wrobel's oxide breakdown for V DS = 0 volts (for both normal incidence and angle); and (2) when V GS = 0 volts, energy deposited near the Si/SiO 2 interface is more important than the energy deposited deeper in the epi

  20. Development of a new process for deposition of metallic vapours and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielli, O. de.

    1989-01-01

    Surface treatment processes by deposition, enabling surface properties to be altered without altering the volume, are making rapid progress in industry. The description of these processes has led us to consider the role and the importance of methods using plasmas. The new plasma source we have developed is the subject of this experimental research: it is the basis of the deposition process (metallic ion and vapour deposition). The specifications and preliminary results enable us to compare this process with others in use. Fast deposition rates and excellent adhesion are the two main characteristics of this process [fr

  1. 49 CFR 594.9 - Fee for reimbursement of bond processing costs and costs for processing offers of cash deposits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fee for reimbursement of bond processing costs and costs for processing offers of cash deposits or obligations of the United States in lieu of sureties on... indirect costs the agency incurs for receipt, processing, handling, and disbursement of cash deposits or...

  2. Summary and presentation of the international workshop on beam induced energy deposition (issues, concerns, solutions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundranayagam, R.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses: energy deposition and radiation shielding in antriproton source at FNAL; radiation issues/problems at RHIC; radiation damage to polymers; radiation effects on optical fibre in the SSC tunnel; capabilities of the Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility; the SSC interaction region; the FLUKA code system, modifications, recent extension and experimental verification; energy particle transport calculations and comparisons with experimental data; Los Alamos High Energy Transport code system; MCNP features and applications; intercomparison of Monte Carlo codes designed for simulation of high energy hadronic cascades; event generator, DTUJET-90 and DTUNUC; Preliminary hydrodynamic calculations of beam energy deposition; MESA code calculations of material response to explosive energy deposition; Smooth particle hydrodynamic; hydrodynamic effects and mass depletion phenomena in targets; beam dump: Beam sweeping and spoilers; Design considerations to mitigate effects of accidental beam dump; SSC beam abort and absorbed; beam abort system of SSC options; unconventional scheme for beam spoilers; low β quadrupoles: Energy deposition and radioactivation; beam induces energy deposition in the SSC components; extension of SSC-SR-1033 approach to radioactivation in LHC and SSC detectors; energy deposition in the SSC low-β IR-quads; beam losses and collimation in the LHC; and radiation shielding around scrapers

  3. High voltage electrophoretic deposition for electrochemical energy storage and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanagopalan, Sunand

    High voltage electrophoretic deposition (HVEPD) has been developed as a novel technique to obtain vertically aligned forests of one-dimensional nanomaterials for efficient energy storage. The ability to control and manipulate nanomaterials is critical for their effective usage in a variety of applications. Oriented structures of one-dimensional nanomaterials provide a unique opportunity to take full advantage of their excellent mechanical and electrochemical properties. However, it is still a significant challenge to obtain such oriented structures with great process flexibility, ease of processing under mild conditions and the capability to scale up, especially in context of efficient device fabrication and system packaging. This work presents HVEPD as a simple, versatile and generic technique to obtain vertically aligned forests of different one-dimensional nanomaterials on flexible, transparent and scalable substrates. Improvements on material chemistry and reduction of contact resistance have enabled the fabrication of high power supercapacitor electrodes using the HVEPD method. The investigations have also paved the way for further enhancements of performance by employing hybrid material systems and AC/DC pulsed deposition. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the starting material to demonstrate the HVEPD technique. A comprehensive study of the key parameters was conducted to better understand the working mechanism of the HVEPD process. It has been confirmed that HVEPD was enabled by three key factors: high deposition voltage for alignment, low dispersion concentration to avoid aggregation and simultaneous formation of holding layer by electrodeposition for reinforcement of nanoforests. A set of suitable parameters were found to obtain vertically aligned forests of MWCNTs. Compared with their randomly oriented counterparts, the aligned MWCNT forests showed better electrochemical performance, lower electrical resistance and a capability to

  4. Laser-Aided Directed Energy Deposition of Steel Powder over Flat Surfaces and Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio

    2018-03-16

    In the framework of Additive Manufacturing of metals, Directed Energy Deposition of steel powder over flat surfaces and edges has been investigated in this paper. The aims are the repair and overhaul of actual, worn-out, high price sensitive metal components. A full-factorial experimental plan has been arranged, the results have been discussed in terms of geometry, microhardness and thermal affection as functions of the main governing parameters, laser power, scanning speed and mass flow rate; dilution and catching efficiency have been evaluated as well to compare quality and effectiveness of the process under conditions of both flat and edge depositions. Convincing results are presented to give grounds for shifting the process to actual applications: namely, no cracks or pores have been found in random cross-sections of the samples in the processing window. Interestingly an effect of the scanning conditions has been proven on the resulting hardness in the fusion zone; therefore, the mechanical characteristics are expected to depend on the processing parameters.

  5. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Thorman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (3, Pt(PF34, Co(CO3NO, and W(CO6. Through these case studies, it is evident that this combination of studies can provide valuable insight into potential mechanisms governing deposit formation in FEBID. Although further experiments and new approaches are needed, these studies are an important stepping-stone toward better understanding the fundamental physics behind the deposition process and establishing design criteria for optimized FEBID precursors.

  6. PRISM -- A tool for modelling proton energy deposition in semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, M.K.; Underwood, C.I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a description of, and test results from, a new PC based software simulation tool PRISM (Protons in Semiconductor Materials). The model describes proton energy deposition in complex 3D sensitive volumes of semiconductor materials. PRISM is suitable for simulating energy deposition in surface-barrier detectors and semiconductor memory devices, the latter being susceptible to Single-Event Upset (SEU) and Multiple-Bit Upset (MBU). The design methodology on which PRISM is based, together with the techniques used to simulate ion transport and energy deposition, are described. Preliminary test results used to analyze the PRISM model are presented

  7. Directed Vapor Deposition: Low Vacuum Materials Processing Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groves, J. F; Mattausch, G; Morgner, H; Hass, D. D; Wadley, H. N

    2000-01-01

    Directed vapor deposition (DVD) is a recently developed electron beam-based evaporation technology designed to enhance the creation of high performance thick and thin film coatings on small area surfaces...

  8. Electrode surface engineering by atomic layer deposition: A promising pathway toward better energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-04-29

    Research on electrochemical energy storage devices including Li ion batteries (LIBs), Na ion batteries (NIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs) has accelerated in recent years, in part because developments in nanomaterials are making it possible to achieve high capacities and energy and power densities. These developments can extend battery life in portable devices, and open new markets such as electric vehicles and large-scale grid energy storage. It is well known that surface reactions largely determine the performance and stability of electrochemical energy storage devices. Despite showing impressive capacities and high energy and power densities, many of the new nanostructured electrode materials suffer from limited lifetime due to severe electrode interaction with electrolytes or due to large volume changes. Hence control of the surface of the electrode material is essential for both increasing capacity and improving cyclic stability of the energy storage devices.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) which has become a pervasive synthesis method in the microelectronics industry, has recently emerged as a promising process for electrochemical energy storage. ALD boasts excellent conformality, atomic scale thickness control, and uniformity over large areas. Since ALD is based on self-limiting surface reactions, complex shapes and nanostructures can be coated with excellent uniformity, and most processes can be done below 200. °C. In this article, we review recent studies on the use of ALD coatings to improve the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices, with particular emphasis on the studies that have provided mechanistic insight into the role of ALD in improving device performance. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Improved energy efficiency in the process industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilavachi, P A [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    1992-12-31

    The European Commission, through the JOULE Programme, is promoting energy efficient technologies in the process industries; the topics of the various R and D activities are: heat exchangers (enhanced evaporation, shell and tube heat exchangers including distribution of fluids, and fouling), low energy separation processes (adsorption, melt-crystallization and supercritical extraction), chemical reactors (methanol synthesis and reactors with integral heat exchangers), other unit operations (evaporators, glass-melting furnaces, cement kilns and baking ovens, dryers and packed columns and replacements for R12 in refrigeration), energy and system process models (batch processes, simulation and control of transients and energy synthesis), development of advanced sensors.

  10. Building of nested components by a double-nozzle droplet deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Du, Jun; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2016-07-01

    According to the nested components jointed with multiple parts,a double-nozzle droplet deposition process was put forward in this paper, and the experimental system was developed. Through the research on the properties of support materials and the process of double-nozzle droplet deposition, the linkage control of the metal droplet deposition and the support material extrusion was realized, and a nested component with complex construction was fabricated directly. Compared with the traditional forming processes, this double-nozzle deposition process has the advantages of short cycle, low cost and so on. It can provide an approach way to build the nested parts.

  11. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  12. Minimum energy consumption process synthesis for energy saving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao-Ping, Jia [Institute for Petroleum and Chemical Industry, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042, Shandong (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fang, Wang; Shu-Guang, Xiang; Xin-Sun, Tan; Fang-Yu, Han [Institute for Petroleum and Chemical Industry, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042, Shandong (China)

    2008-05-15

    The paper presents a synthesis strategy for the chemical processes with energy saving. The concept of minimum energy consumption process (MECP) is proposed. Three characteristics of MECP are introduced, including thermodynamic minimum energy demand, energy consumption efficiency and integration degree. These characteristics are evaluated according to quantitative thermodynamic analysis and qualitative knowledge rules. The procedure of synthesis strategy is proposed to support the generation of MECP alternatives, which combine flowsheet integration and heat integration. The cases studies will focus on how integration degrees of a process affect the energy-saving results. The separation sequences of the hydrodealkylation of toluene (HDA) process and ethanol distillation process as case studies are used to illustrate. (author)

  13. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  14. Nanostructured Electrodes Via Electrostatic Spray Deposition for Energy Storage System

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, C.; Agrawal, R.; Kim, T. K.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Yu, Y.; Beidaghi, M.; Penmatsa, V.; Wang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Energy storage systems such as Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors are extremely important in today’s society, and have been widely used as the energy and power sources for portable electronics, electrical vehicles and hybrid electrical vehicles. A

  15. Numerical study on increasing mass flow ratio by energy deposition of high frequency pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Diankai; Hong Yanji; Li Qian

    2013-01-01

    The mass flow ratio (MFR) of air breathing ramjet inlet would be decreased, when the Mach number is lower than the designed value. High frequency pulsed laser energy was deposited upstream of the cowl lip to reflect the stream so as to increase the MFR. When the Mach number of the flow was 5.0, and the static pressure and temperature of the flow were 2 551.6 Pa and 116.7 K, respectively, two-dimensional non-stationary compressible RANS equations were solved with upwind format to study the mechanisms of increasing MFR by high frequency pulsed laser energy deposition. The laser deposition frequency was 100 kHz and the average power was 500 W. The crossing point of the first forebody oblique shock and extension line of cowl lip was selected as the expected point. Then the deposition position was optimized by searching near the expected point. The results indicate that with the optimization of laser energy deposition position, the MFR would be increased from 63% to 97%. The potential value of increasing MFR by high frequency pulsed laser energy deposition was proved. The method for selection of the energy deposition position was also presented. (authors)

  16. Model of enhanced energy deposition in a Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Davis, J.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L. Jr.; Rudakov, L. I.; Deeney, C.

    2000-01-01

    In numerous experiments, magnetic energy coupled to strongly radiating Z-pinch plasmas exceeds the thermalized kinetic energy, sometimes by a factor of 2-3. An analytical model describing this additional energy deposition based on the concept of macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent pinch heating proposed by Rudakov and Sudan [Phys. Reports 283, 253 (1997)] is presented. The pinch plasma is modeled as a foam-like medium saturated with toroidal ''magnetic bubbles'' produced by the development of surface m=0 Rayleigh-Taylor and MHD instabilities. As the bubbles converge to the pinch axis, their magnetic energy is converted to thermal energy of the plasma through pdV work. Explicit formulas for the average dissipation rate of this process and the corresponding contribution to the resistance of the load, which compare favorably to the experimental data and simulation results, are presented. The possibility of using this enhanced (relative to Ohmic heating) dissipation mechanism to power novel plasma radiation sources and produce high K-shell yields using long current rise time machines is discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. The role of Energy Deposition in the Epitaxial Layer in Triggering SEGR in Power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, L.; Swift, G.; Taylor, W.; Edmonds, L.

    1999-01-01

    In these SEGR experiments, three identical-oxide MOSFET types were irradiated with six ions of significantly different ranges. Results show the prime importance of the total energy deposited in the epitaxial layer.

  18. Energy deposition patterns within limb models heated with a mini annular phased array (MAPA) applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerquin-Kern, J.L.; Hagmann, M.J.; Charny, C.K.; Levin, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out in order to characterize a MAPA applicator prior to possible clinical implementation. The energy deposition patterns were determined in several human limb models of different complexities. The maximum energy deposition observed in a homogeneous cylindrical phantom was found to be at the middle of the applicator. For more realistically shaped, homogeneous limb models, the point of maximum energy deposition was shifted towards a smaller cross-sectional region; this was also the case for isolated human legs. Furthermore, significant heating was observed in the bone of the isolated legs. Such phenomena illustrate the limitation of using classical 2-D numerical models for predicting the energy deposition patterns in heterogeneous bodies

  19. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  20. Nanostructure of PDMS–TEOS–PrZr hybrids prepared by direct deposition of gamma radiation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancastre, Joana J.H.; Falcão, António N.; Margaça, Fernanda M.A.; Ferreira, Luís M.; Miranda Salvado, Isabel M.; Almásy, László; Casimiro, Maria H.; Meiszterics, Anikó

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid materials were prepared by direct energy deposition. • The influence of the catalyst content (PrZr) was investigated. • The developed oxide network was found to be strongly dependent on the PrZr content. • A model is proposed for the development of the oxide network in these materials. - Abstract: Organic–inorganic materials have been the object of intense research due to their wide range of properties and therefore innumerous applications. We prepared organic–inorganic hybrid materials by direct energy deposition on a mixture of polydimethylsiloxane silanol terminated (33 wt% fixed content), tetraethylorthosilicate and a minor content of zirconium propoxide that varied from 1 to 5 wt% using gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. The samples, dried in air at room temperature, are bulk, flexible and transparent. Their nanostructure was investigated by small angle neutron scattering. It was found that the inorganic oxide network has fractal structure, which becomes denser as the zirconium propoxide content decreases. The results suggest that oxide nanosized regions grow from the OH terminal group of PDMS which are the condensation seeds. Their number and position remains unaltered with the variation of zirconium propoxide content that only affects their microstructure. A model is proposed for the nanostructure of the oxide network that develops in the irradiation processed hybrid materials.

  1. Nanostructure of PDMS–TEOS–PrZr hybrids prepared by direct deposition of gamma radiation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancastre, Joana J.H., E-mail: jlancastre@ctn.ist.utl.pt [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 (km 139.7), 2695-066 Bobadela, LRS (Portugal); Falcão, António N. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 (km 139.7), 2695-066 Bobadela, LRS (Portugal); Margaça, Fernanda M.A., E-mail: fmargaca@ctn.ist.utl.pt [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 (km 139.7), 2695-066 Bobadela, LRS (Portugal); Ferreira, Luís M. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 (km 139.7), 2695-066 Bobadela, LRS (Portugal); Miranda Salvado, Isabel M. [CICECO & Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais e Cerâmica, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Almásy, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, PO Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Casimiro, Maria H. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Meiszterics, Anikó [Gedeon Richter Ltd., PO Box 27, H-1475 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Hybrid materials were prepared by direct energy deposition. • The influence of the catalyst content (PrZr) was investigated. • The developed oxide network was found to be strongly dependent on the PrZr content. • A model is proposed for the development of the oxide network in these materials. - Abstract: Organic–inorganic materials have been the object of intense research due to their wide range of properties and therefore innumerous applications. We prepared organic–inorganic hybrid materials by direct energy deposition on a mixture of polydimethylsiloxane silanol terminated (33 wt% fixed content), tetraethylorthosilicate and a minor content of zirconium propoxide that varied from 1 to 5 wt% using gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. The samples, dried in air at room temperature, are bulk, flexible and transparent. Their nanostructure was investigated by small angle neutron scattering. It was found that the inorganic oxide network has fractal structure, which becomes denser as the zirconium propoxide content decreases. The results suggest that oxide nanosized regions grow from the OH terminal group of PDMS which are the condensation seeds. Their number and position remains unaltered with the variation of zirconium propoxide content that only affects their microstructure. A model is proposed for the nanostructure of the oxide network that develops in the irradiation processed hybrid materials.

  2. Nitrogen deposition to the United States: distribution, sources, and processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We simulate nitrogen deposition over the US in 2006–2008 by using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model at 1/2°×2/3° horizontal resolution over North America and adjacent oceans. US emissions of NOx and NH3 in the model are 6.7 and 2.9 Tg N a−1 respectively, including a 20% natural contribution for each. Ammonia emissions are a factor of 3 lower in winter than summer, providing a good match to US network observations of NHx (≡NH3 gas + ammonium aerosol and ammonium wet deposition fluxes. Model comparisons to observed deposition fluxes and surface air concentrations of oxidized nitrogen species (NOy show overall good agreement but excessive wintertime HNO3 production over the US Midwest and Northeast. This suggests a model overestimate N2O5 hydrolysis in aerosols, and a possible factor is inhibition by aerosol nitrate. Model results indicate a total nitrogen deposition flux of 6.5 Tg N a−1 over the contiguous US, including 4.2 as NOy and 2.3 as NHx. Domestic anthropogenic, foreign anthropogenic, and natural sources contribute respectively 78%, 6%, and 16% of total nitrogen deposition over the contiguous US in the model. The domestic anthropogenic contribution generally exceeds 70% in the east and in populated areas of the west, and is typically 50–70% in remote areas of the west. Total nitrogen deposition in the model exceeds 10 kg N ha−1 a−1 over 35% of the contiguous US.

  3. Mechanisms of ignition by transient energy deposition: Regimes of combustion wave propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiverin, A. D.; Kassoy, D. R.; Ivanov, M. F.; Liberman, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagating in reactive gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied depending on the characteristics of a transient thermal energy deposition localized in a finite volume of reactive gas. Different regimes of the reaction wave propagation are initiated depending on the amount of deposited thermal energy, power of the source, and the size of the hot spot. The main parameters which define regimes of the combustion wave...

  4. Sedimentary facies and Holocene depositional processes of Laura Island, Majuro Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Toru; Kayanne, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yamano, Hiroya

    2014-10-01

    The depositional processes that formed Laura Island, Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, were reconstructed based on a facies analysis of island sediments and spine ratios, and radiocarbon ages of foraminifera. Sedimentary facies were analyzed from trenches and drill cores excavated on the island and its adjacent reef flat. Depositional ages were obtained using benthic foraminifera (Calcarina) whose spines had not been abraded. The facies were classified into two types: gravelly and sandy. The initial sediments of these sites consisted of gravelly facies in the lower horizon and sandy facies in the upper horizon. Their ages were approximately 2000 cal BP and coincident with the onset of a 1.1-m decline in regional relative sea level, which enabled deposition of the gravelly facies. Half of the sand fraction of the sediment was composed of larger benthic foraminifera. The spine ratio showed that their supply source on the reef flat was located oceanside of the island. The supply source appears to have been caused by the relative sea-level fall. This indicates that the studied island was formed by a relative reduction in wave energy and enhanced foraminiferal supply, both of which were triggered by the late Holocene relative sea-level fall.

  5. Energy scenarios for Colombia: process and content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ricardo A. [National Univ. of Colombia, Escuela de Geosciencias y Medio Ambiente, Medellin (Colombia); Vesga, Daniel R.A. [Unidad de Planeacion Minero Energetica, Bogota (Colombia); Cadena, Angela I. [Los Andes Univ., School of Engineering, Bogota (Colombia); Boman, Ulf [Kairos Future AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Larsen, Erik [Cass Business School, London (United Kingdom); Dyner, Isaac [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Energy Inst., Medellin (Colombia)

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the approach undertaken, and the four energy scenarios that have been developed, to support long term energy policy in Colombia. The scenarios were constructed with emphasis on maximum interaction between stakeholders in the Colombian energy sector. The process directly involved over 120 people. The scenarios were developed as strategic support tools for the Energy and Mining Planning Unit (UPME), which is the Colombian institution in charge of developing the country's energy strategies and National Energy Policy. The methodology employed is presented, followed by a detailed description of each of the four scenarios. (Author)

  6. Monte carlo calculation of energy deposition and ionization yield for high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.; McDonald, J.C.; Coyne, J.J.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Recent calculations of event size spectra for neutrons use a continuous slowing down approximation model for the energy losses experienced by secondary charged particles (protons and alphas) and thus do not allow for straggling effects. Discrepancies between the calculations and experimental measurements are thought to be, in part, due to the neglect of straggling. A tractable way of including stochastics in radiation transport calculations is via the Monte Carlo method and a number of efforts directed toward simulating positive ion track structure have been initiated employing this technique. Recent results obtained with our updated and extended MOCA code for charged particle track structure are presented here. Major emphasis has been on calculating energy deposition and ionization yield spectra for recoil proton crossers since they are the most prevalent event type at high energies (>99% at 14 MeV) for small volumes. Neutron event-size spectra can be obtained from them by numerical summing and folding techniques. Data for ionization yield spectra are presented for simulated recoil protons up to 20 MeV in sites of diameters 2-1000 nm

  7. Electrochemically Deposited Nickel Membranes; Process-Microstructure-Property Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the manufacturing, surface morphology, internal structure and mechanical properties of Ni-foils used as membranes in reference-microphones. Two types of foils, referred to as S-type and 0-type foils, were electrochemically deposited from a Watts-type electrolyte, with (S...

  8. The fate of SOC during the processes of water erosion and subsequent deposition: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemelryck, H.; Govers, G.; van Oost, K.; Merckx, R.

    2009-04-01

    Globally soils are the largest terrestrial pool of carbon (C). A relatively small increase or decrease in soil carbon content due to changes in land use or management practices could therefore result in a significant net exchange of C between the soil C reservoir and the atmosphere. As such, the geomorphic processes of water and tillage erosion have been identified to significantly impact on this large pool of soil organic carbon (SOC). Soil erosion, transport and deposition not only result in redistribution of sediments and associated carbon within a landscape, but also affect the exchange of C between the pedosphere and the atmosphere. The direction and magnitude of an erosion-induced change in the global C balance is however a topic of much debate as opposing processes interact: i) At eroding sites a net uptake of C could be the result of reduced respiration rates and continued inputs of newly produced carbon. ii) Colluvial deposition of eroded sediment and SOC leads to the burial of the original topsoil and this may constrain the decomposition of its containing SOC. iii) Eroded sediment could be transported to distal depositional environments or fluvial systems where it will either be conserved or become rapidly mineralized. iv) Increased emission of CO2 due to erosion may result from the disruptive energy of erosive forces causing the breakdown of aggregates and exposing previously protected SOC to microbial decomposition. The above-mentioned processes show a large spatial and temporal variability and assessing their impact requires an integrated modeling approach. However uncertainties about the basic processes that accompany SOC displacement are still large. This study focuses on one of these large information gaps: the fate of eroded and subsequently deposited SOC. A preceding experimental study (Van Hemelryck et al., 2008) was used to identify controlling factors (erosional intensity, changes in soil structure,…). However this experimental research

  9. Low energy Cu clusters slow deposition on a Fe (001) surface investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shixu [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gong, Hengfeng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Division of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, Xuanzhi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Gongping, E-mail: ligp@lzu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Zhiguang, E-mail: zhgwang@impcas.ac.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We study the deposition of low energy Cu clusters on Fe (001) surface by molecular dynamics. • The interaction between low energy cluster and substrate can be divided to the landing and the thermal diffusion phases. • The phenomenon of contact epitaxy of cluster occurred. • The thermal diffusion of cluster atoms was analyzed. - Abstract: The slow deposition of low energy Cu clusters on a Fe (001) surface was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. A many-body potential based on Finnis–Sinclair model was used to describe the interactions among atoms. Three clusters comprising of 13, 55 and 147 atoms, respectively, were deposited with incident energies ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 eV/atom at various substrate temperatures (0, 300 and 800 K). The rearrangement and the diffusion of cluster can occur, only when the cluster atoms are activated and obtained enough migration energy. The interaction between low energy cluster and substrate can be divided to the landing and the thermal diffusion phases. In the former, the migration energy originates from the latent heat of binding energy for the soft deposition regime and primarily comes from the incident energy of cluster for the energetic cluster deposition regime. In the latter, the thermal vibration would result in some cluster atoms activated again at medium and high substrate temperatures. Also, the effects of incident energy, cluster size and substrate temperature on the interaction potential energy between cluster and substrate, the final deposition morphology of cluster, the spreading index and the structure parameter of cluster are analyzed.

  10. Energy deposition and GDR emission in inelastic alpha particle scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Viesti, G; Fabris, D; Nebbia, G; Cinausero, M; Fioretto, E; Napoli, D R; Prete, G; Hagel, K; Natowitz, J B; Wada, R; Gonthier, P; Majka, Z; Alfarro, R; Zhao, Y; Mdeiwayeh, N; Ho, T

    1999-01-01

    Neutron fold distributions measured for the reaction sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi(alpha,alpha') at 240 MeV have been analyzed with the help of Statistical Model calculations to determine the distribution of excitation energy in the primary target fragments as a function of the projectile energy loss, EL. Results show that the distributions in excitation energy feature a plateau which extends from the kinematical limit E sub x =EL to very small excitations, suggesting a variety of interactions of the beam particles with the target nucleus. Requiring an additional coincidence with a light charged particle leads to selection of a significant higher average excitation energy. This effect is extrapolated to explore results of previous GDR decay measurements in the case of a sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb target. Corrections of derived GDR parameters due to the partial transfer of excitation energy are suggested.

  11. Hypersonic wave drag reduction performance of cylinders with repetitive laser energy depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J; Hong, Y J; Li, Q; Huang, H

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely research that wave drag reduction on hypersonic vehicle by laser energy depositions. Using laser energy to reduce wave drag can improve vehicle performance. A second order accurate scheme based on finite-difference method and domain decomposition of structural grid is used to compute the drag performance of cylinders in a hypersonic flow of Mach number 2 at altitude of 15km with repetitive energy depositions. The effects of frequency on drag reduction are studied. The calculated results show: the recirculation zone is generated due to the interaction between bow shock over the cylinder and blast wave produced by energy deposition, and a virtual spike which is supported by an axis-symmetric recirculation, is formed in front of the cylinder. By increasing the repetitive frequency, the drag is reduced and the oscillation of the drag is decreased; however, the energy efficiency decreases by increasing the frequency.

  12. Magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components is investigated using the Integrated TIGER Series. The Integrated TIGER Series is a set of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes which perform photon and electron transport, with or without macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. A three-dimensional computational model of 100 MeV electrons incident on a graphite block was used to simulate runawayelectrons striking a plasma facing component at the edge of a tokamak. Results show that more energy from runaway electrons will be deposited in a material that is in the presence of a magnetic field than in a material that is in the presence of no field. For low angle incident runaway electrons in a strong magnetic field, the majority of the increased energy deposition is near the material surface with a higher energy density. Electrons which would have been reflected with no field, orbit the magnetic field lines and are redeposited in the material surface, resulting in a substantial increase in surface energy deposition. Based on previous studies, the higher energy deposition and energy density will result in higher temperatures which are expected to cause more damage to a plasma facing component

  13. The Impact of Hydrodynamics in Erosion - Deposition Process in Can Gio Mangrove Biosphere Reserve, South Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Luong, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can Gio Mangrove Biosphere Reserve is always considered as a friendly green belt to protect and bring up the habitants. However, recently some mangrove areas in the Dong Tranh estuary are being eroded seriously. Based on the field measurements in SW and NE monsoons as well as data of topography changes in 10 years, it is proved that hydrodynamics of waves, tidal currents and riverine currents are the main reasons for erosion-deposition processes at the studied site. The erosion-deposition process changes due to monsoon. The analysed results show that high waves and tidal oscillation cause the increase of the erosion rate in NE monsoon. However, high sediment deposition occurs in SW monsoon due to weak waves and more alluvium from upstream. Many young mangrove trees grow up and develop in the SW monsoon. From the research, it is strongly emphasized the role of mangrove forests in soil retention and energy dissipation.

  14. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  15. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2013-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  16. Drag Reduction by Off-Body Energy Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — What are the key technical challenges? Implementation of non-equilibrium thermochemistry; Accurate energy balance; Dynamic impulse measurements at Mach 2 What is...

  17. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  18. Plasma processing techniques for deposition of carbonic thin protective coatings on structural nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Oncioiu, G.; Coaca, E.; Rusu, O.; Lungu, C.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The production of nano-structured surface films with controlled properties is crucial for the development of materials necessary for the Advanced Systems for Nuclear Energy. Since the surface of materials is the zone through which materials interact with the environment, the surface science and surface engineering techniques plays an essential role in the understanding and control of the processes involved. Complex surface structures were developed on stainless steels used as structural nuclear materials: austenitic stainless steels based on Fe, austenitic steels with high content of Cr, ferrites resistant to corrosion, by various Plasma Processing methods which include: - Plasma Electrolytic (PE) treatments: the steel substrates were modified by nitriding and nitro-carburizing plasma diffusion treatments; - carbonic films deposition in Thermionic Vacuum Arc Plasma. The results of the characterization of surface structures obtained in various experimental conditions for improvement of the properties (corrosion resistance, hardness, wear properties) are reported: the processes and structures were characterized by correlation of the results of the complementary techniques: XPS, 'depth profiling', SEM, XRD, EIS. An overall description of the processes involved in the surface properties improvement, and some consideration about the new materials development for energy technologies are presented

  19. Plasma and process characterization of high power magnetron physical vapor deposition with integrated plasma equipment--feature profile model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Da; Stout, Phillip J.; Ventzek, Peter L.G.

    2003-01-01

    High power magnetron physical vapor deposition (HPM-PVD) has recently emerged for metal deposition into deep submicron features in state of the art integrated circuit fabrication. However, the plasma characteristics and process mechanism are not well known. An integrated plasma equipment-feature profile modeling infrastructure has therefore been developed for HPM-PVD deposition, and it has been applied to simulating copper seed deposition with an Ar background gas for damascene metalization. The equipment scale model is based on the hybrid plasma equipment model [M. Grapperhaus et al., J. Appl. Phys. 83, 35 (1998); J. Lu and M. J. Kushner, ibid., 89, 878 (2001)], which couples a three-dimensional Monte Carlo sputtering module within a two-dimensional fluid model. The plasma kinetics of thermalized, athermal, and ionized metals and the contributions of these species in feature deposition are resolved. A Monte Carlo technique is used to derive the angular distribution of athermal metals. Simulations show that in typical HPM-PVD processing, Ar + is the dominant ionized species driving sputtering. Athermal metal neutrals are the dominant deposition precursors due to the operation at high target power and low pressure. The angular distribution of athermals is off axis and more focused than thermal neutrals. The athermal characteristics favor sufficient and uniform deposition on the sidewall of the feature, which is the critical area in small feature filling. In addition, athermals lead to a thick bottom coverage. An appreciable fraction (∼10%) of the metals incident to the wafer are ionized. The ionized metals also contribute to bottom deposition in the absence of sputtering. We have studied the impact of process and equipment parameters on HPM-PVD. Simulations show that target power impacts both plasma ionization and target sputtering. The Ar + ion density increases nearly linearly with target power, different from the behavior of typical ionized PVD processing. The

  20. Silicon oxide barrier films deposited on PET foils in pulsed plasmas: influence of substrate bias on deposition process and film properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steves, S; Bibinov, N; Awakowicz, P; Ozkaya, B; Liu, C-N; Ozcan, O; Grundmeier, G

    2013-01-01

    A widely used plastic for packaging, polyethylene terephtalate (PET) offers limited barrier properties against gas permeation. For many applications of PET (from food packaging to micro electronics) improved barrier properties are essential. A silicon oxide barrier coating of PET foils is applied by means of a pulsed microwave driven low-pressure plasma. While the adjustment of the microwave power allows for a control of the ion production during the plasma pulse, a substrate bias controls the energy of ions impinging on the substrate. Detailed analysis of deposited films applying oxygen permeation measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy are correlated with results from plasma diagnostics describing the deposition process. The influence of a change in process parameters such as gas mixture and substrate bias on the gas temperature, electron density, mean electron energy, ion energy and the atomic oxygen density is studied. An additional substrate bias results in an increase in atomic oxygen density up to a factor of 6, although plasma parameter such as electron density of n e = 3.8 ± 0.8 × 10 17 m −3 and electron temperature of k B T e = 1.7 ± 0.1 eV are unmodified. It is shown that atomic oxygen densities measured during deposition process higher than n O = 1.8 × 10 21 m −3 yield in barrier films with a barrier improvement factor up to 150. Good barrier films are highly cross-linked and show a smooth morphology. (paper)

  1. Investigation on the correlation between energy deposition and clustered DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liming; Champion, Christophe

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the correlation between energy deposition and clustered DNA damage, based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrum of direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons including the dissociative electron attachment. Clustered DNA damage is classified as simple and complex in terms of the combination of single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs) and adjacent base damage (BD). The results show that the energy depositions associated with about 90% of total clustered DNA damage are below 150 eV. The simple clustered DNA damage, which is constituted of the combination of SSBs and adjacent BD, is dominant, accounting for 90% of all clustered DNA damage, and the spectra of the energy depositions correlating with them are similar for different primary energies. One type of simple clustered DNA damage is the combination of a SSB and 1-5 BD, which is denoted as SSB + BD. The average contribution of SSB + BD to total simple clustered DNA damage reaches up to about 84% for the considered primary energies. In all forms of SSB + BD, the SSB + BD including only one base damage is dominant (above 80%). In addition, for the considered primary energies, there is no obvious difference between the average energy depositions for a fixed complexity of SSB + BD determined by the number of base damage, but average energy depositions increase with the complexity of SSB + BD. In the complex clustered DNA damage constituted by the combination of DSBs and BD around them, a relatively simple type is a DSB combining adjacent BD, marked as DSB + BD, and it is of substantial contribution (on average up to about 82%). The spectrum of DSB + BD is given mainly by the DSB in combination with different numbers of base damage, from 1 to 5. For the considered primary energies, the DSB combined with only one base damage contributes about 83% of total DSB + BD, and the average energy deposition is about 106 eV. However, the

  2. Closed-Loop Process Control for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Deposition Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor); Martin, Richard E. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A closed-loop control method for an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) process includes detecting a feature of interest during the process using a sensor(s), continuously evaluating the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein, and automatically modifying control parameters to control the EBF(sup 3) process. An apparatus provides closed-loop control method of the process, and includes an electron gun for generating an electron beam, a wire feeder for feeding a wire toward a substrate, wherein the wire is melted and progressively deposited in layers onto the substrate, a sensor(s), and a host machine. The sensor(s) measure the feature of interest during the process, and the host machine continuously evaluates the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein. The host machine automatically modifies control parameters to the EBF(sup 3) apparatus to control the EBF(sup 3) process in a closed-loop manner.

  3. Effect of electron degeneracy on fast-particles energy deposition in dense plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johzaki, T.; Nakao, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Kudo, K.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of electron degeneracy on fast-particles energy deposition in dense plasmas are investigated by making transport calculations for the fast particles. It is found that the degeneracy substantially affects the profiles of energy deposition of 3.52-MeV α-particles. On the other hand, the effect on the energy deposition of 14.1-MeV neutrons is negligibly small because the recoil ions, which transfer the neutron energy to the plasma constituents, are produced in a whole plasma volume due to the long mean-free-path of neutrons. The coupled transport-hydrodynamic calculations show that these effects of degeneracy are negligible in the ignition and burn characteristics of central ignition D-T targets. (author)

  4. Energy deposition at the bone-tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of nuclear fragmentation recoils produced by high-energy nucleons in the region of the bone-tissue interface is considered. Results for the different flux and absorbed dose for recoils produced by 1 GeV protons are presented in a bidirectional transport model. The energy deposition in marrow cavities is seen to be enhanced by recoils produced in bone. Approximate analytic formulae for absorbed dose near the interface region are also presented for a simplified range-energy model.

  5. Energy analysis in sterilization process of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Sun; Pyun, Yu Ryang

    1986-01-01

    A procedure was developed for predicting energy consumption of batch type thermal processing of food. From mass and energy balance equations various energy usages or losses were estimated for steam sterilization of model food system in No.301-7 can (Φ74.1 x 113.0mm) at three different temperatures. Selected models were 5 % bentonite solution for conductive food and tap water for convective food. Total steam or energy consumption was higher at 110 deg C than at two other higher temperatures (121 deg C and 130 deg C). High energy consumption at low sterilization temperature was mainly due to high bleeding steam energy and convective and radiative heat losses. Thermal energy efficiency was also disscussed. (Author)

  6. Reduced thermal budget processing of Y--Ba--Cu--O high temperature superconducting thin films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Sinha, S.; Hsu, N.J.; Ng, J.T.C.; Chou, P.; Thakur, R.P.S.; Narayan, J.

    1991-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has the potential of emerging as a viable technique to fabricate ribbons, tapes, coated wires, and the deposition of films of high temperature superconductors, and related materials. As a reduced thermal budget processing technique, rapid isothermal processing (RIP) based on incoherent radiation as the source of energy can be usefully coupled to conventional MOCVD. In this paper we report on the deposition and characterization of high quality superconducting thin films of Y--Ba--Cu--O (YBCO) on MgO and SrTiO 3 substrates by RIP assisted MOCVD. By using a mixture of N 2 O and O 2 as the oxygen source films deposited initially at 600 degree C for 1 min and then at 740 degree C for 30 min are primarily c-axis oriented and with zero resistance being observed at 84 and 89 K for MgO and SrTiO 3 substrates, respectively. The zero magnetic field current densities at 77 K for MgO and SrTiO 3 substrates are 1.2x10 6 and 1.5x10 6 A/cm 2 , respectively. It is envisaged that high energy photons from the incoherent light source and the use of a mixture of N 2 O and O 2 as the oxygen source, assist chemical reactions and lower overall thermal budget for processing of these films

  7. Simulation calculation for the energy deposition profile and the transmission fraction of intense pulsed electron beam at various incident angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Zhang Jiasheng; Huang Jianjun; Sun Jianfeng

    2002-01-01

    The incident angles have a heavy effect on the intense pulsed electron beam energy deposition profile, energy deposition fraction and beam current transmission fraction in material. The author presents electron beam energy deposition profile and energy deposition fraction versus electron energy (0.5-2.0 MeV), at various incident angles for three aluminum targets of various thickness via theoretical calculation. The intense pulsed electron beam current transmission fractions versus electron energy (0.4-1.4 MeV) at various incident angles for three thickness of carbon targets were also theoretically calculated. The calculation results indicate that the deposition energy in unit mass of material surface layer increase with the rise of electron beam incident angle, and electron beam with low incident angle (closer to normal incident angle) penetrates deeper into the target material. The electron beams deposit more energy in unit mass of material surface layer at 60 degree-70 degree incident angle

  8. Deposition of luminescent thin films for solar energy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices are a widely available, long lasting means of generating sustainable energy. Unfortunately, the integration of such devices into society is to date still limited. This is in part due to the much less than optimal efficiency of conversion of sunlight to electricity, but also by

  9. Electron-energy deposition in skin and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, G.T.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The primary object of this study was to investigate the relations between dosimeter response and skin dose resulting from beta-particle irradiation. This object was achieved by combining evaluation of beta-source energy spectra, calculation of flux energy spectra, and employment of a Monte-Carlo electron-transport computer program for determination of depth-dose distribution in multislab geometries. Intermediate results from three steps of evaluation were compared individually with experimental data or with other theoretical results and showed excellent agreement. The combined method is applicable for the electron agreement. The combined method is applicable for the electron energy range of 1 keV to 5 MeV for both monoenergetic electrons and energy-distributed electrons. Determination of dosimeter response - skin dose relationships for homogeneous atmospheric beta-particle sources and for two specific configurations of LiF TLD's have been carried out in this study. Information based on these calculations is of value in designing beta-particle dosimeters as well as in assessing potential occupational and public health risks associated with the nuclear power industry

  10. Energy conversion technology by chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, I W; Yoon, K S; Cho, B W [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1996-12-01

    The sharp increase in energy usage according to the industry development has resulted in deficiency of energy resources and severe pollution problems. Therefore, development of the effective way of energy usage and energy resources of low pollution is needed. Development of the energy conversion technology by chemical processes is also indispensable, which will replace the pollutant-producing and inefficient mechanical energy conversion technologies. Energy conversion technology by chemical processes directly converts chemical energy to electrical one, or converts heat energy to chemical one followed by heat storage. The technology includes batteries, fuel cells, and energy storage system. The are still many problems on performance, safety, and manufacturing of the secondary battery which is highly demanded in electronics, communication, and computer industries. To overcome these problems, key components such as carbon electrode, metal oxide electrode, and solid polymer electrolyte are developed in this study, followed by the fabrication of the lithium secondary battery. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell, as an advanced power generating apparatus with high efficiency, no pollution, and no noise, has many applications such as zero-emission vehicles, on-site power plants, and military purposes. After fabricating the cell components and operating the single cells, the fundamental technologies in polymer electrolyte fuel cell are established in this study. Energy storage technology provides the safe and regular heat energy, irrespective of the change of the heat energy sources, adjusts time gap between consumption and supply, and upgrades and concentrates low grade heat energy. In this study, useful chemical reactions for efficient storage and transport are investigated and the chemical heat storage technology are developed. (author) 41 refs., 90 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. The Plasco Process for energy from waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryden, R.M. [Plasco Energy Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Plasco Energy Group (Plasco) has a patented process that provides a way of recycling products that are difficult or uneconomic for conventional recycle programs. This presentation included information on the Plasco PGP system that can process energy from waste. The specifications and benefits of the Plasco process were discussed, notably that no energy supplements such as coal or natural gas are required for the process. The amount of power consumed by households and in a Plasco plant were identified. The amounts of waste processed and converted by the Plasco plant were also provided along with sketches of Plasco's Ottawa demonstration facility and Plasco gasification converter. Last, the presentation addressed the cooperative solution involving several partners such as the city of Ottawa, province of Ontario and Plasco. The waste recycling opportunities for communities were also highlighted. 1 tab., figs.

  12. Evaluation of burnup characteristics and energy deposition during NSRR pulse irradiation tests on irradiated BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio

    2000-11-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of irradiated fuel are performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate the fuel behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident Conditions (RIA). The severity of the RIA is represented by energy deposition or peak fuel enthalpy during the power excursion. In case of the irradiated fuel tests, the energy deposition varies depending both on the amounts and distribution of residual fissile and neutron absorbing fission products generated during the base irradiation. Thus, proper fuel burnup characterization, especially for low enriched commercial fuels, is important, because plutonium (Pu) takes a large part of fissile and its generation depends on the neutron spectrum during the base irradiation. Fuel burnup calculations were conducted with ORIGEN2, RODBURN and SWAT codes for the BWR fuels tested in the NSRR. The calculation results were compared with the measured isotope concentrations and used for the NSRR neutron calculations to evaluate energy depositions of the test fuel. The comparison of the code calculations and the measurements revealed that the neutron spectrum change due to difference in void fraction altered Pu generation and energy deposition in the NSRR tests considerably. With the properly evaluated neutron spectrum, the combined burnup and NSRR neutron calculation gave reasonably good evaluation of the energy deposition. The calculations provided radial distributions of the fission product accumulation during the base irradiation and power distribution during the NSRR pulse irradiation, which were important for the evaluation of both burnup characteristics and fission gas release behavior. (author)

  13. Deposition and characteristics of PbS thin films by an in-situ solution chemical reaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Junna; Ji, Huiming; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xuerong; Lai, Junyun; Liu, Weiyan; Li, Tongfei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ma, Yuanliang; Li, Haiqin; Zhao, Suqin [College of Physics and Electronic Information Engineering, Qinghai University for Nationalities, Xining 810007 (China); Jin, Zhengguo, E-mail: zhgjin@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Preferential oriented and uniform PbS thin films were deposited by a room temperature in-situ solution chemical reaction process, in which the lead nitrate as precursor in a form of thin solid films from lead precursor solution was used to react with ammonium sulfide ethanol solution. Influence of 1-butanol addition in the lead precursor solution, Pb:S molar ratios in the separate cationic and anionic solutions, deposition cycle numbers and annealing treatment in Ar atmosphere on structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical absorption properties of the deposited PbS films were investigated based on X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, UV–vis, near infrared ray and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The results showed that the deposited PbS thin films had a cubic structure and highly preferred orientation along with the plane (100). The deposition rate of single-layer was stable, about 30 nm in thickness per deposition cycle. - Highlights: • Time-efficiency synthetic method for the preparation of lead sulfide (PbS) films • Effect of 1-butanol addition into cationic precursor solution is discussed. • Growth rate of the PbS films is stable at about 30 nm per cycle.

  14. Simulation of spatially dependent excitation rates and power deposition in RF discharges for plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Anderson, H.M.; Hargis, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    In low pressure, radio frequency (RF) discharges of the type used in plasma processing of semiconductor materials, the rate of electron impact excitation and energy transfer processes depends upon both the phase of the RF excitation and position in the discharge. Electron impact collisions create radicals that diffuse or drift to the surfaces of interest where they are adsorbed or otherwise react. To the extent that these radicals have a finite lifetime, their transport time from point of creation to surface of interest is an important parameter. The spatial dependence of the rate of the initial electron impact collisions is therefore also an important parameter. The power that sustains the discharge is coupled into the system by two mechanisms: a high energy e-beam component of the electron distribution resulting from electrons falling through or being accelerated by the sheaths, and by joule heating in the body of the plasma. In this paper, the authors discuss the spatial dependence of excitation rates and the method of power deposition iin RF discharges of the type used for plasma processing

  15. Numerical Simulation of Molten Flow in Directed Energy Deposition Using an Iterative Geometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Timothy J.; Rumpfkeil, Markus P.; Chaudhary, Anil

    2018-06-01

    The complex, multi-faceted physics of laser-based additive metals processing tends to demand high-fidelity models and costly simulation tools to provide predictions accurate enough to aid in selecting process parameters. Of particular difficulty is the accurate determination of melt pool shape and size, which are useful for predicting lack-of-fusion, as this typically requires an adequate treatment of thermal and fluid flow. In this article we describe a novel numerical simulation tool which aims to achieve a balance between accuracy and cost. This is accomplished by making simplifying assumptions regarding the behavior of the gas-liquid interface for processes with a moderate energy density, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS). The details of the implementation, which is based on the solver simpleFoam of the well-known software suite OpenFOAM, are given here and the tool is verified and validated for a LENS process involving Ti-6Al-4V. The results indicate that the new tool predicts width and height of a deposited track to engineering accuracy levels.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Molten Flow in Directed Energy Deposition Using an Iterative Geometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Timothy J.; Rumpfkeil, Markus P.; Chaudhary, Anil

    2018-03-01

    The complex, multi-faceted physics of laser-based additive metals processing tends to demand high-fidelity models and costly simulation tools to provide predictions accurate enough to aid in selecting process parameters. Of particular difficulty is the accurate determination of melt pool shape and size, which are useful for predicting lack-of-fusion, as this typically requires an adequate treatment of thermal and fluid flow. In this article we describe a novel numerical simulation tool which aims to achieve a balance between accuracy and cost. This is accomplished by making simplifying assumptions regarding the behavior of the gas-liquid interface for processes with a moderate energy density, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS). The details of the implementation, which is based on the solver simpleFoam of the well-known software suite OpenFOAM, are given here and the tool is verified and validated for a LENS process involving Ti-6Al-4V. The results indicate that the new tool predicts width and height of a deposited track to engineering accuracy levels.

  17. Relationship between energy deposition and shock wave phenomenon in an underwater electrical wire explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruoyu; Zhou, Haibin; Wu, Jiawei; Qiu, Aici; Ding, Weidong; Zhang, Yongmin

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study of pressure waves generated by an exploding copper wire in a water medium is performed. We examined the effects of energy deposited at different stages on the characteristics of the resulting shock waves. In the experiments, a microsecond time-scale pulsed current source was used to explode a 300-μm-diameter, 4-cm-long copper wire with initial stored energies ranging from 500 to 2700 J. Our experimental results indicated that the peak pressure (4.5-8.1 MPa) and energy (49-287 J) of the shock waves did not follow a simple relationship with any electrical parameters, such as peak voltage or deposited energy. Conversely, the impulse had a quasi-linear relationship with the parameter Π. We also found that the peak pressure was mainly influenced by the energy deposited before separation of the shock wave front and the discharge plasma channel (DPC). The decay time constant of the pressure waveform was affected by the energy injection after the separation. These phenomena clearly demonstrated that the deposited energy influenced the expansion of the DPC and affected the shock wave characteristics.

  18. Performance characterization of Ni60-WC coating on steel processed with supersonic laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Luo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ni60-WC particles are used to improve the wear resistance of hard-facing steel due to their high hardness. An emerging technology that combines laser with cold spraying to deposit the hard-facing coatings is known as supersonic laser deposition. In this study, Ni60-WC is deposited on low-carbon steel using SLD. The microstructure and performance of the coatings are investigated through SEM, optical microscopy, EDS, XRD, microhardness and pin-on-disc wear tests. The experimental results of the coating processed with the optimal parameters are compared to those of the coating deposited using laser cladding.

  19. COREL, Ion Implantation in Solids, Range, Straggling Using Thomas-Fermi Cross-Sections. RASE4, Ion Implantation in Solids, Range, Straggling, Energy Deposition, Recoils. DAMG2, Ion Implantation in Solids, Energy Deposition Distribution with Recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: COREL calculates the final average projected range, standard deviation in projected range, standard deviation in locations transverse to projected range, and average range along path for energetic atomic projectiles incident on amorphous targets or crystalline targets oriented such that the projectiles are not incident along low index crystallographic axes or planes. RASE4 calculates the instantaneous average projected range, standard deviation in projected range, standard deviation in locations transverse to projected range, and average range along path for energetic atomic projectiles incident on amorphous targets or crystalline targets oriented such that the projectiles are not incident along low index crystallographic axes or planes. RASE4 also calculates the instantaneous rate at which the projectile is depositing energy into atomic processes (damage) and into electronic processes (electronic excitation), the average range of target atom recoils projected onto the direction of motion of the projectiles, and the standard deviation in the recoil projected range. DAMG2 calculates the distribution in depth of the energy deposited into atomic processes (damage), electronic processes (electronic excitation), or other energy-dependent quality produced by energetic atomic projectiles incident on amorphous targets or crystalline targets oriented such that the projectiles are not incident along low index crystallographic axes or planes. 2 - Method of solution: COREL: The truncated differential equation which governs the several variables being sought is solved through second-order by trapezoidal integration. The energy-dependent coefficients in the equation are obtained by rectangular integration over the Thomas-Fermi elastic scattering cross section. RASE4: The truncated differential equation which governs the range and straggling variables is solved through second-order by trapezoidal integration. The energy

  20. High energy ion range and deposited energy calculation using the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck splitting of the Boltzmann transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozolevski, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the splitting of the straight-ahead Boltzmann transport equation in the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, decomposing the differential cross-section into a singular part, corresponding to small energy transfer events, and in a regular one, which corresponds to large energy transfer. The convergence of implantation profile, nuclear and electronic energy depositions, calculated from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, to the respective exact distributions, calculated from Monte-Carlo method, was exanimate in a large-energy interval for various values of splitting parameter and for different ion-target mass relations. It is shown that for the universal potential there exists an optimal value of splitting parameter, for which range and deposited energy distributions, calculated from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, accurately approximate the exact distributions and which minimizes the computational expenses

  1. Investigation of the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) process using CFD-DEM method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Liu Rongzheng; Wen Yuanyun; Liu Bing; Shao Youlin

    2014-01-01

    The CFD-DEM-CVD multiscale coupling simulation concept was proposed based on the mass/momentum/energy transfer involved in the FB-CVD process. The pyrolysis process of the reaction gas in the spouted bed can be simulated by CFD method, then the concentration field and velocity field can be extracted and coupled with the particle movement behavior which can be simulated by DEM. Particle deposition process can be described by the CVD model based on particle position, velocity and neighboring gas concentration. This multiscale coupling method can be implemented in the Fluent@-EDEM@ software with their UDF (User Definition Function) and API (Application Programming Interface). Base on the multiscale coupling concept, the criterion for evaluating FB-CVD process is given. At first, the volume in the coating furnace is divided into two parts (active coating area and non-active coating area) based on simulation results of chemical pyrolysis process. Then the residence time of all particles in the active coating area can be obtained using the CFD-DEM simulation method. The residence time distribution can be used as a criterion for evaluating the gas-solid contact efficiency and operation performance of the coating furnace. At last different coating parameters of the coating furnace are compared based on the proposed criterion. And also, the future research emphasis is discussed. (author)

  2. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  3. A Study of CRUD Deposition Processing and Composition Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yanghong; Kim, H. M.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Ahn, S. B.

    2013-07-01

    After cutting and drilling the spent fuel, we made a scrapping crud from the surface on the cladding. To scrap crud on the cladding surface, we made a special apparatus which has a 1/1,000 mm accuracy, but we could not taken crud. Thus, we effort the most possible use equipment to take crud samples, but unfortunately failed to get crud. We assume the crud would be dissolved. Because of the two fuel cladding, 17ACE7 and Plus 7, which were storage in PIEF pool for few years, it would be chemical reaction between pool water and crud deposited on the cladding. But we could not know the reason clearly. Therefore, it was impossible to analysis the crud, after that this project had to be stopped

  4. Processes in Environmental Depositional Systems and Deformation in Sedimentary Basins: Goals for Exoloration in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ochoa, J.

    2005-05-01

    Among the recent needs to establish new goals in the mexican energy industry to increase the petroleum reserves, has been necessary to recapitulate on some academic an operative concepts and definitions applied to the Petroliferous Basins Exploration; first of all, in order to understand the Petroleum System in given tectonophysical framework. The tectonophysical environment experienced by the petroliferous basin in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, merely in the Campeche Sound and adjacent terrestrial regions (Figure 1); has been the result of interaction among the tectonic plates, the Coco's Plate with impingement and subduction beneath the Northamerican Plate and the Yucatán Microplate and even in very deep connection with the oceanic crust of southwesternmost portion of the Gulf of Mexico and the one of the Caribbean sea beneath the gulf of Belize-Honduras. The tectonosedimentary effects in the Campeche Bay starting with the skeleton formed for the Cenozoic Era, kept simultaneous conditions in depositions and deformations because of strain, stress and collapse fields, acted through this Era up to the present day, as observed in the surface Aguayo et al, 1999 and Sandoval, 2000. The involved portions of the crust and its boundaries have also been performing the relative sinking of the mere southwestern centre of the Gulf of Mexico, and the rising of the southeastern lands of Mexico. In the middle contiguity are found the productive Tertiary basins of: Comalcalco, Macuspana, Salina del Itsmo, Campeche-Champoton and other in deep waters; all of them, in an arrangement of basins among distensive faulted blocks in echelon, falling down to the deep centre of the Gulf Sandoval, op cit. With this scenario and that ones of other basins, a recapitulation on concepts and definitions, has been made on the regional natural processes of the environmental depositional systems and on the basins analysis in the tectonophysical framework, in order to reflect on the

  5. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  6. Energy deposition measurements in fast reactor safety experiments with fission thermocouple detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Scott, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of phenomena occurring in in-pile fast reactor safety experiments requires an accurate measurement of the time dependent energy depositions within the fissile material. At Sandia Laboratories thin-film fission thermocouples are being developed for this purpose. These detectors have high temperature capabilities (400 to 500 0 C), are sodium compatible, and have milli-second time response. A significant advantage of these detectors for use as energy deposition monitors is that they produce an output voltage which is directly dependent on the temperature of a small chip of fissile material within the detectors. However, heat losses within the detector make it necessary to correct the response of the detector to determine the energy deposition. A method of correcting the detector response which uses an inverse convolution procedure has been developed and successfully tested with experimental data obtained in the Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) and in the Annular Core Research Reactor

  7. Modified energy-deposition model, for the computation of the stopping-power ratio for small cavity sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, A.C.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a modification to the Spencer-Attix theory, which allows application of the theory to larger cavity sizes. The modified theory is in better agreement with the actual process of energy deposition by delta rays. In the first part of the paper it is recalled how the Spencer-Attix theory can be derived from basic principles, which allows a physical interpretation of the theory in terms of a function describing the space and direction average of the deposited energy. A realistic model for the computation of this function is described and the resulting expression for the stopping-power ratio is calculated. For the comparison between the Spencer-Attix theory and this modified expression a correction factor to the ''Bragg-Gray inhomogeneous term'' has been defined. This factor has been computed as a function of cavity size for different source energies and mean excitation energies; thus, general properties of this factor have been elucidated. The computations have been extended to include the density effect. It has been shown that the computation of the inhomogeneous term can be performed for any expression describing the energy loss per unit distance of the electrons as a function of their energy. Thus an expression has been calculated which is in agreement with a quadratic range-energy relationship. In conclusion, the concrete procedure for computing the stopping-power ratio is reviewed

  8. Scaling behavior and morphological properties of the interfaces obtained by the multilayer deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achik, I. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Université Hassan II-Mohammedia, Faculté des sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco); Boughaleb, Y., E-mail: yboughaleb@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Université Hassan II-Mohammedia, Faculté des sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco); Université Chouaib Doukkali, Faculté des sciences, El Jadida (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hader, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Université Hassan II-Mohammedia, Faculté des sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco); CRMEF Settat (Morocco); Sbiaai, K. [Université Chouaib Doukkali, Faculté des sciences, El Jadida (Morocco); Hajjaji, A. [Université Chouaib Doukkali, Ecole nationale des sciences appliquées, El Jadida (Morocco)

    2013-10-31

    The aim of the present work was to study numerically the scaling behavior and the morphological properties of the interfaces generated by the multilayer deposition process. We have noticed that, in the case where the ratio of the surface diffusion coefficient to the deposition rate reaches high values D/F > > 1, the interface consists of mound structures. By using the dynamic scaling, we have shown that the height–height correlation function scales with time t and length l as G(l,t) ∼ l{sup α}f(t/l{sup α/β}) with β = 0.25 ± 0.05 and α = 0.51 ± 0.02. These exponent values are equal to the ones predicted by the Edwards–Wilkinson approach. Besides, our results are in agreement with the growth system of Cu/Cu(100) at 300 K which has been characterized in more detail by a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and spot profile analysis — low energy electronic diffusion study. Moreover, by considering two different methods, we have examined the fractal aspect of the obtained interfaces. - Highlights: • The adlayer interfaces present mound morphologies. • The adlayer interfaces scale with the Family–Vicsek law. • The critical exponents (α, β) are in agreement with those of Edwards–Wilkinson approach.

  9. Scaling behavior and morphological properties of the interfaces obtained by the multilayer deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achik, I.; Boughaleb, Y.; Hader, A.; Sbiaai, K.; Hajjaji, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study numerically the scaling behavior and the morphological properties of the interfaces generated by the multilayer deposition process. We have noticed that, in the case where the ratio of the surface diffusion coefficient to the deposition rate reaches high values D/F > > 1, the interface consists of mound structures. By using the dynamic scaling, we have shown that the height–height correlation function scales with time t and length l as G(l,t) ∼ l α f(t/l α/β ) with β = 0.25 ± 0.05 and α = 0.51 ± 0.02. These exponent values are equal to the ones predicted by the Edwards–Wilkinson approach. Besides, our results are in agreement with the growth system of Cu/Cu(100) at 300 K which has been characterized in more detail by a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and spot profile analysis — low energy electronic diffusion study. Moreover, by considering two different methods, we have examined the fractal aspect of the obtained interfaces. - Highlights: • The adlayer interfaces present mound morphologies. • The adlayer interfaces scale with the Family–Vicsek law. • The critical exponents (α, β) are in agreement with those of Edwards–Wilkinson approach

  10. In situ analysis of thin film deposition processes using time-of-flight (TOF) ion beam analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, J.; Lin, Y.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.H.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Non-destructive, in situ methods for characterization of thin film growth phenomena is key to understand thin film growth processes and to develop more reliable deposition procedures, especially for complex layered structures involving multi-phase materials. However, surface characterization methods that use either electrons (e.g. AES or XPS) or low energy ions (SIMS) require an UHV environment and utilize instrumentation which obstructs line of sight access to the substrate and are therefore incompatible with line of sight deposition methods and thin film deposition processes which introduce gas, either part of the deposition or in order to produce the desired phase. We have developed a means of differentially pumping both the ion beam source and detectors of a TOF ion beam surface analysis spectrometer that does not interfere with the deposition process and permits compositional and structural analysis of the growing film in the present system, at pressures up to several mTorr. Higher pressures are feasible with modified source-detector geometry. In order to quantify the sensitivity of Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS), we have measured the signal intensity for stabilized clean metals in a variety of gas environments as a function of the ambient gas species and pressure, and ion beam species and kinetic energy. Results are interpreted in terms of collision cross sections which are compared with known gas phase scattering data and provide an apriori basis for the evaluation of time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopies (ToF-ISARS) for various industrial processing environments which involve both inert and reactive cases. The cross section data for primary ion-gas molecule and recoiled atom-gas molecule interactions are also provided. from which the maximum operating pressure in any experimental configuration can be obtained

  11. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  12. Electron pulsed beam induced processing of thin film surface by Nb3Ge deposited into a stainless steel tape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, I.; Korenev, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    A surface of superconductive thin film of Nb 3 Ge deposited onto a stainless steel tape was processed using the electron beam technique. The electron beam used had the following parameters: beam current density from 400 to 1000 A/cm 2 ; beam energy 100 keV; beam impulse length 300 ns. By theoretical analysis it is shown that the heating of film surface is an adiabatic process. It corresponds to our experimental data and pictures showing a surface remelting due to electron beam influence. After beam processing the superconductive parameters of the film remain unchanged. Roentgenograms have been analysed of Nb 3 Ge film surface recrystallized due to electron beam influence

  13. Modelling heavy-ion energy deposition in extended media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishustin, I.; Pshenichnov, I.; Greiner, W.; Mishustin, I.; Pshenichnov, I.

    2010-01-01

    We present recent developments of the Monte Carlo model for heavy-ion therapy (MCHIT), which is currently based on the Geant4 tool-kit of version 9.2. The major advancement of the model concerns the modelling of violent fragmentation reactions by means of the Fermi break-up model, which is used to simulate decays of hot fragments created after the first stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions. By means of MCHIT we study the dose distributions from therapeutic beams of carbon nuclei in tissue-like materials, like water and PMMA. The contributions to the total dose from primary beam nuclei and from charged secondary fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation reactions are calculated. The build-up of secondary fragments along the beam axis is calculated and compared with available experimental data. Finally, we demonstrate the impact of violent multifragment decays on energy distributions of secondary neutrons produced by carbon nuclei in water. (authors)

  14. Modelling heavy-ion energy deposition in extended media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishustin, I.; Pshenichnov, I.; Greiner, W. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.-W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mishustin, I. [Kurchatov Institute, Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pshenichnov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    We present recent developments of the Monte Carlo model for heavy-ion therapy (MCHIT), which is currently based on the Geant4 tool-kit of version 9.2. The major advancement of the model concerns the modelling of violent fragmentation reactions by means of the Fermi break-up model, which is used to simulate decays of hot fragments created after the first stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions. By means of MCHIT we study the dose distributions from therapeutic beams of carbon nuclei in tissue-like materials, like water and PMMA. The contributions to the total dose from primary beam nuclei and from charged secondary fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation reactions are calculated. The build-up of secondary fragments along the beam axis is calculated and compared with available experimental data. Finally, we demonstrate the impact of violent multifragment decays on energy distributions of secondary neutrons produced by carbon nuclei in water. (authors)

  15. One-step electrodeposition process of CuInSe2: Deposition time effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    CuInSe2 thin films were prepared by one-step electrodeposition process using a simplified two- electrodes system. ... homojunctions or heterojunctions (Rincon et al 1983). Efficiency of ... deposition times onto indium thin oxide (ITO)-covered.

  16. Complex processing of antimony-mercury gold concentrates of Dzhizhikrut Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdusalyamova, M.N.; Gadoev, S.A.; Dreisinger, D.; Solozhenkin, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Present article is devoted to complex processing of antimony-mercury gold concentrates of Dzhizhikrut Deposit. The purpose of research was obtaining the metallic mercury and antimony with further gold and thallium extraction.

  17. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Zohdi, Tarek I.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface

  18. Process control of high rate microcrystalline silicon based solar cell deposition by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilper, T.; Donker, M.N. van den; Carius, R.; Rech, B.; Braeuer, G.; Repmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon thin-film solar cells based on microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) were prepared in a 30 x 30 cm 2 plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor using 13.56 or 40.68 MHz plasma excitation frequency. Plasma emission was recorded by optical emission spectroscopy during μc-Si:H absorber layer deposition at deposition rates between 0.5 and 2.5 nm/s. The time course of SiH * and H β emission indicated strong drifts in the process conditions particularly at low total gas flows. By actively controlling the SiH 4 gas flow, the observed process drifts were successfully suppressed resulting in a more homogeneous i-layer crystallinity along the growth direction. In a deposition regime with efficient usage of the process gas, the μc-Si:H solar cell efficiency was enhanced from 7.9 % up to 8.8 % by applying process control

  19. Nanostructured Thin Film Synthesis by Aerosol Chemical Vapor Deposition for Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Tandeep S.

    Renewable energy sources offer a viable solution to the growing energy demand while mitigating concerns for greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. This has led to a tremendous momentum towards solar and wind-based energy harvesting technologies driving efficiencies higher and costs lower. However, the intermittent nature of these energy sources necessitates energy storage technologies, which remain the Achilles heel in meeting the renewable energy goals. This dissertation focusses on two approaches for addressing the needs of energy storage: first, targeting direct solar to fuel conversion via photoelectrochemical water-splitting and second, improving the performance of current rechargeable batteries by developing new electrode architectures and synthesis processes. The aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD) process has emerged as a promising single-step approach for nanostructured thin film synthesis directly on substrates. The relationship between the morphology and the operating parameters in the process is complex. In this work, a simulation based approach has been developed to understand the relationship and acquire the ability of predicting the morphology. These controlled nanostructured morphologies of TiO2 , compounded with gold nanoparticles of various shapes, are used for solar water-splitting applications. Tuning of light absorption in the visible-light range along with reduced electron-hole recombination in the composite structures has been demonstrated. The ACVD process is further extended to a novel single-step synthesis of nanostructured TiO2 electrodes directly on the current collector for applications as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, mainly for electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The effect of morphology of the nanostructures has been investigated via experimental studies and electrochemical transport modelling. Results demonstrate the exceptional performance of the single crystal one-dimensional nanostructures over granular

  20. Measurements of gamma-ray energy deposition in a heterogeneous reactor experimental configuration and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calamand, D.; Wouters, R. de; Knipe, A.D.; Menil, R.

    1984-10-01

    An important contribution to the power output of a fast reactor is provided by the energy deposition from gamma-rays, and is particularly significant in the inner fertile zones of heterogeneous breeder reactor designs. To establish the validity of calculational methods and data for such systems an extensive series of measurements was performed in the zero power reactor Masurca, as part of the RACINE programme. The experimental study involved four European laboratories and the measurement techniques covered a range of thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionization chamber. The present paper describes and compares the gamma-ray energy deposition measurements and analysis

  1. Use of process indices for simplification of the description of vapor deposition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Yuya; Noda, Suguru; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Vapor deposition is a complex process, including gas-phase, surface, and solid-phase phenomena. Because of the complexity of chemical and physical processes occurring in vapor deposition processes, it is difficult to form a comprehensive, fundamental understanding of vapor deposition and to control such systems for obtaining desirable structures and performance. To overcome this difficulty, we present a method for simplifying the complex description of such systems. One simplification method is to separate complex systems into multiple elements, and determine which of these are important elements. We call this method abridgement. The abridgement method retains only the dominant processes in a description of the system, and discards the others. Abridgement can be achieved by using process indices to evaluate the relative importance of the elementary processes. We describe the formulation and use of these process indices through examples of the growth of continuous films, initial deposition processes, and the formation of the preferred orientation of polycrystalline films. In this paper, we propose a method for representing complex vapor deposition processes as a set of simpler processes

  2. Membranes for Environmentally Friendly Energy Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuezhong; Hägg, May-Britt

    2012-01-01

    Membrane separation systems require no or very little chemicals compared to standard unit operations. They are also easy to scale up, energy efficient, and already widely used in various gas and liquid separation processes. Different types of membranes such as common polymers, microporous organic polymers, fixed-site-carrier membranes, mixed matrix membranes, carbon membranes as well as inorganic membranes have been investigated for CO2 capture/removal and other energy processes in the last two decades. The aim of this work is to review the membrane systems applied in different energy processes, such as post-combustion, pre-combustion, oxyfuel combustion, natural gas sweetening, biogas upgrading, hydrogen production, volatile organic compounds (VOC) recovery and pressure retarded osmosis for power generation. Although different membranes could probably be used in a specific separation process, choosing a suitable membrane material will mainly depend on the membrane permeance and selectivity, process conditions (e.g., operating pressure, temperature) and the impurities in a gas stream (such as SO2, NOx, H2S, etc.). Moreover, process design and the challenges relevant to a membrane system are also being discussed to illustrate the membrane process feasibility for a specific application based on process simulation and economic cost estimation. PMID:24958426

  3. Membranes for Environmentally Friendly Energy Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong He

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane separation systems require no or very little chemicals compared to standard unit operations. They are also easy to scale up, energy efficient, and already widely used in various gas and liquid separation processes. Different types of membranes such as common polymers, microporous organic polymers, fixed-site-carrier membranes, mixed matrix membranes, carbon membranes as well as inorganic membranes have been investigated for CO2 capture/removal and other energy processes in the last two decades. The aim of this work is to review the membrane systems applied in different energy processes, such as post-combustion, pre-combustion, oxyfuel combustion, natural gas sweetening, biogas upgrading, hydrogen production, volatile organic compounds (VOC recovery and pressure retarded osmosis for power generation. Although different membranes could probably be used in a specific separation process, choosing a suitable membrane material will mainly depend on the membrane permeance and selectivity, process conditions (e.g., operating pressure, temperature and the impurities in a gas stream (such as SO2, NOx, H2S, etc.. Moreover, process design and the challenges relevant to a membrane system are also being discussed to illustrate the membrane process feasibility for a specific application based on process simulation and economic cost estimation.

  4. Ecological succession as an energy dispersal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtz, Peter; Annila, Arto

    2010-04-01

    Ecological succession is described by the 2nd law of thermodynamics. According to the universal law of the maximal energy dispersal, an ecosystem evolves toward a stationary state in its surroundings by consuming free energy via diverse mechanisms. Species are the mechanisms that conduct energy down along gradients between repositories of energy which consist of populations at various thermodynamic levels. The salient characteristics of succession, growing biomass production, increasing species richness and shifting distributions of species are found as consequences of the universal quest to diminish energy density differences in least time. The analysis reveals that during succession the ecosystem's energy transduction network, i.e., the food web organizes increasingly more effective in the free energy reduction by acquiring new, more effective and abandoning old, less effective species of energy transduction. The number of species does not necessarily peak at the climax state that corresponds to the maximum-entropy partition of species maximizing consumption of free energy. According to the theory of evolution by natural selection founded on statistical physics of open systems, ecological succession is one among many other evolutionary processes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PVD processes of thin films deposition using Hall-current discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svadkovskij, I.V.

    2007-01-01

    Results of research and developments in the field of PVD processes of thin films deposition using Hall-current discharge have been summarized. Effects of interaction of ions with surface during deposition have been considered. Also features of application and prospects of devices based on ion beam and magnetron sputtering systems in thin films technologies have been analyzed. The aspects in the field plasma physics, technology and equipment plasma PVD processes of thin films deposition have been systematized, on the base of investigations made by author and other scientists. (authors)

  6. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddaluno, G.; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S.

    2003-01-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m 2 and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime

  7. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddaluno, G.; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S.

    2003-03-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m 2 and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime.

  8. Energy Balance, Evapo-transpiration and Dew deposition in the Dead Sea Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jutta; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on earth. It is a terminal hypersaline lake, located at the lowest point on earth with a lake level of currently -429 m above mean sea level (amsl). It is located in a transition zone of semiarid to arid climate conditions, which makes it highly sensible to climate change (Alpert1997, Smiatek2011). The Virtual Institute DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE) is an international project funded by the German Helmholtz Association and was established to study coupled atmospheric hydrological, and lithospheric processes in the changing environment of the Dead Sea. At the moment the most prominent environmental change is the lake level decline of approximately 1 m / year due to anthropogenic interferences (Gertman, 2002). This leads to noticeable changes in the fractions of the existing terrestrial surfaces - water, bare soil and vegetated areas - in the valley. Thus, the partitioning of the net radiation in the valley changes as well. To thoroughly study the atmospheric and hydrological processes in the Dead Sea valley, which are driven by the energy balance components, sound data of the energy fluxes of the different surfaces are necessary. Before DESERVE no long-term monitoring network simultaneously measuring the energy balance components of the different surfaces in the Dead Sea valley was available. Therefore, three energy balance stations were installed at three characteristic sites at the coast-line, over bare soil, and within vegetation, measuring all energy balance components by using the eddy covariance method. The results show, that the partitioning of the energy into sensible and latent heat flux on a diurnal scale is totally different at the three sites. This results in gradients between the sites, which are e.g. responsible for the typical diurnal wind systems at the Dead Sea. Furthermore, driving forces of evapo-transpiration at the sites were identified and a detailed analysis of the daily evaporation and dew deposition rates

  9. Steam process cogeneration using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.

    2010-10-01

    Use of energy in a sustainable manner is to make processes more efficient. Oil industry requires of electricity and steam for refinery and petrochemical processes, nuclear energy can be a clean energy alternative. Cogeneration is an option to be assessed by Mexico to provide additional value to electricity generation. Mexico is a country with oil resources that requires process heat for gasoline production among other things. With the concern about the climate change and sustain ability policies it is adequate to use cogeneration as a way to optimize energy resources. Currently there is a national program that considers cogeneration for several Mexican refineries, and the first choices are combined cycle plants and thermo power plants using residual oil. This is long term program. The pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) is a next generation reactors that works with very high temperatures that can be used to produce steam process along with electricity, in this work two different couplings are assessed for the PBMR reactor to produce steam process, the two couplings are compared for using in the Mexican refineries and some conclusions are given. (Author)

  10. Influence of Oxygen Partial Pressure during Processing on the Thermoelectric Properties of Aerosol-Deposited CuFeO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöcker, Thomas; Exner, Jörg; Schubert, Michael; Streibl, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2016-03-24

    In the field of thermoelectric energy conversion, oxide materials show promising potential due to their good stability in oxidizing environments. Hence, the influence of oxygen partial pressure during synthesis on the thermoelectric properties of Cu-Delafossites at high temperatures was investigated in this study. For these purposes, CuFeO₂ powders were synthetized using a conventional mixed-oxide technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were conducted to determine the crystal structures of the delafossites associated with the oxygen content during the synthesis. Out of these powders, films with a thickness of about 25 µm were prepared by the relatively new aerosol-deposition (AD) coating technique. It is based on a room temperature impact consolidation process (RTIC) to deposit dense solid films of ceramic materials on various substrates without using a high-temperature step during the coating process. On these dense CuFeO₂ films deposited on alumina substrates with electrode structures, the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. We compared the thermoelectric properties of both standard processed and aerosol deposited CuFeO₂ up to 900 °C and investigated the influence of oxygen partial pressure on the electrical conductivity, on the Seebeck coefficient and on the high temperature stability of CuFeO₂. These studies may not only help to improve the thermoelectric material in the high-temperature case, but may also serve as an initial basis to establish a defect chemical model.

  11. Neutrons and gamma transport in atmosphere by Tripoli-2 code. Energy deposit and electron current time function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnaud, T.; Nimal, J.C.; Ulpat, J.P.; Faucheux, G.

    1988-01-01

    The Tripoli-2 computer code has been adapted to calculate, in addition to energy deposit in matter by neutrons (Kerma) the energy deposit by gamma produced in neutronic impacts and the induced recoil electron current. The energy deposit conduces at air ionization, consequently at a conductibility. This knowledge added at that of electron current permit to resolve the Maxwell equations of electromagnetic field. The study is realized for an atmospheric explosion 100 meters high. The calculations of energy deposit and electron current have been conducted as far as 2.5km [fr

  12. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  13. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  14. Measures for waste water management from recovery processing of Zhushanxia uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yaochi; Xu Lechang

    2000-01-01

    Measures for waste water management from recovery processing of Zhushanxia uranium deposit of Wengyuan Mine is analyzed, which include improving process flow, recycling process water used in uranium mill as much as possible and choosing a suitable disposing system. All these can decrease the amount of waste water, and also reduce costs of disposing waste water and harm to environment

  15. Low-energy ion-beam deposition apparatus equipped with surface analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hideki; Aoki, Yasushi; Nagai, Siro.

    1994-10-01

    A sophisticated apparatus for low energy ion beam deposition (IBD) was installed at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI in March 1991. The apparatus is composed of an IBD system and a real time/in-situ surface analysis system for diagnosing deposited thin films. The IBD system provides various kinds of low energy ion down to 10 eV with current density of 10 μA/cm 2 and irradiation area of 15x15 mm 2 . The surface analysis system consists of RHEED, AES, ISS and SIMS. This report describes the characteristics and the operation procedure of the apparatus together with some experimental results on depositing thin carbon films. (author)

  16. Electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane and dichlorosilacyclohexane : The role of dissociative ionization and dissociative electron attachment in the deposition process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragesh Kumar, T. P.; Hari, S.; Damodaran, Krishna K.; Ingólfsson, Oddur; Hagen, C.W.

    2017-01-01

    We present first experiments on electron beam induced deposition of silacyclohexane (SCH) and dichlorosilacyclohexane (DCSCH) under a focused high-energy electron beam (FEBID). We compare the deposition dynamics observed when growing pillars of high aspect ratio from these compounds and we

  17. Studies of Physicochemical Processes in Atmospheric Particles and Acid Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Spyros N.

    A comprehensive chemical mechanism for aqueous -phase atmospheric chemistry was developed and its detailed sensitivity analysis was performed. The main aqueous-phase reaction pathways for the system are the oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by H_2O_2 , OH, O_2 (catalysed by Fe ^{3+} and Mn^ {2+}), O_3 and HSO_sp{5}{-}. The gas-phase concentrations of SO_2, H_2O_2, HO _2, OH, O_3 HCHO, NH_3, HNO_3 and HCl and the liquid water content of the cloud are of primary importance. The Lagrangian model predictions for temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas-phase concentrations of SO_2 , HNO_3, and NH_3 , pH, aqueous-phase concentrations of SO _sp{4}{2-}, NH _sp{4}{+} and NO _sp{3}{-}, and finally deposition rates of the above ions match well the observed values. A third model was developed to study the distribution of acidity and solute concentration among the various droplet sizes in a fog or a cloud. Significant solute concentration differences can occur in aqueous droplets inside a fog or a cloud. Fogs in polluted environments have the potential to increase aerosol sulfate concentrations, but at the same time to cause reductions in the aerosol concentration of nitrate, chloride, ammonium and sodium as well as in the total aerosol mass concentration. The sulfate producd during fog episodes favors the aerosol particles that have access to most of the fog liquid water. Aerosol scavenging efficiencies of around 80% were calculated for urban fogs. Sampling and subsequent mixing of fog droplets of different sizes may result in measured concentrations that are not fully representative of the fogwater chemical composition. Isoprene and beta-pinene, at concentration levels ranging from a few ppb to a few ppm were reacted photochemically with NO_ {x} in the Caltech outdoor smog chamber facility. Aerosol formation from the isoprene photooxidation was found to be negligible even under extreme ambient conditions due to the relatively high vapor pressure of its

  18. Lightweight, high-opacity paper : process costs and energy use reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    John H. Klungness; Fabienne. Pianta; Mathew L. Stroika; Marguerite. Sykes; Freya. Tan; Said. AbuBakr

    1999-01-01

    Fiber loading is an environmentally friendly, energy efficient, and economical method for depositing precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) partly within pulp fibers. Fiber loading can easily be done within the existing pulp processing system. This paper is a review of the process development from bench-scale to industrial-scale demonstrations, with additional...

  19. Rapid deposition process for zinc oxide film applications in pyroelectric devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a rapid process for the deposition of films. Zinc oxide is a low toxicity and environmentally friendly material, and it possesses properties such as semiconductivity, pyroelectricity and piezoelectricity without the poling process. Therefore, AD is used to accelerate the manufacturing process for applications of ZnO films in pyroelectric devices. Increasing the temperature variation rate in pyroelectric films is a useful method for enhancing the responsivity of pyroelectric devices. In the present study, a porous ZnO film possessing the properties of large heat absorption and high temperature variation rate is successfully produced by the AD rapid process and laser annealing for application in pyroelectric devices. (paper)

  20. Surface engineering of zirconium particles by molecular layer deposition: Significantly enhanced electrostatic safety at minimum loss of the energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lijun; Yan, Ning; Hao, Haixia; An, Ting; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2018-04-01

    Because of its high volumetric heat of oxidation, Zr powder is a promising high energy fuel/additive for rocket propellants. However, the application of Zr powder is restricted by its ultra-high electrostatic discharge sensitivity, which poses great hazards for handling, transportation and utilization of this material. By performing molecular layer deposition of polyimide using 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic anhydride and ethylenediamine as the precursors, Zr particles can be uniformly encapsulated by thin layers of the polymer. The thicknesses of the encapsulation layers can be precisely controlled by adjusting the number of deposition cycle. High temperature annealing converts the polymer layer into a carbon coating. Results of thermal analyses reveal that the polymer or carbon coatings have little negative effect on the energy release process of the Zr powder. By varying the thickness of the polyimide or carbon coating, electrostatic discharge sensitivity of the Zr powder can be tuned in a wide range and its uncontrolled ignition hazard can be virtually eliminated. This research demonstrates the great potential of molecular layer deposition in effectively modifying the surface properties of highly reactive metal based energetic materials with minimum sacrifices of their energy densities.

  1. A criterion for selecting renewable energy processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searcy, Erin; Flynn, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that minimum incremental cost per unit of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, in essence the carbon credit required to economically sustain a renewable energy plant, is the most appropriate social criterion for choosing from a myriad of alternatives. The application of this criterion is illustrated for four processing alternatives for straw/corn stover: production of power by direct combustion and biomass integrated gasification and combined cycle (BIGCC), and production of transportation fuel via lignocellulosic ethanol and Fischer Tropsch (FT) syndiesel. Ethanol requires a lower carbon credit than FT, and direct combustion a lower credit than BIGCC. For comparing processes that make a different form of end use energy, in this study ethanol vs. electrical power via direct combustion, the lowest carbon credit depends on the relative values of the two energy forms. When power is 70$ MW h -1 , ethanol production has a lower required carbon credit at oil prices greater than 600$ t -1 (80$ bbl -1 ). (author)

  2. Production processes at extremely high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gastmans, R; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2013-01-01

    The production processes are identified that contribute to the rise of the total cross section in proton-proton scattering at extremely high energies, s->~. At such energies, the scattering can be described by a black disk (completely absorptive) with a radius expanding logarithmically with energy surrounded by a gray fringe (partially absorptive). For the leading term of (lns)^2 in the increasing total cross section, the gray fringe is neglected, and geometrical optics is generalized to production processes. It is known that half of the rise in the total cross section is due to elastic scattering. The other half is found to originate from the production of jets with relatively small momenta in the center-of-mass system.

  3. A novel method of calculating the energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Xinying; Lu, Jiayu; Cui, Quansheng; Pang, Lei; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the energy deposition curve is very important in the fields to which nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharges (NPDBDs) are applied. It helps the understanding of the discharge physics and fast gas heating. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model, composed of three capacitances, is introduced and a method of calculating the energy deposition curve is proposed for a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator. The capacitance C d and the energy deposition curve E R are determined by mathematically proving that the mapping from C d to E R is bijective and numerically searching one C d that satisfies the requirement for E R to be a monotonically non-decreasing function. It is found that the value of capacitance C d varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage due to the change of discharge area and is dependent on the polarity of applied voltage. The bijectiveness of the mapping from C d to E R in nanosecond pulse volumetric dielectric barrier discharge (NPVDBD) is demonstrated and the feasibility of the application of the new method to NPVDBD is validated. This preliminarily shows a high possibility of developing a unified approach to calculate the energy deposition curve in NPDBD. (paper)

  4. Energy accumulating substances for increase of replacement factor of petroleum from layer on Kumkol deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunusov, U.I.; Ospanov, E.S.; Nurabaev, B.K.; Ajshuakov, K.A.; Tursunkulov, Eh.T.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory researches with using of alloys of energy accumulating substances are carried out with the purpose of petroleum output increase on Kumkol deposit. Factor of petroleum replacement within range from 79.5 to 82.0 % is received by use silico-barium, silico-calcium and ferro-silicium with alkali and aluminium. (author)

  5. The Energy Deposition Pattern as the Unconventional Strangelet Signature and its Relevance to the Castor Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1998-07-01

    It has been shown, by GEANT simulations, that the energy deposition pattern in deep calorimeters could be the spectacular and unconventional signature of different kinds of stable and unstable strangelets. The CASTOR calorimeter is shown to be the appropriate tool for detection of strongly penetrating objects, such as strangelets possibly produced in the baryon-rich region in central Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. (author)

  6. Calculation of neutron radiation energy deposition distribution in subcellular parts of tissue using recombination chamber microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Zielczynski, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recombination chamber microdosimetry was used as an instrument for determination of local neutron radiation energy deposition distribution. The method allows to simulate of subcellular regions of tissue of the order of 70 nm in size. The results obtained qualitatively correspond to relationship between biological efficiency and neutron energy, and show regular differences of distributions achieved by the recombination method and distributions measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), which simulates greater tissue regions of 1 μm in size

  7. Energy uses in combination processes applying irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1998-01-01

    The costs of energy in the food system are significant and have increased as a result of the growth in population worldwide. This, in turn, demands an increased harvest per area of land, and thus intensive agriculture. The energy used in the food system is not only a drain on limited resources but also has an adverse impact on the environment. It is therefore important to devise methods that reduce energy in all undertakings. The energy used in food irradiation is relatively low compared with other methods and relative to the amount of energy used in producing food. for this reason, food irradiation is an environmentally friendly method and the costs of processing and preserving food do not depend greatly on the fluctuating costs of renewable energy sources such as oil. Irradiation in 60 Co facilities uses a very small amount of energy, about 0.032-0.0465 MJ/kg for radicidation doses of 3 kGy. Irradiation in 5 MV DC electron accelerator facilities uses about twice as much energy; 10 MV travelling wave accelerator facilities use about five times as much and 5 MV X ray facilities about 25 times as much as 60 Co facilities. In practice, X ray facilities are employed only for low dose applications such as sprout inhibition, inactivation of trichina in pork products and disinfestation of fruits, therefore the energy used in low. Frequently, irradiation can be used in combination with other low energy methods such as the sun drying of spices, condiments, vegetables and fish. The overall method of preservation is then particularly environmentally friendly and results in microbiologically safe and wholesome food. (author)

  8. Structure of fast ion energy depositions in water. Application to the Monte Carlo study of cellular inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    In order to understand the physical processes involved in the heavy ion irradiation of biological samples, a Monte Carlo simulation code and a random inventory code for interaction clusters in volumes comparable to those of sensible biological sites like nucleosomes (few nm 3 ) have been developed. It is now well known that macroscopic parameters like the dose rate or the stopping power are not suitable to explain the cellular inactivation induced by heavy ions irradiation. The aim of this work is the development of a mechanistic model based on the identification of primary processes susceptible to be of major importance on the biological aspect. The code developed simulates the creation and transport in water of all secondary particles produced by the impact of heavy ions. Once all energy depositions generated, an algorithm of random inventory of interaction clusters has been built in order to evaluate the type of critical energy deposition which presents a correlation with the experimental data of cellular inactivation. For light ions, like particles, this cluster model has permitted to reproduce the variations of the experimental number of lethal lesions observed, in particular the decay of biological efficiency. However, for heavy ions, these parameters do not allow to reproduce the experimental data of cellular inactivation. Therefore, the concept of ionization clusters described in terms of critical deposition in critical volumes is not sufficient. (J.S.)

  9. Sources and processes contributing to nitrogen deposition: an adjoint model analysis applied to biodiversity hotspots worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, Fabien; Jacob, Daniel J; Henze, Daven K

    2013-04-02

    Anthropogenic enrichment of reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition is an ecological concern. We use the adjoint of a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to identify the sources and processes that control Nr deposition to an ensemble of biodiversity hotspots worldwide and two U.S. national parks (Cuyahoga and Rocky Mountain). We find that anthropogenic sources dominate deposition at all continental sites and are mainly regional (less than 1000 km) in origin. In Hawaii, Nr supply is controlled by oceanic emissions of ammonia (50%) and anthropogenic sources (50%), with important contributions from Asia and North America. Nr deposition is also sensitive in complicated ways to emissions of SO2, which affect Nr gas-aerosol partitioning, and of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which affect oxidant concentrations and produce organic nitrate reservoirs. For example, VOC emissions generally inhibit deposition of locally emitted NOx but significantly increase Nr deposition downwind. However, in polluted boreal regions, anthropogenic VOC emissions can promote Nr deposition in winter. Uncertainties in chemical rate constants for OH + NO2 and NO2 hydrolysis also complicate the determination of source-receptor relationships for polluted sites in winter. Application of our adjoint sensitivities to the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) scenarios for 2010-2050 indicates that future decreases in Nr deposition due to NOx emission controls will be offset by concurrent increases in ammonia emissions from agriculture.

  10. Energy saving estimation on radiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Maekawa, H.; Ito, Y.; Nishikawa, I.; Fujii, H.; Murata, K.

    1982-01-01

    When the quantity of paint used for industrial coating is assumed to be 420,000 tons, it is estimated that the area being coated is 2.8 billion m 2 , the petroleum required for pretreatment steam, drying and baking is 1.68 million tons, and the required amount of energy saving is 120,000 tons per year in terms of petroleum. The authors examined how the adoption of electron beam curing for surface coating contributes to the energy saving. So far, it has been said that electron beam curing is more efficient than thermal or light curing in energy consumption, but the premise condition was not clear. The theoretical energy requirement for thermal curing, light curing and electron beam curing was calculated and compared. The comparison of the measured values was also performed. The amount of energy required for thermal curing, UV light curing and electron beam curing was roughly 100:10:1, and the cost of energy for them was 50:5:1. In spite of the large merit of electron beam curing, it has not spread as expected, because of the repayment cost of the facility and the cost of inert gas required for the process. Energy saving is brought about by electron beam curing, but the overall cost must be examined case by case. (Kako, I.)

  11. Energy conservation by reducing process variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wising, Ulrika; Lafourcade, Sebastien [Pepite S.A., Liege (Belgium); Mack, Philippe [Pepite Technologies Inc., Montreal (Canada)

    2011-12-21

    Energy conservation is becoming an increasingly important instrument to stay competitive in today is increasingly global market. Important investments have been made in infrastructure and personnel in order to improve the management of energy such as increased metering, energy dashboards, energy managers, etc. Despite these investments, the results have not materialized and there is still a significant potential to further reduce energy consumption. In this paper a new methodology will be presented that helps industry better operate existing assets in order to reduce energy consumption, without having to make capital investments. The methodology uses a combination of advanced data analysis tools and a specific implementation scheme that has lead to significant savings in industry. The advanced data analysis tools are used to analyze the variability of the process in order to assess when the plant has been operated well or not so well in the past. By finding the root causes of these variations and the key variables that can explain them, improved operating guidelines and models can be developed and implemented. The specific implementation scheme is an important part of the methodology as it involves the people operating the plant. Several user cases will be presented showing an energy conservation of between 10%-20% without capital investments necessary. (author)

  12. Biomass energy - Definitions, resources and transformation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damien, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Biomass energy is today considered as a new renewable energy source, and thus, has entered a regulatory framework aiming at encouraging its development for CO 2 pollution abatement. This book addresses the constraints, both natural and technological, of the exploitation of the biomass resource, and then the economical and regulatory aspects of this industry. This second edition provides a complement about the plants used and the new R and D progresses made in this domain. Content: 1 - Definitions and general considerations: natural organic products, regulatory and standardized definitions, energy aspects of biomass fuels; 2 - Resources: energy production dedicated crops, biomass by-products, biomass from wastes; 3 - Biomass to energy transformation processes: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, torrefaction, methanation, alcoholic fermentation, landfill biogas, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, methanol synthesis, trans-esterification, synthetic natural gas production, bio-hydrogen production; 4 - Biofuels: solid fuels, solid automotive biofuels, gaseous biofuels, liquid biofuels, comparative efficiency; 5 - Situation of biomass energy: regulations, impact on non-energy purpose biomass, advantages and drawbacks

  13. Calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in a test reactor. Calorimetric measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecheri, K.-F.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in the experimental devices irradiated in the test reactors of the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre. A theoretical study briefly recalls to mind the various sorts of nuclear reactions that occur in a reactor, from the special angle of their ability to deposit calorific energy in the materials. A special study with the help of a graphite calorimeter made it possible to show the possible effect of the various parameters intervening in this energy absorption: the nature of the materials, their geometry, the spectrum of the incident gamma rays and the fact that the variation of this spectrum is due to the position of the measuring point with respect to the reactor core or to the presence of structures around the measuring instrument. The results of the calculations made with the help of the Mercury IV and ANISN codes are compared with those of the determinations in order to ascertain that very are adapted to the forecasts of energy deposition in the various materials. The conclusion was reached that in order to calculate with accuracy the depositifs of gamma energy in the experimental devices, it is necessary either to introduce the build-up calculation for the low energy photons, in the Mercury IV calculation code or to associate the DOT code to the ANISN calculation code [fr

  14. Modeling of the Effect of Path Planning on Thermokinetic Evolutions in Laser Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozmehr, Ehsan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-07-01

    A thermokinetic model coupling finite-element heat transfer with transformation kinetics is developed to determine the effect of deposition patterns on the phase-transformation kinetics of laser powder deposition (LPD) process of a hot-work tool steel. The finite-element model is used to define the temperature history of the process used in an empirical-based kinetic model to analyze the tempering effect of the heating and cooling cycles of the deposition process. An area is defined to be covered by AISI H13 on a substrate of AISI 1018 with three different deposition patterns: one section, two section, and three section. The two-section pattern divides the area of the one-section pattern into two sections, and the three-section pattern divides that area into three sections. The results show that dividing the area under deposition into smaller areas can influence the phase transformation kinetics of the process and, consequently, change the final hardness of the deposited material. The two-section pattern shows a higher average hardness than the one-section pattern, and the three-section pattern shows a fully hardened surface without significant tempered zones of low hardness. To verify the results, a microhardness test and scanning electron microscope were used.

  15. The effect of energy and momentum transfer during magnetron sputter deposition of yttrium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jinjiao; Liang, Wenping; Miao, Qiang; Depla, Diederik

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the ratio between the energy and the deposition flux, or the energy per arriving atom, on the growth of Y2O3 sputter deposited thin films has been studied. The energy per arriving atom has been varied by the adjustment of the discharge power, and/or the target-to-substrate distance. The relationship between the energy per arriving atom and the phase evolution, grain size, microstructure, packing density and residual stress was investigated in detail. At low energy per arriving atom, the films consist of the monoclinic B phase with a preferential (1 1 1) orientation. A minority cubic C phase appears at higher energy per arriving atom. A study of the thin film cross sections showed for all films straight columns throughout the thickness, typically for a zone II microstructure. The intrinsic stress is compressive, and increases with increasing energy per atom. The same trend is observed for the film density. Simulations show that the momentum transfer per arriving atom also scales with the energy per arriving atom. Hence, the interpretation of the observed trends as a function of the energy per arriving atom must be treated with care.

  16. Deposition and post-processing techniques for transparent conductive films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoforo, Mark Greyson; Mehra, Saahil; Salleo, Alberto; Peumans, Peter

    2017-07-04

    In one embodiment, a method is provided for fabrication of a semitransparent conductive mesh. A first solution having conductive nanowires suspended therein and a second solution having nanoparticles suspended therein are sprayed toward a substrate, the spraying forming a mist. The mist is processed, while on the substrate, to provide a semitransparent conductive material in the form of a mesh having the conductive nanowires and nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are configured and arranged to direct light passing through the mesh. Connections between the nanowires provide conductivity through the mesh.

  17. Non-local energy deposition: A problem in regional RF hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, M.J.; Levin, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    As the frequency is decreased below 1 GHz, RF applicators can cause deep heating of tissues. However, there is a concomitant problem in that significant energy deposition may occur well beyond the dimensions of the applicator. The BSD Medical Corporation has described to the authors tests with a phantom manequin in which SAR in the neck was significantly greater than that in the abdomen when an Annular Phased Array System (APAS) was positioned for abdominal heating. The authors have obtained numerical solutions for the SAR distribution in a 180-cell inhomogeneous block model of man subjected to r-f irradiation approximating that emanating from various applicators. The solutions agree with the reports of BSD that significant heating in the neck, inner thighs, and back will occur with an abdominally-placed APAS. They suggest that a similar problem will occur with a helical-coil or other applicator for which the electric field is predominantly parallel to the axis of the body. Typically, 70% or more of the total energy will be deposited outside the bounds of an axial applicator when it is placed around the chest or abdomen. The problem is most severe at frequencies for which body parts such as the arm or head may resonate. In such cases, over 90% of the energy may be deposited outside the bounds of applicator. The problem of non-local energy deposition appears to be substantially reduced for non-axial applicators. If the arm extends outward from the side of the body, an axial applicator around it will cause negligible energy deposition in the rest of the body

  18. Influence of substrate geometry on ion-plasma coating deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshikh, V.M.; Leonov, S.A.; Belous, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of substrate geometry on the feature of Ti vacuum arc plasma streams condensation process in presence of N 2 or Ar in a discharge ambient were investigated. Character of gas pressure and substrate potential influence on deposition rate is conditioned the competitive processes of condensation and sputtering, and also presence of double electric layer on a border plasma-substrate. Influence of potential on deposition rate especially strongly shows up for cylindrical substrates of small size. For such substrates it was found substantial (approximately in 4 times) growth of deposition rate at the increasing of negative potential from 100 to 700 V when nitrogen pressure is ∼0,3...2,5 Pa. Possibility of droplet-free coating deposition the substrate backs and in discharge ambient, being outside area of cathode direct visibility is shown

  19. Indium oxide deposition on glass by aerosol pyrolysis (Pyrosol (R) process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandenet, G.; Lagarde, Y.; Spitz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The pyrosol (R) process involves the pyrolysis of an aerosol generated by ultrasonic nebulisation from a solution of organic or inorganic compounds. This technique was used to deposit transparent n-conducting indium oxide films on glass. The electrical and optical properties of these films were studied as a function of the deposition temperature and doping (using tin or fluorine). A deposition temperature of 480 deg C and a Sn/In ratio of about 5% gave the best results. In this case, the transmission in the visible range was 92%, the infrared reflection 84% and the electrical resistivity 1.7x10 -4 ohm.cm [fr

  20. Deposition of thin films and surface modification by pulsed high energy density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Pengxun; Yang Size

    2002-01-01

    The use of pulsed high energy density plasma is a new low temperature plasma technology for material surface treatment and thin film deposition. The authors present detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the production mechanism and physical properties of the pulsed plasma. The basic physics of the pulsed plasma-material interaction has been investigated. Diagnostic measurements show that the pulsed plasma has a high electron temperature of 10-100 eV, density of 10 14 -10 16 cm -3 , translation velocity of ∼10 -7 cm/s and power density of ∼10 4 W/cm 2 . Its use in material surface treatment combines the effects of laser surface treatment, electron beam treatment, shock wave bombardment, ion implantation, sputtering deposition and chemical vapor deposition. The metastable phase and other kinds of compounds can be produced on low temperature substrates. For thin film deposition, a high deposition ratio and strong film to substrate adhesion can be achieved. The thin film deposition and material surface modification by the pulsed plasma and related physical mechanism have been investigated. Thin film c-BN, Ti(CN), TiN, DLC and AlN materials have been produced successfully on various substrates at room temperature. A wide interface layer exists between film and substrate, resulting in strong adhesion. Metal surface properties can be improved greatly by using this kind of treatment

  1. Electric ignition energy evaluation and the energy distribution structure of energy released in electrostatic discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingming; Huang Jinxiang; Shao Huige; Zhang Yunming

    2017-01-01

    Ignition energy is one of the important parameters of flammable materials, and evaluating ignition energy precisely is essential to the safety of process industry and combustion science and technology. By using electric spark discharge test system, a series of electric spark discharge experiments were conducted with the capacitor-stored energy in the range of 10 J, 100 J, and 1000 J, respectively. The evaluation method for energy consumed by electric spark, wire, and switch during capacitor discharge process has been studied respectively. The resistance of wire, switch, and plasma between electrodes has been evaluated by different methods and an optimized evaluation method has been obtained. The electric energy consumed by wire, electric switch, and electric spark-induced plasma between electrodes were obtained and the energy structure of capacitor-released energy was analyzed. The dynamic process and the characteristic parameters (the maximum power, duration of discharge process) of electric spark discharge process have been analyzed. Experimental results showed that, electric spark-consumed energy only accounts for 8%–14% of the capacitor-released energy. With the increase of capacitor-released energy, the duration of discharge process becomes longer, and the energy of plasma accounts for more in the capacitor-released energy. The power of electric spark varies with time as a damped sinusoids function and the period and the maximum value increase with the capacitor-released energy. (paper)

  2. Balancing Energy Processes in Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicki Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issue of balancing energy processes in turbine engines in operation in aeronautic and marine propulsion systems with the aim to analyse and evaluate basic operating parameters. The first part presents the problem of enormous amounts of energy needed for driving fans and compressors of the largest contemporary turbofan engines commonly used in long-distance aviation. The amounts of the transmitted power and the effect of flow parameters and constructional properties of the engines on their performance and real efficiency are evaluated. The second part of the article, devoted to marine applications of turbine engines, presents the energy balance of the kinetic system of torque transmission from main engine turbines to screw propellers in the combined system of COGAG type. The physical model of energy conversion processes executed in this system is presented, along with the physical model of gasodynamic processes taking place in a separate driving turbine of a reversing engine. These models have made the basis for formulating balance equations, which then were used for analysing static and dynamic properties of the analysed type of propulsion, in particular in the aspect of mechanical loss evaluation in its kinematic system.

  3. Hydraulic experimental investigation on spatial distribution and formation process of tsunami deposit on a slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Sakuraba, M.; Nojima, K.

    2017-12-01

    An important aim of the study of tsunami deposits is to estimate the characteristics of past tsunamis from the tsunami deposits found locally. Based on the tsunami characteristics estimated from tsunami deposit, it is possible to examine tsunami risk assessment in coastal areas. It is considered that tsunami deposits are formed based on the dynamic correlation between tsunami's hydraulic values, sediment particle size, topography, etc. However, it is currently not enough to evaluate the characteristics of tsunamis from tsunami deposits. This is considered to be one of the reasons that the understanding of the formation process of tsunami deposits is not sufficiently understood. In this study, we analyze the measurement results of hydraulic experiment (Yamamoto et al., 2016) and focus on the formation process and distribution of tsunami deposits. Hydraulic experiment was conducted with two-dimensional water channel with a slope. Tsunami was inputted as a bore wave flow. The moving floor section was installed as a seabed slope connecting to shoreline and grain size distribution was set some cases. The water level was measured using ultrasonic displacement gauges, and the flow velocity was measured using propeller current meters and an electromagnetic current meter. The water level and flow velocity was measured at some points. The distribution of tsunami deposit was measured from shoreline to run-up limit on the slope. Yamamoto et al. (2016) reported the measurement results on the distribution of tsunami deposit with wave height and sand grain size. Therefore, in this study, hydraulic analysis of tsunami sediment formation process was examined based on the measurement data. Time series fluctuation of hydraulic parameters such as Froude number, Shields number, Rouse number etc. was calculated to understand on the formation process of tsunami deposit. In the front part of the tsunami, the flow velocity take strong flow from shoreline to around the middle of slope. From

  4. Rapid processing method for solution deposited YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawley, J.T.; Clem, P.G.; Boyle, T.J.; Ottley, L.M.; Overmyer, D.L.; Siegal, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) films, deposited on buffered metal substrates, are the primary candidate for second-generation superconducting (SC) wires, with applications including expanded power grid transmission capability, compact motors, and enhanced sensitivity magnetic resonance imaging. Feasibility of manufacturing such superconducting wires is dependent on high processing speed, often a limitation of vapor and solution-based YBCO deposition processes. In this work, YBCO films were fabricated via a new diethanolamine-modified trifluoroacetic film solution deposition method. Modifying the copper chemistry of the YBCO precursor solution with diethanolamine enables a hundredfold decrease in the organic pyrolysis time required for MA/cm 2 current density (J c ) YBCO films, from multiple hours to ∼20 s in atmospheric pressure air. High quality, ∼0.2 μm thick YBCO films with J c (77 K) values ≥2 MA/cm 2 at 77 K are routinely crystallized from these rapidly pyrolyzed films deposited on LaAlO 3 . This process has also enabled J c (77 K)=1.1 MA/cm 2 YBCO films via 90 m/h dip-coating on Oak Ridge National Laboratory RABiTS textured metal tape substrates. This new YBCO solution deposition method suggests a route toward inexpensive and commercializable ∼$10/kA m solution deposited YBCO coated conductor wires

  5. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers.

  6. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  7. Energy optimization of integrated process plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandvig Nielsen, J

    1996-10-01

    A general approach for viewing the process synthesis as an evolutionary process is proposed. Each step is taken according to the present level of information and knowledge. This is formulated in a Process Synthesis Cycle. Initially the synthesis is conducted at a high abstraction level maximizing use of heuristics (prior experience, rules of thumbs etc). When further knowledge and information are available, heuristics will gradually be replaced by exact problem formulations. The principles in the Process Synthesis Cycle, is used to develop a general procedure for energy synthesis, based on available tools. The procedure is based on efficient use of process simulators with integrated Pinch capabilities (energy targeting). The proposed general procedure is tailored to three specific problems (Humid Air Turbine power plant synthesis, Nitric Acid process synthesis and Sulphuric Acid synthesis). Using the procedure reduces the problem dimension considerable and thus allows for faster evaluation of more alternatives. At more detailed level a new framework for the Heat Exchanger Network synthesis problem is proposed. The new framework is object oriented based on a general functional description of all elements potentially present in the heat exchanger network (streams, exchangers, pumps, furnaces etc.). (LN) 116 refs.

  8. Study of Energy Deposition and Activation for the LINAC4 Dump

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Mauro, E; Mereghetti, A; Silari, M; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    This document provides estimates of energy deposition and activation for the dump of the future LINAC4 accelerator. Detailed maps of power density deposited in the dump are given, allowing to perform further thermo mechanical studies. Residual dose rates at a few cooling times for different irradiation scenarios have been calculated. Moreover, the air activation has been evaluated and doses to the reference population group and to a worker intervening in the cave at the shutdown have been predicted. Calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo particle transport and interaction code FLUKA.

  9. Kinetic-energy induced smoothening and delay of epitaxial breakdown in pulsed-laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Byungha; Aziz, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated the effect of kinetic energy of depositing species from the effect of flux pulsing during pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) on surface morphology evolution of Ge(001) homoepitaxy at low temperature (100 deg. C). Using a dual molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) PLD chamber, we compare morphology evolution from three different growth methods under identical experimental conditions except for the differing nature of the depositing flux: (a) PLD with average kinetic energy 300 eV (PLD-KE); (b) PLD with suppressed kinetic energy comparable to thermal evaporation energy (PLD-TH); and (c) MBE. The thicknesses at which epitaxial breakdown occurs are ranked in the order PLD-KE>MBE>PLD-TH; additionally, the surface is smoother in PLD-KE than in MBE. The surface roughness of the films grown by PLD-TH cannot be compared due to the early epitaxial breakdown. These results demonstrate convincingly that kinetic energy is more important than flux pulsing in the enhancement of epitaxial growth, i.e., the reduction in roughness and the delay of epitaxial breakdown

  10. Effect of Source, Surfactant, and Deposition Process on Electronic Properties of Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of arrays of carbon nanotubes from several different sources differing in the manufacturing process used with a variety of average properties such as length, diameter, and chirality are studied. We used several common surfactants to disperse each of these nanotubes and then deposited them on Si wafers from their aqueous solutions using dielectrophoresis. Transport measurements were performed to compare and determine the effect of different surfactants, deposition processes, and synthesis processes on nanotubes synthesized using CVD, CoMoCAT, laser ablation, and HiPCO.

  11. Plasmonic resonance-enhanced local photothermal energy deposition by aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Xinyuan; Jiang Naibo; Zhang Zhili; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Local energy deposition of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) by localized surface plasmon resonance-enhanced photothermal effects is demonstrated. Low-power light stimuli are efficiently and locally concentrated to trigger the oxidation reactions of Al NPs because of the large ohmic absorption and high reactivity of the Al. Numerical simulations show that both ultraviolet and visible light are more efficient than infrared light for photothermal energy coupling. The natural oxidation layer of alumina is found to have minimum impact on the energy deposition because of its negligible dielectric losses. The near-field distributions of the electric field indicate that slight aggregation induces much higher local enhancement, especially at the interface region of multiple contacting nanoparticles.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Radial and Angular Distribution of γ-Ray's Energy Deposition in Scintillation Optical Fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Shibiao; Yin Zejie; Tang Yu; Huang Huan

    2006-01-01

    Angular and radial distributions of the energy deposition of γ-ray radiation in scintillation optical fibres are simulated and analysed using the Geant4 system. The results show a linear relation between the energy deposition and the radius of the fibres. The deposition is roughly inversely proportional to sinθ with θ the incident angle relative to the fibre axis. The results could provide corrections to the measurements of the scintillation fibres used in monitoring the γ-ray radiation

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of a calorimetric technique for measuring energy deposition in materials caused by complex pile irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, P.; Sciers, P.; Droulers, Y.

    1962-01-01

    Calorimetric methods may be used to measure gamma fluxes greater than 10 6 r/h near the cores of swimming pool reactors. The theory, design, and properties of isothermal calorimeters are discussed, and experimental results obtained with two types are presented. Measurement of energy deposition in materials and the long term integration of energy depositions are other uses of these devices. Results of measurements on heat deposition in steel and water are given. Fluxes were also measured. (authors) [fr

  14. Investigation of effect of process parameters on multilayer builds by direct metal deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amine, Tarak; Newkirk, Joseph W.; Liou, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer direct laser deposition (DLD) is a fabrication process through which parts are fabricated by creating a molten pool into which metal powder is injected as. During fabrication, complex thermal activity occurs in different regions of the build; for example, newly deposited layers will reheat previously deposited layers. The objective of this study was to provide insight into the thermal activity that occurs during the DLD process. This work focused on the effect of the deposition parameters of deposited layers on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the previously deposited layers. It is important to characterize these effects in order to provide information for proper parameter selection in future DLD fabrication. Varying the parameters was shown to produce different effects on the microstructure morphology and property values, presumably resulting from in-situ quench and tempering of the steels. In general, the microstructure was secondary dendrite arm spacing. Typically, both the travel speed and laser power significantly affect the microstructure and hardness. A commercial ABAQUS/CAE software was used to model this process by developing a thermo-mechanical 3D finite element model. This work presents a 3D heat transfer model that considers the continuous addition of mass in front of a moving laser beam using ABAQUS/CAE software. The model assumes the deposit geometry appropriate to each experimental condition and calculates the temperature distribution, cooling rates and re-melted layer depth, which can affect the final microstructure. Model simulations were qualitatively compared with experimental results acquired in situ using a K-type thermocouple. - Highlights: • Direct laser deposition DLD. • Microstructure of stainless steel 316L. • Thermocouples measurement. • 3D finite element modeling

  15. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  16. Sedimentary processes and depositional environments of the Horn River Shale in British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Hoon; Koh, Chang-Seong; Joe, Young-Jin; Woo, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Suk

    2017-04-01

    The Horn River Basin in the northeastern British Columbia, Canada, is one of the largest unconventional gas accumulations in North America. It consists mainly of Devonian shales (Horn River Formation) and is stratigraphically divided into three members, the Muskwa, Otterpark and Evie in descending order. This study focuses on sedimentary processes and depositional environments of the Horn River shale based on sedimentary facies analysis aided by well-log mineralogy (ECS) and total organic carbon (TOC) data. The shale formation consists dominantly of siliceous minerals (quartz, feldspar and mica) and subordinate clay mineral and carbonate materials, and TOC ranging from 1.0 to 7.6%. Based on sedimentary structures and micro texture, three sedimentary facies were classified: homogeneous mudstone (HM), indistinctly laminated mudstone (ILM), and planar laminated mudstone (PLM). Integrated interpretation of the sedimentary facies, lithology and TOC suggests that depositional environment of the Horn River shale was an anoxic quiescent basin plain and base-of-slope off carbonate platform or reef. In this deeper marine setting, organic-rich facies HM and ILM, dominant in the Muskwa (the upper part of the Horn River Formation) and Evie (the lower part of the Horn River Formation) members, may have been emplaced by pelagic to hemipelagic sedimentation on the anoxic sea floor with infrequent effects of low-density gravity flows (turbidity currents or nepheloid flows). In the other hand, facies PLM typifying the Otterpark Member (the middle part of the Horn River Formation) suggests more frequent inflow of bottom-hugging turbidity currents punctuating the hemipelagic settling of the background sedimentation process. The stratigraphic change of sedimentary facies and TOC content in the Horn River Formation is most appropriately interpreted to have been caused by the relative sea-level change, that is, lower TOC and frequent signal of turbidity current during the sea

  17. Evidence for substantial forestry canopy processing of nitrogen deposition using isotopic tracer experiments in low deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraretto, Daniele; Heal, Kate

    2017-04-01

    Temperate forest ecosystems are significant sinks for nitrogen deposition (Ndep) yielding benefits such as protection of waterbodies from eutrophication and enhanced sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Previous studies have shown evidence of biological nitrification and Ndep processing and retention in forest canopies. However, this was reported only at sites with high environmental or experimentally enhanced rates of Ndep (˜18 kg N ha-1 y-1) and has not yet been demonstrated in low Ndep environments. We have used bulk field hydrochemical measurements and labelled isotopic experiments to assess canopy processing in a lower Ndep environment (˜7 kg N ha-1 year-1) at a Sitka spruce plantation in Perthshire, Scotland, representing the dominant tree species (24%) in woodlands in Great Britain. Analysis of 4.5 years of measured N fluxes in rainfall (RF) and fogwater onto the canopy and throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) below the canopy suggests strong transformation and uptake of Ndep in the forest canopy. Annual canopy Ndep uptake was ˜4.7 kg N ha-1 year-1, representing 60-76% of annual Ndep. To validate these plot-scale results and track N uptake within the forest canopy in different seasons, double 15N-labelled NH4NO3 (98%) solution was sprayed in summer and winter onto the canopy of three trees at the measurement site. RF, TF and SF samples have been collected and analysed for 15NH4 and 15NO3. Comparing the amount of labelled N recovered under the sample trees with the measured δ15N signal is expected to provide further evidence of the role of forest canopies in actively processing and retaining atmospheric N deposition.

  18. Mechanical energy release and fuel fragmentation in high energy deposition into fuel under a reactivity initiated accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takaharu; Saito, Shinzo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1985-01-01

    The fuel fragmentation is one of important subjects to be studied, since it is one of basic processes of molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) and it has not yet been made clear enough. Accordingly, UO 2 fuel fragmentation was studied in the NSRR experiments simulating a reactivity initiated accident (RIA). As results of the experiments, the distribution of the size of fuel fragments was obtained and the mechanism of fuel fragmentation was discussed as described below. It was revealed that the distribution was well displayed in the form of logarithmic Rosin-Rammler's distribution law. It was shown that the conversion ratio from thermal energy to mechanical in the experiment was in inverse propotion to the volume-surface mean diameter defined as a ratio of the total volume of fragments to the total surface. Consequently, it was confirmed that the mean diameter was proper as an index for the degree of the fuel fragmentation. It was also pointed out that the Weber-type hydraulic instability model for fragmentation was consistent with the experimental results. The mechanism of the fuel fragmentation is understood as follows. Cladding tube is ruptured due to the increase in rod pressure when fuel is molten, and then molten fuel spouts through the openings in the form of jet. As a result of molten fuel spouting, fuel is fragmented by the Weber-type of hydraulic instability. The model well explains the effects of experimental parameters as heat deposition, subcooling of cooling water and capsule diameter, on the fuel fragmentation. According to the model, fuel fragments have to be spherical. There were many spherical particles which had hollow and burst crack. This may be due to internal burst during solidification process. The items which should be studied further are also described in the end of this report. (author)

  19. Low-temperature processed ZnO and CdS photodetectors deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Como, N; Moreno, S; Mejia, I; Quevedo-Lopez, M A

    2014-01-01

    UV-VIS photodetectors using an interdigital configuration, with zinc oxide (ZnO) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) semiconductors deposited by pulsed laser deposition, were fabricated with a maximum processing temperature of 100 °C. Without any further post-growth annealing, the photodetectors are compatible with flexible and transparent substrates. Aluminum (Al) and indium tin oxide (ITO) were investigated as contacts. Focusing on underwater communications, the impact of metal contact (ITO versus Al) was investigated to determine the maximum responsivity using a laser with a 405 nm wavelength. As expected, the responsivity increases for reduced metal finger separation. This is a consequence of reduced carrier transit time for shorter finger separation. For ITO, the highest responsivities for both films (ZnO and CdS) were ∼3 A W −1 at 5 V. On the other hand, for Al contacts, the maximum responsivities at 5 V were ∼0.1 A W −1 and 0.7 A W −1 for CdS and ZnO, respectively. (paper)

  20. Image processing to optimize wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kyle Marc-Anthony

    The world is turning to renewable energies as a means of ensuring the planet's future and well-being. There have been a few attempts in the past to utilize wave power as a means of generating electricity through the use of Wave Energy Converters (WEC), but only recently are they becoming a focal point in the renewable energy field. Over the past few years there has been a global drive to advance the efficiency of WEC. Placing a mechanical device either onshore or offshore that captures the energy within ocean surface waves to drive a mechanical device is how wave power is produced. This paper seeks to provide a novel and innovative way to estimate ocean wave frequency through the use of image processing. This will be achieved by applying a complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filter bank to satellite images of ocean waves. The complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filterbank provides an equal subband decomposition of the Nyquist bounded discrete time Fourier Transform spectrum. The maximum energy of the 2D complex modulated lapped transform subband is used to determine the horizontal and vertical frequency, which subsequently can be used to determine the wave frequency in the direction of the WEC by a simple trigonometric scaling. The robustness of the proposed method is provided by the applications to simulated and real satellite images where the frequency is known.

  1. Evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Wook; Park, Yong Sung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Doo Wan; Lee, Hong Soo; Han, Su Cheol [Jeonbuk Department of Inhalation Research, Korea Institute of toxicology, KRICT, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    These absorbed dose can calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle transport code). Internal radiotherapy absorbed dose was calculated using conventional software, such as OLINDA/EXM or Monte Carlo simulation. However, the OLINDA/EXM does not calculate individual absorbed dose and non-standard organ, such as tumor. While the Monte Carlo simulation can calculated non-standard organ and specific absorbed dose using individual CT image. External radiotherapy, absorbed dose can calculated by specific absorbed energy in specific organs using Monte Carlo simulation. The specific absorbed energy in each organ was difference between species or even if the same species. Since they have difference organ sizes, position, and density of organs. The aim of this study was to individually evaluated cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. We evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed energy in each organ compared with mouse heart was 54.6 fold higher than monkey absorbed energy in heart. Likewise lung was 88.4, liver was 16.0, urinary bladder was 29.4 fold higher than monkey. It means that the distance of each organs and organ mass was effects of the absorbed energy. This result may help to can calculated absorbed dose and more accuracy plan for external radiation beam therapy and internal radiotherapy.

  2. Evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Wook; Park, Yong Sung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Cho, Doo Wan; Lee, Hong Soo; Han, Su Cheol

    2016-01-01

    These absorbed dose can calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle transport code). Internal radiotherapy absorbed dose was calculated using conventional software, such as OLINDA/EXM or Monte Carlo simulation. However, the OLINDA/EXM does not calculate individual absorbed dose and non-standard organ, such as tumor. While the Monte Carlo simulation can calculated non-standard organ and specific absorbed dose using individual CT image. External radiotherapy, absorbed dose can calculated by specific absorbed energy in specific organs using Monte Carlo simulation. The specific absorbed energy in each organ was difference between species or even if the same species. Since they have difference organ sizes, position, and density of organs. The aim of this study was to individually evaluated cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. We evaluation of cobalt-60 energy deposit in mouse and monkey using Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed energy in each organ compared with mouse heart was 54.6 fold higher than monkey absorbed energy in heart. Likewise lung was 88.4, liver was 16.0, urinary bladder was 29.4 fold higher than monkey. It means that the distance of each organs and organ mass was effects of the absorbed energy. This result may help to can calculated absorbed dose and more accuracy plan for external radiation beam therapy and internal radiotherapy.

  3. Overview of an energy management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantraine, P.

    2004-01-01

    Invista is a global and vertically integrated fiber, resin and intermediates business which belonged to Dupont but is now a subsidiary of Koch Industries. A background of Invista and its former relationship with Dupont was presented. This presentation was based on goals and work done as Dupont Canada Inc., up to the end of 2003. Details of Invista's approach to climate change in Canada were provided along with the company's relationship with Natural Resources Canada. The historical position of Dupont Canada was reviewed in detail, including their commitment to voluntary approach; participation in the national process; their goal of 85 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) by 2000; 93 per cent reduction in nitrous oxide emissions; energy efficiency goals; and continuing growth of the company. An outline and mission of the energy management team established in 1974 was presented, with details of the 1974 oil shortage, stabilization in the 1980s through to rises in electricity prices in the 1990s and concerns over climate change in recent years. Details of the team's operational procedures were presented. Results were presented in graph form and include: total energy use from 1972 to 2003 as well as cumulative energy conservation projects and resulting energy savings. Examples of activities and projects were provided, including details of energy performance contracting. It was concluded that in order to conserve energy, top management support was necessary, as well as passion and dedication in both leaders and teams. A broad scope for creativity in finding solutions within evolving constraints was also important, as was the nurturing of capability, capacity and recognition for results achieved. tabs., figs

  4. Experiment study on the thick GEM-like multiplier for X-ray photoelectrons energy deposition gaining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Pengfei; Ye Yan; Long Yan; Cao Ningxiang; Jia Xing; Li Jianfeng

    2009-01-01

    The GEM is a novel detector with high gain,high time and location resolution. Imitating the structure of the GEM, a thick GEM-like multiplier which has the similar function with that of the GEM is designed and manufactured. The characteristics of the thick GEM-like multiplier increasing electron energy deposition in absorbing medium has been experimentally studied. The results indicate that the energy deposition gain of x-ray photoelectron in medium is apparent, and the maximum energy deposition can increase by more than 40%. Some suggestions of further increasing the energy deposition are given, and the future application of the way of increasing the x-ray photoelectron energy deposition by the thick GEM-like multiplier in hard x-ray imaging is prospected. (authors)

  5. Low-pressure c-BN deposition - is a CVD process possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, R.; Tang, X.

    2001-01-01

    Since the low-pressure diamond deposition was discovered in 1982 there is a high interest to find a similar process for the c-BN synthesis. A review about the c-BN deposition process as well as its characterization is given. Experiments with a simple chemical vapor deposition(CVD) reactor using tris(dimethylamino)borane as precursor were carried out. In a cold-wall reactor substrates were heated up by high-frequency. Argon was used as protecting and carrying the precursor, it was saturated with tris(dimethylamino)borane (precursor) according to its vapor pressure and transports the pressure to the hot substrate, where deposition occurs. WC-Co hardmetal plates containing 6 wt. % Co, Mo and Si were used as substrates. Various BN layers were deposited and characterized. X-ray diffraction, IR-spectroscopy and SIMS indicate that BN-coatings containing c-BN were deposited. However a final verification of c-BN crystallites by TEM investigations was not possible till now. (nevyjel)

  6. Studies on the high electronic energy deposition in polyaniline thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.; Gudage, Y.G.; Vyas, J.C.; Singh, F.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2008-01-01

    We report here the physico-chemical changes brought about by high electronic energy deposition of gold ions in HCl doped polyaniline (PANI) thin films. PANI thin films were synthesized by in situ polymerization technique. The as-synthesized PANI thin films of thickness 160 nm were irradiated using Au 7+ ion of 100 MeV energy at different fluences, namely, 5 x 10 11 ions/cm 2 and 5 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 , respectively. A significant change was seen after irradiation in electrical and photo conductivity, which may be related to increased carrier concentration, and structural modifications in the polymer film. In addition, the high electronic energy deposition showed other effects like cross-linking of polymer chains, bond breaking and creation of defect sites. AFM observations revealed mountainous type features in all (before and after irradiation) PANI samples. The average size (diameter) and density of such mountainous clusters were found to be related with the ion fluence. The AFM profiles also showed change in the surface roughness of the films with respect to irradiation, which is one of the peculiarity of the high electronic energy deposition technique

  7. Influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition in a low-pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition into low-pressure plasma is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. Depending on the emitter temperature, different modes of discharge operation are obtained. The mode type depends on the plasma frequency and does not depend on the ratio between the densities of beam and plasma electrons. Namely, plasma is stable when the plasma frequency is small. For this plasma, the energy transfer from emitted electrons to plasma electrons is inefficient. The increase in the plasma frequency results first in the excitation of two-stream electron instability. However, since the thermal velocity of plasma electrons is smaller than the electrostatic wave velocity, the resonant wave-particle interaction is inefficient for the energy deposition into the plasma. Further increase in the plasma frequency leads to the distortion of beam of emitted electrons. Then, the electrostatic wave generated due to two-stream instability decays into multiple slower waves. Phase velocities of these waves are comparable with the thermal velocity of plasma electrons which makes possible the resonant wave-particle interaction. This results in the efficient energy deposition from emitted electrons into the plasma.

  8. Effect of water side deposits on the energy performance of coal fired thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, M. Siddhartha

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of water side deposits in the 210 MW coal fired thermal power plant components (viz., boiler, turbine, feed water heaters, condensers and lube oil coolers) on the energy efficiency of these components and that of the overall system at 100% maximum continuous rating (MCR). The origin, composition and rate of build up of deposits on the water side are presented. A linear growth rate of deposits is assumed for simplicity. The effects of the reduction in heat transfer, increased pressure drop and increased pumping power/reduced power output in the components are quantified in the form of curve fits as functions of the deposit thickness (μm). The reduction in heat transfer in the boiler components is in the range of 0.2-2.0% under normal scaling. The increased pumping power is of the order of 0.6-7.6% in the boiler components, 29% in the BFP circuit, 26% in the LPH circuit, 21% in the HPH circuit and 18% in the lube oil cooler circuits. The effects on the overall coal fired plant is quantified through functional relations between the efficiencies and the notional deposit thickness. The sensitivity indices to the notional deposit thickness are: boiler efficiency: -0.0021% points/μm, turbine circuit efficiency: -0.0037% points/μm, auxiliary power efficiency: -0.00129% points/μm, gross overall efficiency: -0.0039% points/μm and net overall efficiency: -0.0040% points/μm. The overall effect of scale build up is either increased power input of ∼68 kW/μm (at a constant power output) or decreased power output ∼25 kW/μm (at a constant power input). Successful contaminant control techniques are highlighted. Capacity reduction effects due to water side deposits are negligible

  9. Simple Mathematical Models of High Energy Ion Beam Assisted Deposition Concentration Profiles in Binary Thin Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, F.; Konvičková, S.; Jech, V.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2011), s. 8936-8942 ISSN 1533-4880 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : SILICON-NITRIDE FILMS * ENHANCED DEPOSITION * IBAD-PROCESS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.563, year: 2011

  10. Modeling and simulation of the deposition/relaxation processes of polycrystalline diatomic structures of metallic nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M. F.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Riaño-Rojas, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    This work develops a model that mimics the growth of diatomic, polycrystalline thin films by artificially splitting the growth into deposition and relaxation processes including two stages: (1) a grain-based stochastic method (grains orientation randomly chosen) is considered and by means of the Kinetic Monte Carlo method employing a non-standard version, known as Constant Time Stepping, the deposition is simulated. The adsorption of adatoms is accepted or rejected depending on the neighborhood conditions; furthermore, the desorption process is not included in the simulation and (2) the Monte Carlo method combined with the metropolis algorithm is used to simulate the diffusion. The model was developed by accounting for parameters that determine the morphology of the film, such as the growth temperature, the interacting atomic species, the binding energy and the material crystal structure. The modeled samples exhibited an FCC structure with grain formation with orientations in the family planes of , and . The grain size and film roughness were analyzed. By construction, the grain size decreased, and the roughness increased, as the growth temperature increased. Although, during the growth process of real materials, the deposition and relaxation occurs simultaneously, this method may perhaps be valid to build realistic polycrystalline samples.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of the lysozyme protein: an unexpected “Inverse MAPLE” process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Films of organic materials are commonly deposited by laser assisted methods, such as MAPLE (matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation), where a few percent of the film material in the target is protected by a light-absorbing volatile matrix. Another possibility is to irradiate the dry organic...... the ejection and deposition of lysozyme. This can be called an “inverse MAPLE” process, since the ratio of “matrix” to film material in the target is 10:90, which is inverse of the typical MAPLE process where the film material is dissolved in the matrix down to several wt.%. Lysozyme is a well-known protein...

  12. Role of temperature and energy density in the pulsed laser deposition of zirconium oxide thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittra, Joy; Abraham, G.J.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Kulkarni, U.D.; Dey, G.K.

    2011-01-01

    Present work brings out the effects of energy density and substrate temperature on pulsed laser deposition of zirconium oxide thin film on Zr-base alloy substrates. The ablation of sintered zirconia has been carried out using a KrF excimer laser having 30 ns pulse width and 600 mJ energy at source at 10 Hz repetition rate. To comprehend effects of these parameters on the synthesized thin film, pure zirconia substrate has been ablated at two different energy densities, 2 J.cm -2 and 5 J.cm -2 , keeping the substrate at 300 K, 573 K and 873 K, respectively. After visual observation, deposited thin films have been examined using Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and X-ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS). It has been found that the oxide deposited at 300 K temperature does not show good adherence with the substrate and deteriorates further with the reduction in energy density of the incident laser. The oxide films, deposited at 573 K and 873 K, have been found to be adherent with the substrate and appear lustrous black. These indicate that the threshold for adherence of the zirconia film on the Zr-base alloy substrate lies in between 300 K and 573 K. Analysis of Raman spectra has indicated that thin films of zirconia, deposited using pulsed laser, on the Zr-base metallic substrate are initially in amorphous state. Experimental evidence has indicated a strong link among the degree of crystallinity of the deposited oxide film, the substrate temperature and the energy density. It also has shown that the crystallization of the oxide film is dependent on the substrate temperature and the duration of holding at high temperature. The O:Zr ratios of the films, analyzed from the XPS data, have been found to be close to but less than 2. This appears to explain the reason for the transformation of amorphous oxide into monoclinic and tetragonal phases, below 573 K, and not into cubic phase, which is reported to be more oxygen deficient. (author)

  13. Volcanogenic Uranium Deposits: Geology, Geochemical Processes, and Criteria for Resource Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Felsic volcanic rocks have long been considered a primary source of uranium for many kinds of uranium deposits, but volcanogenic uranium deposits themselves have generally not been important resources. Until the past few years, resource summaries for the United States or the world generally include volcanogenic in the broad category of 'other deposits' because they comprised less than 0.5 percent of past production or estimated resources. Exploration in the United States from the 1940s through 1982 discovered hundreds of prospects in volcanic rocks, of which fewer than 20 had some recorded production. Intensive exploration in the late 1970s found some large deposits, but low grades (less than about 0.10 percent U3O8) discouraged economic development. A few deposits in the world, drilled in the 1980s and 1990s, are now known to contain large resources (>20,000 tonnes U3O8). However, research on ore-forming processes and exploration for volcanogenic deposits has lagged behind other kinds of uranium deposits and has not utilized advances in understanding of geology, geochemistry, and paleohydrology of ore deposits in general and epithermal deposits in particular. This review outlines new ways to explore and assess for volcanogenic deposits, using new concepts of convection, fluid mixing, and high heat flow to mobilize uranium from volcanic source rocks and form deposits that are postulated to be large. Much can also be learned from studies of epithermal metal deposits, such as the important roles of extensional tectonics, bimodal volcanism, and fracture-flow systems related to resurgent calderas. Regional resource assessment is helped by genetic concepts, but hampered by limited information on frontier areas and undiscovered districts. Diagnostic data used to define ore deposit genesis, such as stable isotopic data, are rarely available for frontier areas. A volcanic environment classification, with three classes (proximal, distal, and pre-volcanic structures

  14. Analysis of heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dan, Zhang; He, Zhang; Chang-Chun, Wei; Jian, Sun; Guo-Fu, Hou; Shao-Zhen, Xiong; Xin-Hua, Geng; Ying, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    A possible heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon has been studied. It includes the discharge time-accumulating heating effect, discharge power, inter-electrode distance, and total gas flow rate induced heating effect. It is found that the heating effects mentioned above are in some ways quite similar to and in other ways very different from each other. However, all of them will directly or indirectly cause the increase of the substrate surface temperature during the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon thin films, which will affect the properties of the materials with increasing time. This phenomenon is very serious for the high deposition rate of microcrystalline silicon thin films because of the high input power and the relatively small inter-electrode distance needed. Through analysis of the heating effects occurring in the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon, it is proposed that the discharge power and the heating temperature should be as low as possible, and the total gas flow rate and the inter-electrode distance should be suitable so that device-grade high quality deposition rate microcrystalline silicon thin films can be fabricated

  15. Energy deposited in the high luminosity inner triplets of the LHC by collision debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildner, E.; Broggi, F.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Hoa, C.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Mokhov, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    The 14 TeV center of mass proton-proton collisions in the LHC produce not only debris interesting for physics but also showers of particles ending up in the accelerator equipment, in particular in the superconducting magnet coils. Evaluations of this contribution to the heat, that has to be transported by the cryogenic system, have been made to guarantee that the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets does not exceed limits for magnet quenching and the capacity of the cryogenic system. The models of the LHC base-line are detailed and include description of, for energy deposition, essential elements like beam-pipes and corrector magnets. The evaluations made using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA are compared to previous studies using MARS. For the consolidation of the calculations, a dedicated comparative study of these two codes was performed for a reduced setup

  16. 1-D Van der Waals Foams Heated by Ion Beam Energy Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A.B.; Barnard, J.J.; More, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    One dimensional simulations of various initial average density aluminum foams (modeled as slabs of solid metal separated by low density regions) heated by volumetric energy deposition are conducted with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code using a van der Waals equation of tate (EOS). The resulting behavior is studied to facilitate the design of future warm dense matter (WDM) experiments at LBNL. In the simulations the energy deposition ranges from 10 to 30 kJ/g and from 0.075 to 4.0 ns total pulse length, resulting in temperatures from approximately 1 o 4 eV. We study peak pressures and temperatures in the foams, expansion velocity, and the phase evolution. Five relevant time scales in the problem are identified. Additionally, we present a method for characterizing the level of inhomogeneity in a foam target as it is heated and the time it takes for a foam to homogenize.

  17. Study of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition process on very dense powder for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanni, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is part of the development of low-enriched nuclear fuel, for the Materials Test Reactors (MTRs), constituted of uranium-molybdenum particles mixed with an aluminum matrix. Under certain conditions under irradiations, the U(Mo) particles interact with the aluminum matrix, causing unacceptable swelling of the fuel plate. To inhibit this phenomenon, one solution consists in depositing on the surface of the U(Mo) particles, a thin silicon layer to create a barrier effect. This thesis has concerned the study of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process to deposit silicon from silane, on the U(Mo) powder, which has an exceptional density of 17,500 kg/m 3 . To achieve this goal, two axes were treated during the thesis: the study and the optimization of the fluidization of a so dense powder, and then those of the silicon deposition process. For the first axis, a series of tests was performed on a surrogate tungsten powder in different columns made of glass and made of steel with internal diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm, at room temperature and at high temperature (650 C) close to that of the deposits. These experiments helped to identify wall effects phenomena within the fluidized bed, which can lead to heterogeneous deposits or particles agglomeration. Some dimensions of the fluidization columns and operating conditions allowing a satisfactory fluidization of the powder were identified, paving the way for the study of silicon deposition. Several campaigns of deposition experiments on the surrogate powder and then on the U(Mo) powder were carried out in the second axis of the study. The influence of the bed temperature, the inlet molar fraction of silane diluted in argon, and the total gas flow of fluidization, was examined for different diameters of reactor and for various masses of powder. Morphological and structural characterization analyses (SEM, XRD..) revealed a uniform silicon deposition on all the powder and around each particle

  18. Heavy Ion Induced Degradation in SiC Schottky Diodes: Bias and Energy Deposition Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Arto; Galloway, Kenneth F.; Nicklaw, Christopher; Bosser, Alexandre L.; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Pintacuda, Francesco; Reed, Robert A.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Weller, Robert A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results on ion-induced leakage current increase in 4H-SiC Schottky power diodes are presented. Monte Carlo and TCAD simulations show that degradation is due to the synergy between applied bias and ion energy deposition. This degradation is possibly related to thermal spot annealing at the metal semiconductor interface. This thermal annealing leads to an inhomogeneity of the Schottky barrier that could be responsible for the increase leakage current as a function of fluence.

  19. Investigation of the nucleation process of chemical vapour deposited diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katai, S.

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this work was to contribute to the understanding of the bias enhanced nucleation (BEN) process during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond on silicon. The investigation of both the gas phase environment above the substrate surface, by in situ mass selective energy analysis of ions, and of the surface composition and structure by in vacuo surface analytic methods (XPS, EELS) have been carried out. In both cases, the implementation of these measurements required the development and construction of special experimental apparatus as well. The secondary aim of this work was to give orientation to our long term goal of growing diamond films with improved quality. For this reason, (1) contaminant levels at the diamond-silicon interface after growth were studied by SIMS, (2) the internal stress distribution of highly oriented free-standing diamond films were studied by Raman spectroscopy, and (3) an attempt was made to produce spatially regular oriented nuclei formation by nucleating on a pattern created by laser treatment on silicon substrates. (orig.)

  20. Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyotaro Kawaguchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the surface modification of orthodontic stainless steel using electrophoretic deposition (EPD of bioactive glass (BG. The BG coatings were characterized by spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The frictional properties were investigated using a progressive load scratch test. The remineralization ability of the etched dental enamel was studied according to the time-dependent mechanical properties of the enamel using a nano-indentation test. The EPD process using alternating current produced higher values in both reflectance and lightness. Additionally, the BG coating was thinner than that prepared using direct current, and was completely amorphous. All of the BG coatings displayed good interfacial adhesion, and Si and O were the major components. Most BG-coated specimens produced slightly higher frictional forces compared with non-coated specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of etched enamel specimens immersed with most BG-coated specimens recovered significantly with increasing immersion time compared with the non-coated specimen, and significant acid-neutralization was observed for the BG-coated specimens. The surface modification technique using EPD and BG coating on orthodontic stainless steel may assist the development of new non-cytotoxic orthodontic metallic appliances having satisfactory appearance and remineralization ability.

  1. Modeling of thermal, electronic, hydrodynamic, and dynamic deposition processes for pulsed-laser deposition of thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.L.; LeBoeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Chen, K.R.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1994-11-01

    Various physical processes during laser ablation of solids for pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) are studied using a variety of computational techniques. In the course of the authors combined theoretical and experimental effort, they have been trying to work on as many aspects of PLD processes as possible, but with special focus on the following areas: (a) the effects of collisional interactions between the particles in the plume and in the background on the evolving flow field and on thin film growth, (b) interactions between the energetic particles and the growing thin films and their effects on film quality, (c) rapid phase transformations through the liquid and vapor phases under possibly nonequilibrium thermodynamic conditions induced by laser-solid interactions, (d) breakdown of the vapor into a plasma in the early stages of ablation through both electronic and photoionization processes, (c) hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor/plasma during and after ablation. The computational techniques used include finite difference (FD) methods, particle-in-cell model, and atomistic simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) techniques

  2. Fluid expulsion sites on the Cascadia accretionary prism: mapping diagenetic deposits with processed GLORIA imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Bobb; Seke, Erol; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Holmes, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    Point-discharge fluid expulsion on accretionary prisms is commonly indicated by diagenetic deposition of calcium carbonate cements and gas hydrates in near-surface (topographic and lithologic information. We have processed GLORIA imagery from the Oregon continental margin to remove topographic effects. A synthetic side scan image was created initially from Sea Beam bathymetric data and then was subtracted iteratively from the original GLORIA data until topographic features disappeared. The residual image contains high-amplitude backscattering that we attribute to diagenetic deposits associated with fluid discharge, based on submersible mapping, Ocean Drilling Program drilling, and collected samples. Diagenetic deposits are concentrated (1) near an out-of-sequence thrust fault on the second ridge landward of the base of the continental slope, (2) along zones characterized by deep-seated strikeslip faults that cut transversely across the margin, and (3) in undeformed Cascadia Basin deposits which overlie incipient thrust faults seaward of the toe of the prism. There is no evidence of diagenetic deposition associated with the frontal thrust that rises from the dècollement. If the dècollement is an important aquifer, apparently the fluids are passed either to the strike-slip faults which intersect the dècollement or to the incipient faults in Cascadia Basin for expulsion. Diagenetic deposits seaward of the prism toe probably consist dominantly of gas hydrates.

  3. Deposition behavior of colloid in filtration process through glass beads packed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinju, Hirofumi; Nagasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoru; Tanaka, Tadao; Takebe, Shinichi; Ogawa, Hiromichi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the deposition behavior in colloid transport through porous media by conducting column experiments and batch experiments using polystyrene latex particles and spherical glass beads. The conclusion of this present work are summarized as follows: (1) The comparison between the results of the batch and the column experiments indicated that the deposition was enhanced in the column experiments compared with the batch experiments due to particles trapped by the effect of slow field. (2) Colloid BTCs showed three different stages of deposition which can be characterized by the different rate of the change in the C/C O . Three stages can be explained by the existence of large area of weak deposition sites and small area of strong deposition sites on the collector surfaces. (3) The amount of deposited particles until the beginning of the third stage was larger for lower flow velocity. (4) The results of the column experiments revealed that breakthrough behavior of colloidal particles of the second run after back wash process is affected by remaining particles on collector surfaces. (J.P.N.)

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of processes proceeding on (111) faces of diamond during chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarczyk, W.; Prawer, S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited diamond is commonly synthesized from activated hydrogen-rich, carbon/hydrogen gas mixtures under conditions which should, from a thermodynamic equilibrium point of view, favour the production of graphite. Much remains to be understood about why diamond, and not graphite, forms under these conditions. However, it is well known that the presence of atomic hydrogen, is crucial to the success of diamond deposition. As part of an attempt to better understand the deposition process, a thermodynamic analysis of the process was performed on diamond (111) faces in hydrogen rich environments. It is shown that the key role of atomic hydrogen is to inhibit the reconstruction of the (111) face to an sp 2 -bonded structure, which would provide a template for graphite, rather than diamond formation. The model correctly predicts experimentally determined trends in growth rate and diamond film quality as a function of methane concentration in the stating gas mixture. 17 refs., 4 figs

  5. Effects of vacuum processing erbium dideuteride/ditritide films deposited on chromium underlays on copper substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provo, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Thin films of erbium dideuteride/ditritide were experimentally produced on chromium underlays deposited on copper substrates. The chromium underlay is required to prevent erbium occluder/copper substrate alloying which inhibits hydriding. Data taken has shown that vacuum processing affects the erbium/chromium/copper interaction. With an in situ process in which underlay/occluder films are vacuum deposited onto copper substrates and hydrided with no air exposure between these steps, data indicates a minimum of 1500A of chromium is required for optimum hydriding. If films are vacuum deposited as above and air-exposed before hydriding, a minimum of 3000A of chromium was shown to be required for equivalent hydriding. Data suggests that the activation step (600 0 C for 1 hour) required for hydriding the film of the second type is responsible for the difference observed. Such underlay thickness parameters are important, with regard to heat transfer considerations in thin hydride targets used for neutron generation

  6. Inter-comparison of MARS and FLUKA: Predictions on Energy Deposition in LHC IR Quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoa, C; Cerutti, F; Ferrai, A

    2008-01-01

    Detailed modellings of the LHC insertion regions (IR) have earlier been performed to evaluate energy deposition in the IR superconducting magnets [1-4]. Proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV in the centre of mass lead to debris, depositing energy in the IR components. To evaluate uncertainties in those simulations and gain further confidence in the tools and approaches used, inter-comparison calculations have been performed with the latest versions of the FLUKA (2006.3b) [5, 6] and MARS15 [7, 8] Monte Carlo codes. These two codes, used worldwide for multi particle interaction and transport in accelerator, detector and shielding components, have been thoroughly benchmarked by the code authors and the user community (see, for example, recent [9, 10]). In the study described below, a better than 5% agreement was obtained for energy deposition calculated with these two codes - based on different independent physics models - for the identical geometry and initial conditions of a simple model representing the IR5 and ...

  7. Inter-comparison of MARS and FLUKA: Predictions on energy deposition in LHC IR quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoa, Christine; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mokhov, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    Detailed modelings of the LHC insertion regions (IR) have earlier been performed to evaluate energy deposition in the IR superconducting magnets [1-4]. Proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV in the centre of mass lead to debris, depositing energy in the IR components. To evaluate uncertainties in those simulations and gain further confidence in the tools and approaches used, inter-comparison calculations have been performed with the latest versions of the FLUKA (2006.3b) [5, 6] and MARS15 [7, 8] Monte Carlo codes. These two codes, used worldwide for multi particle interaction and transport in accelerator, detector and shielding components, have been thoroughly benchmarked by the code authors and the user community (see, for example, recent [9, 10]). In the study described below, a better than 5% agreement was obtained for energy deposition calculated with these two codes--based on different independent physics models--for the identical geometry and initial conditions of a simple model representing the IR5 and its first quadrupole

  8. Energy deposition and ion production from thermal oxygen ion precipitation during Cassini's T57 flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Darci; Smith, Michael; Jimson, Theodore; Higgins, Alex

    2018-05-01

    Cassini's Radio Science Investigation (RSS) and Langmuir Probe observed abnormally high electron densities in Titan's ionosphere during Cassini's T57 flyby. We have developed a three-dimensional model to investigate how the precipitation of thermal magnetospheric O+ may have contributed to enhanced ion production in Titan's ionosphere. The three-dimensional model builds on previous work because it calculates both the flux of oxygen through Titan's exobase and the energy deposition and ion production rates in Titan's atmosphere. We find that energy deposition rates and ion production rates due to thermal O+ precipitation have a similar magnitude to the rates from magnetospheric electron precipitation and that the simulated ionization rates are sufficient to explain the abnormally high electron densities observed by RSS and Cassini's Langmuir Probe. Globally, thermal O+ deposits less energy in Titan's atmosphere than solar EUV, suggesting it has a smaller impact on the thermal structure of Titan's neutral atmosphere. However, our results indicate that thermal O+ precipitation can have a significant impact on Titan's ionosphere.

  9. The study on microb and organic metallogenetic process of the interlayer oxidized zone uranium deposit. A case study of the Shihongtan uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Haiming; Shang Gaofeng

    2010-01-01

    Microbial and organic process internationally leads the field in the study of metallogenetic process presently. Focusing on Shi Hongtan uranium deposit, a typical interlayer oxidized zone sandstone-type deposit, this paper analyzes the geochemical characteristics of microb and organic matter in the deposit, and explores the interaction of microb and organic matter. It considers that the anaerobic bacterium actively takes part in the formation of the interlayer oxidized zone, as well as the mobilization and migration of uranium. In the redox (oxidation-reduction) transition zone, sulphate-reducing bacteria reduced sulphate to stink damp, lowing Eh and acidifying pH in the groundwater, which leads to reducing and absorbing of uranium, by using light hydrocarbon which is the product of the biochemical process of organism and the soluble organic matter as the source of carbon. The interaction of microb and organic matter controls the metallogenetic process of uranium in the deposit. (authors)

  10. Subband Energy Detection in Passive Array Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bono, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...), which includes both Subband Peak Energy Detection (SPED) and Subband Extrema Energy Detection (SEED). It will be shown that SED has several performance advantages over Conventional Energy Detection...

  11. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, Tom, E-mail: tompeat12@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); McNutt, Philip [TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Naveed [TWI Technology Centre, Wallis Way, Catcliff, Rotherham, S60 5TZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • WC-CoCr, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings were cold spray deposited on AA5083 and friction stir processed. • The SprayStirred WC-CoCr demonstrated a hardness increase of 100% over the cold sprayed coating. • As-deposited and SprayStirred coatings were examined under slurry erosion test conditions. • Mass and volume loss was measured following 20-min exposure to the slurry. • The WC-CoCr and Al2O3 demonstrated a reduction in volume loss of approx. 40% over the cold sprayed coating. - Abstract: This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide – cobalt chromium, chromium carbide – nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the

  12. Energy deposition in a thin copper target downstream and off-axis of a proton-radiography target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.; Snead, C.L.; Hanson, A.L.; Murray, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    A series of proton energy-deposition experiments was conducted to measure the energy deposited in a copper target located downstream and off-axis of a high-energy proton-radiography target. The proton/target interactions involved low-intensity bunches of protons at 24 GeV/c onto a spherical target consisting of concentric shells of tungsten and copper. The energy-deposition target was placed at five locations downstream of the proton-radiography target, off-axis of the primary beam transport, and was either unshielded or shielded by 5 or 10 cm of lead. Maximum temperature rises measured in the energy-deposition target due to single bunches of 5x10 10 protons on the proton-radiography target were approximately 20 mK per bunch. The data indicated that the scattered radiation was concentrated close to the primary transport axis of the beam line. The energy deposited in the energy-deposition target was reduced by moving the target radially away from the primary transport axis. Placing lead shielding in front of the target further reduced the energy deposition. The measured temperature rises of the energy-deposition target were empirically correlated with the distance from the source, the number of protons incident on the proton-radiography target, the thickness of the lead shielding, and the angle of the energy-deposition target off-axis of the beam line from the proton-radiography target. The correlation of the experimental data that was developed provides a starting point for the evaluation of the shielding requirements for devices downstream of proton-radiography targets such as superconducting magnets

  13. Renewable Energy Zone (REZ) Transmission Planning Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nathan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-03-08

    A REZ is a geographical area that enables the development of profitable, cost-effective, grid-connected renewable energy (RE). The REZ Transmission Planning Process is a proactive approach to plan, approve, and build transmission infrastructure connecting REZs to the power system which helps to increase the share of solar, wind and other RE resources in the power system while maintaining reliability and economics, and focuses on large-scale wind and solar resources that can be developed in sufficient quantities to warrant transmission system expansion and upgrades.

  14. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik, E-mail: soumik.banerjee@wsu.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  15. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface—A modeling based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortuza, S.M.; Taufique, M.F.N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The model determined the surface coverage of solution-processed film on perovskite. • Calculated surface density map provides insight into morphology of the monolayer. • Carbonyl oxygen atom of PCBM strongly attaches to the (110) surface of perovskite. • Uniform distribution of clusters on perovskite surface at lower PCBM concentration. • Deposition rate of PCBM on the surface is very high at initial stage of film growth. - Abstract: The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy study of ion energy deposition in gold: evidence for a spike threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruault, M.O.; Bernas, H.; Chaumont, J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine different atomic species, from K to Yb, were implanted into gold at energies ranging from 20 to 150 keV. The nature and depth-distribution of the resultant defect clusters were studied by transmission electron microscopy techniques as well as a modification of the '2 1/2-D' stereo technique developed by Mitchell and Bell. The effect of implanted ion dose and sample purity were determined. The cluster depth distributions are in overall agreement with the damage distributions deduced from the energy deposition calculations of Winterbon, Sigmund, and Sanders. The nature of the defect clusters is found to depend on the mass and energy of the incoming ion, in agreement with our previously reported work. These results are suggested to provide evidence for the decisive influence of the deposited energy density on the nature of visible damage. We conclude that it is possible to distinguish between cascade and 'spike' effects, the latter setting in when the average energy per atom in the cascade is approximately 2 eV/atom. All results (obtained -at low doses on pure samples- for a variety of ion species in Au, Al, Cu, W, Mo and Ni) may be related to each other in this way

  17. Ti film deposition process of a plasma focus: Study by an experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Inestrosa-Izurieta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma generated by plasma focus (PF devices have substantially different physical characteristics from another plasma, energetic ions and electrons, compared with conventional plasma devices used for plasma nanofabrication, offering new and unique opportunities in the processing and synthesis of Nanomaterials. This article presents the use of a plasma focus of tens of joules, PF-50J, for the deposition of materials sprayed from the anode by the plasma dynamics in the axial direction. This work focuses on the determination of the most significant effects of the technological parameters of the system on the obtained depositions through the use of a statistical experimental design. The results allow us to give a qualitative understanding of the Ti film deposition process in our PF device depending on four different events provoked by the plasma dynamics: i an electric erosion of the outer material of the anode; ii substrate ablation generating an interlayer; iii electron beam deposition of material from the center of the anode; iv heat load provoking clustering or even melting of the deposition surface.

  18. Sorting processes with energy-constrained comparisons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissmann, Barbara; Penna, Paolo

    2018-05-01

    We study very simple sorting algorithms based on a probabilistic comparator model. In this model, errors in comparing two elements are due to (1) the energy or effort put in the comparison and (2) the difference between the compared elements. Such algorithms repeatedly compare and swap pairs of randomly chosen elements, and they correspond to natural Markovian processes. The study of these Markov chains reveals an interesting phenomenon. Namely, in several cases, the algorithm that repeatedly compares only adjacent elements is better than the one making arbitrary comparisons: in the long-run, the former algorithm produces sequences that are "better sorted". The analysis of the underlying Markov chain poses interesting questions as the latter algorithm yields a nonreversible chain, and therefore its stationary distribution seems difficult to calculate explicitly. We nevertheless provide bounds on the stationary distributions and on the mixing time of these processes in several restrictions.

  19. The Dark Energy Survey Image Processing Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, E.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a five-year optical imaging campaign with the goal of understanding the origin of cosmic acceleration. DES performs a 5000 square degree survey of the southern sky in five optical bands (g,r,i,z,Y) to a depth of ~24th magnitude. Contemporaneously, DES performs a deep, time-domain survey in four optical bands (g,r,i,z) over 27 square degrees. DES exposures are processed nightly with an evolving data reduction pipeline and evaluated for image quality to determine if they need to be retaken. Difference imaging and transient source detection are also performed in the time domain component nightly. On a bi-annual basis, DES exposures are reprocessed with a refined pipeline and coadded to maximize imaging depth. Here we describe the DES image processing pipeline in support of DES science, as a reference for users of archival DES data, and as a guide for future astronomical surveys.

  20. Self-catalytic growth of tin oxide nanowires by chemical vapor deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thabethe, BS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on the synthesis of tin oxide (SnO(sub2)) nanowires by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Commercially bought SnO nanopowders were vaporized at 1050°C for 30 minutes with argon gas continuously passing through the system...

  1. Optimization of Nano-Process Deposition Parameters Based on Gravitational Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlina Mohd Sabri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on the radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering process, a physical vapor deposition technique which is widely used in thin film production. This process requires the optimized combination of deposition parameters in order to obtain the desirable thin film. The conventional method in the optimization of the deposition parameters had been reported to be costly and time consuming due to its trial and error nature. Thus, gravitational search algorithm (GSA technique had been proposed to solve this nano-process parameters optimization problem. In this research, the optimized parameter combination was expected to produce the desirable electrical and optical properties of the thin film. The performance of GSA in this research was compared with that of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, Genetic Algorithm (GA, Artificial Immune System (AIS and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO. Based on the overall results, the GSA optimized parameter combination had generated the best electrical and an acceptable optical properties of thin film compared to the others. This computational experiment is expected to overcome the problem of having to conduct repetitive laboratory experiments in obtaining the most optimized parameter combination. Based on this initial experiment, the adaptation of GSA into this problem could offer a more efficient and productive way of depositing quality thin film in the fabrication process.

  2. Plasma processes and film growth of expanding thermal plasma deposited textured zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, R.; Linden, J.L.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma processes and film growth of textured zinc oxide deposited from oxygen and diethyl zinc utilizing expanding thermal argon plasma created by a cascaded arc is discussed. In all conditions explored, an excess of argon ions and low temperature electrons is available, which represent the

  3. Nature of the pulsed laser process for the deposition of high T/sub c/ superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, T.; Wu, X.D.; Inam, A.

    1988-01-01

    The pulsed laser thin-film deposition process can enable preparation of thin films of complex composition with good control over the film stoichiometry. The film compositions are similar to that of the target pellet and as a consequence this technique appears to be an ideal method for preparing high T/sub c/ thin films on a variety of substrates.The factors which contribute to this beneficial phenomenon have been explored by a laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) and a post ablation ionization (PAI) neutral velocity analysis technique in order to determine the mass and velocities of the laser ejected material. In addition, x-ray absorption measurements on films deposited onto substrates at room temperature were performed in order to identify the presence of short-range crystalline order in the films. Both of these studies rule out the ejection of stoichiometric clusters of material from the pellet during the laser ablation/deposition process. Instead, binary and ternary suboxides are emitted from the target pellet. These suboxides most likely have unit sticking coefficient to the substrate which could contribute to the preservation of the film stoichiometry. The velocity distribution of several neutral species (e.g., BaO) indicates that particles have energies of several eV. Thus the effective temperatures of the emitted species are ∼15 x 10 3 K, and these energetic particles may facilitate growth of the crystalline films at low substrate temperatures

  4. Enthalpy restoration in geothermal energy processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1983-01-01

    A geothermal deep well energy extraction system is provided of the general type in which solute-bearing hot water is pumped to the earth's surface from a relatively low temperature geothermal source by transferring thermal energy from the hot water to a working fluid for driving a primary turbine-motor and a primary electrical generator at the earth's surface. The superheated expanded exhaust from the primary turbine motor is conducted to a bubble tank where it bubbles through a layer of sub-cooled working fluid that has been condensed. The superheat and latent heat from the expanded exhaust of the turbine transfers thermal energy to the sub-cooled condensate. The desuperheated exhaust is then conducted to the condenser where it is condensed and sub-cooled, whereupon it is conducted back to the bubble tank via a barometric storage tank. The novel condensing process of this invention makes it possible to exploit geothermal sources which might otherwise be non-exploitable.

  5. Simulation of diesel engine energy conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. С. Афанасьев

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to keep diesel engines in good working order the troubleshooting methods shall be improved. For their further improvement by parameters of associated processes a need has arisen to develop a diesel engine troubleshooting method based on time parameters of operating cycle. For such method to be developed a computational experiment involving simulation of diesel engine energy conversion processes has been carried out. The simulation was based on the basic mathematical model of reciprocating internal combustion engines, representing a closed system of equations and relationships. The said model has been supplemented with the engine torque dynamics taking into account the current values of in-cylinder processes with different amounts of fuel injected, including zero feed.The torque values obtained by the in-cylinder pressure conversion does not account for mechanical losses, which is why the base simulation program has been supplemented with calculations for the friction and pumping forces. In order to determine the indicator diagram of idle cylinder a transition to zero fuel feed mode and exclusion of the combustion process from calculation have been provisioned.

  6. Energy deposition by a 106Ru/106Rh eye applicator simulated using LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Williart, A.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Borge, M.J.G.; Tengblad, O.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.; Garcia, G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study introduces LEPTS, an event-by-event Monte Carlo programme, for simulating an ophthalmic 106 Ru/ 106 Rh applicator relevant in brachytherapy of ocular tumours. The distinctive characteristics of this code are the underlying radiation-matter interaction models that distinguish elastic and several kinds of inelastic collisions, as well as the use of mostly experimental input data. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of low-energy electrons for generally being responsible for the deposition of a large portion of the total energy imparted to matter. - Highlights: → We present the Monte Carlo code LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation. → Carefully selected input data from 10 keV to 1 eV. → Application to an electron emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 plaque used in brachytherapy.

  7. Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Kyotaro Kawaguchi; Masahiro Iijima; Kazuhiko Endo; Itaru Mizoguchi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the surface modification of orthodontic stainless steel using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of bioactive glass (BG). The BG coatings were characterized by spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The frictional properties were investigated using a progressive load scratch test. The remineralization ability of the etched dental enamel was studied according to the time-dependent mechanical proper...

  8. Modelling the geometry of a moving laser melt pool and deposition track via energy and mass balances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J; Li Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-21

    The additive manufacturing technique of laser direct metal deposition allows multiple tracks of full density metallic material to be built to form complex parts for rapid tooling and manufacture. Practical results and theoretical models have shown that the geometries of the tracks are governed by multiple factors. Original work with single layer cladding identified three basic clad profiles but, so far, models of multiple layer, powder-feed deposition have been based on only two of them. At higher powder mass flow rates, experimental results have shown that a layer's width can become greater than the melt pool width at the substrate surface, but previous analytical models have not been able to accommodate this. In this paper, a model based on this third profile is established and experimentally verified. The model concentrates on mathematical analysis of the melt pool and establishes mass and energy balances based on one-dimensional heat conduction to the substrate. Deposition track limits are considered as arcs of circles rather than of ellipses, as used in most established models, reflecting the dominance of surface tension forces in the melt pool, and expressions for elongation of the melt pool with increasing traverse speed are incorporated. Trends in layer width and height with major process parameters are captured and predicted layer dimensions correspond well to the experimental values.

  9. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme; Akinlabi, Esther; Shukla, Mukul; Pityana, Sisa

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti–6Al–4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti–6Al–4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti–6Al–4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti–6Al–4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic–ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications. - Highlights: • Characteristics of HAP coatings produced on Ti-6Al-4V achieved with direct laser melting are reported. • Optimal process parameters necessary to achieve biocompatible coating are reported. • The SEM micrograph of the soaked HAP coating revealed partially melted crystals of HAP. • The HAP coating was retained at the surface of

  10. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by direct laser melting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme, E-mail: MTlotleng@csir.co.za [Laser Materials Processing Group, National Laser Center CSIR, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Akinlabi, Esther [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Shukla, Mukul [Department of Mechanical Engineering Technology, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Department of Mechanical Engineering, MNNIT, Allahabad, UP 211004 (India); Pityana, Sisa [Laser Materials Processing Group, National Laser Center CSIR, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) coatings on bioinert metals such as Ti–6Al–4V are necessary for biomedical applications. Together, HAP and Ti–6Al–4V are biocompatible and bioactive. The challenges of depositing HAP on Ti–6Al–4V with traditional thermal spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti–6Al–4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little dilution. The microstructural and mechanical properties, chemical composition and bio-activities of the produced coatings were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness machine, and by immersion test in Hanks' solution. The results showed that the choice of the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure, the mechanical properties and the retainment of HAP on the surface of the coating. Also, the choice of laser power of 750 W led to no dilution. The microhardness results inferred a strong intermetallic–ceramic interfacial bonding; which meant that the 750 W coating could survive long in service. Also, the coating was softer at the surface and stronger in the heat affected zones. Hence, this process parameter setting can be considered as an optimal setting. The soak tests revealed that the surface of the coating had unmelted crystals of HAP. The CaP ratio conducted on the soaked coating was 2.00 which corresponded to tetra calcium phosphate. This coating seems attractive for metallic implant applications. - Highlights: • Characteristics of HAP coatings produced on Ti-6Al-4V achieved with direct laser melting are reported. • Optimal process parameters necessary to achieve biocompatible coating are reported. • The SEM micrograph of the soaked HAP coating revealed partially melted crystals of HAP. • The HAP coating was retained at the surface of

  11. Energy deposition and the formation of biologically significant lesions by accelerated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption that the number of biologically significant lesions depends only on the amount of of energy absorbed in a critical cellular site is not able to explain the increase of RBE with LET and leads to large discrepancies between predicted and measured inactivation cross sections in the LET range between 20 and 200 keV.μm -1 . It has, therefore, to be concluded that not only the amount of energy absorbed but also the spatial pattern of this deposition plays a decisive role. In the model presented it is postulated that two or more energy deposition events in nanometre sites are required for the formation of biologically significant lesions. This cooperative action has to take place in very short times so that only interactions within a single particle track contribute. The mathematical treatment will be outlined and qualitatively shown that the model is able to predict RBE-LET relationships. The calculations use a track structure model based on classical collision mechanics. It is compared with existing experimental results showing good agreement at least for higher particle energies. (author)

  12. Thermokinetic Modeling of Phase Transformation in the Laser Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozmehr, Ehsan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2009-08-01

    A finite element model coupled with a thermokinetic model is developed to predict the phase transformation of the laser deposition of AISI 4140 on a substrate with the same material. Four different deposition patterns, long-bead, short-bead, spiral-in, and spiral-out, are used to cover a similar area. Using a finite element model, the temperature history of the laser powder deposition (LPD) process is determined. The martensite transformation as well as martensite tempering is considered to calculate the final fraction of martensite, ferrite, cementite, ɛ-carbide, and retained austenite. Comparing the surface hardness topography of different patterns reveals that path planning is a critical parameter in laser surface modification. The predicted results are in a close agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Effect of Processing Parameters on Performance of Spray-Deposited Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack W. Owen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs is often strongly dependent on the fabrication procedure. In this study, we fabricate OTFTs of soluble small-molecule organic semiconductors by spray-deposition and explore the effect of processing parameters on film morphology and device mobility. In particular, we report on the effect of the nature of solvent, the pressure of the carrier gas used in deposition, and the spraying distance. We investigate the surface morphology using scanning force microscopy and show that the molecules pack along the π-stacking direction, which is the preferred charge transport direction. Our results demonstrate that we can tune the field-effect mobility of spray-deposited devices two orders of magnitude, from 10−3 cm2/Vs to 10−1 cm2/Vs, by controlling fabrication parameters.

  14. Energy deposition around swift proton tracks in polymethylmethacrylate: How much and how far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapor, Maurizio; Abril, Isabel; de Vera, Pablo; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    The use of proton beams in several modern technologies to probe or modify the properties of materials, such as proton beam lithography or ion beam cancer therapy, requires us to accurately know the extent to which the energy lost by the swift projectiles in the medium is redistributed radially around their tracks, since this determines several endpoints, such as the resolution of imaging or manufacturing techniques, or even the biological outcomes of radiotherapy. In this paper, the radial distribution of the energy deposited around swift-proton tracks in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by the transport of secondary electrons is obtained by means of a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. The initial energy and angular distributions of the secondary electrons generated by proton impact, as well as the electronic cross sections for the ejection of these electrons, are reliably calculated in the framework of the dielectric formalism, where a realistic electronic excitation spectrum of PMMA is accounted for. The cascade of all secondary electrons generated in PMMA is simulated taking into account the main interactions that occur between these electrons and the condensed phase target. After analyzing the influence that several angular distributions of the electrons generated by the proton beam have on the resulting radial profiles of deposited energy, we conclude that the widely used Rudd and Kim formula should be replaced by the simpler isotropic angular distribution, which leads to radial energy distributions comparable to the ones obtained from more realistic angular distributions. By studying the dependence of the radial dose on the proton energy we recommend lower proton energies than previously published for reducing proximity effects around a proton track. The obtained results are of relevance for assessing the resolution limits of proton beam based imaging and manufacturing techniques.

  15. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator.

  16. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator

  17. Experimentally Investigating the Effect of Temperature Differences in the Particle Deposition Process on Solar Photovoltaic (PV Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental investigation of the dust particle deposition process on solar photovoltaic (PV modules with different surface temperatures by a heating plate to illustrate the effect of the temperature difference (thermophoresis between the module surface and the surrounding air on the dust accumulation process under different operating temperatures. In general, if the temperature of PV modules is increased, the energy conversion efficiency of the modules is decreased. However, in this study, it is firstly found that higher PV module surface temperature differences result in a higher energy output compared with those modules with lower temperature differences because of a reduced accumulation of dust particles. The measured deposition densities of dust particles were found to range from 0.54 g/m2 to 0.85 g/m2 under the range of experimental conditions and the output power ratios were found to increase from 0.861 to 0.965 with the increase in the temperature difference from 0 to 50 °C. The PV module with a higher temperature difference experiences a lower dust density because of the effect of the thermophoresis force arising from the temperature gradient between the module surface and its surrounding air. In addition, dust particles have a significant impact on the short circuit current, as well as the output power. However, the influence of particles on open circuit voltage can be negligible.

  18. Effect of energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles on interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Okada, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the noise of interferometric gravitational wave detectors due to heat energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles. We derived a general formula that describes the response of a mirror against a cosmic-ray passage. We found that there are differences in the comic-ray responses (the dependence of temperature and cosmic-ray track position) in cases of interferometric and resonant gravitational wave detectors. The power spectral density of vibrations caused by low-energy secondary muons is 100 times smaller than the goal sensitivity of future second-generation interferometer projects, such as LCGT and Advanced LIGO. The arrival frequency of high-energy cosmic-ray muons that generate enough large showers inside mirrors of LCGT and Advanced LIGO is one per a millennium. We also discuss the probability of exotic-particle detection with interferometers.

  19. Compensation of decreased ion energy by increased hydrogen dilution in plasma deposition of thin film silicon solar cells at low substrate temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.D.; de Jong, M.M.; Rath, J.K.; Brinza, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goedheer, W.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Gorbachev, Y.E.; Orlov, K.E.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Smirnov, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to deposit thin film silicon solar cells on plastics and papers, the deposition process needs to be adapted for low deposition temperatures. In a very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) process, both the gas phase and the surface processes are affected by

  20. Influence of radioactive contamination to agricultural products due to dry and wet deposition processes during a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Choi, Yong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo

    2002-01-01

    Combined with deposition model onto the ground of radionuclides, the influence of radioactive contamination to agricultural products was analyzed due to wet deposition as well as dry deposition from radioactive air concentration during a nuclear emergency. The previous dynamic food chain model, in which initial input parameter is only radionuclide concentrations on the ground, was improved for the evaluating of radioactive contamination to agricultural products from either radionuclide concentrations in air or radionuclide concentrations on the ground. As the results, in case of deposition onto the ground, wet deposition was more dominant process than dry deposition. While the contamination levels of agricultural products were dependent on the a variety of factors such as radionuclides and rainfall rate. It means that the contamination levels of agricultural products are determined from which is more dominant process between deposition on the ground and interception onto agricultural plants

  1. Topography and surface free energy of DPPC layers deposited on a glass, mica, or PMMA support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Malgorzata; Chibowski, Emil

    2006-08-15

    An investigation of energetic properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) layers deposited on glass, mica, and PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) surfaces was carried out by means of contact angles measurements (advancing and receding) for three probe liquids (diiodomethane, water, and formamide). DPPC was deposited on the surfaces from water (on glass and mica) or methanol (on PMMA) solutions. The topography of the tested surfaces was determined with a help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using the measured contact angles, the total apparent surface free energy and its components of the studied layers were determined from van Oss et al.'s (Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base components, LWAB) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approaches. It allowed us to learn about changes in the surface free energy of the layers (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) depending on their number and kind of support. It was found that the changes in the energy greatly depended on the surface properties of the substrate as well as the statistical number of monolayers of DPPC. However, principal changes took place for first three monolayers.

  2. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  3. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  4. FCC-hh final-focus for flat-beams: parameters and energy deposition studies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081283; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Seryi, Andrei; Van Riesen-Haupt, Leon; Besana, Maria Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The international Future Circular Collider (FCC) study comprises the study of a new scientific structure in a tunnel of 100 km. This will allow the installation of two accelerators, a 45.6–175 GeV lepton collider and a 100-TeV hadron collider. An optimized design of a final-focus system for the hadron collider is presented here. The new design is more compact and enables unequal ${\\beta}$$^{∗}$ in both planes, whose choice is justified here. This is followed by energy deposition studies, where the total dose in the magnets as a consequence of the collision debris is evaluated.

  5. Energy deposition in the window of the TOTEM Roman pot for the nominal TOTEM run

    CERN Document Server

    Dimovasili, E

    2005-01-01

    The TOTEM Roman Pot needs to be protected from possible accidents. One of the most serious accident scenarios is the beam loss during an asynchronous abort dump. In this case of dump failure it is possible that a deflected bunch hits the Roman Pot, causing severe damage to its thin window. This technical note discusses the results of FLUKA Monte Carlo studies that have been performed in order to calculate the energy deposition and the temperature increase in the thin window due to the nominal LHC bunch.

  6. Calibration processes for high-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, E.

    2005-01-01

    The Dissertation is devoted to the processes on high energy colliders, namely, to the measurement and evaluation of muon anomalous magnetic moment, the lepton pair production in peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions, γγ and γ-lepton collisions in helicity representation and finally to the derivation of new sum rule for photoproduction processes. The anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and muon, a e and a μ , played an important role in the development of particle physics. Until now they have continued to serve as basic quantities for testing the validity of the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and Standard Model, put the strict constraints for the theories beyond the Standard Model and provided important insights into the structure of the fundamental interactions. While the value of anomalous magnetic moment of electron is known very well, in the case of a muon the situation is more complicated. The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental value varies from 1.02 to 2.96 standard deviation σ. The reason is that the theoretical value consists (unlike the case of electron) from various types of contributions. While QED and weak interaction contributions to a μ seem to be estimated quite reliably, there is critical situation in hadronic contributions, mainly for light-by-light meson pole terms, therefore the third.order (in fine structure constant) hadronic light-by-light contributions to a μ from the pole terms of the scalar σ a 0 and pseudoscalar π 0 , η, η ' mesons in the framework of the linearized extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model has been recalculated. As the QED and Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) share many properties, the solving of the issue of the lepton pair production in peripheral collisions of heavy ions can help to understand very important and unsolved problem of accounting the final state interaction of quarks and gluons in QCD. Unfortunately, even QED is not solving this problem satisfactorily despite the recent high

  7. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  8. Optical monitoring of surface processes relevant to thin film growth by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simcock, Michael Neil

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports on the investigation of the use of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) as an in-situ monitor for the preparation and oxidation of GaAs(100) c(4x4) surfaces using a CVD 2000 MOCVD reactor. These surfaces were oxidised using air. It was found that it was possible to follow surface degradation using RA transients at 2.6eV and 4eV. From this data it was possible to speculate on the nature of the surface oxidation process. A study was performed into the rate of surface degradation under different concentrations of air, it was found that the relation between the air concentration and the surface degradation was complicated but that the behaviour of the first third of the degradation approximated a first order behaviour. An estimation of the activation energy of the process was then made, and an assessment of the potential use of the glove-box for STM studies which is an integral part of the MOCVD equipment was also made. Following this, a description is given of the construction of an interferometer for monitoring thin film growth. An investigation is also described into two techniques designed to evaluate the changes in reflected intensity as measured by an interferometer. The first technique uses an iteration procedure to determine the film thickness from the reflection data. This is done using a Taylor series expansion of the thin film reflection function to iterate for the thickness. Problems were found with the iteration when applied to noisy data, these were solved by using a least squares fit to smooth the data. Problems were also found with the iteration at the turning points these were solved using the derivative of the function and by anticipating the position of the turning points. The second procedure uses the virtual interface method to determine the optical constants of the topmost deposited material, the virtual substrate, and the growth rate. This method is applied by using a Taylor series expansion of the thin film reflection

  9. Aluminum-containing dense deposits of the glomerular basement membrane: identification by energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.M. Jr.; Pitcock, J.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Heavy metals, including gold, mercury, lead, bismuth, and cadmium, have the potential to cause renal disease. With the development of X-ray microanalysis, these heavy metals can now be identified in tissue deposits. This report describes a case of renal failure, probably related to dysproteinemia, in which granular, electron-opaque dense deposits were present in the glomerular basement membranes. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrated that these dense deposits contained aluminum. An analysis of this patient's history in relation to the current knowledge of aluminum metabolism suggests that the aluminum deposition occurred secondary to previous glomerular injury. This case emphasizes the need to utilize heavy metal identification technology whenever granular, electron-opaque dense deposits are identified and represents, to our knowledge, the first study to document aluminum deposits within the glomerular basement membrane of humans

  10. Review of recent progresses on flexible oxide semiconductor thin film transistors based on atomic layer deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiazhen; Han, Ki-Lim; Hong, TaeHyun; Choi, Wan-Ho; Park, Jin-Seong

    2018-01-01

    The current article is a review of recent progress and major trends in the field of flexible oxide thin film transistors (TFTs), fabricating with atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. The ALD process offers accurate controlling of film thickness and composition as well as ability of achieving excellent uniformity over large areas at relatively low temperatures. First, an introduction is provided on what is the definition of ALD, the difference among other vacuum deposition techniques, and the brief key factors of ALD on flexible devices. Second, considering functional layers in flexible oxide TFT, the ALD process on polymer substrates may improve device performances such as mobility and stability, adopting as buffer layers over the polymer substrate, gate insulators, and active layers. Third, this review consists of the evaluation methods of flexible oxide TFTs under various mechanical stress conditions. The bending radius and repetition cycles are mostly considering for conventional flexible devices. It summarizes how the device has been degraded/changed under various stress types (directions). The last part of this review suggests a potential of each ALD film, including the releasing stress, the optimization of TFT structure, and the enhancement of device performance. Thus, the functional ALD layers in flexible oxide TFTs offer great possibilities regarding anti-mechanical stress films, along with flexible display and information storage application fields. Project supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (No. NRF-2017R1D1A1B03034035), the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy (No. #10051403), and the Korea Semiconductor Research Consortium.

  11. Novel Evaporation Process for Deposition of Kesterite Thin Films Synthesized by Solvothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Estrada-Ayub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kesterite, a quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4, is a promising option as a material absorber to reduce the cost of photovoltaic solar cells. The solvothermal method is a way to synthesize nanoparticles of this material. In this work, once synthesized, particles were deposited on a substrate through evaporation, and their morphological, structural, and optical properties were studied. Results show that changes of precursor ratios during solvothermal synthesis result in a modification of particle morphology but not on its size. The deposition of already synthesized kesterite through evaporation preserves kesterite structure and permits the formation of a homogenous film on a substrate. Optical reflectance and transmittance measurements allowed estimating the band-gap energy between 1.41 and 1.46 eV for representative samples, which is near the optimum for the absorber material.

  12. THE ROLE OF CRYOGENIC PROCESSES IN THE FORMATION OF LOESS DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav N. Konishchev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to the analysis of the genetic nature of mineral substances in loess deposits. In permafrost under the influence of multiple alternate freezing and thawing in dispersed deposits, quartz particles accumulate the 0.05-0.01 mm fraction, while feldspars are crushed to a coarse fraction of 0.1-0.05 mm. In dispersed sediments formed in temperate and warm climatic zones, the granulometric spectrum of quartz and feldspar has the opposite pattern. The proposed methodology is based on a differential analysis of the distribution of these minerals by the granulometric spectrum. We have proposed two criteria - the coefficient of cryogenic contrast (CCC and the coefficient of distribution of heavy minerals, which allow determination of the degree of participation of cryogenic processes in the formation of loess sediments and processes of aeolian or water sedimentation.

  13. Nitrogen deposition in precipitation to a monsoon-affected eutrophic embayment: Fluxes, sources, and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunchao; Zhang, Jingping; Liu, Songlin; Jiang, Zhijian; Arbi, Iman; Huang, Xiaoping; Macreadie, Peter Ian

    2018-06-01

    Daya Bay in the South China Sea (SCS) has experienced rapid nitrogen pollution and intensified eutrophication in the past decade due to economic development. Here, we estimated the deposition fluxes of nitrogenous species, clarified the contribution of nitrogen from precipitation and measured ions and isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate in precipitation in one year period to trace its sources and formation processes among different seasons. We found that the deposition fluxes of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), NO3-, NH4+, NO2-, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to Daya Bay were 132.5, 64.4 17.5, 1.0, 49.6 mmol m-2•yr-1, respectively. DON was a significant contributor to nitrogen deposition (37% of TDN), and NO3- accounted for 78% of the DIN in precipitation. The nitrogen deposition fluxes were higher in spring and summer, and lower in winter. Nitrogen from precipitation contributed nearly 38% of the total input of nitrogen (point sources input and dry and wet deposition) in Daya Bay. The δ15N-NO3- abundance, ion compositions, and air mass backward trajectories implicated that coal combustion, vehicle exhausts, and dust from mainland China delivered by northeast monsoon were the main sources in winter, while fossil fuel combustion (coal combustion and vehicle exhausts) and dust from PRD and southeast Asia transported by southwest monsoon were the main sources in spring; marine sources, vehicle exhausts and lightning could be the potential sources in summer. δ18O results showed that OH pathway was dominant in the chemical formation process of nitrate in summer, while N2O5+ DMS/HC pathways in winter and spring.

  14. Electron energy deposition in a multilayered carbon--uranium--carbon configuration and in semi-infinite uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1977-10-01

    Absolute measurements of electron energy deposition profiles are reported here for electrons incident on the multilayer configuration of carbon-uranium-carbon. These measurements were for normally incident source electrons at an energy of 1.0 MeV. To complement these measurements, electron energy deposition profiles were also obtained for electrons incident on semi-infinite uranium as a function of energy and angle of incidence. The results are compared with the predictions of a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport model. In general, the agreement between theory and experiment is good. This work was in support of the Reactor Safety Research Equation-of-State Program

  15. Energy efficient processing of natural resources; Energieeffiziente Verarbeitung natuerlicher Rohstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlken, Alexandra [Univ. Bremen (Germany). Projekt FU2; Hans, Carl [Bremer Institut fuer Produktion und Logistik GmbH BIBA, Bremen (Germany). Abt. Intelligente Informations- und Kommunikationsumgebungen fuer die kooperative Produktion im Forschungsbereich Informations- und Kommunikationstechnische Anwendungen; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter [Univ. Bremen (Germany). Inst. fuer integrierte Produktentwicklung; Bremer Institut fuer Produktion und Logistik GmbH BIBA, Bremen (Germany). Forschungsbereich Informations- und kommunikationstechnische Anwendungen; Austing, Bernhard [Fa. Austing, Damme (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Energy efficiency is gaining high importance in production processes. High energy consumption is directly related to high costs. The processing of natural resources is resulting in additional energy input because of defined output quality demands. This paper discussed approaches and IT-solutions for the automatically adjustment of production processes to cope with varying input qualities. The intention is to achieve the lowest energy input into the process without quality restraints.

  16. Mechanical properties of silicon oxynitride thin films prepared by low energy ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Yukari; Hasuyama, Hiroki; Kondoh, Toshiharu; Imaoka, Yasuo; Watari, Takanori; Baba, Koumei; Hatada, Ruriko

    1999-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO x N y ) films (0.1-0.7 μm) were produced on Si (1 0 0), glass and 316L stainless steel substrates by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) using Si evaporation and the concurrent bombardment with a mixture of 200 eV N 2 and Ar, or O 2 and Ar ions. Adhesion was evaluated by pull-off tests. Film hardness was measured by a nanoindentation system with AFM. The measurement of internal stress in the films was carried out by the Stoney method. The film structure was examined by GXRD. XPS was employed to measure the composition of films and to analyze the chemical bonds. The dependence of mechanical properties on the film thickness and the processing temperature during deposition was studied. Finally, the relations between the mechanical properties of the films and the correlation with corrosion-protection ability of films are discussed and summarized

  17. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes black coatings from roll-to-roll deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, Thomas; Papciak, L.; Sangar, A.; Descarpentries, J.; Vignal, T.; de Longiviere, Xavier; Porterat, D.; Mestre, Q.; Hauf, H.

    2017-09-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have recently attracted growing interest as a very efficient light absorbing material over a broad spectral range making them a superior coating in space optics applications such as radiometry, optical calibration, and stray light elimination. However, VACNT coatings available to-date most often result from batch-to-batch deposition processes thus potentially limiting the manufacturing repeatability, substrate size and cost efficiency of this material.

  18. Impact of the Fused Deposition (FDM) Printing Process on Polylactic Acid (PLA) Chemistry and Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Arthur Cuiffo; Jeffrey Snyder; Alicia M. Elliott; Nicholas Romero; Sandhiya Kannan; Gary P. Halada

    2017-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is an organic polymer commonly used in fused deposition (FDM) printing and biomedical scaffolding that is biocompatible and immunologically inert. However, variations in source material quality and chemistry make it necessary to characterize the filament and determine potential changes in chemistry occurring as a result of the FDM process. We used several spectroscopic techniques, including laser confocal microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and pho...

  19. Processing-Microstructure-Property Relationships for Cold Spray Powder Deposition of Al-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Champagne [18]. The simulations were completed to compare the simulated particle exit velocities versus the measured particle exit velocities. In...620 m/s to 670 m/s [39]. V. Champagne states that for pure aluminum, an acceptable critical velocity for the deposition of pure aluminum is anything...Materials and Processess, vol. 168, no. 5, pp. 53–55, May 2010. [3] V. K. Champagne and P. F. Leyman, “Cold Spray Process Development for the Reclamation

  20. Ellipsometry study of process deposition of amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide sputtered thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talagrand, C.; Boddaert, X.; Selmeczi, D.G.; Defranoux, C.; Collot, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an InGaZnO optical study by spectrometric ellipsometry. First of all, the fitting results of different models and different structures are analysed to choose the most appropriate model. The Tauc–Lorentz model is suitable for thickness measurements but a more complex model allows the refractive index and extinction coefficient to be extracted more accurately. Secondly, different InGaZnO process depositions are carried out in order to investigate stability, influence of deposition time and uniformity. Films present satisfactory optical stability over time. InGaZnO optical property evolution as a function of deposition time is related to an increase in temperature. To understand the behaviour of uniformity, mapping measurements are correlated to thin film resistivity. Results show that temperature and resputtering are the two phenomena that affect IGZO uniformity. - Highlights: • Model and structure are investigated to fit IGZO ellipsometric angles. • Maximum refractive index rises with substrate temperature and thus deposition time. • Resputtering leads to inhomogeneity in IGZO electrical and optical properties

  1. Ellipsometry study of process deposition of amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talagrand, C., E-mail: talagrand@emse.fr [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Boddaert, X. [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Selmeczi, D.G.; Defranoux, C. [Semilab Semiconductor Physics Laboratory Co. Ltd., Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Collot, P. [Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Aix-en-Provence, 2 cours des Arts et Métiers (France)

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an InGaZnO optical study by spectrometric ellipsometry. First of all, the fitting results of different models and different structures are analysed to choose the most appropriate model. The Tauc–Lorentz model is suitable for thickness measurements but a more complex model allows the refractive index and extinction coefficient to be extracted more accurately. Secondly, different InGaZnO process depositions are carried out in order to investigate stability, influence of deposition time and uniformity. Films present satisfactory optical stability over time. InGaZnO optical property evolution as a function of deposition time is related to an increase in temperature. To understand the behaviour of uniformity, mapping measurements are correlated to thin film resistivity. Results show that temperature and resputtering are the two phenomena that affect IGZO uniformity. - Highlights: • Model and structure are investigated to fit IGZO ellipsometric angles. • Maximum refractive index rises with substrate temperature and thus deposition time. • Resputtering leads to inhomogeneity in IGZO electrical and optical properties.

  2. Particokinetics: computational analysis of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Walter HZ; Mamani, Javier B; Sibov, Tatiana T; Caous, Cristofer A; Amaro, Edson; Gamarra, Lionel F

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles in suspension are often utilized for intracellular labeling and evaluation of toxicity in experiments conducted in vitro. The purpose of this study was to undertake a computational modeling analysis of the deposition kinetics of a magnetite nanoparticle agglomerate in cell culture medium. Methods Finite difference methods and the Crank–Nicolson algorithm were used to solve the equation of mass transport in order to analyze concentration profiles and dose deposition. Theoretical data were confirmed by experimental magnetic resonance imaging. Results Different behavior in the dose fraction deposited was found for magnetic nanoparticles up to 50 nm in diameter when compared with magnetic nanoparticles of a larger diameter. Small changes in the dispersion factor cause variations of up to 22% in the dose deposited. The experimental data confirmed the theoretical results. Conclusion These findings are important in planning for nanomaterial absorption, because they provide valuable information for efficient intracellular labeling and control toxicity. This model enables determination of the in vitro transport behavior of specific magnetic nanoparticles, which is also relevant to other models that use cellular components and particle absorption processes. PMID:22745539

  3. Particokinetics: computational analysis of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles deposition process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cárdenas WH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Walter HZ Cárdenas, Javier B Mamani, Tatiana T Sibov, Cristofer A Caous, Edson Amaro Jr, Lionel F GamarraInstituto do Cérebro, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Nanoparticles in suspension are often utilized for intracellular labeling and evaluation of toxicity in experiments conducted in vitro. The purpose of this study was to undertake a computational modeling analysis of the deposition kinetics of a magnetite nanoparticle agglomerate in cell culture medium.Methods: Finite difference methods and the Crank-Nicolson algorithm were used to solve the equation of mass transport in order to analyze concentration profiles and dose deposition. Theoretical data were confirmed by experimental magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Different behavior in the dose fraction deposited was found for magnetic nanoparticles up to 50 nm in diameter when compared with magnetic nanoparticles of a larger diameter. Small changes in the dispersion factor cause variations of up to 22% in the dose deposited. The experimental data confirmed the theoretical results.Conclusion: These findings are important in planning for nanomaterial absorption, because they provide valuable information for efficient intracellular labeling and control toxicity. This model enables determination of the in vitro transport behavior of specific magnetic nanoparticles, which is also relevant to other models that use cellular components and particle absorption processes.Keywords: magnetite, nanoparticles, diffusion, sedimentation, agglomerates, computational modeling, cellular labeling, magnetic resonance imaging

  4. Comparison of Calibration of Sensors Used for the Quantification of Nuclear Energy Rate Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, J.; Reynard-Carette, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Universite de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397, Marseille (France); Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K. [National Centre for Nuclear Research A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk (Poland); Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.F. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jagielski, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technolgy, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    This present work deals with a collaborative program called GAMMA-MAJOR 'Development and qualification of a deterministic scheme for the evaluation of GAMMA heating in MTR reactors with exploitation as example MARIA reactor and Jules Horowitz Reactor' between the National Centre for Nuclear Research of Poland, the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission and Aix Marseille University. One of main objectives of this program is to optimize the nuclear heating quantification thanks to calculation validated from experimental measurements of radiation energy deposition carried out in irradiation reactors. The quantification of the nuclear heating is a key data especially for the thermal, mechanical design and sizing of irradiation experimental devices in specific irradiated conditions and locations. The determination of this data is usually performed by differential calorimeters and gamma thermometers such as used in the experimental multi-sensors device called CARMEN 'Calorimetric en Reacteur et Mesures des Emissions Nucleaires'. In the framework of the GAMMA-MAJOR program a new calorimeter was designed for the nuclear energy deposition quantification. It corresponds to a single-cell calorimeter and it is called KAROLINA. This calorimeter was recently tested during an irradiation campaign inside MARIA reactor in Poland. This new single-cell calorimeter differs from previous CALMOS or CARMEN type differential calorimeters according to three main points: its geometry, its preliminary out-of-pile calibration, and its in-pile measurement method. The differential calorimeter, which is made of two identical cells containing heaters, has a calibration method based on the use of steady thermal states reached by simulating the nuclear energy deposition into the calorimeter sample by Joule effect; whereas the single-cell calorimeter, which has no heater, is calibrated by using the transient thermal response of the sensor (heating and cooling

  5. Comparison of Calibration of Sensors Used for the Quantification of Nuclear Energy Rate Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, J.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.F.; Jagielski, J.

    2015-01-01

    This present work deals with a collaborative program called GAMMA-MAJOR 'Development and qualification of a deterministic scheme for the evaluation of GAMMA heating in MTR reactors with exploitation as example MARIA reactor and Jules Horowitz Reactor' between the National Centre for Nuclear Research of Poland, the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission and Aix Marseille University. One of main objectives of this program is to optimize the nuclear heating quantification thanks to calculation validated from experimental measurements of radiation energy deposition carried out in irradiation reactors. The quantification of the nuclear heating is a key data especially for the thermal, mechanical design and sizing of irradiation experimental devices in specific irradiated conditions and locations. The determination of this data is usually performed by differential calorimeters and gamma thermometers such as used in the experimental multi-sensors device called CARMEN 'Calorimetric en Reacteur et Mesures des Emissions Nucleaires'. In the framework of the GAMMA-MAJOR program a new calorimeter was designed for the nuclear energy deposition quantification. It corresponds to a single-cell calorimeter and it is called KAROLINA. This calorimeter was recently tested during an irradiation campaign inside MARIA reactor in Poland. This new single-cell calorimeter differs from previous CALMOS or CARMEN type differential calorimeters according to three main points: its geometry, its preliminary out-of-pile calibration, and its in-pile measurement method. The differential calorimeter, which is made of two identical cells containing heaters, has a calibration method based on the use of steady thermal states reached by simulating the nuclear energy deposition into the calorimeter sample by Joule effect; whereas the single-cell calorimeter, which has no heater, is calibrated by using the transient thermal response of the sensor (heating and cooling

  6. Energy deposition and radiation quality of radon and radon daughters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, L.R.; Caswell, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of the alpha particles from radon and its daughters with cells at risk in the bronchial epithelium. The authors calculated alpha-particle energy spectra incident upon the cells and also energy deposition spectra in micrometer- and nanometer-sized sites as a function of cell depth, site size, airway diameter, activities of 218 Po and 214 Po, and other parameters. These data are now being applied, using biophysical models of radiation effects, to predict cell killing, mutations, and cell transformation. The model predictions are then compared to experimental biophysical, biochemical, and biological information. These studies contribute to a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the biological effectiveness of the radiations emitted by radon and its progeny

  7. Deposition of silicon oxynitride films by low energy ion beam assisted nitridation at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youroukov, S; Kitova, S; Danev, G [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 109, 113 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: skitova@clf.bas.bg

    2008-05-01

    The possibility is studied of growing thin silicon oxynitride films by e-gun evaporation of SiO and SiO{sub 2} together with concurrent bombardment with low energy N{sub 2}{sup +} ions from a cyclotron resonance (ECR) source at room temperature of substrates. The degree of nitridation and oxidation of the films is investigated by means of X-ray spectroscopy. The optical characteristics of the films, their environmental stability and adhesion to different substrates are examined. The results obtained show than the films deposited are transparent. It is found that in the case of SiO evaporation with concurrent N{sub 2}{sup +} ion bombardment, reactive implantation of nitrogen within the films takes place at room temperature of the substrate with the formation of a new silicon oxynitride compound even at low ion energy (150-200 eV)

  8. Deposition of silicon oxynitride films by low energy ion beam assisted nitridation at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youroukov, S.; Kitova, S.; Danev, G.

    2008-05-01

    The possibility is studied of growing thin silicon oxynitride films by e-gun evaporation of SiO and SiO2 together with concurrent bombardment with low energy N2+ ions from a cyclotron resonance (ECR) source at room temperature of substrates. The degree of nitridation and oxidation of the films is investigated by means of X-ray spectroscopy. The optical characteristics of the films, their environmental stability and adhesion to different substrates are examined. The results obtained show than the films deposited are transparent. It is found that in the case of SiO evaporation with concurrent N2+ ion bombardment, reactive implantation of nitrogen within the films takes place at room temperature of the substrate with the formation of a new silicon oxynitride compound even at low ion energy (150-200 eV).

  9. On the energy deposition into the plasma for an inverted fireball geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Gruenwald, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    Energy deposition into a plasma for an inverted fireball geometry is studied using a self-consistent two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collision model. In this model, the cathode is a pin which injects the fixed electron current and the anode is a hollow metal tube covered with the metal grid. We obtain an almost constant ratio between the densities of plasmas generated in the cathode-grid gap and inside the hollow anode. The results of the simulations show that there is no energy exchange between the beam and plasma electrons at low emission currents. For increasing current, however, we observe the increasing coupling between the electron beam and the thermal plasma electrons. This leads to the heating of plasma electrons and the generation of the so-called supra-thermal electrons.

  10. Crystalline and amorphous carbon nitride films produced by high-energy shock plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursilll, L.A.; Peng, Julin; Gurarie, V.N.; Orlov, A.V.; Prawer, S.

    1995-01-01

    High-energy shock plasma deposition techniques are used to produce carbon-nitride films containing both crystalline and amorphous components. The structures are examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, parallel-electron-energy loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The crystalline phase appears to be face-centered cubic with unit cell parameter approx. a=0.63nm and it may be stabilized by calcium and oxygen at about 1-2 at % levels. The carbon atoms appear to have both trigonal and tetrahedral bonding for the crystalline phase. There is PEELS evidence that a significant fraction of the nitrogen atoms have sp 2 trigonal bonds in the crystalline phase. The amorphous carbon-nitride film component varies from essentially graphite, containing virtually no nitrogen, to amorphous carbon-nitride containing up to 10 at % N, where the fraction of sp 3 bonds is significant. 15 refs., 5 figs

  11. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  12. Monte Carlo charged-particle tracking and energy deposition on a Lagrangian mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Moses, G A; McKenty, P W

    2005-10-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm for alpha particle tracking and energy deposition on a cylindrical computational mesh in a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations is presented. The straight line approximation is used to follow propagation of "Monte Carlo particles" which represent collections of alpha particles generated from thermonuclear deuterium-tritium (DT) reactions. Energy deposition in the plasma is modeled by the continuous slowing down approximation. The scheme addresses various aspects arising in the coupling of Monte Carlo tracking with Lagrangian hydrodynamics; such as non-orthogonal severely distorted mesh cells, particle relocation on the moving mesh and particle relocation after rezoning. A comparison with the flux-limited multi-group diffusion transport method is presented for a polar direct drive target design for the National Ignition Facility. Simulations show the Monte Carlo transport method predicts about earlier ignition than predicted by the diffusion method, and generates higher hot spot temperature. Nearly linear speed-up is achieved for multi-processor parallel simulations.

  13. Genetic Algorithm-Based Optimization to Match Asteroid Energy Deposition Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarano, Ana; Mathias, Donovan; Wheeler, Lorien; Close, Sigrid

    2018-01-01

    An asteroid entering Earth's atmosphere deposits energy along its path due to thermal ablation and dissipative forces that can be measured by ground-based and spaceborne instruments. Inference of pre-entry asteroid properties and characterization of the atmospheric breakup is facilitated by using an analytic fragment-cloud model (FCM) in conjunction with a Genetic Algorithm (GA). This optimization technique is used to inversely solve for the asteroid's entry properties, such as diameter, density, strength, velocity, entry angle, and strength scaling, from simulations using FCM. The previous parameters' fitness evaluation involves minimizing error to ascertain the best match between the physics-based calculated energy deposition and the observed meteors. This steady-state GA provided sets of solutions agreeing with literature, such as the meteor from Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013 and Tagish Lake, Canada in 2000, which were used as case studies in order to validate the optimization routine. The assisted exploration and exploitation of this multi-dimensional search space enables inference and uncertainty analysis that can inform studies of near-Earth asteroids and consequently improve risk assessment.

  14. Optimization of the LHC interaction region with respect to beam-induced energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Strait, J.B.

    1996-06-01

    Energy deposition in the superconducting magnets by particles from p- p collisions is a significant challenge for the design of the LHC high luminosity insertions. We have studies the dependence of the energy deposition on the apertures and strengths of insertion magnets and on the placement of absorbers in front of and within the quadrupoles. Monte Carlo simulations were made using the code DTUJET to generate 7x7 TeV p-p events and the code MARS to follow hadronic and electromagnetic cascades induced in the insertion components. The 3D geometry and magnetic field descriptions of the LHC-4.1 lattice were used. With a quadrupole coil aperture ≥70 mm, absorbers can be placed within the magnet bore which reduce the peak power density, at full luminosity, below 0.5 mW/g, a level that should allow the magnets to operate at their design field. The total heat load can be removed by a cooling system similar to that used in the main magnets

  15. Studies on high electronic energy deposition in transparent conducting indium tin oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N G [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Gudage, Y G [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Ghosh, A [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Vyas, J C [Technical and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (MS) (India); Singh, F [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tripathi, A [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sharma, Ramphal [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India)

    2008-02-07

    We have examined the effect of swift heavy ions using 100 MeV Au{sup 8+} ions on the electrical properties of transparent, conducting indium tin oxide polycrystalline films with resistivity of 0.58 x 10{sup -4} {omega} cm and optical transmission greater than 78% (pristine). We report on the modifications occurring after high electronic energy deposition. With the increase in fluency, x-ray line intensity of the peaks corresponding to the planes (1 1 0), (4 0 0), (4 4 1) increased, while (3 3 1) remained constant. Surface morphological studies showed a pomegranate structure of pristine samples, which was highly disturbed with a high dose of irradiation. For the high dose, there was a formation of small spherical domes uniformly distributed over the entire surface. The transmittance was seen to be decreasing with the increase in ion fluency. At higher doses, the resistivity and photoluminescence intensity was seen to be decreased. In addition, the carrier concentration was seen to be increased, which was in accordance with the decrease in resistivity. The observed modifications after high electronic energy deposition in these films may lead to fruitful device applications.

  16. Studies on high electronic energy deposition in transparent conducting indium tin oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N G; Gudage, Y G; Ghosh, A; Vyas, J C; Singh, F; Tripathi, A; Sharma, Ramphal

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the effect of swift heavy ions using 100 MeV Au 8+ ions on the electrical properties of transparent, conducting indium tin oxide polycrystalline films with resistivity of 0.58 x 10 -4 Ω cm and optical transmission greater than 78% (pristine). We report on the modifications occurring after high electronic energy deposition. With the increase in fluency, x-ray line intensity of the peaks corresponding to the planes (1 1 0), (4 0 0), (4 4 1) increased, while (3 3 1) remained constant. Surface morphological studies showed a pomegranate structure of pristine samples, which was highly disturbed with a high dose of irradiation. For the high dose, there was a formation of small spherical domes uniformly distributed over the entire surface. The transmittance was seen to be decreasing with the increase in ion fluency. At higher doses, the resistivity and photoluminescence intensity was seen to be decreased. In addition, the carrier concentration was seen to be increased, which was in accordance with the decrease in resistivity. The observed modifications after high electronic energy deposition in these films may lead to fruitful device applications

  17. Erosion of pyrolytic carbon under high surface energy deposition from a pulsed hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon materials are widely applied as plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion devices and are also the prime candidate materials for the next generation of experimental fusion reactors. During operation these materials are frequently subjected to high energy deposition from plasma disruptions. The erosion of carbon materials is regarded as the main issue governing the operational lifetime of plasma facing components. Laboratory experiments have been performed to study the thermal erosion behaviour of carbon in a plasma environment. In the experiments the surface of pyrolytic carbon specimens was exposed to pulsed energy deposition of up to 3.8 MJ m -2 from a hydrogen plasma. The behaviour of the eroded carbon species in the plasma was measured by time-resolved and space-resolved spectroscopy. Intense line radiation of ionic carbon has been measured in the plasma in front of the carbon surface. The results show that the eroded carbon is immediately ionised in the vicinity of the material surface, with a fraction of it being ionised to the double-charged state. (Author)

  18. Depth-resolved detection and process dependence of traps at ultrathin plasma-oxidized and deposited SiO2/Si interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillson, L. J.; Young, A. P.; White, B. D.; Schaefer, J.; Niimi, H.; Lee, Y. M.; Lucovsky, G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-energy electron-excited nanoluminescence spectroscopy reveals depth-resolved optical emission associated with traps near the interface between ultrathin SiO 2 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on plasma-oxidized crystalline Si. These near-interface states exhibit a strong dependence on local chemical bonding changes introduced by thermal/gas processing, layer-specific nitridation, or depth-dependent radiation exposure. The depth-dependent results provide a means to test chemical and structural bond models used to develop advanced dielectric-semiconductor junctions. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  19. Flux and energy deposition distribution studies inside the irradiation room of the portuguese 60Co irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portugal, Luis; Oliveira, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In December 2003 the irradiator of the Portuguese 60 Co irradiation facility, UTR, was replenished. Eighteen new sources were loaded and the older ones (156) were rearranged. The result was an irradiator with about 10.2 P Bq of total activity. The active area of the irradiator has also increased. Now it uses twenty five of the thirty tubes of the source rack, nine more than in the previous geometry. This facility was designed mainly for sterilisation of medical devices. However it is also used for the irradiation of other products such as cork stoppers, plastics and a limited number of food and feed. The purpose of this work is to perform dosimetric studies inside the irradiation room of a 60 Co irradiation facility, particularly, the flux and energy deposition distributions. The MCNPX code was used for the simulation of the facility. The track average mesh tally capabilities of MCNPX were used to plot the photon flux and energy deposition distributions. This tool provides a fast way for flux and energy deposition mapping. The absorbed dose distribution near the walls of the irradiation room was also calculated. Instead of using meshtallys as before, the average absorbed dose inside boxes lined with the walls was determined and afterwards a plot of its distribution was made. The absorbed dose rates obtained ranged from 5 to 500 Gy.h -1 depending on material being irradiated in process and the location on the wall. These positions can be useful for fixed irradiation purposes. Both dosimetric studies were done considering two different materials being irradiated in the process: cork stoppers and water, materials with quite different densities (0.102 and 1 g.cm-3, respectively). These studies showed some important characteristics of the radiation fields inside the irradiation room, namely its spatial heterogeneity. Tunnelling and shadow effects were enhanced when the product boxes increases its density. Besides a deeper dosimetric understanding of the

  20. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics.Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details for ALD and material fabrication, ellipsometry film thickness, preparation of gel electrolyte and separator, details for electrochemical measurements, HRTEM image of VOx coated porous silicon, Raman spectroscopy for VOx as-deposited as well as annealed in air for 1 hour at 450 °C, SEM and transient behavior dissolution tests of uniformly coated VOx on

  1. Bio-mineralization and potential biogeochemical processes in bauxite deposits: genetic and ore quality significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskou, Magdalini; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The Parnassos-Ghiona bauxite deposit in Greece of karst type is the 11th largest bauxite producer in the world. The mineralogical, major and trace-element contents and δ18O, δ12C, δ34S isotopic compositions of bauxite ores from this deposit and associated limestone provide valuable evidence for their origin and biogeochemical processes resulting in the beneficiation of low grade bauxite ores. The organic matter as thin coal layers, overlying the bauxite deposits, within limestone itself (negative δ12C isotopic values) and the negative δ34S values in sulfides within bauxite ores point to the existence of the appropriate circumstances for Fe bio-leaching and bio-mineralization. Furthermore, a consortium of microorganisms of varying morphological forms (filament-like and spherical to lenticular at an average size of 2 μm), either as fossils or presently living and producing enzymes, is a powerful factor to catalyze the redox reactions, expedite the rates of metal extraction and provide alternative pathways for metal leaching processes resulting in the beneficiation of bauxite ore.

  2. Gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet in plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process, emerging as a highly efficient hybrid approach, is based on two powerful technologies of both plasma spray and physical vapor deposition. The maximum production rate is affected by the material feed rate apparently, but it is determined by the material vapor capacity of transporting plasma actually and essentially. In order to realize high production rate, the gaseous material capacity of plasma jet must be fundamentally understood. In this study, the thermal characteristics of plasma were measured by optical emission spectrometry. The results show that the open plasma jet is in the local thermal equilibrium due to a typical electron number density from 2.1 × 1015 to 3.1 × 1015 cm-3. In this condition, the temperature of gaseous zirconia can be equal to the plasma temperature. A model was developed to obtain the vapor pressure of gaseous ZrO2 molecules as a two dimensional map of jet axis and radial position corresponding to different average plasma temperatures. The overall gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet, take zirconia for example, was further established. This approach on evaluating material capacity in plasma jet would shed light on the process optimization towards both depositing columnar coating and a high production rate of PS-PVD.

  3. Deposition of high Tc superconductor thin films by pulsed excimer laser ablation and their post-synthesis processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogale, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the use of pulsed excimer laser ablation technique for deposition of high quality superconductor thin films on different substrate materials such as Y stabilized ZrO 2 , SrTiO 3 , LiNbO 3 , Silicon and Stainless Steels, and dopant incorporation during the film depositions. Processing of deposited films using ion and laser beams for realisation of device features are presented. 28 refs., 16 figs

  4. Interpretation of postdepositional processes related to the formation and destruction of the Jackpile-Paguate uranium deposit, northwest New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.S.; Curtis, H.S.; Hafen, P.L.; Salek-Nejad, H.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents aspects of geological studies conducted on the Jackpile-Paguate uranium deposit in northwestern New Mexico in order to document and interpret certain geological characteristics of the deposit and suggest a sequence of processes which have formed and, in part, destroyed the deposits. The principle contributions of the paper are the field and petrologic observations and the interpretations they permit. 29 refs

  5. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy facilities... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... affected public and private parties will be involved in the planning process. [61 FR 33806, June 28, 1996...

  6. Energy efficient process planning based on numerical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Hochmuth, C.; Schmidt, G.; Dix, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of energy-efficient manufacturing is to generate products with maximum value-added at minimum energy consumption. To this end, in metal cutting processes, it is necessary to reduce the specific cutting energy while, at the same time, precision requirements have to be ensured. Precision is critical in metal cutting processes because they often constitute the final stages of metalworking chains. This paper presents a method for the planning of energy-efficient machining processes ...

  7. Data on nearshore wave process and surficial beach deposits, central Tamil Nadu coast, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joevivek, V; Chandrasekar, N

    2017-08-01

    The chronicles of nearshore morphology and surficial beach deposits provide valuable information about the nature of the beach condition and the depositional environment. It imparts an understanding about the spatial and temporal relationship of nearshore waves and its influence over the distribution of beach sediments. This article contains data about wave and sediment dynamics of the ten sandy beaches along the central Tamil Nadu coast, India. This present dataset comprises nearshore wave parameters, breaker wave type, beach morphodynamic state, grain size distribution and weight percentage of heavy and light mineral distribution. The dataset will figure out the beach morphology and hydrodynamic condition with respect to the different monsoonal season. This will act as a field reference to realize the coastal dynamics in an open sea condition. The nearshore entities were obtained from the intensive field survey between January 2011 and December 2011, while characteristics of beach sediments are examined by the chemical process in the laboratory environment.

  8. Catalytic behaviors of ruthenium dioxide films deposited on ferroelectrics substrates, by spin coating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachane, M.; Nowakowski, P.; Villain, S.; Gavarri, J.R.; Muller, Ch.; Elaatmani, M.; Outzourhite, A.; Luk'yanchuk, I.; Zegzouti, A.; Daoud, M.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic ruthenium dioxide films were deposited by spin-coating process on ferroelectric films mainly constituted of SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 (SBT) and Ba 2 NaNb 5 O 15 (BNN) phases. After thermal treatment under air, these ferroelectric-catalytic systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images showed that RuO 2 film morphology depended on substrate nature. A study of CH 4 conversion into CO 2 and H 2 O was carried out using these catalytic-ferroelectric multilayers: the conversion was analyzed from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, at various temperatures. Improved catalytic properties were observed for RuO 2 films deposited on BNN oxide layer

  9. Mass-Spectrometric Studies of Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes of Organic Silicon Compounds Containing Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Takashi; Ansari, S. G.; Yoneyama, Koji; Nakajima, Teppei; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki; Nakamura, Megumi; Umemoto, Hironobu

    2006-02-01

    The mechanism of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) processes for hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and trisdimethylaminosilane (TDMAS), which are used as source gases to prepare SiNx or SiCxNy films, was studied using three different mass spectrometric techniques: ionization by Li+ ion attachment, vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and electron impact. The results for HMDS show that Si-N bonds dissociate selectively, although Si-C bonds are weaker, and (CH3)3SiNH should be one of the main precursors of deposited films. This decomposition mechanism did not change when NH3 was introduced, but the decomposition efficiency was slightly increased. Similar results were obtained for TDMAS.

  10. On the processing-structure-property relationship of ITO layers deposited on crystalline and amorphous Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diplas, S.; Ulyashin, A.; Maknys, K.; Gunnaes, A.E.; Jorgensen, S.; Wright, D.; Watts, J.F.; Olsen, A.; Finstad, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) antireflection coatings were deposited on crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous hydrogenated Si (a-Si:H) and glass substrates at room temperature (RT), 160 deg. C and 230 deg. C by magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combined with resistance and transmittance measurements. The conductivity and refractive index as well as the morphology of the ITO films showed a significant dependence on the processing conditions. The films deposited on the two different Si substrates at higher temperatures have rougher surfaces compared to the RT ones due to the development of crystallinity and growth of columnar grains

  11. Dayside pickup oxygen ion precipitation at Venus and Mars: Spatial distributions, energy deposition and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhmann, J.G.; Kozyra, J.U.

    1991-01-01

    The fluxes and energy spectra of picked-up planetary O + ions incident on the dayside atmospheres of Venus and Mars are calculated using the neutral exposure models of Nagy and Cravens (1988) and the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gasdynamic model of the magnetosheath electric and magnetic field. Cold (∼10 eV) O + ions are launched from hemispherical grids of starting points covering the daysides of the planets and their trajectories are followed until they either impact the dayside obstacle or cross the terminator plane. The impacting, or precipitating, ion fluxes are weighted according to the altitude of the hemispherical starting point grid in a manner consistent with the exosphere density models and the local photoion production rate. Maps of precipitating ion number flux and energy flux show the asymmetrical distribution of dayside energy deposition expected from this source which is unique to the weakly magnetized planets. Although the associated heating of the atmosphere and ionsphere is found to be negligible compared to that from the usual sources, backscattered or sputtered neutral oxygen atoms are produced at energies exceeding that needed for escape from the gravitational fields of both planets. These neutral winds, driven by pickup ion precipitation, represent a possibly significant loss of atmospheric constituents over the age of the solar system

  12. Influence of Energy and Temperature in Cluster Coalescence Induced by Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Jiménez-Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence induced by deposition of different Cu clusters on an epitaxial Co cluster supported on a Cu(001 substrate is studied by constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. The degree of epitaxy of the final system increases with increasing separation between the centres of mass of the projectile and target clusters during the collision. Structure, roughness, and epitaxial order of the supported cluster also influence the degree of epitaxy. The effect of energy and temperature is determinant on the epitaxial condition of the coalesced cluster, especially both factors modify the generation, growth and interaction among grains. A higher temperature favours the epitaxial growth for low impact parameters. A higher energy contributes to the epitaxial coalescence for any initial separation between the projectile and target clusters. The influence of projectile energy is notably greater than the influence of temperature since higher energies allow greater and instantaneous atomic reorganizations, so that the number of arisen grains just after the collision becomes smaller. The appearance of grain boundary dislocations is, therefore, a decisive factor in the epitaxial growth of the coalesced cluster.

  13. Approach to the calculation of energy deposition in a container of fuel irradiated by the neutronic codes coupling fluid-dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso, C.; Aleman, A.; Colomer, C.; Fabbri, M.; Martin, M.; Saellas, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work identifies a possible area of improvement through the creation of a code of coupling between deposition energy codes which calculate neutron (MCNP), and data from heading into fluid dynamics (ANSYS-Fluent) or codes thermomechanical, called MAFACS (Monte Carlo ANSYS Fluent Automatic Coupling Software), being possible to so summarize the process by shortening the needs of computing time, increasing the precision of the results and therefore improving the design of the components.

  14. Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol-gel vs melt-processing route)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, J.V., E-mail: giulietta.rau@ism.cnr.it [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Teghil, R. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Fosca, M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); De Bonis, A. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A. [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, UR INSTM ' Roma Tor Vergata' , Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome (Italy); Albertini, V. Rossi [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Caminiti, R. [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); Ravaglioli, A. [Parco Torricelli delle Arti e delle Scienze, Via Granarolo, 64-48018 Faenza (Ra) (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target was prepared by sol-gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass-ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol-gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm{sup 2} and 500 Degree-Sign C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 {mu}m thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 {mu}m thick sol-gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  15. Bioactive glass–ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol–gel vs melt-processing route)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, J.V.; Teghil, R.; Fosca, M.; De Bonis, A.; Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Caminiti, R.; Ravaglioli, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bioactive glass–ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. ► Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. ► Target was prepared by sol–gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. ► Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. ► The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass–ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol–gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm 2 and 500 °C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 μm thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 μm thick sol–gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  16. Measurements of poloidal and toroidal energy deposition asymmetries in the ASDEX divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.

    1991-03-01

    Energy deposition characteristics in the ASDEX divertors have been analyzed over a wide range of discharges and wall conditions during ohmically heated, additionally heated, or lower hybrid current drive experiments. Changes in discharge operating parameters with high power additional heating produce a diversity of effects on the magnitudes and distributions of the energy absorbed in the divertors. Poloidally and toroidally resolved energy deposition patterns are particularly sensitive to changes in the edge safety factor, the type and power level of additional heating used, and the vertical position of the plasma. In most additionally heated discharges, a large fraction of the incremental divertor loading is found on only one or two target rings. Poloidal in-out asymmetries, which typically favor the low-field side by a factor of 2.5 in ohmic discharges, commonly range between a factor of 2.5 and 4.5 in additionally heated experiments and in extreme cases can be as large as a factor of 5.6. At the same time, toroidal asymmetries on individual target rings are found to range between a factor of 1.4 and 3.8 in typical ICRH and NBI cases with extreme LHCD cases of 4.3. A model, proposed to explain the cause of discharge asymmetries, is compared with the experimental observations. Under some conditions, for example during LHCD experiments, the model is in good agreement with the data. A method is proposed for supressing discharge asymmetries which may generally improve the divertor performance as well. (orig./AH)

  17. Lateral particle density reconstruction from the energy deposits of particles in the KASCADE-Grande detector stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, G.; Brancus, I.M.; Mitrica, B.; Sima, O.; Rebel, H.

    2005-01-01

    The study of primary cosmic rays with energies greater than 10 14 eV is done mostly by indirect observation techniques such as the study of Extensive Air Showers (EAS). In the much larger framework effort of inferring data on the mass and energy of the primaries from EAS observables, the present study aims at delivering a versatile method and software tool that will be used to reconstruct lateral particle densities from the energy deposits of particles in the KASCADE-Grande detector stations. The study has been performed on simulated events, by taking into account the interaction of the EAS components with the detector array (energy deposits). The energy deposits have been parametrized for different incident energies and angles. Thus it is possible to reconstruct the particle densities in detectors from the energy deposits. A correlation between lateral particle density and primary mass and primary energy (at ∼ 600 m from shower core) has been established. The study puts great emphasis on the quality of reconstruction and also on the speed of the technique. The data obtained from the study on simulated events will be used soon on real events detected by the KASCADE-Grande array. (authors)

  18. SU-G-TeP3-13: The Role of Nanoscale Energy Deposition in the Development of Gold Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkby, C; Koger, B; Suchowerska, N; McKenzie, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can enhance radiotherapy effects. The high photoelectric cross section of gold relative to tissue, particularly at lower energies, leads to localized dose enhancement. However in a clinical context, photon energies must also be sufficient to reach a target volume at a given depth. These properties must be balanced to optimize such a therapy. Given that nanoscale energy deposition patterns around GNPs play a role in determining biological outcomes, in this work we seek to establish their role in this optimization process. Methods: The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to generate spherical dose deposition kernels in 1000 nm diameter spheres around 50 nm diameter GNPs in response to monoenergetic photons incident on the GNP. Induced “lesions” were estimated by either a local effect model (LEM) or a mean dose model (MDM). The ratio of these estimates was examined for a range of photon energies (10 keV to 2 MeV), for three sets of linear-quadratic parameters. Results: The models produce distinct differences in expected lesion values, the lower the alpha-beta ratio, the greater the difference. The ratio of expected lesion values remained constant within 5% for energies of 40 keV and above across all parameter sets and rose to a difference of 35% for lower energies only for the lowest alpha-beta ratio. Conclusion: Consistent with other work, these calculations suggest nanoscale energy deposition patterns matter in predicting biological response to GNP-enhanced radiotherapy. However the ratio of expected lesions between the different models is largely independent of energy, indicating that GNP-enhanced radiotherapy scenarios can be optimized in photon energy without consideration of the nanoscale patterns. Special attention may be warranted for energies of 20 keV or below and low alpha-beta ratios.

  19. SU-G-TeP3-13: The Role of Nanoscale Energy Deposition in the Development of Gold Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkby, C [Jack Ady Cancer Centre, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Koger, B [The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Suchowerska, N [Chris O’Brien Lifehouse Camperdown, NSW (Australia); McKenzie, D [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can enhance radiotherapy effects. The high photoelectric cross section of gold relative to tissue, particularly at lower energies, leads to localized dose enhancement. However in a clinical context, photon energies must also be sufficient to reach a target volume at a given depth. These properties must be balanced to optimize such a therapy. Given that nanoscale energy deposition patterns around GNPs play a role in determining biological outcomes, in this work we seek to establish their role in this optimization process. Methods: The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to generate spherical dose deposition kernels in 1000 nm diameter spheres around 50 nm diameter GNPs in response to monoenergetic photons incident on the GNP. Induced “lesions” were estimated by either a local effect model (LEM) or a mean dose model (MDM). The ratio of these estimates was examined for a range of photon energies (10 keV to 2 MeV), for three sets of linear-quadratic parameters. Results: The models produce distinct differences in expected lesion values, the lower the alpha-beta ratio, the greater the difference. The ratio of expected lesion values remained constant within 5% for energies of 40 keV and above across all parameter sets and rose to a difference of 35% for lower energies only for the lowest alpha-beta ratio. Conclusion: Consistent with other work, these calculations suggest nanoscale energy deposition patterns matter in predicting biological response to GNP-enhanced radiotherapy. However the ratio of expected lesions between the different models is largely independent of energy, indicating that GNP-enhanced radiotherapy scenarios can be optimized in photon energy without consideration of the nanoscale patterns. Special attention may be warranted for energies of 20 keV or below and low alpha-beta ratios.

  20. Building a Better Capacitor with Thin-Film Atomic Layer Deposition Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Christopher [North Seattle College, WA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The goal of this research is to determine procedures for creating ultra-high capacity supercapacitors by using nanofabrication techniques and high k-value dielectrics. One way to potentially solve the problem of climate change is to switch the source of energy to a source that doesn’t release many tons of greenhouse gases, gases which cause global warming, into the Earth’s atmosphere. These trap in more heat from the Sun’s solar energy and cause global temperatures to rise. Atomic layer deposition will be used to create a uniform thin-film of dielectric to greatly enhance the abilities of our capacitors and will build them on the nanoscale.

  1. Process qualification and testing of LENS deposited AY1E0125 D-bottle brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, Clinton J.; Smugeresky, John E.; Jew, Michael; Gill, David Dennis; Scheffel, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The LENS Qualification team had the goal of performing a process qualification for the Laser Engineered Net Shaping(trademark)(LENS(reg s ign)) process. Process Qualification requires that a part be selected for process demonstration. The AY1E0125 D-Bottle Bracket from the W80-3 was selected for this work. The repeatability of the LENS process was baselined to determine process parameters. Six D-Bottle brackets were deposited using LENS, machined to final dimensions, and tested in comparison to conventionally processed brackets. The tests, taken from ES1E0003, included a mass analysis and structural dynamic testing including free-free and assembly-level modal tests, and Haversine shock tests. The LENS brackets performed with very similar characteristics to the conventionally processed brackets. Based on the results of the testing, it was concluded that the performance of the brackets made them eligible for parallel path testing in subsystem level tests. The testing results and process rigor qualified the LENS process as detailed in EER200638525A

  2. The development of the process of electrophoresis deposition of the boron on aluminium substrate to be used in the construction of neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Sampa, M.H. de.

    1988-01-01

    The development in the country of autonomous nuclear technology made it necessary to construct radiation detectors to substitute the imported ones among others the boron lined neutron detectors. For this reason was developed the process of boron electrophoresis deposition on aluminium substrate of large area for use in the construction of these neutron detectors. After the definition and optimization of the parameters involved in the process, depositions of 10 B were made on cylinders to be used after wards as electrodes in gamma compensated and non-compensated ionization chambers and in proportional detectors. Prototype of ionization were designed, builted and mounted in the department of Application for Engineering and Industry (TE) of Nuclear Energy Research Institute (IPEN) belonging to the National Atomic Energy Comission (CNEN). Submited to caracterization tests at IPEN's IEA-RL reactor, they satisfied fully the technical especifications of the project. (author) [pt

  3. Sedimentological characteristics and depositional processes of sediment gravity flows in rift basins: The Palaeogene Dongying and Shahejie formations, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Chen, Hongde; Zhong, Yijiang; Wang, Jun; Xu, Changgui; Chen, Anqing; Du, Xiaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Sediment gravity flow deposits are common, particularly in sandy formations, but their origin has been a matter of debate and there is no consensus about the classification of such deposits. However, sediment gravity flow sandstones are economically important and have the potential to meet a growing demand in oil and gas exploration, so there is a drive to better understand them. This study focuses on sediment gravity flow deposits identified from well cores in Palaeogene deposits from the Liaodong Bay Depression in Bohai Bay Basin, China. We classify the sediment gravity flow deposits into eight lithofacies using lithological characteristics, grain size, and sedimentary structures, and interpret the associated depositional processes. Based on the scale, spatial distribution, and contact relationships of sediment gravity flow deposits, we defined six types of lithofacies associations (LAs) that reflect transformation processes and depositional morphology: LA1 (unconfined proximal breccia deposits), LA2 (confined channel deposits), LA3 (braided-channel lobe deposits), LA4 (unconfined lobe deposits), LA5 (distal sheet deposits), and LA6 (non-channelized sheet deposits). Finally, we established three depositional models that reflect the sedimentological characteristics and depositional processes of sediment gravity flow deposits: (1) slope-apron gravel-rich depositional model, which involves cohesive debris flows deposited as LA1 and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA5; (2) non-channelized surge-like turbidity current depositional model, which mainly comprises sandy slumping, suspended load dominated turbidity currents, and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA5 and LA6; and (3) channelized subaqueous-fan depositional model, which consists of non-cohesive bedload dominated turbidity currents, suspended load dominated turbidity currents, and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA2-LA5, originating from sustained extrabasinal turbidity currents

  4. Advanced Materials Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin

    In order to meet the ever increasing energy needs of society and realize the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s target for energy storage, acquiring a fundamental understanding of the chemical mechanisms in batteries for direct guidance and searching novel advanced materials with high energy density are critical. To realize rechargeable batteries with superior energy density, great cathodes and excellent anodes are required. LiMn2O4 (LMO) has been considered as a simpler surrogate for high energy cathode materials like NMC. Previous studies demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improved the capacity of LMO cathodes. This improvement was attributed to a reduction in surface area and diminished Mn dissolution. However, here we propose a different mechanism for ALD Al 2O3 on LMO based on in-situ and ex-situ investigations coupled with density functional theory calculations. We discovered that Al2O 3 not only coats the LMO, but also dopes the LMO surface with Al leading to changes in the Mn oxidation state. Different thicknesses of Al2O 3 were deposited on nonstoichiometric LiMn2O4 for electrochemical measurements. The LMO treated with one cycle of ALD Al2O3 (1xAl 2O3 LMO) to produce a sub-monolayer coating yielded a remarkable initial capacity, 16.4% higher than its uncoated LMO counterpart in full cells. The stability of 1xAl2O3 LMO is also much better as a result of stabilized defects with Al species. Furthermore, 4xAl 2O3 LMO demonstrates remarkable capacity retention. Stoichiometric LiMn2O4 was also evaluated with similar improved performance achieved. All superior results, accomplished by great stability and reduced Mn dissolution, is thanks to the synergetic effects of Al-doping and ALD Al2O 3 coating. Turning our attention to the anode, we again utilized aluminum oxide ALD to form conformal films on lithium. We elaborately designed and studied, for the first time, the growth mechanism during Al2O3 ALD on lithium metal in

  5. Local energy deposited for alpha particles emitted from inhaled radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-affan, I.A.M.; Haque, A.K.M.M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to calculate the local energy deposited by alpha particles emitted from radon daughters deposited on the mucus surface in the lung airways. For the particular case of 218 Po (Ra A) and 214 Bi (Ra C'), microdose spectra have been evaluated in test spheres of 1 μm diameter which were taken to lie within airways of diameters 18 000, 3500 and 600 μm. In each case, the contributions of the near and far wall were computed separately. The average microdosimetric parameters y-bar F and y-bar D have also been calculated. For the two smaller airways, y-bar F and y-bar D values were found to be about 110 and 135 keV μm -1 for 218 Po and about 87 and 107 keV μm -1 for 214 Bi respectively. The corresponding values were about 10% higher for the largest airway. (author)

  6. Functionally graded material of 304L stainless steel and inconel 625 fabricated by directed energy deposition: Characterization and thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Beth E.; Otis, Richard A.; Borgonia, John Paul; Suh, Jong-ook; Dillon, R. Peter; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Many engineering applications, particularly in extreme environments, require components with properties that vary with location in the part. Functionally graded materials (FGMs), which possess gradients in properties such as hardness or density, are a potential solution to address these requirements. The laser-based additive manufacturing process of directed energy deposition (DED) can be used to fabricate metallic parts with a gradient in composition by adjusting the volume fraction of metallic powders delivered to the melt pool as a function of position. As this is a fusion process, secondary phases may develop in the gradient zone during solidification that can result in undesirable properties in the part. This work describes experimental and thermodynamic studies of a component built from 304L stainless steel incrementally graded to Inconel 625. The microstructure, chemistry, phase composition, and microhardness as a function of position were characterized by microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microindentation. Particles of secondary phases were found in small amounts within cracks in the gradient zone. These were ascertained to consist of transition metal carbides by experimental results and thermodynamic calculations. The study provides a combined experimental and thermodynamic computational modeling approach toward the fabrication and evaluation of a functionally graded material made by DED additive manufacturing.

  7. Half-sandwich cobalt complexes in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgi, Colin [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Hapke, Marko; Thiel, Indre [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. an der Universität Rostock (LIKAT), Albert-Einstein-Straße 29a, Rostock 18059 (Germany); Hildebrandt, Alexander [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E. [Fraunhofer Institute of Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Technologie-Campus 3, Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Technische Universität Chemnitz, Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Lang, Heinrich, E-mail: heinrich.lang@chemie.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany)

    2015-03-02

    A series of cobalt half-sandwich complexes of type [Co(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(L)(L′)] (1: L, L′ = 1,5-hexadiene; 2: L = P(OEt){sub 3}, L′ = H{sub 2}C=CHSiMe{sub 3}; 3: L = L′ = P(OEt){sub 3}) has been studied regarding their physical properties such as the vapor pressure, decomposition temperature and applicability within the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, with a focus of the influence of the phosphite ligands. It could be shown that an increasing number of P(OEt){sub 3} ligands increases the vapor pressure and thermal stability of the respective organometallic compound. Complex 3 appeared to be a promising MOCVD precursor with a high vapor pressure and hence was deposited onto Si/SiO{sub 2} (100 nm) substrates. The resulting reflective layer is closed, dense and homogeneous, with a slightly granulated surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies demonstrated the formation of metallic cobalt, cobalt phosphate, cobalt oxide and cobalt carbide. - Highlights: • Thermal studies and vapor pressure measurements of cobalt half-sandwich complexes was carried out. • Chemical vapor deposition with cobalt half-sandwich complexes is reported. • The use of Co-phosphites results in significant phosphorous-doped metallic layers.

  8. Wet and dry deposition and resuspension of AFCT/TFCT fuel processing radionuclides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slinn, W.G.N.; Katen, P.C.; Wolf, M.A.; Loveland, W.D.; Radke, L.F.; Miller, E.L.; Ghannam, L.J.; Reynolds, B.W.; Vickers, D.

    1979-09-01

    After short summary and introductory chapters, Chapter IV contains a critical analysis of available parameterizations for resuspension and for wet and dry removal processes and recommends interim parameterizations for use in radiation dose calculations. Chapter V describes methods and experimental results from field studies of in-cloud vs below-cloud scavenging, precipitation efficiency, and modifications of aerosols by clouds. In Chapter VI are contained descriptions of methods and results from four different approaches to the problem of measuring the dry deposition velocities of submicron aerosol particles depositing on vegetation. Chapter VII describes experimental results from a study of resuspension and weathering of tracer aerosol particles deposited on soil, grass and gravel; typical resuspension rates were found to be of the order of 10 -8 s -1 and it is recommended that the concept of weathering be reassessed. In Chapter VIII, National Weather Service data are used to obtain Lagrangian statistics for use in a regional-scale study of wet and dry removal. Chapter IX develops new concepts in reservoir models for application at regional to global scales. In the final chapter are some comments about the results found in this study and recommendations for future research

  9. Reconstructing depositional processes and history from reservoir stratigraphy: Englebright Lake, Yuba River, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, N.P.; Wright, S.A.; Alpers, Charles N.; Flint, L.E.; Holmes, C.W.; Rubin, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Reservoirs provide the opportunity to link watershed history with its stratigraphic record. We analyze sediment cores from a northern California reservoir in the context of hydrologic history, watershed management, and depositional processes. Observations of recent depositional patterns, sediment-transport calculations, and 137CS geochronology support a conceptual model in which the reservoir delta progrades during floods of short duration (days) and is modified during prolonged (weeks to months) drawdowns that rework topset beds and transport sand from topsets to foresets. Sediment coarser than 0.25-0.5 mm. deposits in foresets and topsets, and finer material falls out of suspension as bottomset beds. Simple hydraulic calculations indicate that fine sand (0.063-0.5 mm) is transported into the distal bottomset area only during floods. The overall stratigraphy suggests that two phases of delta building occurred in the reservoir. The first, from dam construction in 1940 to 1970, was heavily influenced by annual, prolonged >20 m drawdowns of the water level. The second, built on top of the first, reflects sedimentation from 1970 to 2002 when the influence of drawdowns was less. Sedimentation rates in the central part of the reservoir have declined ???25% since 1970, likely reflecting a combination of fewer large floods, changes in watershed management, and winnowing of stored hydraulic mining sediment. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Deposition and surface treatment of Ag-embedded indium tin oxide by plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Ja-Yeon; Kwon, Min-Ki; Yoon, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ji-Myon

    2013-01-01

    Ag-embedded indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited on Corning 1737 glass by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering under an Ar or Ar/O 2 mixed gas ambient with a combination of ITO and Ag targets that were sputtered alternately by switching on and off the shutter of the sputter gun. The effects of a subsequent surface treatment using H 2 and H 2 + O 2 mixed gas plasma were also examined. The specific resistance of the as-deposited Ag-embedded ITO sample was lower than that of normal ITO. The transmittance was quenched when Ag was incorporated in ITO. To enhance the specific resistance of Ag-embedded ITO, a surface treatment was conducted using H 2 or H 2 + O 2 mixed gas plasma. Although all samples showed improved specific resistance after the H 2 plasma treatment, the transmittance was quenched due to the formation of agglomerated metals on the surface. The specific resistance of the film was improved without any deterioration of the transmittance after a H 2 + O 2 mixed gas plasma treatment. - Highlights: • Ag-embedded indium tin oxide was deposited. • The contact resistivity was decreased by H 2 + O 2 plasma treatment. • The process was carried out at room temperature without thermal treatment. • The mechanism of enhancing the contact resistance was clarified

  11. Tuning polymorphism and orientation in organic semiconductor thin films via post-deposition processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiszpanski, Anna M; Baur, Robin M; Kim, Bumjung; Tremblay, Noah J; Nuckolls, Colin; Woll, Arthur R; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-11-05

    Though both the crystal structure and molecular orientation of organic semiconductors are known to impact charge transport in thin-film devices, separately accessing different polymorphs and varying the out-of-plane molecular orientation is challenging, typically requiring stringent control over film deposition conditions, film thickness, and substrate chemistry. Here we demonstrate independent tuning of the crystalline polymorph and molecular orientation in thin films of contorted hexabenzocoronene, c-HBC, during post-deposition processing without the need to adjust deposition conditions. Three polymorphs are observed, two of which have not been previously reported. Using our ability to independently tune the crystal structure and out-of-plane molecular orientation in thin films of c-HBC, we have decoupled and evaluated the effects that molecular packing and orientation have on device performance in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In the case of TFTs comprising c-HBC, polymorphism and molecular orientation are equally important; independently changing either one affects the field-effect mobility by an order of magnitude.

  12. New deposition processes for the growth of oxide and nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apen, E.A.; Atagi, L.M.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Hubbard, K.M.; Salazar, K.V.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this effort is to study the use of homoleptic metal amido compounds as precursors for chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The amides offer potential for the deposition of a variety of important materials at low temperatures. The establishment of these precursor compounds will enhance the ability to exploit the properties of advanced materials in numerous coatings applications. Experiments were performed to study the reactivity of Sn[NMe 2 ] 4 with oxygen. The data demonstrated that gas-phase insertion of oxygen into the Sn-N bond, leading to a reactive intermediate, plays an important role in tin oxide deposition. Several CVD processes for technologically important materials were developed using the amido precursor complexes. These included the plasma enhanced CVD of TiN and Zr 3 N 4 , and the thermal CVD of GaN and AlN. Quality films were obtained in each case, demonstrating the potential of the amido compounds as CVD precursors

  13. Energy balance in processes of transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, S.V.; Tsytovich, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    The authors consider the transition radiation arising when a charged particle crosses an interface between two nonabsorbing media. It is shown that energy balance is observed under these circumstances. The fulfillment of energy balance in transition radiation for nonabsorbing media is rigorously demonstrated. This allows one to find the energy of the transition radiation from the change in the energy of the intrinsic field of the charge and the work of forces for volume waves, which in a number of cases of complicated configurations may prove to be considerably simpler than a direct calculation of the radiation power. For surface waves, a calculation of the work of forces enables one to determine the radiation power directly

  14. Energy Deposition Studies for the LHC Insertion Region Upgrade Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Mereghetti, A; Wildner, E

    2010-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is starting operation with beam, aiming to achieve nominal performance in the shortest term, the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions is actively pursued in order to enhance the physics reach of the machine. Its first phase, with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2-3 1034cm-2s-1, relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology and is intended to maximize the use of the existing infrastructure. The impact of the increased power of the collision debris has been investigated through detailed energy deposition studies, considering the new aperture requirements for the low-ß quadrupoles and a number of other elements in the insertions. Effective solutions in terms of shielding options and design/layout optimization have been envisaged and the crucial factors have been pointed out.

  15. Energy Deposition in Adjacent LHC Superconducting Magnets from Beam Loss at LHC Transfer Line Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Beavan, S; Kain, V

    2006-01-01

    Injection intensities for the LHC are over an order of magnitude above the damage threshold. The collimation system in the two transfer lines is designed to dilute the beam sufficiently to avoid damage in case of accidental beam loss or mis-steered beam. To maximise the protection for the LHC most of the collimators are located in the last 300 m upstream of the injection point where the transfer lines approach the LHC machine. To study the issue of possible quenches following beam loss at the collimators part of the collimation section in one of the lines, TI 8, together with the adjacent part of the LHC has been modeled in FLUKA. The simulated energy deposition in the LHC for worst-case accidental losses and as well as for losses expected during a normal filling is presented.

  16. Energy deposition profile for modification proposal of ISOLDE’s HRS Beam Dump, from FLUKA simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, V

    2014-01-01

    The current ISOLDE HRS beam dump has been found to be unsuitable on previous simulations, due to thermomechanical stresses. In this paper a proposal for modifying HRS dump is studied using FLUKA. The energy deposited in this modified beam dump and the amount of neutrons streaming to the tunnel area are scored and compared with the simulation of current dump. Two versions of the modification have been assessed, determining which of them is more desirable in terms of influence of radiation on ISOLDE’s tunnel. Finally, a rough estimate of temperature raise in the modified dump is shown. Further conclusions on the adequacy of these modifications need to include the thermomechanical calculations’ results, based on those presented here.

  17. Simulation of energy deposit distribution in water for 10 and 25 MeV electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrell Carbonell, Maria de los Angeles.

    1977-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was applied to transport simulation of electron beams from the exit window of a linear accelerator till the absorption by a water phantom. The distribution of energy deposit is calculated for ideal apparatus and experimental conditions. Calculations are made for a distance window-water surface of one meter, for 10 and 25 MeV monoenergetic incident electrons, and for different fields (15x15 cm 2 to 4x4 cm 2 ). Comparisons with experimental measurements obtained in comparable conditions with a Sagittaire accelerator (C.G.R.-MeV), show a good agreement concerning radial distribution and depth distribution around isodose 100%. However a certain disagreement appears in the end of depth penetration [fr

  18. Methods for shifting the pattern of energy deposition with a MAPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerquin-Kern, J.L.; Hagmann, M.J.; Levin, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    In earlier work the authors observed local heating in bone when an amputated human leg was treated with a MAPA. For this reason we have experimentally compared several methods for controlling the pattern of energy deposition. These methods include radial displacement of the phantom relative to the MAPA, adjusting phase and magnitude of the currents in the dipole elements, and the use of dielectric spacers between the bolus and parts of the phantom. Cylindrical homogeneous muscle-phantoms have been used in these tests. Both theory and experiments show that greater displacement of the pattern can be obtained using phase-shifting than is possible with radial displacement of the phantom. Dielectric spacers act as a shield by decoupling the phantom from the MAPA. The dielectric spacers are simple to use and give results that are stable and easy to predict

  19. Roll-to-roll atomic layer deposition process for flexible electronics encapsulation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydannik, Philipp S.; Kääriäinen, Tommi O.; Lahtinen, Kimmo; Cameron, David C.; Söderlund, Mikko; Soininen, Pekka; Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Moro, Lorenza; Zeng, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    At present flexible electronic devices are under extensive development and, among them, flexible organic light-emitting diode displays are the closest to a large market deployment. One of the remaining unsolved challenges is high throughput production of impermeable flexible transparent barrier layers that protect sensitive light-emitting materials against ambient moisture. The present studies deal with the adaptation of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to high-throughput roll-to-roll production using the spatial ALD concept. We report the development of such a process for the deposition of 20 nm thickness Al 2 O 3 diffusion barrier layers on 500 mm wide polymer webs. The process uses trimethylaluminum and water as precursors at a substrate temperature of 105 °C. The observation of self-limiting film growth behavior and uniformity of thickness confirms the ALD growth mechanism. Water vapor transmission rates for 20 nm Al 2 O 3 films deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates were measured as a function of substrate residence time, that is, time of exposure of the substrate to one precursor zone. Moisture permeation levels measured at 38 °C/90% relative humidity by coulometric isostatic–isobaric method were below the detection limit of the instrument ( −4  g/m 2 day) for films coated at web moving speed of 0.25 m/min. Measurements using the Ca test indicated water vapor transmission rates ∼5 × 10 −6 g/m 2 day. Optical measurements on the coated web showed minimum transmission of 80% in the visible range that is the same as the original PEN substrate

  20. Roll-to-roll atomic layer deposition process for flexible electronics encapsulation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maydannik, Philipp S., E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.fi; Kääriäinen, Tommi O.; Lahtinen, Kimmo; Cameron, David C. [Advanced Surface Technology Research Laboratory, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Söderlund, Mikko; Soininen, Pekka [Beneq Oy, P.O. Box 262, 01511 Vantaa (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Moro, Lorenza; Zeng, Xianghui [Samsung Cheil Industries, San Jose R and D Center, 2186 Bering Drive, San Jose, California 95131 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    At present flexible electronic devices are under extensive development and, among them, flexible organic light-emitting diode displays are the closest to a large market deployment. One of the remaining unsolved challenges is high throughput production of impermeable flexible transparent barrier layers that protect sensitive light-emitting materials against ambient moisture. The present studies deal with the adaptation of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to high-throughput roll-to-roll production using the spatial ALD concept. We report the development of such a process for the deposition of 20 nm thickness Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffusion barrier layers on 500 mm wide polymer webs. The process uses trimethylaluminum and water as precursors at a substrate temperature of 105 °C. The observation of self-limiting film growth behavior and uniformity of thickness confirms the ALD growth mechanism. Water vapor transmission rates for 20 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates were measured as a function of substrate residence time, that is, time of exposure of the substrate to one precursor zone. Moisture permeation levels measured at 38 °C/90% relative humidity by coulometric isostatic–isobaric method were below the detection limit of the instrument (<5 × 10{sup −4} g/m{sup 2} day) for films coated at web moving speed of 0.25 m/min. Measurements using the Ca test indicated water vapor transmission rates ∼5 × 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2} day. Optical measurements on the coated web showed minimum transmission of 80% in the visible range that is the same as the original PEN substrate.

  1. High-rate anisotropic ablation and deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene using synchrotron radiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inayoshi, Muneto; Ikeda, Masanobu; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Hiraya, Atsunari.

    1995-01-01

    Both anisotropic ablation and thin film formation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were successfully demonstrated using synchrotron radiation (SR) irradiation of PTFE, that is, the SR ablation process. Anisotropic ablation by the SR irradiation was performed at an extremely high rate of 3500 μm/min at a PTFE target temperature of 200degC. Moreover, a PTFE thin film was formed at a high rate of 2.6 μm/min using SR ablation of PTFE. The chemical structure of the deposited film was similar to that of the PTFE target as determined from Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. (author)

  2. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Felipe; Da Rocha, Caique O C; Medeiros, Gabriela S; Fechine, Guilhermino J M

    2016-01-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased. (paper)

  3. Feature scale modeling for etching and deposition processes in semiconductor manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyka, W.

    2000-04-01

    Simulation of etching and deposition processes as well as three-dimensional geometry generation are important issues in state of the art TCAD applications. Three-dimensional effects are gaining importance for semiconductor devices and for their interconnects. Therefore a strictly physically based simulation of their topography is required. Accurate investigation of single etching and deposition processes has become equally important as process integration. Within this context several aspects of three-dimensional topography simulation have been covered by this thesis and new and interesting results have been achieved in various areas. The algorithmic core of the cell-based structuring element surface propagation method has been optimized and has been eliminated from its position as factor which predominantly determines the required CPU time. In parallel with investigated optimization techniques and required by various process models, the implementation of the surface normal calculation and the special handling of voids and unconnected parts of the geometry has been completed in three dimensions. A process-step-based solid modeling tool which incorporates layout data as well as aerial image simulation has been supplied. It can be coupled with the topography simulation and includes simple geometrically based models for CMP and oxidation. In the presented combination, the tool makes use of the design information stored in the layout file, combines it with the manufacturing recipe, and hence is extremely helpful for the automatic generation of three-dimensional structures. Its usefulness has been proven with several interconnect examples. Regarding topography models, resist development not only turned out to be very helpful for predicting exposed and etched resist profiles within a rigorous lithography simulation, but, by means of benchmark examples, also demonstrated the extraordinary stability of the proposed cellular surface movement algorithm. With respect to

  4. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Photocatalyst Nanoparticles on PVDF Membranes for Advanced Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Filpo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical binding of photocatalytic materials, such as TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles, onto porous polymer membranes requires a series of chemical reactions and long purification processes, which often result in small amounts of trapped nanoparticles with reduced photocatalytic activity. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique was investigated in order to allow the nucleation and growth of ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF porous membranes for application in advanced oxidation processes. The thickness of obtained surface coatings by sputtered nanoparticles was found to depend on process conditions. The photocatalytic efficiency of sputtered membranes was tested against both a model drug and a model organic pollutant in a small continuous flow reactor.

  5. Reactor and process design in sustainable energy technology

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Reactor Process Design in Sustainable Energy Technology compiles and explains current developments in reactor and process design in sustainable energy technologies, including optimization and scale-up methodologies and numerical methods. Sustainable energy technologies that require more efficient means of converting and utilizing energy can help provide for burgeoning global energy demand while reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions associated with energy production. The book, contributed by an international team of academic and industry experts in the field, brings numerous reactor design cases to readers based on their valuable experience from lab R&D scale to industry levels. It is the first to emphasize reactor engineering in sustainable energy technology discussing design. It provides comprehensive tools and information to help engineers and energy professionals learn, design, and specify chemical reactors and processes confidently. Emphasis on reactor engineering in sustainable energy techn...

  6. Refractories for Industrial Processing. Opportunities for Improved Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hayden, H. Wayne [Metals Manufacture Process and Controls Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Angelini, Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Robert E. [R.E. Moore Associates, Maricopa, AZ (United States); Headrick, William L. [R.E. Moore Associates, Maricopa, AZ (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Refractories are a class of materials of critical importance to manufacturing industries with high-temperature unit processes. This study describes industrial refractory applications and identifies refractory performance barriers to energy efficiency for processing. The report provides recommendations for R&D pathways leading to improved refractories for energy-efficient manufacturing and processing.

  7. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  8. Instrumentation and control for fossil-energy processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    The 1982 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes was held June 7 through 9, 1982, at Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy; Argonne National Laboratory; and the Society for Control and Instrumentation of Energy Processes. Fifty-two papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; eleven papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. Effects of deposited nuclear and electronic energy on the hardness of R7T7-type containment glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuget, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)]. E-mail: sylvain.peuget@cea.fr; Noel, P.-Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Loubet, J.-L. [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR CNRS 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon 36, avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Pavan, S. [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR CNRS 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon 36, avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Nivet, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Chenet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    The effects of elastic and inelastic interactions induced by cumulative alpha decay on the hardness of R7T7-type nuclear containment glass were investigated on actinide-doped glass specimens and by external irradiation of inactive glass by light and heavy ions. Vickers microindentation and nanoindentation hardness measurements showed that in the deposited energy range investigated (below 3 x 10{sup 22} keV/cm{sup 3}) inelastic effects have no influence on the plastic response of the glass. Conversely, identical hardness variations versus the nuclear energy deposited in the material were observed on curium-doped glass and on glass irradiated by ion bombardment. The observed hardness variation stabilized after the deposited energy reached about 3 x 10{sup 2} keV{sub nucl}/cm{sup 3}. These findings indicate that the change in the plastic response of the glass is a consequence of ballistic effects.

  10. A flexible angle sensor made from MWNT/CuO/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite films deposited by an electrophoretic co-deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toboonsung, Buppachat, E-mail: buppachattt@yahoo.co.th [Physics and General Science Program, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Singjai, Pisith, E-mail: singjai@hotmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand)

    2012-08-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MWNT/CuO/Cu{sub 2}Onanocomposite films were coated on a PET sheet. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The film resistance and application as angle sensor were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thesensor showed a linear relation between the film resistance and the bending angle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A minimum loop area and a high stability in sensitivity over a thousand bending cycles were obtained. - Abstract: A flexible angle sensor was prepared using an electrophoretic co-deposition process to form nanocomposite networks of multi-wall carbon nanotube/cupric oxide/cuprous oxide (MWNT/CuO/Cu{sub 2}O) on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. The deposition method used copper and stainless steel electrodes, and the effects of varying of electrode separation, MWNT concentration in deionized water, voltage and deposition time were studied. The film resistance of the as-deposited samples decreased with increasing the MWNT concentration up to 0.3 mg/ml. The angle sensor showed a linear relation between the film resistance and the bending angle, a relationship that was illustrated with loop area and sensitivity data. The best angle sensor was successfully made with an electrode separation of 8 mm, a concentration of 0.3 mg/ml, a voltage of 10 V and a deposition time of 3 h, parameters that resulted in a minimum loop area and the most stability in sensitivity over a thousand bending cycles.

  11. Sensor-based atomic layer deposition for rapid process learning and enhanced manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei

    In the search for sensor based atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to accelerate process learning and enhance manufacturability, we have explored new reactor designs and applied in-situ process sensing to W and HfO 2 ALD processes. A novel wafer scale ALD reactor, which features fast gas switching, good process sensing compatibility and significant similarity to the real manufacturing environment, is constructed. The reactor has a unique movable reactor cap design that allows two possible operation modes: (1) steady-state flow with alternating gas species; or (2) fill-and-pump-out cycling of each gas, accelerating the pump-out by lifting the cap to employ the large chamber volume as ballast. Downstream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) sampling is applied for in-situ process sensing of tungsten ALD process. The QMS reveals essential surface reaction dynamics through real-time signals associated with byproduct generation as well as precursor introduction and depletion for each ALD half cycle, which are then used for process learning and optimization. More subtle interactions such as imperfect surface saturation and reactant dose interaction are also directly observed by QMS, indicating that ALD process is more complicated than the suggested layer-by-layer growth. By integrating in real-time the byproduct QMS signals over each exposure and plotting it against process cycle number, the deposition kinetics on the wafer is directly measured. For continuous ALD runs, the total integrated byproduct QMS signal in each ALD run is also linear to ALD film thickness, and therefore can be used for ALD film thickness metrology. The in-situ process sensing is also applied to HfO2 ALD process that is carried out in a furnace type ALD reactor. Precursor dose end-point control is applied to precisely control the precursor dose in each half cycle. Multiple process sensors, including quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and QMS are used to provide real time process information. The

  12. Electromagnetic sensors for monitoring of scour and deposition processes at bridges and offshore wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Panagiotis; Tarantino, Alessandro; Judd, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Recent increases in precipitation have resulted in severe and frequent flooding incidents. This has put hydraulic structures at high risk of failure due to scour, with severe consequences to public safety and significant economic losses. Foundation scour is the leading cause of bridge failures and one of the main climate change impacts to highway and railway infrastructure. Scour action is also being considered as a major risk for offshore wind farm developments as it leads to excessive excavation of the surrounding seabed. Bed level conditions at underwater foundations are very difficult to evaluate, considering that scour holes are often re-filled by deposited loose material which is easily eroded during smaller scale events. An ability to gather information concerning the evolution of scouring will enable the validation of models derived from laboratory-based studies and the assessment of different engineering designs. Several efforts have focused on the development of instrumentation techniques to measure scour processes at foundations. However, they are not being used routinely due to numerous technical and cost issues; therefore, scour continues to be inspected visually. This research project presents a new sensing technique, designed to measure scour depth variation and sediment deposition around the foundations of bridges and offshore wind turbines, and to provide an early warning of an impending structural failure. The monitoring system consists of a probe with integrated electromagnetic sensors, designed to detect the change in the surrounding medium around the foundation structure. The probe is linked to a wireless network to enable remote data acquisition. A developed prototype and a commercial sensor were evaluated to quantify their capabilities to detect scour and sediment deposition processes. Finite element modelling was performed to define the optimum geometric characteristics of the prototype scour sensor based on models with various permittivity

  13. Comparison of feed energy costs of maintenance, lean deposition, and fat deposition in three lines of mice selected for heat loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, D L; Nielsen, M K

    2006-02-01

    Three replications of mouse selection populations for high heat loss (MH), low heat loss (ML), and a nonselected control (MC) were used to estimate the feed energy costs of maintenance and gain and to test whether selection had changed these costs. At 21 and 49 d of age, mice were weighed and subjected to dual x-ray densitometry measurement for prediction of body composition. At 21 d, mice were randomly assigned to an ad libitum, an 80% of ad libitum, or a 60% of ad libitum feeding group for 28-d collection of individual feed intake. Data were analyzed using 3 approaches. The first approach was an attempt to partition energy intake between costs for maintenance, fat deposition, and lean deposition for each replicate, sex, and line by multiple regression of feed intake on the sum of daily metabolic weight (kg(0.75)), fat gain, and lean gain. Approach II was a less restrictive attempt to partition energy intake between costs for maintenance and total gain for each replicate, sex, and line by multiple regression of feed intake on the sum of daily metabolic weight and total gain. Approach III used multiple regression on the entire data set with pooled regressions on fat and lean gains, and subclass regressions for maintenance. Contrasts were conducted to test the effect of selection (MH - ML) and asymmetry of selection [(MH + ML)/2 - MC] for the various energy costs. In approach I, there were no differences between lines for costs of maintenance, fat deposition, or protein deposition, but we question our ability to estimate these accurately. In approach II, selection changed both cost of maintenance (P = 0.03) and gain (P = 0.05); MH mice had greater per unit costs than ML mice for both. Asymmetry of the selection response was found in approach II for the cost of maintenance (P = 0.06). In approach III, the effect of selection (P maintenance cost, but asymmetry of selection (P > 0.17) was not evident. Sex effects were found for the cost of fat deposition (P = 0.02) in

  14. Process-structure-property relationships of micron thick gadolinium oxide films deposited by reactive electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Daniel A.

    Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) is an attractive material for solid state neutron detection due to gadolinium's high thermal neutron capture cross section. Development of neutron detectors based on Gd2 O3 requires sufficiently thick films to ensure neutron absorption. In this dissertation work, the process-structure-property relationships of micron thick Gd2O3 films deposited by reactive electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) were studied. Through a systematic design of experiments, fundamental studies were conducted to determine the effects of processing conditions such as deposition temperature, oxygen flow rate, deposition rate, and substrate material on Gd2O3 film crystallographic phase, texture, morphology, grain size, density, and surface roughness. Films deposited at high rates (> 5 A/s) were examined via x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative phase volume calculations were performed via a Rietveld refinement technique. All films deposited at high rates were found to be fully monoclinic or mixed cubic/monoclinic phase. Generally, increased deposition temperature and increased oxygen flow resulted in increased cubic phase volume. As film thickness increased, monoclinic phase volume increased. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) depth profiling analysis showed that cubic phase was only present under large incidence angle (large penetration depth) measurements, and after a certain point, only monoclinic phase was grown. This was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis with selected area diffraction (SAD). Based on this information, a large compressive stress was hypothesized to cause the formation of the monoclinic phase and this hypothesis was confirmed by demonstrating the existence of a stress induced phase transition. An experiment was designed to introduce compressive stress into the Gd2O 3 films via ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). This allowed for systematic increase in compressive stress while

  15. Efficiency of manufacturing processes energy and ecological perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wen

    2015-01-01

     This monograph presents a reliable methodology for characterising the energy and eco-efficiency of unit manufacturing processes. The Specific Energy Consumption, SEC, will be identified as the key indicator for the energy efficiency of unit processes.  An empirical approach will be validated on different machine tools and manufacturing processes to depict the relationship between process parameters and energy consumptions. Statistical results and additional validation runs will corroborate the high level of accuracy in predicting the energy consumption. In relation to the eco-efficiency, the value and the associated environmental impacts of  manufacturing processes will also be discussed. The interrelationship between process parameters, process value and the associated environmental impact will be integrated in the evaluation of eco-efficiency. The book concludes with a further investigation of the results in order to develop strategies for further efficiency improvement. The target audience primarily co...

  16. Monte Carlo simulations used to calculate the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen as a function of iodine concentration and photon energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocine, Nora; Meignan, Michel; Masset, Hélène

    2018-04-01

    To better understand the risks of cumulative medical X-ray investigations and the possible causal role of contrast agent on the coronary artery wall, the correlation between iodinated contrast media and the increase of energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen as a function of iodine concentration and photon energy is investigated. The calculations of energy deposition have been performed using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation codes, namely PENetration and Energy LOss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE) and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Exposure of a cylinder phantom, artery and a metal stent (AISI 316L) to several X-ray photon beams were simulated. For the energies used in cardiac imaging the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen increases with the quantity of iodine. Monte Carlo calculations indicate a strong dependence of the energy enhancement factor (EEF) on photon energy and iodine concentration. The maximum value of EEF is equal to 25; this factor is showed for 83 keV and for 400 mg Iodine/mL. No significant impact of the stent is observed on the absorbed dose in the artery for incident X-ray beams with mean energies of 44, 48, 52 and 55 keV. A strong correlation was shown between the increase in the concentration of iodine and the energy deposited in the coronary artery lumen for the energies used in cardiac imaging and over the energy range between 44 and 55 keV. The data provided by this study could be useful for creating new medical imaging protocols to obtain better diagnostic information with a lower level of radiation exposure.

  17. Nano crystalline high energy milled 5083 Al powder deposited using cold spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, M.R., E-mail: mohammadreza.rokni@mines.sdsmt.edu [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Advanced Materials Processing Center, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM and T), SD (United States); Widener, C.A. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Advanced Materials Processing Center, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM and T), SD (United States); Nardi, A.T. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Champagne, V.K. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Electron microscopy and nanoindentation are used to investigate the relationship between microstructure and nanohardness of a non-cryomilled, nanocrystalline 5083 Al alloy powder before and after being deposited by cold spray. Microstructural investigations observed the presence of nano grains in the powder microstructure, ranging from 20 to 80 nm and with a typical grain size of 40–50 nm. It was also revealed that the nanocrystalline structure of the powder is retained after cold spraying. As a result, almost no change in nanohardness was indicated between the powder and the particles interior in the cold sprayed layer. However, hardness was substantially higher in some regions in the cold sprayed layer, which was attributed to the particle–particle interfaces or other areas with very small nano grain size. The presence of some un-joined particle remnant lines was also found in the deposition and explained through Critical Velocity Ratio (CVR) of powder particles. Although cold spray is a high deformation process, there is little evidence of dislocations within the nanograins of the cold sprayed layer. The latter observation is rationalized through intragranular dislocation slip and recovery mechanisms.

  18. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  19. On the Sustainability and Progress of Energy Neutral Mineral Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Reitsma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of primary ores such as phosphate rock, gold-, copper- and rare earth ores contain considerable amounts of accompanying uranium and other critical materials. Energy neutral mineral processing is the extraction of unconventional uranium during primary ore processing to use it, after enrichment and fuel production, to generate greenhouse gas lean energy in a nuclear reactor. Energy neutrality is reached if the energy produced from the extracted uranium is equal to or larger than the energy required for primary ore processing, uranium extraction, -conversion, -enrichment and -fuel production. This work discusses the sustainability of energy neutral mineral processing and provides an overview of the current progress of a multinational research project on that topic conducted under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposition Processing of Improved Titanium Nitride Coatings for Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Talisha M.

    Recently surface coating technology has attracted considerable attention of researchers to develop novel coatings with enhanced functional properties such as hardness, biocompatibility, wear and corrosion resistance for medical devices and surgical tools. The materials currently being used for surgical implants include predominantly stainless steel (316L), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr), titanium and its alloys. Some of the limitations of these implants include improper mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, cytotoxicity and bonding with bone. One of the ways to improve the performance and biocompatibility of these implants is to coat their surfaces with biocompatible materials. Among the various coating materials, titanium nitride (TiN) shows excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, a systematic study of pulsed laser ablation processing of TiN coatings was conducted. TiN thin film coatings were grown on commercially pure titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (316L) substrates at different substrate temperatures and different nitrogen partial pressures using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructural, surface, mechanical, chemical, corrosion and biological analysis techniques were applied to characterize the TiN thin film coatings. The PLD processed TiN thin film coatings showed improvements in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility when compared to the bare substrates. The enhanced performance properties of the TiN thin film coatings were a result of the changing and varying of the deposition parameters.

  1. Spallation reactions and energy deposition in heavy target materials comparison of measurements and MC-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Enke, M.; Galin, J.

    2001-01-01

    A renascence of interest for energetic proton induced production of neutrons originates recently by the inception of new projects for target stations of intense spallation neutron sources (like the planned European Spallation Source ESS), accelerator-driven nuclear reactors, nuclear waste transmutation and also the application for radioactive beams. Here we verify the predictive power of transport codes currently on the market by confronting observables and quantities of interest with an exhaustive matrix of benchmark data essentially coming from two experiments being performed at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY at Juelich. Program packages like HERMES, LCS or MCNPX master the prevision of reaction cross sections, hadronic interaction lengths, averaged neutron multiplicities and neutron multiplicity distributions in thick and thin(!) targets for a wide spectrum of incident proton energies, geometrical shapes and materials of the target. While also the observables related to the energy deposition in thick targets are in a good agreement with the model predictions, the production cross section measurements however for light charged particles on thin targets point out that problems exist within these models. (author)

  2. Influence of processing parameters on lattice parameters in laser deposited tool alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.F., E-mail: gfsun82@gmail.com [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Bhattacharya, S. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Dinda, G.P.; Dasgupta, A. [Center for Advanced Technologies, Focus: Hope, Detroit, MI, 48238 (United States); Mazumder, J. [Center for Laser-Aided Intelligent Manufacturing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Orientation relationships among phases in the DMD are given. {yields} Martensite lattice parameters increased with laser specific energy. {yields} Austenite lattice parameters decreased with laser specific energy. - Abstract: Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) has been used to form AISI 4340 steel coating on the AISI 4140 steel substrate. The microstructural property of the DMD coating was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Microhardness of the DMD was measured with a Vickers microhardness tester. Results indicate that DMD can be used to form dense AISI 4340 steel coatings on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The DMD coating is mainly composed of martensite and retained austenite. Consecutive thermal cycles have a remarkable effect on the microstructure of the plan view of the DMD coating and on the corresponding microhardness distribution. Orientation relationships among austenite, martensite and cementite in the DMD coating followed the ones in conventional heat treated steels. As the laser specific energy decreased, cooling rate increased, and martensite peaks broadened and shifted to a lower Bragg's angle. Also martensite lattice parameters increased and austenite lattice parameters decreased due to the above parameter change.

  3. Influence of processing parameters on lattice parameters in laser deposited tool alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, G.F.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dinda, G.P.; Dasgupta, A.; Mazumder, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Orientation relationships among phases in the DMD are given. → Martensite lattice parameters increased with laser specific energy. → Austenite lattice parameters decreased with laser specific energy. - Abstract: Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) has been used to form AISI 4340 steel coating on the AISI 4140 steel substrate. The microstructural property of the DMD coating was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Microhardness of the DMD was measured with a Vickers microhardness tester. Results indicate that DMD can be used to form dense AISI 4340 steel coatings on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The DMD coating is mainly composed of martensite and retained austenite. Consecutive thermal cycles have a remarkable effect on the microstructure of the plan view of the DMD coating and on the corresponding microhardness distribution. Orientation relationships among austenite, martensite and cementite in the DMD coating followed the ones in conventional heat treated steels. As the laser specific energy decreased, cooling rate increased, and martensite peaks broadened and shifted to a lower Bragg's angle. Also martensite lattice parameters increased and austenite lattice parameters decreased due to the above parameter change.

  4. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Sekkat, Zouheir [Optics & Photonics Center, Moroccan Foundation for Advanced Science, Innovation and Research, Rabat (Morocco); Abd-lefdil, Mohammed [University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); El Khakani, My Ali, E-mail: elkhakani@emt.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High quality CZTS thin films grown by means of PLD technique without resorting to any post sulfurization process. • Effect of thermal annealing treatments (in the 200–500 °C range) on the structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of PLD-CZTS films. • Experimental determination of key optoelectronic parameters (i.e.; E{sub g}, VBM, ϕ, I{sub p}, and χ) enabling the reconstruction of energy band electronic structure of the PLD-CZTS films. • Investigation on the energy band alignments of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials. - Abstract: We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (T{sub a}), but their crystallinity is much improved for T{sub a} ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with T{sub a} (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at T{sub a} = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for T{sub a} = 300–400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV–vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at T{sub a} = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS

  5. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  6. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  7. Simultaneous Co-deposition of Zn-Mg Alloy Layers on Steel Strip by PVD Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yeob [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of); Goodenough, Mark [Strategic Marketing, Tata Steel, Warwickshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This is the first release of an interim report on the development of coating technology of Zn-Mg alloy layers on steel strip by EML-PVD (electromagnetic levitation - physical vapor deposition) process in an air-to-air type continuous PVD pilot plant. It intends to introduce a basic principle of the EML-PVD process together with the high speed PVD pilot plant built in Posco. Due to the agitation effect provided by the high frequency induction coil, simultaneous evaporation of Zn and Mg from a droplet could produce alloy coating layers with Mg content of 6% to 12% depending on the composition of the droplet inside the coil. For its superior corrosion resistance, Zn-Mg alloy coated steel would be a very promising material for automotive, electrical appliances, and construction applications.

  8. Electro-deposition painting process improvement of cab truck by Six Sigma concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawitu, Kitiya; Chutima, Parames

    2017-06-01

    The case study company is a manufacturer of trucks and currently facing a high rework cost due to the thickness of the electro-deposited paint (EDP) of the truck cab is lower than standard. In addition, the process capability is very low. The Six Sigma concept consisting of 5 phases (DMAIC) is applied to determine new parameter settings for each significant controllable factor. After the improvement, EDP thickness of the truck cab increases from 17.88μ to 20μ (i.e. standard = 20 ± 3μ). Moreover, the process capability indexes (Cp and Cpk) are increased from 0.9 to 1.43, and from 0.27 to 1.43, respectively. This improvement could save the rework cost about 1.6M THB per year.

  9. Seed defective reduction in automotive Electro-Deposition Coating Process of truck cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonthilug, Aekkalag; Chutima, Parames

    2018-02-01

    The case study company is one of players in Thailand’s Automotive Industry who manufacturing truck and bus for both domestic and international market. This research focuses on a product quality problem about seed defects occurred in the Electro-Deposition Coating Process of truck cabin. The 5-phase of Six Sigma methodology including D-Define, M-Measure, A-Analyze, I-Improve, and C-Control is applied to this research to identify root causes of problem for setting new parameters of each significant factor. After the improvement, seed defects in this process is reduced from 9,178 defects per unit to 876 defects per unit (90% improvement)

  10. Simultaneous Co-deposition of Zn-Mg Alloy Layers on Steel Strip by PVD Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Yeob; Goodenough, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This is the first release of an interim report on the development of coating technology of Zn-Mg alloy layers on steel strip by EML-PVD (electromagnetic levitation - physical vapor deposition) process in an air-to-air type continuous PVD pilot plant. It intends to introduce a basic principle of the EML-PVD process together with the high speed PVD pilot plant built in Posco. Due to the agitation effect provided by the high frequency induction coil, simultaneous evaporation of Zn and Mg from a droplet could produce alloy coating layers with Mg content of 6% to 12% depending on the composition of the droplet inside the coil. For its superior corrosion resistance, Zn-Mg alloy coated steel would be a very promising material for automotive, electrical appliances, and construction applications

  11. Energy and dose characteristics of ion bombardment during pulsed laser deposition of thin films under pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fominski, V.Yu.; Nevolin, V.N.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on pulsed laser deposition of Fe films on Si substrates were performed with the aim to analyze the role of factors determining the formation of an energy spectrum and a dose of ions bombarding the film in strong pulsed electric fields. The amplitude of the high-voltage pulse (-40 kV) applied to the substrate and the laser fluence at the Fe target were fixed during the deposition. Owing to the high laser fluence (8 J/cm 2 ) at a relatively low power (20 mJ), the ionization of the laser plume was high, but the Fe vapor pressure near the substrate was low enough to avoid arcing. Electric signals from a target exposed to laser radiation were measured under different conditions (at different delay times) of application of electric pulses. The Si(100) substrates were analyzed using Rutherford ion backscattering/channeling spectrometry. The ion implantation dose occurred to be the highest if the high-voltage pulse was applied at a moment of time when the ion component of the plume approached the substrate. In this case, the implanted ions had the highest energy determined by the amplitude of the electric pulse. An advance or delay in applying a high-voltage pulse caused the ion dose and energy to decrease. A physical model incorporating three possible modes of ion implantation was proposed for the interpretation of the experimental results. If a laser plume was formed in the external field, ions were accelerated from the front of the dense plasma, and the ion current depended on the gas-dynamic expansion of the plume. The application of a high-voltage pulse, at the instant when the front approached the substrate, maintained the mode that was characteristic of the traditional plasma immersion ion implantation, and the ion current was governed by the dynamics of the plasma sheath in the substrate-to-target gap. In the case of an extremely late application of a high-voltage pulse, ions retained in the entire volume of the experimental chamber (as a result of the

  12. Energy consumption in smelting reduction (SR) processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Paulo Santos; Salierno, Giovanni Felice; Fang, Jue; Mankhand, Tilak R.; Assis, Carlos Frederico Campos de

    2010-01-01

    In contrast, conventional processes use coke and hematite/sinter in the blast furnace, in SR processes, other alternative fuels and iron ore sources, like charcoal and fine iron ores, can be used to produce sponge iron. The use of these alternative sources, by SR processes, can reduce environmental impacts and lower production costs. At first, the concepts of the theoretical gas utilization ratio, the smelting heat of the iron ore and the effective calorific value of coal were introduced. Then, the reason for gas utilization ratio and its performance in the shaft as a reducer in the smelting process are discussed and calculated. The relationship between coal consumption and iron ore reduction in the fluidized bed are also discussed. Finally, the influence of post-combustion on coal consumption in an iron bath furnace are calculated and discussed. (author)

  13. Characterization of hydroxyapatite coating by pulse laser deposition technique on stainless steel 316 L by varying laser energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, Himanshu; Singh, Gurbhinder; Agrawal, Khelendra; Prakash, Satya; Agarwal, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite coating was successfully deposited on stainless steel substrate by pulse laser deposition at different energy levels (i.e. 300 mJ and 500 mJ, respectively). ► Variation in laser energy affects the surface characteristic of hydroxyapatite coating (particle size, surface roughness, uniformity, Ca/P ratio). ► Laser energy between 300 mJ and 500 mJ is the optimal choice for obtaining ideal Ca/P ratio. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite is an attractive biomaterial mainly used in bone and tooth implants because it closely resembles human tooth and bone mineral and has proven to be biologically compatible with these tissues. In spite of this advantage of hydroxyapatite it has also certain limitation like inferior mechanical properties which do not make it suitable for long term load bearing applications; hence a lot of research is going on in the development of hydroxyapatite coating over various metallic implants. These metallic implants have good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is to deposit hydroxyapatite coating over stainless steel grade 316 L by pulse laser deposition technique by varying laser energy. To know the effect of this variation, the coatings were than characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, finite emission-scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. Mapping process and age of Quaternary deposits on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K. M.; Minor, S. A.; Bedford, D.

    2016-12-01

    Employing a geomorphic process-age classification scheme, we mapped the Quaternary surficial geology of Santa Rosa (SRI) within the Channel Islands National Park. This detailed (1:12,000 scale) map represents upland erosional transport processes and alluvial, fluvial, eolian, beach, marine terrace, mass wasting, and mixed depositional processes. Mapping was motivated through an agreement with the National Park Service and is intended to aid natural resource assessments, including post-grazing disturbance recovery and identification of mass wasting and tectonic hazards. We obtained numerous detailed geologic field observations, fossils for faunal identification as age control, and materials for numeric dating. This GPS-located field information provides ground truth for delineating map units and faults using GIS-based datasets- high-resolution (sub-meter) aerial imagery, LiDAR-based DEMs and derivative raster products. Mapped geologic units denote surface processes and Quaternary faults constrain deformation kinematics and rates, which inform models of landscape change. Significant findings include: 1) Flights of older Pleistocene (>120 ka) and possibly Pliocene marine terraces were identified beneath younger alluvial and eolian deposits at elevations as much as 275 m above modern sea level. Such elevated terraces suggest that SRI was a smaller, more submerged island in the late Neogene and (or) early Pleistocene prior to tectonic uplift. 2) Structural and geomorphic observations made along the potentially seismogenic SRI fault indicate a protracted slip history during the late Neogene and Quaternary involving early normal slip, later strike slip, and recent reverse slip. These changes in slip mode explain a marked contrast in island physiography across the fault. 3) Many of the steeper slopes are dramatically stripped of regolith, with exposed bedrock and deeply incised gullies, presumably due effects related to past grazing practices. 4) Surface water presence is

  15. Novel sedimentological fingerprints link shifting depositional processes to Holocene climate transitions in East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bilt, Willem G. M.; Rea, Brice; Spagnolo, Matteo; Roerdink, Desiree L.; Jørgensen, Steffen L.; Bakke, Jostein

    2018-05-01

    The Arctic warms faster than any other region of our planet. Besides melting glaciers, thawing permafrost and decreasing sea-ice, this amplified response affects earth surface processes. This geomorphological expression of climate change may alter landscapes and increase the frequency and magnitude of geohazards like floods or mass-movements. Beyond the short span of sparse monitoring time series, geological archives provide a valuable long-term context for future risk assessment. Lake sediment sequences are particularly promising in this respect as continuous recorders of surface process change. Over the past decade, the emergence of new techniques that characterize depositional signatures in more detail has enhanced this potential. Here, we present a well-dated Holocene-length lake sediment sequence from Ammassalik Island on southeast Greenland. This area is particularly sensitive to regional shifts in the Arctic climate system due to its location near the sea-ice limit, the Greenland Ice Sheet and the convergence of polar and Atlantic waters. The expression of Holocene change is fingerprinted using physical (grain size, organic content, density), visual (3-D Computed Tomography) and geochemical (X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Diffraction) evidence. We show that three sharp transitions characterize the Holocene evolution of Ymer Lake. Between 10 and 9.5 cal. ka BP, rapid local glacier loss from the lake catchment culminated in an outburst flood. Following a quiescent Holocene climatic optimum, Neoglacial cooling, lengthening lake ice cover and shifting wind patterns prompted in-lake avalanching of sediments from 4.2 cal. ka BP onwards. Finally, glaciers reformed in the catchment around 1.2 cal. ka BP. The timing of these shifts is consistent with the regional expression of deglaciation, Neoglacial cooling and Little Ice Age-type glacier growth, respectively. The novel multi-proxy approach applied in this study rigorously links depositional sediment signatures to

  16. Microstructural Effects and Properties of Non-line-of-Sight Coating Processing via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a unique processing method that bridges the gap between conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, and enables highly tailorable coatings composed of a variety of materials in thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures with modification of the processing conditions. The strengths of this processing technique are material and microstructural flexibility, deposition speed, and potential for non-line-of-sight (NLOS) capability by vaporization of the feedstock material. The NLOS capability of PS-PVD is investigated here using yttria-stabilized zirconia and gadolinium zirconate, which are materials of interest for turbine engine applications. PS-PVD coatings were applied to static cylindrical substrates approximately 6-19 mm in diameter to study the coating morphology as a function of angle. In addition, coatings were deposited on flat substrates under various impingement configurations. Impingement angle had significant effects on the deposition mode, and microscopy of coatings indicated that there was a shift in the deposition mode at approximately 90° from incidence on the cylindrical samples, which may indicate the onset of more turbulent flow and PVD-like growth. Coatings deposited at non-perpendicular angles exhibited a higher density and nearly a 2× improvement in erosion performance when compared to coatings deposited with the torch normal to the surface.

  17. Energy optimization of bread baking process undergoing quality constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papasidero, Davide; Pierucci, Sauro; Manenti, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    International home energy rating regulations are forcing to use efficient cooking equipment and processes towards energy saving and sustainability. For this reason gas ovens are replaced by the electric ones, to get the highest energy rating. Due to this fact, the study of the technologies related to the energy efficiency in cooking is increasingly developing. Indeed, big industries are working to the energy optimization of their processes since decades, while there is still a lot of room in energy optimization of single household appliances. The achievement of a higher efficiency can have a big impact on the society only if the use of modern equipment gets widespread. The combination of several energy sources (e.g. forced convection, irradiation, microwave, etc.) and their optimization is an emerging target for oven manufacturers towards optimal oven design. In this work, an energy consumption analysis and optimization is applied to the case of bread baking. Each source of energy gets the due importance and the process conditions are compared. A basic quality standard is guaranteed by taking into account some quality markers, which are relevant based on a consumer viewpoint. - Highlights: • Energy optimization is based on a validated finite-element model for bread baking. • Quality parameters for the product acceptability are introduced as constraints. • Dynamic optimization leads to 20% energy saving compared to non-optimized case. • The approach is applicable to many products, quality parameters, thermal processes. • Other heating processes can be easily integrated in the presented model.

  18. Peat Deposits at Bijoynagar Upazila, Brahmanbaria District, Bangladesh : A Potential Local Source of Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nazwanul Haque

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh with about 160 million people in land of 147,570 square km which is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. With the increase of population and diversifying of economic activities, Bangladesh has become an energy hunger country. Presently, 80% peoples depend on non commercial energy sources living in the rural area. Peat exploration at Bijoynagar Upazila, Brahmanbaria district. Bangladesh has been carried out for reserve estimation and its economic aspect evaluation. Total peat exploration area is about 4000 hectare. In explored area, nine peat bearing locations are identified in which peat deposits are observed from 0.152 to 3.0 meters below the surface. Total reserves are about 32.61 million tons in wet condition and 13.044 million tons in dry conditions. The peat is grayish brown to grayish black, fibrous, less to medium compacted and water content is about 60-80 % in wet condition. Chemical analyses of the peat shows that fixed carbon content is 15-25 %, Sulfur is 0.1 to 0.8 % and calorific value of the peat is 3000-7000 BTU. The peat of the area is medium to good quality. The peat may be extracted by open peat mining because of its surface to near surface position. This peat can be conveniently used for small industrial and domestic purpose as briquette and compressed tablet form to meet the growing energy demand of the area. But most of the people of Bijoynagar area live on agriculture. So, peat extraction and related geo-environmental degradation may change living style of the people. Proper land use planning, environmental management and policy should be taken before peat extraction.

  19. Analysis of the overall energy intensity of alumina refinery process using unit process energy intensity and product ratio method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liru; Aye, Lu [International Technologies Center (IDTC), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,The University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Lu, Zhongwu [Institute of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, Peihong [Department of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shenyang Architecture University, Shenyang 110168 (China)

    2006-07-15

    Alumina refinery is an energy intensive industry. Traditional energy saving methods employed have been single-equipment-orientated. Based on two concepts of 'energy carrier' and 'system', this paper presents a method that analyzes the effects of unit process energy intensity (e) and product ratio (p) on overall energy intensity of alumina. The important conclusion drawn from this method is that it is necessary to decrease both the unit process energy intensity and the product ratios in order to decrease the overall energy intensity of alumina, which may be taken as a future policy for energy saving. As a case study, the overall energy intensity of the Chinese Zhenzhou alumina refinery plant with Bayer-sinter combined method between 1995 and 2000 was analyzed. The result shows that the overall energy intensity of alumina in this plant decreased by 7.36 GJ/t-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} over this period, 49% of total energy saving is due to direct energy saving, and 51% is due to indirect energy saving. The emphasis in this paper is on decreasing product ratios of high-energy consumption unit processes, such as evaporation, slurry sintering, aluminium trihydrate calcining and desilication. Energy savings can be made (1) by increasing the proportion of Bayer and indirect digestion, (2) by increasing the grade of ore by ore dressing or importing some rich gibbsite and (3) by promoting the advancement in technology. (author)

  20. Deposition of Coating to Protect Waste Water Reservoir in Acidic Solution by Arc Thermal Spray Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion characteristics of 304 stainless steel (SS and titanium (Ti coatings deposited by the arc thermal spray process in pH 4 solution were assessed. The Ti-sprayed coating exhibits uniform, less porous, and adherent coating morphology compared to the SS-sprayed coating. The electrochemical study, that is, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, revealed that as exposure periods to solution were increased, the polarization resistance (Rp decreased and the charge transfer resistance (Rct increased owing to corrosion of the metallic surface and simultaneously at the same time the deposition of oxide films/corrosion on the SS-sprayed surface, while Ti coating transformed unstable oxides into the stable phase. Potentiodynamic studies confirmed that both sprayed coatings exhibited passive tendency attributed due to the deposition of corrosion products on SS samples, whereas the Ti-sprayed sample formed passive oxide films. The Ti coating reduced the corrosion rate by more than six times compared to the SS coating after 312 h of exposure to sulfuric acid- (H2SO4- contaminated water solution, that is, pH 4. Scanning electron microscope (SEM results confirmed the uniform and globular morphology of the passive film on the Ti coating resulting in reduced corrosion. On the other hand, the corrosion products formed on SS-sprayed coating exhibit micropores with a net-like microstructure. X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed the presence of the composite oxide film on Ti-sprayed samples and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH on the SS-coated surface. The transformation of TiO and Ti3O into TiO2 (rutile and anatase and Ti3O5 after 312 h of exposure to H2SO4 acid reveals the improved corrosion resistance properties of Ti-sprayed coating.

  1. High energy ion implantation for IC processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterhoff, S.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the results of fundamental research on high energy ion implantation in silicon are presented and discussed. The implantations have been carried out with the 500 kV HVEE ion implantation machine, that was acquired in 1981 by the IC technology and Electronics group at Twente University of Technology. The damage and anneal behaviour of 1 MeV boron implantations to a dose of 10 13 /cm 2 have been investigated as a function of anneal temperature by sheet resistance, Hall and noise measurements. (Auth.)

  2. Deposition Rate and Energy Enhancements of TiN Thin-Film in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Source

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdi Muhyuddin D. Barra; Henry J. Ramos

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been synthesized using the sheet plasma negative ion source (SPNIS). The parameters used for its effective synthesis has been determined from previous experiments and studies. In this study, further enhancement of the deposition rate of TiN synthesis and advancement of the SPNIS operation is presented. This is primarily achieved by the addition of Sm-Co permanent magnets and a modification of the configuration in the TiN deposition process. The ...

  3. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  4. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  5. Low energy production processes in manufacturing of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion implantation and pulsed energy techniques are being combined for fabrication of silicon solar cells totally under vacuum and at room temperature. Simplified sequences allow very short processing times with small process energy consumption. Economic projections for fully automated production are excellent.

  6. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  7. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Gruel

    Full Text Available Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This

  8. TC17 titanium alloy laser melting deposition repair process and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Yudai; Zheng, Hang; Tang, Kang; Li, Huaixue; Gong, Shuili

    2016-08-01

    Due to the high manufacturing cost of titanium compressor blisks, aero engine repairing process research has important engineering significance and economic value. TC17 titanium alloy is a rich β stable element dual α+β phase alloy whose nominal composition is Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Mo-4Cr. It has high mechanical strength, good fracture toughness, high hardenability and a wide forging-temperature range. Through a surface response experiment with different laser powers, scanning speeds and powder feeding speeds, the coaxial powder feeding laser melting deposition repair process is studied for the surface circular groove defects. In this paper, the tensile properties, relative density, microhardness, elemental composition, internal defects and microstructure of the laser-repaired TC17 forging plate are analyzed. The results show that the laser melting deposition process could realize the form restoration of groove defect; tensile strength and elongation could reach 1100 MPa and 10%, which could reach 91-98% that of original TC17 wrought material; with the optimal parameters (1000 W-25 V-8 mm/s), the microhardness of the additive zone, the heat-affected zone and base material is evenly distributed at 370-390 HV500. The element content difference between the additive zone and base material is less than ±0.15%. Due to the existence of the pores 10 μm in diameter, the relative density could reach 99%, which is mainly inversely proportional to the powder feeding speed. The repaired zone is typically columnar and dendrite crystal, and the 0.5-1.5 mm-deep heat-affected zone in the groove interface is coarse equiaxial crystal.

  9. A Complete Reporting of MCNP6 Validation Results for Electron Energy Deposition in Single-Layer Extended Media for Source Energies <= 1-MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hughes, Henry Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-04

    In this paper, we expand on previous validation work by Dixon and Hughes. That is, we present a more complete suite of validation results with respect to to the well-known Lockwood energy deposition experiment. Lockwood et al. measured energy deposition in materials including beryllium, carbon, aluminum, iron, copper, molybdenum, tantalum, and uranium, for both single- and multi-layer 1-D geometries. Source configurations included mono-energetic, mono-directional electron beams with energies of 0.05-MeV, 0.1-MeV, 0.3- MeV, 0.5-MeV, and 1-MeV, in both normal and off-normal angles of incidence. These experiments are particularly valuable for validating electron transport codes, because they are closely represented by simulating pencil beams incident on 1-D semi-infinite slabs with and without material interfaces. Herein, we include total energy deposition and energy deposition profiles for the single-layer experiments reported by Lockwood et al. (a more complete multi-layer validation will follow in another report).

  10. Renewable Energy Supply for Power Dominated, Energy Intense Production Processes - A Systematic Conversion Approach for the Anodizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    >D Stollenwerk, T Kuvarakul, I Kuperjans,

    2013-06-01

    European countries are highly dependent on energy imports. To lower this import dependency effectively, renewable energies will take a major role in future energy supply systems. To assist the national and inter-European efforts, extensive changes towards a renewable energy supply, especially on the company level, will be unavoidable. To conduct this conversion in the most effective way, the methodology developed in this paper can support the planning procedure. It is applied to the energy intense anodizing production process, where the electrical demand is the governing factor for the energy system layout. The differences between the classical system layout based on the current energy procurement and an approach with a detailed load-time-curve analysis, using process decomposition besides thermodynamic optimization, are discussed. The technical effects on the resulting energy systems are shown besides the resulting energy supply costs which will be determined by hourly discrete simulation.

  11. Renewable Energy Supply for Power Dominated, Energy Intense Production Processes – A Systematic Conversion Approach for the Anodizing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stollenwerk, D; Kuvarakul, T; Kuperjans, I

    2013-01-01

    European countries are highly dependent on energy imports. To lower this import dependency effectively, renewable energies will take a major role in future energy supply systems. To assist the national and inter-European efforts, extensive changes towards a renewable energy supply, especially on the company level, will be unavoidable. To conduct this conversion in the most effective way, the methodology developed in this paper can support the planning procedure. It is applied to the energy intense anodizing production process, where the electrical demand is the governing factor for the energy system layout. The differences between the classical system layout based on the current energy procurement and an approach with a detailed load-time-curve analysis, using process decomposition besides thermodynamic optimization, are discussed. The technical effects on the resulting energy systems are shown besides the resulting energy supply costs which will be determined by hourly discrete simulation.

  12. Sedimentation rates and depositional processes in Lake Superior from 210Pb geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Alexander, E.C. Jr.; Lively, R.S.; Eisenreich, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Sedimentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.32 cm/yr in 17 sediment box cores from Lake Superior, as determined by 210 Pb geochronology. Shoreline erosion and resuspension of nearshore sediments causes moderate to high (0.05-0.11 cm/yr) sedimentation rates in the western arm of Lake Superior. Sedimentation rates are very high (> 0.15 cm/yr) in marginal bays adjoining Lake Superior; and moderate to very high (0.07-0.19 cm/yr) in open lake regions adjacent to marginal bays. Resuspension of nearshore and shoal top sediments in southern and southeastern Lake Superior by storms is responsible for depositional anomalies in 210 Pb profiles corresponding to 1905, 1916-1918, and 1940 storms. Sedimentation rates are very low (0.01-0.03 cm/yr) in the central basins due to isolation from sediment sources. These data indicate that sedimentation rates and processes vary significantly in different regions of Lake Superior. The sedimentation rates provided by this study, in conjunction with previously-reported sedimentation rates, yield a better understanding of the Lake Superior depositional environment

  13. Effect of voltage on the characteristics of magnesium-lanthanum deposits synthesized by an electrodeposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahli, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Energétique, Université de Constantine 1 (Algeria); Chetehouna, K.; Gascoin, N. [INSA-CVL, Univ. Orléans, PRISME, EA 4229, F-18020, Bourges (France); Bellel, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Energétique, Université de Constantine 1 (Algeria); Tadini, P., E-mail: tadini.pietro@gmail.com [INSA-CVL, Univ. Orléans, PRISME, EA 4229, F-18020, Bourges (France)

    2017-04-15

    This work deals with the characterization of magnesium-lanthanum powders deposits produced with an electrodeposition technique using an aqueous solution based on magnesium chloride and lanthanum(III) nitrate. In recent years, the interest for magnesium-based alloys is growing due to their potential use as solid state systems for hydrogen storage. This work is a preliminary study on the synthesis of magnesium-lanthanum powders oriented to their later evaluation in systems for hydrogen storage. Magnesium and Lanthanum are deposited on a copper plate used as a cathode. Chemical composition, structure and morphology are investigated by EDS, XRD, FTIR and SEM. The effect of voltage on powders characteristics is studied considering three values (3, 3.5 and 4 V). EDS analysis shows the presence of three major elements (Mg, La and O) with a little amount of Cl. The weight percentages of Mg and O increase whereas the one of La decreases with the growth of voltage. Morphological characterization reveals that heterogeneous chemical structures are formed on the surface of the electrode and the size of aggregates decreases with the increase of voltage. From the results of X-ray analysis the deposits reveal the significant presence of two phases: Mg(OH){sub 2} and La(OH){sub 3}. The peaks originating from the Mg(OH){sub 2} phase has a non-monotonic behavior and those of La(OH){sub 3} phase increase with the increase of voltage. FTIR analysis confirms the presence of the two phases identified in XRD diffractograms and exhibits that their corresponding transmittance values increase for higher voltage values. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnesium-lanthanum deposits by an electrodeposition process. • Voltage effect is investigated using different physicochemical analysis techniques (EDS, XRD, FTIR and SEM). • The EDS analysis shows the presence of three major elements (Mg, La and O) and a little amount of Cl. • Two phases, namely Mg(OH){sub 2} and La(OH){sub 3} are

  14. High energy diffraction processes - TOTEM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We study two problems in this thesis. First, we analyse a model for pp and anti-pp elastic scattering. The model was developed by M.M.Islam and coworkers in the past 25 years. Our aim was to make a prediction for differential cross section of pp scattering at energy of 14 TeV which will be measured by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC at CERN. Since protons carry electromagnetic charge, we had to take into account an electromagnetic interaction and effects of the interference between electromagnetic and hadronic forces. We also analysed the model in the impact parameter representation. It enabled us to gain information about range of hadronic forces responsible for elastic, inelastic and total pp and anti-pp scattering. In the second part we present our alignment method for detectors inside the Roman pots of the TOTEM experiment. The method was used during Roman Pot tests on the SPS beam last year.

  15. Crystallization process of zircon and fergusonite during hydrothermal alteration in Nechalacho REE deposit, Thor Lake, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kon, Y.; Tsunematsu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The core samples of two drill holes, which penetrate sub-horizontal mineralized horizons at Nechalacho REE deposit in the Proterozoic Thor Lake syenite, Canada, were studied in order to clarify magmatic and hydrothermal processes that enriched HFSE (e.g. Zr, Nb, Y and REE). Zircon is the most common REE minerals in Nechalacho REE deposit. The zircon is divided into five types as follows: Type-1 zircon occurs as single grain in phlogopite and the chondrite-normalized REE pattern is characterized by a steeply-rising slope from the LREE to the HREE with a positive Ce-anomaly and negative Eu-anomaly. This chemical characteristic is similar to that of igneous zircon. Type-2 zircon consists of HREE-rich magmatic porous core and LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal rim. This type zircon is mostly included in phlogopite and fluorite, and occasionally in microcline. Type-3 zircon is characterized by euhedral to anhedral crystal, occurring in a complex intergrowth with REE fluorocarbonates. Type-3 zircons have high contents of REE, Nb and fluorine. Type-4 zircon consists of porous-core and -rim zones, but their chemical compositions are similar to each other. This type zircon is a subhedral crystal rimmed by fergusonite. Type-5 zircon is characterized by smaller, porous and subhedral to anhedral crystals. The interstices between small zircons are filled by fergusonite. Type-4 and -5 zircons show low REE and Nb contents. Occurrences of these five types of zircon are different according to the depth and degree of the alteration by hydrothermal solutions rich in F- and CO3 of the two drill holes, which permit a model for evolution of the zircon crystallization in Nechalacho REE deposit as follows: (1) type-1 (single magmatic zircon) is formed in miaskitic syenite. (2) LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal zircon formed around HREE-rich magmatic zircon (type-2 zircon); (3) type-3 zircon crystallized thorough F and CO3-rich hydrothermal alteration of type-2 zircon which formed the complex

  16. Clay minerals in uraniferous deposit of Imouraren (Tim Mersoi basin, Niger): implications on genesis of deposit and on ore treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Nigerian uraniferous deposits are located in carboniferous and Jurassic formations of Tim Mersoi basin. AREVA is shareholder of 3 mine sites in this area: SOMAIR and COMINAK, both in exploitation since 1960's and IMOURAREN, 80 km further South, whose exploitation is planned for 2015. Mineralization of Imouraren deposit is included in the fluvial formation of Tchirezrine 2 (Jurassic), composed of channels and flood plains. Facies of channel in-fillings range from coarse sandstones to siltstones, while overflow facies are composed of analcimolites. Secondary mineralogy was acquired during 2 stages: 1- diagenesis, with formation of clay minerals, analcime, secondary quartz and albites, and 2- stage of fluids circulations, which induced alteration of detrital and diagenetic minerals, formation of new phases and uranium deposition. A mineralogical zoning, at the scale of deposit resulted from this alteration. The heterogeneity of Tchirezrine 2, at the level of both facies and mineralogy, is also evidenced during ore treatment, as ore reacts differently depending on its source, with sometimes problems of U recovery. Ore treatment tests showed that analcimes and chlorites were both penalizing minerals, because of 1- the sequestration of U-bearing minerals into analcimes, 2- their dissolution which trends to move away from U solubilization conditions (pH and Eh) and to form numerous sulfates, and 3- problems of percolation. A detection method of analcime-rich ores, based on infrared spectroscopy, was developed in order to optimize ore blending and so to reduce negative effects during ore treatment process. (author)

  17. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  18. Thermal analysis of fused deposition modeling process using infrared thermography imaging and finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2017-05-01

    After years of development, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) has become the most popular technique in commercial 3D printing due to its cost effectiveness and easy-to-operate fabrication process. Mechanical strength and dimensional accuracy are two of the most important factors for reliability of FDM products. However, the solid-liquid-solid state changes of material in the FDM process make it difficult to monitor and model. In this paper, an experimental model was developed to apply cost-effective infrared thermography imaging method to acquire temperature history of filaments at the interface and their corresponding cooling mechanism. A three-dimensional finite element model was constructed to simulate the same process using element "birth and death" feature and validated with the thermal response from the experimental model. In 6 of 9 experimental conditions, a maximum of 13% difference existed between the experimental and numerical models. This work suggests that numerical modeling of FDM process is reliable and can facilitate better understanding of bead spreading and road-to-road bonding mechanics during fabrication.

  19. A combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion en Optica y Nanofisica (CIOyN), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abril, Isabel [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d' Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Heredia-Avalos, Santiago [Departament de Fisica, Enginyeria de Sistemes i Teoria del Senyal, Universitat d' Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris, E-mail: rgm@um.es [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-10-07

    We have evaluated the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water using the simulation code SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids), which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques and includes the main interaction phenomena between the projectile and the target constituents: (i) the electronic stopping force due to energy loss to target electronic excitations, including fluctuations due to the energy-loss straggling, (ii) the elastic scattering with the target nuclei, with their corresponding energy loss and (iii) the dynamical changes in projectile charge state due to electronic capture and loss processes. An important feature of SEICS is the accurate account of the excitation spectrum of liquid water, based on a consistent solid-state description of its energy-loss-function over the whole energy and momentum space. We analyse how the above-mentioned interactions affect the depth distribution of the energy delivered in liquid water by proton beams with incident energies of the order of several MeV. Our simulations show that the position of the Bragg peak is determined mainly by the stopping power, whereas its width can be attributed to the energy-loss straggling. Multiple elastic scattering processes contribute slightly only at the distal part of the Bragg peak. The charge state of the projectiles only changes when approaching the end of their trajectories, i.e. near the Bragg peak. We have also simulated the proton-beam energy distribution at several depths in the liquid water target, and found that it is determined mainly by the fluctuation in the energy loss of the projectile, evaluated through the energy-loss straggling. We conclude that a proper description of the target excitation spectrum as well as the inclusion of the energy-loss straggling is essential in the calculation of the proton beam depth-dose distribution.

  20. A combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    We have evaluated the spatial distribution of energy deposition by proton beams in liquid water using the simulation code SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids), which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques and includes the main interaction phenomena between the projectile and the target constituents: (i) the electronic stopping force due to energy loss to target electronic excitations, including fluctuations due to the energy-loss straggling, (ii) the elastic scattering with the target nuclei, with their corresponding energy loss and (iii) the dynamical changes in projectile charge state due to electronic capture and loss processes. An important feature of SEICS is the accurate account of the excitation spectrum of liquid water, based on a consistent solid-state description of its energy-loss-function over the whole energy and momentum space. We analyse how the above-mentioned interactions affect the depth distribution of the energy delivered in liquid water by proton beams with incident energies of the order of several MeV. Our simulations show that the position of the Bragg peak is determined mainly by the stopping power, whereas its width can be attributed to the energy-loss straggling. Multiple elastic scattering processes contribute slightly only at the distal part of the Bragg peak. The charge state of the projectiles only changes when approaching the end of their trajectories, i.e. near the Bragg peak. We have also simulated the proton-beam energy distribution at several depths in the liquid water target, and found that it is determined mainly by the fluctuation in the energy loss of the projectile, evaluated through the energy-loss straggling. We conclude that a proper description of the target excitation spectrum as well as the inclusion of the energy-loss straggling is essential in the calculation of the proton beam depth-dose distribution.

  1. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-03-07

    AMO is developing advanced technologies that cut energy use and carbon emissions in some of the most energy-intensive processes within U.S. manufacturing. The brochure describes the AMO R&D projects that address these challenges.

  2. Composition and structural study of solution-processed Zn(S,O,OH) thin films grown using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based deposition route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffière, M., E-mail: marie.buffiere@imec.be [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); 44Solar, 14 rue Kepler, 44240 La Chapelle-sur-Erdre (France); Gautron, E. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Hildebrandt, T. [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP)-UMR 7174 EDF-CNRS-ENSCP, 6 quai Watier-78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Harel, S.; Guillot-Deudon, C.; Arzel, L. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Naghavi, N. [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP)-UMR 7174 EDF-CNRS-ENSCP, 6 quai Watier-78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Barreau, N. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Kessler, J. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); 44Solar, 14 rue Kepler, 44240 La Chapelle-sur-Erdre (France)

    2013-05-01

    Recent results have revealed that the low deposition time issue of chemical bath deposited (CBD) Zn(S,O,OH) buffer layer used in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) solar cells could be resolved using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an additive in the chemical bath solution. Although the use of this additive does not hinder the electrical properties of the resulting Zn(S,O,OH)-buffered CIGSe solar cells, the impact of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Zn(S,O,OH) properties remains unclear. The present contribution aims at determining the chemical composition and the microstructure of Zn(S,O,OH) film deposited by CBD using the alternative deposition bath containing the standard zinc sulfate, thiourea, ammonia but also H{sub 2}O{sub 2} additive. Both X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses reveal higher sulfur content in alternatively deposited Zn(S,O,OH), since the first step growth of the layer. According to transmission electron microscopy analyses, another consequence of the higher deposition rate achieved when adding H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the bath is the modification of the absorber/buffer interface. This could be explained by the enhancement of the cluster growth mechanism of the layer. - Highlights: ► The Zn(S,O,OH) layer composition can vary with the chemical bath process used. ► The alternative process leads to a faster incorporation of sulfur in the layer. ► No ZnS epitaxial layer has been found at absorber/alternative buffer interface. ► The use of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances the cluster-by-cluster growth mechanism.

  3. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  4. Process and device for thermal energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The main aim of the invention is to create a heating cycle arrangement, for the energy production facilities as from liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, that will stand up to the temperature changes of the heated steam at least as from the high pressure turbine. This arrangement includes a first system in which flows a liquid metal coolant between a heat source, a steam generator and a utilisation system on which flows a vaporisable fluid from this generator, passing through a first turbine, a heater, at least a second turbine and a condenser. The steam heated in the heater is heated by the liquid metal coolant. A preheater is located in the heated steam system upstream of the heater. This preheater is connected so as to heat the steam to a preset, practically constant value, before this steam to be heated enters the heater heated by the liquid metal. This arrangement reduces the thermal transitions in the superheater and the heater during load changes. In a preferential design mode, the steam from the steam generator is sent to a moisture extraction drum and the heater is exposed to the steam in this drum [fr

  5. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z 0 s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ( 3 HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer's guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b → sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  6. Studies on mass deposition effect and energy effect of biomolecules implanted by N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1994-05-01

    By analyzing some spectrum of tyrosine sample implanted by N + ion beam, it is deduced that the implantation N + could react with the tyrosine molecule and substitute =C 5 H- group of benzene ring to produce a N-heterocyclic compound. This compound would notably affect the residual activity of the sample. Moreover, the percentage of the product molecules to the damaged tyrosine molecules is larger than the reciprocal of the proportion of their extinction coefficients. On the other hand, by comparing the release of inorganic phosphate, it is found that the radiation sensibility for four basic nucleotides is 5'-dTMP>5'-CMP>5'-GMP>5'-AMP. to implanted nucleotides, alkali treatment and heat treatment could increase the amount of inorganic phosphate. The amount of inorganic phosphate in the nucleotide samples directly implanted by ions beam is about 60% of the total amount of inorganic phosp